Blackpool 5 Flog It!


Blackpool 5

This edition of the antiques series comes from the historic Blackpool Tower Circus, where Paul Martin is joined by experts Anita Manning and James Lewis.


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Transcript


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Today, we're in one of the UK's most popular holiday resorts.

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This building is 110 years old,

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it has a tower, it has a world-famous ballroom,

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and for one day only, it's home to Flog It!.

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So roll up, roll up, can you guess where we are today?

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Of course you can. We're in Blackpool. Welcome to Flog It!.

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Blackpool has been popular since the middle of the 18th century,

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when it became fashionable to escape the cities and visit the coast.

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But it was in the 1840s that things really took off

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when the railway connecting the industrial parts

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of northern England opened the town up to the masses.

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Its population exploded as a result,

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expanding more than 60 times in just a century.

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And I'm certainly looking forward to this today.

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All the locals have turned up, laden with antiques

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and collectables, all hoping for a favourable valuation.

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-Are you eager to go inside?

-ALL: Yes!

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Well, let's get in and get the show on the road.

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And hoping to build expectations today are our experts.

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-Anita Manning is on the search.

-Where's Paul?

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Where's James?

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And James Lewis is hoping that he doesn't slip up.

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Tell me about these. How long have had them?

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-Been in the family long?

-About two days.

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On the show today, it's his versus hers.

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Which of these items does best when they go under the hammer at auction?

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Will it be this classic gents' wristwatch

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or this ladies' diamond and pearl necklace?

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Find out a little bit later on.

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Today's valuations are taking place in the world famous Tower Circus

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and James Lewis has found something that's a long way from home.

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Irene, about 130 years ago, in Paris, there was a jeweller who

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was obsessed with making very fine pieces of art jewellery in glass.

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That jeweller was Rene Lalique.

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By the 1930s, he was making big pieces of monumental glass,

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architectural pieces, even car mascots.

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And today, his factory is still making work.

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He's probably the most famous glass-maker of all time. Tell me,

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how did you get a piece of Rene Lalique

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-here onto the Flog It! tables?

-Car boot.

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-No!

-Really, car boot.

-Really?

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-Yeah. I didn't know...

-You didn't find Lalique in a car boot?

-I did.

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I didn't know it was Lalique when I bought it.

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-If I like anything, I'll buy it.

-It's a win-win in that case.

-Yeah.

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And I keep it for a while and admire it and...

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Well, if we turn it over, here underneath, just there,

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-we've go the Lalique signature.

-Very small, isn't it?

-Very small.

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Engraved with a little engraving tool.

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The earlier pieces are often stencilled R Lalique.

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After he died, they just purely used the word Lalique.

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R Lalique as well.

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But this piece is probably 1970s, something like that,

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and it's known as the Fern bowl. The Fern pattern bowl.

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And it has a very polished interior

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and the frosted leaf on the outside that Lalique is very well known for.

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Being a modern piece, it's not hugely valuable,

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but what did you pay for it?

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I think about a fiver.

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-Well, you're going to see a profit on that.

-Well, that's something.

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If we put an auction estimate of £100-150, would that be all right?

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-Yeah.

-You'd be happy with that?

-Yeah.

-Great.

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We need to protect it with a reserve.

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Let's put £100 reserve on it.

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If it doesn't make that, you can try on another day.

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-But it should certainly make £100.

-Right, that's fine.

-Well done.

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That is a car boot treasure.

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-Thank you.

-Well found.

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A car boot find worth celebrating

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and Anita's found just the thing to get the party started.

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Dave, welcome to Flog It!.

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I see you've brought a bottle along

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and all these people are looking for a party.

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I know! Course they are!

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Now, everybody likes a wee tot of whisky.

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Tell me where you got this and tell me why you've brought it along.

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I opened a bar and I found it, this were in Tenerife,

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and I found it in a box of rubbish.

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-All right.

-It was black and full of grease.

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-I washed it and that's what came out.

-Were you never tempted to open it?

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No.

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-No? Are you not a whisky man?

-Yes, I love a drop of whisky.

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A drop of malt.

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A drop of malt. Well, you've said a very important word there.

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When we look at whisky, what we're really looking for is single malt.

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We're looking for the best of the distilleries, Springbank and so on.

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This bottle is quite different.

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This is a blended whisky, so we're not in the same

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region as the very fine and expensive whiskies.

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But what we've got here is John Haig and Company, a good maker,

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and we've got this iconic shape.

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This is Dimple whisky and it's in this fabulous bottle which has the

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dimples on the front and the side, so it's an attractive looking lot.

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We're reckoning on it being 50-60 years old.

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How long have you had it, Dave?

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About 30 years.

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Um...

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Price-wise, I would like to keep an estimate fairly modest on this.

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We could put it into auction with an estimate of 80-120.

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-Would you be happy with that?

-Yeah, let's give it a shot.

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Let's give it a shot. My only concern is that it is a blend.

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So 80 to 120, reserve £80 and give the auctioneer a wee bit discretion.

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It'll find its own level, won't it?

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-Let's hope it makes the bidders happy.

-Yeah, exactly.

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As our experts continue looking for items, I've been taking

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a look at some of the history of this magnificent Circus.

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One of the most famous names associated to the

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Blackpool Tower Circus is that of the clown Charlie Cairoli.

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He was born in Milan in 1910.

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He made his first stage appearance as a clown at the age of seven.

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Ten years later, he made his professional debut

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alongside his father, who was also a clown, on stage in Paris.

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Charlie was a very good dancer and musician

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and he quickly secured a permanent place within the circus.

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In 1938, the Cairolis came to England to take

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part in a pantomime in Birmingham and that's where his talents

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were spotted by the Blackpool Tower Circus.

