Ragley Hall 5 Flog It!


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Ragley Hall 5

Antiques series. Paul Martin presents from Ragley Hall in Warwickshire. Antiques experts Charlie Ross and Will Axon find great treasures for auction.


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CLASSICAL MUSIC PLAYS

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This splendid Palladian house was designed by Dr Robert Hooke in 1680.

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Now, he was no ordinary man.

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Not only did he help Sir Christopher Wren

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rebuild London after the Great Fire,

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but he also had a hand in designing the dome of St Paul's Cathedral.

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Now, it doesn't get much better than that, does it?

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Welcome to "Flog It!" from Ragley Hall in Warwickshire.

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So, where better than this historic backdrop

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for our experts to wax lyrical about

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all the antiques and collectables they are just

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about to see, but more importantly, give us their valuations.

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All of these good folk have come from Warwickshire

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and beyond laden with their antiques and collectables,

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and that is only one question on their lips, which is...

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CROWD: What's it worth?

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Brilliant! Stay tuned and you will find out.

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And already settling in to these aristocratic surroundings is

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a distinguished gentleman of the saleroom, Will Axon.

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You haven't just taken that of His Lordship's car, have you?

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No, we've left the car...

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And a prince of the antiques world, auctioneer Charlie Ross.

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Probably a bit too high for a milking chair.

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When you're milking, you've got to be down there.

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On the show today, we delve deep into history.

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One of our experts brushes with the ceremonial

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but ends up looking a right charlie.

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We travel to Edgehill to find out

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more about one of Warwickshire's famous battles.

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And closer to home, we see how the First World War

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touched the lives of the family here at Ragley.

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Well, everyone is now safely seated in the Great Hall

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and there is a wonderful air of anticipation and excitement.

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Who is going to go off to auction and go home with lots of money?

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That is what we are going to do right now, make a start.

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This is the first person going off to the saleroom,

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and it is a valuation with Charlie Ross.

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And he is currently in the Red Saloon with Raymond.

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This is a busby. Yep.

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It belongs to the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. Yep.

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You were never a serving member of Her Majesty's Forces, were you?

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No, only in the TA. In the TA.

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It is a wonderful, wonderful object. It is not particularly old, is it?

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Now, it is between '70 and '72. Right.

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So, not 70 years old. No. 1970. Yeah.

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So, we're looking at 40, 50 years old.

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At the front, of course, we have got the badge,

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which you can explain to us.

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That is the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers' badge.

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And here we have got...? That is a hackle. That is the hackle.

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A lot of people say, you know, feathers and this, that and the

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other when you've got the one on your berry, but that's a hackle.

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May we just lift it up here? Because there's something quite interesting.

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Now, I see on here a little tag. That's right.

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That is the sealed whatsit from the MOD to say that

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that's original, it is not a repro. Not a repro or a fake.

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So, that is the vital thing. Yeah.

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Now, who would have worn this? Somebody in a band? Yeah, bandsmen.

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Bandsmen. Nobody else wore them bar bandsmen. Right.

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They're purely ceremonial, aren't they?

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They're just ceremonial.

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You would never have gone off to war wearing it, would you? No.

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Whoever had this had a very small head, didn't he?

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I mean, to be honest, I'd have felt a bit of this twerp

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standing to attention in this.

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Plus the fact if you wore that into battle, you'd have your head shot.

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You certainly would.

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You wouldn't want to peer out of a trench wearing this, would you? No.

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I think it is a wonderfully tactile object.

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Well, the value.

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Get it in at the right money and they fall over each other for it.

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I'd say...170, what I paid for it.

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I think we need a little bit more flexibility, don't we?

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You do want to sell it, don't you? Yeah.

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We'll put it in at one and a half. Righto.

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One and a half to make you laugh. Yeah. Yeah? Yeah, that's fine.

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That gives us enough flexibility, doesn't it?

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Okey dokey. ?150. Fixed.

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Fixed? Yeah. As in bayonets? Yeah. Fixed bayonets?

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HE CHUCKLES Fixed reserves? That's it!

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I was going to say, can we use just a little bit of discretion? But no.

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No, no. ?150. I think it is worth that.

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And if it doesn't make that, then you'll take it back home.

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I'll still keep it, yeah. But it is brilliant to see it.

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Thank you very much. Keep my fingers crossed. Thanks very much.

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Cheers, Charlie. Much appreciated, ta.

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That will probably be a one-off,

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and I don't expect we will see another one like it.

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Now over to Wendy,

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who has a couple of items that are giving Will PAWS for thought.

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Wendy, you didn't expect to be on this table, did you, with me?