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They offered him a summer season the following year.

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However, war broke out.

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Charlie was arrested and deported to the Isle of Man

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because he was born in Italy, but he soon proved his French citizenship.

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They released him and he went around the UK performing to all the troops.

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He later returned to the Blackpool Circus

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and earned himself the title of the longest-running performer.

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He was here for 40 years and he retired in 1979.

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And I'm just about to meet his son, Charlie Jr.

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Charlie, pleased to meet you.

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I thought that might be a comic handshake for a minute,

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one of those that goes...like that.

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Tell me all about your father. What was he like?

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Well, he was just like a dad, but it was strange cos he was a clown.

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He was always practising jokes at home.

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If he had a hosepipe in his hand on Sunday,

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somebody was going to get wet!

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He used to like going fishing as well. You were always getting pushed in the water. Oh, you slipped!

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Why do you think he became so popular?

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I think it was just the time.

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After the war, when everybody started to coming away on holidays,

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people came to Blackpool for two weeks.

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-And he was just a popular character.

-Did you perform with your dad?

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I did nine years.

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I started as an apprentice, I was just the stooge getting all the buckets of water,

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and I gradually progressed to doing the white-faced clown.

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-You've got to be pretty fit to be a clown.

-It is a hard life.

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But it's a great life because things happen,

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like if a child laughs,

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my father used to say - when a child laughs, it's like a crystal bell.

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It's an actual pure sound.

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LAUGHTER

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-It's been great to talk to you.

-Lovely to meet you, mate.

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-Enjoy the rest of the day with us.

-I certainly will. It's a great building.

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Some fascinating family history there.

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Back to the valuation tables where James has found a very important collection.

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Who did these belong to?

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These ones belonged to Uncle Archie,

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and these once belonged to Uncle Jack.

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Uncle Archie and Uncle Jack, OK. Let's start with Uncle Archie.

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Now, let's have a look at these.

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The great thing about First World War medals

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is they were all named on the edge.

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And here we have his name, Everitt, of the Leinster regiment.

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-So it's an Irish regiment.

-Yes.

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So we've got three service medals,

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that were awarded to everybody who fought in the First World War.

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And here we have a bar at the top that says,

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5th of August to 22nd of November, 1914.

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So, your Uncle Archie actually served in the First World War

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from the beginning.

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And he was involved in the retreat from Mons,

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which was the first major retreat,

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a tactical retreat by the Allied forces,

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trying to draw the Germans in, trying to wear the Germans out, in a way.

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But then what's even more interesting is if we go

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all the way to the end, your Uncle Archie didn't finish

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at the end of the First World War, because here we've got an RAF medal!

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He changed from Leinster to the RAF!

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And here we've got, for long service and good conduct,

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George V medal.

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So we're talking about somewhere before 1937,

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it was George VI after 1937,

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and he's been awarded a George V medal, so we know that was awarded

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before then. So it looks as if he didn't serve

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in the Second World War. Is that right?

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Well, when he was in the RAF and he came out of the recruiting office

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in Liverpool, he was one of Monty's drivers.

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-Field Marshal Montgomery?

-Yes!

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Interesting.

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Because he's quite a senior chap, with a lot of experience,

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-to be a driver, isn't he?

-Yes.

-Interesting.

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So, this chap - who's that?

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That was Uncle Jack, my mother's brother.

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So Uncle Jack served in the Second World War,

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he served all over the place, looking at this.

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Served in Italy, he served in Africa, we've got the war medal,

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defence medal and the 1939-45 star.

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The thing to say about those is that they are all service medals.

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They all say, "I was here and I did this."

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He was a soldier who undoubtedly did very brave things

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during his time, he just hasn't been recognised for it.

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So, therefore, as a group, they are not going to be hugely valuable.

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So I would put the second with the first and put them together

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as a group and I reckon if we put an auction estimate of £200-£300,

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and a reserve of £200.

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But the great thing about medal collectors, people say to me

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all the time, "How on earth can people bring their parent's medals

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"or their family's medals and sell them?"

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And I say genuinely, because the person that buys them

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will have a massive interest in military history,

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they will be on the internet, they will research,

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they will know Uncle Archie's inside leg measurement

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by the time they've finished, they really will!

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And his story will live on.

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So I'm a great believer that, if they're sitting in the drawer,

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let them go. Let them go to somebody who will research and find out

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and let their story live on. Thank you so much for bringing them in.

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-Wonderful history.

-Thank you.

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Well, after a busy morning here in the circus,

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it's time for our first visit to the auction room.

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This is where we put our experts' valuations to the test.

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Have they been clowning around? We're just about to find out.

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Here's a quick recap of what's going under the hammer.

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There's the Lalique bowl bought at a car-boot sale.

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David is hoping the bidders raise a glass to his bottle of whisky.

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And there's the collection of military medals.

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Well, we haven't had to travel too far for our auction today.

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Just along the coastline is Lytham St Anne's.

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Enough of the bracing sea air, let's get inside the sale room.

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In charge of proceedings is auctioneer Jonathan Cook.

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I caught up with him on the auction preview day

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and he had an update on one of our items.

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We had a value of £100-£200 with a fixed reserve of £100 on this

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-but I know Irene's been on the phone to you.

-Sure.

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She's upped it to around £200 firm.

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Right. Fixed reserve at £200.

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Yeah. Unfortunately, it's not the nicest item, in my opinion.

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I've seen a lot better.

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We've seen a lot of Rene Lalique on the show and it's always sold well,

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-but this one...

-Just a frosted leaf bowl, I think at £200...

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That's all its money.

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It's all its money. You've got to rely on a private wanting that

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cos it'll never go to the trade.

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-Good luck.

-I'll do my best.

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-It's all down to you now!

-I'll do my best!

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Originally, James put a fixed reserve of £100 on this.

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-Totally agreed with that.

-Yep.

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But you've come along to the sale room just before the auction...

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I never thought I'd find another one at a car boot...

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-No.

-..so I thought I'll take a chance.

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He's a good auctioneer, they have Lalique in the cabinet

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so they do have good Lalique buyers here.

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But with a conservative estimate...

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-But no, it might be the right move.

-I think it is the right move, James!

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Well, I'm not going to argue!

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-Take a chance.

-Exactly, that's what it's all about.

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Life is all about taking a chance.

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Right now, we're going to take one big gamble, this is it.

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Lot 120, Lalique signed frosted leaf bowl,

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signed and etched, bids there at 180, 190, £200 bid.

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Any advance on 200? 220, 240.

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260 at the back, 280 with me.

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300 and I'm out. Gent's bid at £300. Any advance on 300?

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Back of the room, then, at £300, are we all sure at 300?

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No further interest, £300...

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You see, you didn't need to change your reserve at all.

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With my estimate...

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-Well done!

-Thank you so much.

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What a great result, what a great result. Well done, you.

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Off to another car-boot sale?

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-Maybe.

-To invest in a car boot!

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From an item found at a car boot to one that was found in a pile of rubbish.

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Our next lot, what can I say, it's over 60 years old,

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it was found in the rubbish 30 years ago by David, in a bar in Tenerife.

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-Fancy throwing that away!

-I was amazed.

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And I'm amazed that you never bothered opening it!

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No, I was tempted to but I never did,

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I thought, no. It's... If you open it, you spoil it.

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-Yeah.

-If you open it, you have to drink the whole bottle!

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And you get a massive headache then!

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Let's put it to the test.

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It's all down to the bidders here. Let's find out, good luck.

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Lot 449. Dimple old blended Scotch whisky.

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Big bottle, 1.75 litre, unopened.

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Bid's there at 40 on the net, any advance in the room at £40?

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Any advance on 42?

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44. At £44. 46. Any advance on the phone?

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48. At £50.

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-Any advance on 50?

-He's struggling.

-Because it's that blended whisky.

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At £50 then, any further interest, all sure? £50...

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-Ah!

-Not sold.

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-Not sold.

-It doesn't matter.

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You know what, you've had that for 30-odd years,

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it doesn't matter if you have it for 40-odd years.

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Maybe you should just have a drink,

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maybe it's meant for you to have a drink. You never know, do you?

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-Invite a few friends along.

-What we'll have to do,

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we'll get the bottle, open it, we'll need about three boxes of straws.

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A reminder that not everything that goes under the hammer will sell,

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but hopefully David will have a great night

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when he gets that whisky home.

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Time to move along now for our next lot.

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Going under the hammer right now, a collection of World War I

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and World War II medals belonging to two uncles from the same family -

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Ruth's family, who's right next to me.

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-One served in the First World War and one served in the Second.

-Yes.

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-And you've got photographs of them there.

-I have.

-So, who is this chap?

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That's Uncle Jack that served in the Second World War.

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There's Uncle Jack, look.

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-And that...?

-That's Uncle Archie that served in the First World War.

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-Uncle Archie, how about that?

-Oh, there he is, yeah.

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That's the one that served in the Army and the RAF.

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-Both very brave men.

-Yeah.

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Now, hopefully, we're going to find a new home for them, Ruth,

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-and they will go to a collector who will cherish them.

-Mm.

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OK? Here we go. Let's find out what they're worth, shall we?

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We know they're priceless,

0:18:340:18:36

but let's see what someone is prepared to pay.

0:18:360:18:38

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:18:380:18:40

Lot 492, World War I, set of four medals.

0:18:400:18:46

All with paperwork, showing there.

0:18:460:18:48

Bids of 170, 180, 200, 220.

0:18:480:18:52

240, 260.

0:18:530:18:55

280, 300.

0:18:560:18:58

At £300... 320 on the net.

0:19:000:19:03

Any advance on 320? At £320...

0:19:030:19:06

The bidding's online, it's not in the room.

0:19:060:19:09

At 320, then, are we all finished at 320?

0:19:090:19:12

All sure at 320, sell away at 320...

0:19:120:19:16

Hammer's gone down. Ruth, they've gone. £320. Is that OK?

0:19:180:19:23

-Yeah.

-They've gone to a collector.

-Yeah, lovely.

0:19:230:19:26

-Do you want those photographs to go with the medals?

-Yes.

0:19:260:19:28

-I think that's a really good idea. You brought those along to give to the auctioneer?

-Yes.

0:19:280:19:32

And that just makes the provenance so watertight, it really does.

0:19:320:19:36

Well, that concludes our first visit to the auction room today.

0:19:380:19:41

So far, so good. We are coming back later on in the programme.

0:19:410:19:44

Don't go away, there could be a big surprise.

0:19:440:19:47

Now, many of you know, I am a great horse lover.

0:19:470:19:49

We have four at home and they really have shaped our history.

0:19:490:19:53

Not just as an early means of transport,

0:19:530:19:55

but also in the world of sport and in the world of fine art, but also on the battlefield.

0:19:550:20:00

When you think of the First World War,

0:20:080:20:10

it's the acts of great bravery and sacrifice that come to mind -

0:20:100:20:13

the many casualties and unsung heroes who battled it out

0:20:130:20:16

in appalling conditions in the trenches.

0:20:160:20:19

But not all the brave comrades stood on two feet.

0:20:210:20:25

In fact, some six million horses

0:20:250:20:27

and mules were drafted in to do some of the most backbreaking work

0:20:270:20:31

during the Great War, as it was known back then.