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I didn't, no. I just thought I'd come for a valuation.

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Were they something that you've had since a little girl

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or have you inherited them? No, no.

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They were husband's. Yeah.

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They were his uncles'. Right, OK.

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And they were young boys around the turn of the century,

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1900 to 1910, I suppose. OK.

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And then they were given to my husband,

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who then gave them to my son. Oh, right.

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And my son is now 38 and... He has just stopped sleeping with them.

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Well, he is not interested in them and I don't think his wife is,

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so we may as well do something with them.

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Well, the big name in bears...

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You're obviously aware of the name Steiff.

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Yes. The well-known bear makers, German.

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Was there an idea that this might have been a Steiff at some point?

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Well, we did wonder. When my son first had him, he did have a growl,

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but that has disappeared.

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Yeah, the growlers do perish, unfortunately.

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One or two times too many and they do perish.

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The thing to look out for for a Steiff bear is the shape.

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There are certain things that they have this pronounced snout,

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so it becomes a sort of...

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And it is quite pointy, the snout of a Steiff bear.

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They have long arms as well,

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where the sort of, the pads are quite long for the arms.

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They almost look a bit sort of monkey-like almost, the arms. Yes.

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They usually have a hump on their back.

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So, you've got the start of that here, but I don't think it is

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prominent enough to make me think it is a Steiff. Right.

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And, of course, you have the button in the ear.

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Now, there is a problem here, isn't there?

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Because from where I am sitting, he looks fine,

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but from where you're sitting, there is no ear, is there, your side?

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No, it's gone. I mean, I talk about damage

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because we're going to have to think about condition.

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What's happened over the years is he's been played with,

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cuddled, rolled about with, you know, the mohair has come away,

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it has perished.

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So, he is down to his bare skin, the poor chap, isn't he? Yes, he is.

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And then I noticed the pads as well. The pads on the feet and the arms,

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they look to have been replaced at some stage.

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They have been, by my mother-in-law. Oh, were they? Yes.

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I mean, she has done a reasonably good job, actually. Yes, she has.

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We move on to the Panda, who, again, is unmarked,

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so no idea who possibly made him.

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But again, a little bit unusual, being a Panda.

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We're used to seeing the mohair bears,

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not so used to seeing the pandas.

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Am I right in thinking that they were on their way to the tip? Yes.

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HE GASPS Outrageous. I'm having a clear-out.

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So, I feel like I've done my good deed of the day.

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I've rescued them from almost certain death. You have.

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Well, listen, we've got to talk about value at some stage.

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I am going to prepare you - it is not going to be a fortune.

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Estimate wise, I'm thinking ?20 to ?40 for the two.

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How does that sound? Yes, I'd be happy with that. Yeah? Yes.

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Considering you were going to chuck them,

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I'm suggesting that we have no reserve,

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we take a bit of a gamble and let them make what they make on the day.

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That sounds good to me. You happy with that?

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I'm very happy with that. Brilliant.

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Well, listen, they're going to find a new home. Aww. All right, then.

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Time to catch up with Charlie again.

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He is now in the splendour of the formal dining room.

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Who knows where he'll pop up next?

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Rather like this splendid house with its splendid contents,

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we've got a lot of history here.

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And quite a bit of it very, very sad.

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And we will come onto that,

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but I am quite intrigued to know how you've ended up with these.

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Well, my brother-in-law used to go to a lot of auction sales. Yes.

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And at the end of the auction sales,

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they used to sell job lots in big boxes. Yep.

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And these two were in one of the big boxes

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that he'd bought in the auction. Yeah.

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And he said to my husband, "You can have these,

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"you'll be interested in these." Yep.

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So, my husband said, "Oh, yes, that's nice."

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And then put them in the loft.

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Well, it is no good having things in the loft, is it?

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On the other hand, the loft does have its advantages.

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It does mean that they haven't been broken or damaged. That's right.

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We have got the two ships here, Lusitania and Mauritania. Yes.

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They were sister ships. They were launched in 1906. Yes.

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Now, the Lusitania was sunk in 1915. Yes.

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And was a civilian passenger ship.

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And yet it was torpedoed. Yes.

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It went down so quickly that very, very few

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of the lifeboats were launched. Just terrible.

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The Mauritania survived the war,

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and I think it was ultimately scrapped in about 1934, 1936.

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So, what we have got here, plain sheets of glass

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with a transfer print reverse on the back. On the back.

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And that is how they are done. And then what actually gives them

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a new dimension is that they've inserted into the print some little

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pieces of mother-of-pearl, which you can see here. Yes.