0:20:310:20:34

So I have come here to the National Army Museum to take a closer look

0:20:340:20:37

at some of the fascinating stories behind history's

0:20:370:20:40

greatest real-life warhorses.

0:20:400:20:42

The use of horsepower in warfare stretches back thousands of years,

0:20:440:20:48

and it was often one side's biggest advantage over the other.

0:20:480:20:52

The more horses an army had, the better its chances of victory.

0:20:520:20:56

Before machine guns and army tanks and air power,

0:20:560:20:59

horses provided height, strength and power.

0:20:590:21:03

Also, companionship.

0:21:030:21:04

But, during the 16th and 17th century,

0:21:040:21:07

the British Mounted Cavalry were a force to be reckoned with.

0:21:070:21:10

The light cavalry were used for reconnaissance and pursuit,

0:21:100:21:13

whilst the heavy cavalry - big men on big horses - used their muscle

0:21:130:21:17

and brawn to overwhelm enemy units with shock charges.

0:21:170:21:22

Today's most famous military commanders would carefully select

0:21:220:21:26

their warhorse to lead them to victory.

0:21:260:21:29

And here in the museum, the horse selected for battle

0:21:290:21:32

by Napoleon Bonaparte is still standing.

0:21:320:21:34

Here he is, the skeleton of Marengo, Napoleon's favourite charger,

0:21:350:21:40

named after the French army's victory at the Battle of Marengo in the year 1800.

0:21:400:21:45

There are many stories about this magnificent charger,

0:21:450:21:48

but it's widely believed he was rode by Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815.

0:21:480:21:53

After the French army's defeat by the English army

0:21:530:21:56

and the allied forces, Marengo was brought back to England

0:21:560:22:00

and shown off around the shires.

0:22:000:22:02

He was a huge success. That's why he's here in the museum.

0:22:020:22:06

The Battle of Waterloo may have been fought and won on horseback,

0:22:070:22:11

but not all famous cavalry charges have ended in victory.

0:22:110:22:15

The ill-fated Charge Of The Light Brigade in 1854 resulted

0:22:150:22:19

in a devastating human and equine death toll.

0:22:190:22:23

The cavalry charged in the wrong direction, straight towards

0:22:230:22:26

the Russian lines, and 475 horses were killed.

0:22:260:22:31

The Light Brigade, as an operational force, was almost wiped out.

0:22:310:22:35

One horse, belonging to Lieutenant Percy Smith,

0:22:350:22:39

is believed to be one of only two horses to have survived

0:22:390:22:41

the whole charge without injury.

0:22:410:22:44

And, unbelievably,

0:22:440:22:45

Lieutenant Smith charged at the Russian army without a weapon.

0:22:450:22:49

It was the sheer speed and power of the horse that took it right through

0:22:490:22:52

those lines, crushing the soldiers below as it just leapt through.

0:22:520:22:57

But the role of the warhorse was to change radically during the First World War.

0:22:590:23:03

The introduction of long-range weapons, such as artillery and machine guns,

0:23:040:23:08

meant that cavalry regiments no longer had the upper hand.

0:23:080:23:12

So, instead of being used in battle, the horses were put to other uses,

0:23:140:23:19

proving themselves a vital part of the war effort.

0:23:190:23:22

Instead of fighting on the move,

0:23:270:23:28

troops were now holed up in trenches for months on end.

0:23:280:23:32

With train lines damaged, roads badly damaged

0:23:320:23:35

and mud preventing vehicle access,

0:23:350:23:37

it was an opportunity for horsepower to triumph once again.

0:23:370:23:40

Hundreds of thousands of horses were drafted in to carry medicines,

0:23:400:23:45

food and ammunition to the troops, and haul big guns to the front line.

0:23:450:23:50

When war broke out, the British Army had nowhere near enough horses,

0:23:500:23:53

so the vast majority of those sent to the Western Front were

0:23:530:23:56

actually civilian work horses from farms and cities.

0:23:560:24:00

And, as a horse lover,

0:24:000:24:01

I can't imagine how traumatic that must have been for the owners,

0:24:010:24:04

never knowing where they were

0:24:040:24:06

or even if they'd ever see them alive again.

0:24:060:24:09

As war progressed, 469,000 horses

0:24:110:24:14

and mules were taken from the countryside

0:24:140:24:17

and shipped to Europe in cramped and often difficult conditions.

0:24:170:24:21

But still even more were needed, so thousands were brought in

0:24:210:24:24

from America and Britain's Empire colonies.

0:24:240:24:27

The important job of looking after the horses was that of the farriers,

0:24:280:24:32

blacksmiths who had received extra veterinary training.

0:24:320:24:35

One of these men was Albert Driscoll,

0:24:350:24:37

and we had a chat with his grandson Sandy.

0:24:370:24:39

He would know how to keep the horses calm, how to talk to them,

0:24:400:24:47

how to treat them, how to stroke their muzzles, etc.

0:24:470:24:51

They would be seeing sights that they wouldn't like.

0:24:510:24:54

Horses are sensitive animals, the same as human beings are.

0:24:540:24:58

As well as caring for the horses,

0:24:580:25:00

the farriers often had a more distressing role to play.

0:25:000:25:04

A horse can't live with three legs, for example,

0:25:050:25:08

so a horse with a badly damaged leg would have to be put down.

0:25:080:25:11

And that was the job of the farriers, to do that.

0:25:110:25:14

And because of their deep love of the horses...

0:25:140:25:18

..they would find it very, very difficult to do what

0:25:190:25:22

they had to do, so they would do their best to keep the horses alive.

0:25:220:25:28

I honestly can't even imagine how somebody would feel

0:25:280:25:32

in that sort of situation.

0:25:320:25:34

But I do know he was always very, very proud of his horses and his men.

0:25:340:25:40

And his battery.

0:25:400:25:41

This monument in central London recognises the sacrifices

0:25:430:25:46

made by horses and other animals in conflicts around the world.

0:25:460:25:50

The British Army used more horses and mules

0:25:510:25:54

during the First World War than at any other campaign in history.

0:25:540:25:58

By the start of the Second World War, machinery was doing

0:25:580:26:01

the heavy lifting and the horse's role was reduced dramatically.

0:26:010:26:05

The Army today has fewer than 450 horses in its service, but the

0:26:070:26:11

legacy of the skill and endurance of the real warhorses lives on.

0:26:110:26:16

So, the next time you pass a war memorial,

0:26:160:26:18

spare a thought for these fellas - man's other best friend.

0:26:180:26:23

Welcome back to Blackpool.

0:26:280:26:29

I'm outside in the fresh air on the prom

0:26:290:26:31

while our experts are working very hard in that building over there.

0:26:310:26:35

Let's go inside and catch up with them and see what they found.

0:26:350:26:38

And it seems Anita has found some colourful ornaments.

0:26:380:26:42

Marguerite, I believe that you are a mad collector.

0:26:430:26:47

Yeah, completely bonkers.

0:26:470:26:49

-And passionate about glass.

-Yeah, yeah. I have been collecting...

0:26:490:26:53

Probably the first piece I bought was about 25 years ago.

0:26:530:26:57

And this was really glass for the masses, I suppose,

0:26:570:27:01

because it was at the time that blown glass was very expensive

0:27:010:27:05

and pressed glass, they could imitate things in a cheap fashion.

0:27:050:27:09

Yeah, uh-huh. I see that lovely wee smile on your face, of enthusiasm.

0:27:090:27:14

You're getting burned up here.

0:27:140:27:16

Now, what we're going to do is change hats. So you're the expert...

0:27:160:27:19

Oh! SHE LAUGHS

0:27:190:27:22

Tell me about this wonderful glass here. Tell me which factory.

0:27:220:27:27

It is all made by a factory called Sowerby, which is in the Northeast.

0:27:270:27:33

And they were one of the top factories, really.

0:27:330:27:37

There was a lot of glass made in the Northeast.

0:27:370:27:39

When would this have been made?

0:27:390:27:41

These were probably about 1880s, something like that. Yeah.

0:27:410:27:46

-It's like an exotic stone.

-Yeah.

0:27:460:27:49

They called it malachite, this particular finish.

0:27:490:27:53

And the other thing that is quite interesting is

0:27:530:27:55

the chemicals that they used.

0:27:550:27:59

They used things like arsenic and ammonia to colour

0:27:590:28:02

some of the glasses, and the best glass workers didn't live very long.

0:28:020:28:07

They were paid quite a lot, but they didn't live very long.

0:28:070:28:10

And what about this piece here?

0:28:100:28:11

And this is another piece, and this has a lozenge mark on it.

0:28:110:28:17

And it's great, because you can tell which factory,

0:28:170:28:20

you can tell the actual day, the batch number and year it was made.

0:28:200:28:26

-And this one is about 1870s.

-Oh, right.

0:28:260:28:28

-I think you're really good at this.

-No, I'm not!

-Are you after my job?

0:28:280:28:33

I couldn't do it as well as you!

0:28:340:28:36

No, I think you have been absolutely wonderful.

0:28:360:28:38

Do you have a lot of glass, Marguerite?

0:28:380:28:41

Yes, I've probably got, oh, hundreds of pieces, maybe.

0:28:410:28:45

Well, I love these, and I think it is interesting in that they are part

0:28:450:28:51

-of their times and they were, perhaps, as you said, a poor man's glass.

-Yeah.

0:28:510:28:57

But they are colourful, they are beautiful,

0:28:570:29:00

and I love in particular this lovely malachite finish.

0:29:000:29:04

I think these are fabulous.

0:29:040:29:05

We can put them to auction, but in auction,

0:29:050:29:09

-this type of moulded glass does not get high prices.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:29:090:29:14

We have to make our estimates modest.

0:29:140:29:17

I would like to put this little group in...

0:29:170:29:20

erm, say, 20 to 40,

0:29:200:29:24

-to make it low and wide to invite the bidding.

-Yeah.

0:29:240:29:28

Now, are you happy with that?

0:29:280:29:31

Erm, I'd like a reserve on them and then maybe see...

0:29:310:29:35

I mean, I'm hoping that we get somebody in who is a collector

0:29:350:29:39

and then, you know, it pushes the price up.

0:29:390:29:42

-They'll like these pieces.

-Yeah, yeah.

-They'll like these.

0:29:420:29:45

-So we can put a reserve of the lower estimate on those.

-Yeah.

0:29:450:29:49

They might do well, but getting rid of all this stuff,

0:29:490:29:53

will that tug at your heartstrings?

0:29:530:29:55

Oh, I have to admit, it will do a bit, but I might find another piece!

0:29:550:29:59

Fingers crossed there will be some glass collectors

0:30:030:30:05

who are just as keen as Marguerite at the auction later on in the show.

0:30:050:30:09

Over now to James Lewis, who is calling time on our next item.

0:30:090:30:12

Brian and Maureen, I have to say,

0:30:150:30:17

I don't even own a wristwatch any more.

0:30:170:30:20

I haven't owned one for years. Do you know why?

0:30:200:30:22

I always leave them in hotel rooms.

0:30:220:30:26

I go around doing Flog It! or wherever, staying overnight

0:30:260:30:29

in a hotel. I pack my shirts into a bag and always forget my wristwatch.

0:30:290:30:33

And the reason why is because I had one of those about 15 years ago and I lost it.

0:30:330:30:39

-Right.

-It's not the same one, is it?

0:30:390:30:41

-You haven't found it in a hotel room somewhere?

-Don't think so.

0:30:410:30:44

Where did you find it?

0:30:440:30:46

-It was in a box, wasn't it? Box of stuff.

-We inherited it, we think.

0:30:460:30:51

I think perhaps from my father,

0:30:510:30:53

because it is the sort of thing he would have worn.

0:30:530:30:56

-OK. You don't remember your father wearing it?

-No.

-No, I don't.

0:30:560:31:01

-No, but...

-It's the sort of thing that might have been saved for best.

0:31:010:31:05

You know, going out to a dinner party, something like that.

0:31:050:31:08

The strap is gold-plated.

0:31:080:31:10

It's the original OMEGA strap, and that would wear quite thin

0:31:100:31:15

if it was used on a daily basis.

0:31:150:31:18

It is known as the OMEGA Constellation,

0:31:180:31:20

which is a wonderful title.

0:31:200:31:23

And, in a way, it harks back to some of the history of OMEGA.

0:31:230:31:27

Originally, it goes back to the 1840s.

0:31:270:31:30

But OMEGA in this form was well known for being

0:31:300:31:34

-the watch that NASA used to go to the moon with.

-Oh, right!

0:31:340:31:38

So your father would have been in very good company.

0:31:380:31:40

Now, if you have a look at the dial,

0:31:400:31:43

it's telling nine o'clock at the moment.

0:31:430:31:45

A good tip is that whenever you're selling a watch,

0:31:450:31:48

you do that with it.

0:31:480:31:50

You make it smile.

0:31:520:31:54

So you do ten past eleven, or ten past ten, or ten to two,

0:31:540:32:00

so that the hands are doing this.

0:32:000:32:02

And it's a proven fact that when you photograph a watch smiling,

0:32:020:32:06

it makes more than if you photograph the watch saying twenty past seven,

0:32:060:32:10

looking like a downturned mouth.

0:32:100:32:13

I mean, it's all psychology.

0:32:130:32:14

It's probably a load of nonsense,

0:32:140:32:16

-but my old boss used to swear by it.

-Seems to work!

0:32:160:32:19

Fingers crossed it won't just be the watch smiling in the saleroom.

0:32:190:32:22

Hopefully, you will be too.

0:32:220:32:24

I reckon that should make...

0:32:240:32:27

£200 to £300.

0:32:270:32:28

-BOTH: Really?

-Yeah.

0:32:280:32:30

-Good Lord.

-Good news?

-Good news, yeah!

0:32:300:32:32

-Excellent news!

-Brilliant, brilliant.

-Wonderful.

0:32:320:32:34

-Would never have thought it.

-It is a good thing, all right?

-Thank you very much.

-Yes, thank you.

0:32:340:32:38

-So we need to protect it with a reserve.

-Right, OK.

-£200?

0:32:380:32:42

-With discretion. Let that auctioneer have a bit of flexibility.

-Yeah.

0:32:420:32:45

You have auction fees to pay as well, but £200, and see how it goes.

0:32:450:32:50

-Great.

-Yeah, thank you.

0:32:500:32:52

So, two items already found to take off to auction.

0:32:530:32:56

We need a third to make it a complete set.

0:32:560:32:59

I wonder what it will be.

0:32:590:33:00

Jean, you have brought something along to Flog It!,

0:33:050:33:09

which I have fallen in love with.

0:33:090:33:11

I want to tell you that,

0:33:110:33:12

as well as loving that, I love being here in the Tower

0:33:120:33:16

and in the circus ring.

0:33:160:33:18

You come from round about.

0:33:180:33:20

Do you come here to look at the circus, do you visit,

0:33:200:33:24

have you visited before?

0:33:240:33:26

I think this is the first time I've been in Blackpool Tower.

0:33:260:33:30

Isn't that awful?

0:33:300:33:31

How long have you lived here?

0:33:310:33:33

Since 1963.

0:33:330:33:35

Oh, no!

0:33:350:33:37

Can you see now what you've missed?

0:33:370:33:39

Yes. Yes, yes.

0:33:390:33:41

It is quite beautiful.

0:33:410:33:43

Well, I love this wee piece.

0:33:440:33:45

Can you tell me where you got it?

0:33:450:33:47

A gentleman gave it to me,

0:33:470:33:49

a friend of the family's.

0:33:490:33:51

And he had been ill at home,

0:33:510:33:54

and my mum and dad nursed him through pneumonia.

0:33:540:33:56

And I think it perhaps was a thank-you.

0:33:560:34:00

-That's very nice.

-Cos he gave it to me. Yes.

0:34:000:34:02

To me, it's the essence of style,

0:34:040:34:06

it has a French look about it...

0:34:060:34:08

It's just "ooh la la".

0:34:080:34:10

It's wonderful. But let's look at it

0:34:100:34:13

a wee bit more closely.

0:34:130:34:14

I've examined it with my glass,

0:34:140:34:16

and I can't see a hallmark.

0:34:160:34:19

But in a piece like this

0:34:190:34:22

I'm sure that it's

0:34:220:34:23

18-carat white gold or platinum.

0:34:230:34:26

Mm.

0:34:260:34:27

We have some lovely diamonds here.

0:34:270:34:29

Yes.

0:34:290:34:31

We have one here,

0:34:310:34:32

this is the largest one -

0:34:320:34:34

it's not a huge diamond,

0:34:340:34:36

but a big diamond would not be appropriate

0:34:360:34:39

for a delicate piece like that,

0:34:390:34:42

so it's in fitting with the style.

0:34:420:34:44

And we have two

0:34:440:34:46

smaller ones here,

0:34:460:34:48

quite pretty,

0:34:480:34:49

and then we have two lines

0:34:490:34:50

of diamonds up here.

0:34:500:34:52

They're very nice diamonds.

0:34:520:34:56

We have a lovely pearl drop here,

0:34:560:34:58

and a little pearl at the chain.

0:34:580:35:01

It's a beautiful piece,

0:35:010:35:03

it would have been the late 1800s,

0:35:030:35:06

it would have been worn by a woman of style.

0:35:060:35:11

Did you wear it when you were a young girl?

0:35:110:35:12

-Very rarely.

-Very rarely.

-I haven't worn it.

0:35:120:35:16

-I mean, it is a young girl's piece.

-Yes.

0:35:160:35:19

And I'm not a young girl.

0:35:190:35:21

It's lovely.

0:35:230:35:24

-Have you had it valued before?

-No.

0:35:240:35:27

-Have you an idea of value?

-No. None.

-Nothing in your head?

0:35:270:35:32

-Nothing in my head.

-OK.

-As much as possible.

0:35:320:35:35

Well, I'm an auctioneer and as much as possible

0:35:360:35:39

-is what I like to do!

-Obviously.

0:35:390:35:41

What I can say at the moment is that

0:35:410:35:45

-jewellery is hot.

-Yes.

0:35:450:35:48

I would like to put this in with an estimate of £200 to £300.

0:35:480:35:53

Would you be happy to sell it within that estimate?

0:35:530:35:55

Yes, because it's not doing anything at home, so...yes.

0:35:550:36:00

Well, I think if it's not your taste,

0:36:000:36:02

and it's been in your possession for a good couple of years...

0:36:020:36:05

Yes. Thank you(!)

0:36:050:36:07

-Shall we put a reserve on it?

-Oh, yes, please.

0:36:090:36:12

I think estimate

0:36:120:36:13

£200 to £300,

0:36:130:36:15

reserve £200.

0:36:150:36:17

The auctioneer has a little bit of discretion.

0:36:170:36:20

-But I'm sure it'll do well.

-Right.

0:36:200:36:23

Great combination -

0:36:230:36:24

diamonds, gold...

0:36:240:36:26

A girl's best friend!

0:36:260:36:28

..pearls.

0:36:280:36:30

-Thank you for bringing it along.

-Thank you very much, thank you.

0:36:300:36:33

MUSIC: "Diamonds" by Rihanna

0:36:330:36:35

Well, there you are. What a wonderful time we've had here at the Tower Circus in Blackpool,

0:36:370:36:40

everybody has thoroughly enjoyed themselves.

0:36:400:36:43

But right now we have to say goodbye,

0:36:430:36:44

because we're heading down the coastline to Lytham St Annes.

0:36:440:36:47

We've got some unfinished business in that auction room to do,

0:36:470:36:51

and here's a quick recap of the items we're taking with us.

0:36:510:36:55

We've got Marguerite's collection of pressed glass.

0:36:550:36:58

And which of these makes the most -

0:37:020:37:03

the gentleman's wristwatch...

0:37:030:37:05

..or the lady's diamond and pearl necklace?

0:37:080:37:11

Welcome back to the auction room in Lytham St Annes,

0:37:140:37:17

where we're hoping that our big-top items will fetch big-top prices.

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However much they make, remember there is commission to pay

0:37:210:37:24

if you're buying or selling at auction.

0:37:240:37:27

Here, it's 15% plus VAT.

0:37:270:37:29

It varies from saleroom to saleroom - if you're not sure,

0:37:290:37:32

check the details in the catalogue or ask the auctioneer.

0:37:320:37:35

So, let's get under way with our first lot -

0:37:350:37:38

the pressed glass collected by Marguerite.

0:37:380:37:41

Is this the start of downsizing now,

0:37:410:37:43

or are you selling some things just to literally grade upwards...?

0:37:430:37:47

Yeah. I really want to be a bit more specific, and perhaps get some quite unusual items.

0:37:470:37:53

-Different colours...?

-Yeah. That I can display.

0:37:530:37:56

I've got some pieces like lions and some animal pieces

0:37:560:38:00

-and if I can get some more of those, that'll be quite nice.

-OK.

0:38:000:38:03

So you're not downsizing at all?

0:38:030:38:05

-You're just swapping.

-A collector never really stops, do they?

0:38:050:38:09

It's in the blood. Once it's there, you cannot stop.

0:38:090:38:11

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:38:110:38:13

Let's put these to the test, shall we?

0:38:130:38:14

Let's find out what they're worth.

0:38:140:38:16

Lot 40. Collection of malachite pressed glass items.

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Four of them in total.

0:38:200:38:23

Bid's there. Lots on interest. Lots of commissions.

0:38:230:38:25

-Interesting.

-Good.

-60...

-60!

0:38:250:38:28

We can start them at 60. 65. 70.

0:38:280:38:31

At £70. Any advance on 70?

0:38:310:38:33

75. 80. At £80. Any advance on 80.

0:38:330:38:36

At £80. Are we all sure at 80?

0:38:360:38:39

Any further interest? £80. 85. 95. 100.

0:38:390:38:43

-Wow.

-At £120. Any further interest?

0:38:430:38:47

At 120. Are we all done at 120?

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30. 140.

0:38:500:38:52

Maybe a collector.

0:38:520:38:55

At £160. Any advance on 160?

0:38:550:38:58

-170. 80.

-I think it's the style, it's quite unusual.

0:38:580:39:03

At 180 then. Sell away at 180.

0:39:030:39:06

All finished at £180.

0:39:060:39:09

That hammer's gone down.

0:39:110:39:13

-Great.

-180!

-How much did you pay for those?

0:39:130:39:16

Um, not as much as that. Just some of the pieces were about £20 or so.

0:39:160:39:21

-Oh, you did pay £20 per piece.

-Yeah.

0:39:210:39:24

-So that was a great investment.

-Yeah.

-It's obviously paid off.

0:39:240:39:27

Good luck with the rest of the collection.

0:39:270:39:29

Thank you ever so much, thanks.

0:39:290:39:30

-Well done.

-Thanks.

-That was a surprise, wasn't it?

-That was great.

0:39:300:39:34

A fantastic result there. Our next lot is the diamond necklace.

0:39:340:39:37

Let's see if it can shine.

0:39:370:39:39

-We like this.

-Beautiful.

-It sparkles.

0:39:390:39:42

Why do you want to sell it? Why aren't you wearing it?

0:39:420:39:44

Well, I've hardly worn it.

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I've had it about 70 years and I've hardly worn it at all.

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Why was that?

0:39:480:39:50

Well, I always felt I had to be beautifully dressed in a ball gown

0:39:500:39:53

-or something like that.

-You could have got away with it.

0:39:530:39:57

-You could have got away with it, Jean.

-I like you!

0:39:570:39:59

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:39:590:40:02

It's going under the hammer now. This is it.

0:40:020:40:05

Elegant diamond and pearl pendant and chain. Set in platinum and gold.

0:40:050:40:08

Circa 1920s.

0:40:080:40:10

-Bid's there at 140.

-Straight in at 140, Jean.

0:40:100:40:13

At 160. 170. At 170. 180. At 190.

0:40:130:40:20

At 190. 200. 220. 240. 260.

0:40:200:40:25

This is very good.

0:40:250:40:27

No bids in the room.

0:40:270:40:28

At £280. Any further interest? At 280.

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At £280, are we all done at 280?

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300. 320.

0:40:360:40:38

320. In the room at 320.

0:40:380:40:41

At £320.

0:40:410:40:43

At £320, are we all sure? 340.

0:40:430:40:46

At 340 on the telephone. 360 on the net.

0:40:460:40:50

380. At £380. Any advance on 380?

0:40:530:40:56

At £380. On the telephone at 380.

0:40:560:41:00

All finished. All sure at 380.

0:41:000:41:03

Yes, the hammer's gone down!

0:41:050:41:06

-Isn't that wonderful?

-That was a good auction experience.

0:41:060:41:10

-Thanks very much indeed.

-That's what it's all about.

0:41:100:41:12

People getting carried away and bidding each other up.

0:41:120:41:15

-Someone else will wear that lovely little pendant and enjoy it.

-Yes.

0:41:150:41:20

And that's what is really beautiful about our industry.

0:41:200:41:22

It's all recycled and re-appreciated, isn't it? Pre-loved.

0:41:240:41:29

-We're very green.

-We are.

0:41:290:41:30

Time's up for our final lot of the day.

0:41:300:41:33

It's the wristwatch belonging to Brian and Maureen.

0:41:330:41:36

-Have you got a watch on today?

-I have.

0:41:360:41:38

Gosh, that's a big face on that.

0:41:380:41:40

You need one when you've got eyes like mine.

0:41:400:41:42

Why are you selling the OMEGA? That is a lovely watch.

0:41:420:41:44

Well, it's been sat in a drawer in a box for ages.

0:41:440:41:47

-But why don't you want to wear it?

-It's just not my style.

0:41:470:41:50

Bond wears one!

0:41:500:41:51

I don't think I look like James Bond.

0:41:530:41:55

Gorgeous watch, though. Wonderful Swiss timepiece.

0:42:000:42:03

I'm hoping it will do 250 to 350,

0:42:030:42:05

somewhere around there, realistically.

0:42:050:42:07

Lot 62. OMEGA gent's chronometer automatic wristwatch.

0:42:070:42:13

Bid's with me at 240. 260. At £260.

0:42:130:42:17

Any advance? 280. 300.

0:42:170:42:20

320. 340. 360. 380.

0:42:200:42:23

400. 420. 440. 460.

0:42:230:42:26

460 with me. Any advance on 460?

0:42:260:42:29

At £460. On commission at 460.

0:42:290:42:33

480. 500.

0:42:330:42:35

One more, it's yours.

0:42:350:42:36

At £500. 520, if it helps.

0:42:360:42:38

520 in the room. Gent's bid at 520.

0:42:400:42:43

At £520. Are we all sure at 520?

0:42:430:42:46

Gent's bid in the room at 520.

0:42:460:42:49

How about that?

0:42:510:42:53

-Brilliant.

-£520!

0:42:540:42:56

Quality always sells, and we say it time and time again on this show.

0:42:560:43:00

There you go.

0:43:000:43:01

-How about that?

-Didn't realise we had that sat in the wardrobe.

0:43:010:43:04

Well, that's it. Sadly, we are running out of time here,

0:43:090:43:12

we're coming to the end of the show.

0:43:120:43:13

The auction's finished and everyone has gone home happy,

0:43:130:43:16

that's what it's all about. If you've been bitten by the bug

0:43:160:43:19

and fancy seeing what your antiques are worth, we would love to see you.

0:43:190:43:22

Bring them along to one of our valuations days

0:43:220:43:24

and hopefully we're coming to a town very near you soon.

0:43:240:43:27

But for now, from Lancashire, it's goodbye from all of us.

0:43:270:43:31

Flog It! comes from the historic Blackpool Tower Circus, where Paul Martin is joined by experts Anita Manning and James Lewis. Together the team pick out a selection of interesting antiques and collectables to be sold at a local auction.

James discovers a glass bowl bought at a car boot sale, and Anita finds a diamond and pearl necklace. But which will do better when they go under the hammer?

Paul goes back in time to investigate the story of the real-life war horses.


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