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Doesn't it give it an extra dimension? It does, doesn't it?

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It absolutely shines at you.

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They have got these rather splendid,

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worn, Edwardian fabric frames round them.

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They were done for a specific purpose,

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and that was to raise money for the Lusitania relief fund.

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Oh.

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Now, what about value? Any ideas?

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Well, actually, we just thought you'd say, "Nothing,

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"just put them in the bin!"

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There's no great quality to the frames or, indeed,

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the transfer printing, but they are real history and they are a pair,

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and I certainly think that the pair are worth between ?100 and ?200.

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That would be really nice.

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I am going to suggest a reserve of ?75 as an absolute stop-gap.

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Stop-gap. Happy with that? Yes, we're very happy.

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As long as they go to someone who really, really wants them. Yes.

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And you never know, they might even go to a museum.

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Yes, that would be good.

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Those paintings are real mementos of a moment in history.

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Well, there you are, you've just seen our experts make their first

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choice of items to take off to auction.

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Now, I've got my favourites, you've probably got yours,

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but let's find out what the bidders think. It is down to them.

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Let's get over to the saleroom,

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and here is a quick recap of what we are taking.

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Raymond's Busby hat is truly splendid,

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so I think we should have lots of interest.

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And people love bears, so I don't think there's any doubt

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that these two will have a new home soon.

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And the paintings of the Mauritania and the Lusitania on glass

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are a little bit special, so fingers crossed.

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For our auction today, we're heading across Warwickshire

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to the village of Tiddington, just south of Stratford-upon-Avon.

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We have come to a small and perfectly-formed

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old red brick Victorian schoolhouse,

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which is now the bustling home of Bigwood Fine Art Auctioneers.

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Our lots will be in the capable hands of auctioneers Stephen Kaye

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and Christopher Ironmonger.

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About turn!

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Raymond's lot is now on parade.

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Everybody ready? Attention, on guard,

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this is it, this is your lot. HE CHUCKLES

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We are talking about the busby hat.

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It is going under the hammer right now.

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The busby hat bearing the crest and plume,

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chinstrap and interior paper label.

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And I can start this at ?100.

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That's not enough. Come on.

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110, 120, 130,

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140, 150. 160?

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150, the lady nearest, the glasses on the head, at 150.

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At ?150, we're going to sell. Come on. At 150.

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Do I hear 160 now? Surely!

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At 150, it is going to go. Are we done?

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All right, Charlie. Well, I think Raymond was right. I'm fine.

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You're happy with that? Yeah.

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I know there's commission to pay, but you've had a bit of fun with it.

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Yes. You didn't lose too much money? No, no. No.

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It is gone. Job done.

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That is a lucky find for someone.

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The next lot can only be described as lovable.

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Wendy, it may be time to say goodbye to your best mates. I know.

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Those bears, those pre-war mohair bears.

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I love the one with the missing ear.

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Oh, dear. I wouldn't want to sell him. Wouldn't you? No! No.

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These things were made to be loved,

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that's why it's nice to see them in this condition.

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And someone else will love him. We're going to find out who right now.

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Golden plush straw-filled teddy bear and a panda bear.

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There we go. Who has got ?20 for these?

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Two handsome little gentlemen there. ?20?

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Ten to get me going, then. Come on, they've got to be...

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15 on the net. 15 on the net we've got. Oh, 15 bid.

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15, 20? At ?15 only.

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They are going to go at 15. Is it ?20?

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At ?15. You disappoint me. At ?20 now?

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At ?15, they are going to be sold.

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?15! No reserve, he's gone! Oh, that is fine. Aw!

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Listen, it's not going to get you a return ticket to Peru

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with another famous bear. Maybe a ticket to Paddington.

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Exactly. But look... Station. I'm happy with that, it's fine.

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As long as they have gone to a nice home, that's fine. Exactly. Aww.

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And I am sure that they have.

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Now for the pair of prints.

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Nautical memorabilia going under the hammer.

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This is big business. We have seen it before.

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Reverse prints on glass, two wonderful, great ships.

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Lovely stories as well. Great history.

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Roma, why are you selling these?

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Well, because they've just been in the loft for...

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They've not been on the wall? No, no!

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I'd have put them on the wall for safekeeping.

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They've been in the loft for about 50 years.

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We're going to put it to the test. Ready, Roma? Yes.

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And I love that name, Roma. That is a great name. Thank you.

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Here we go. They are going under the hammer.

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Pair of period coloured prints of Cunard liners, the Lusitania

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and the Mauritania. Highlighted with mother-of-pearl, canvas covered.

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?60 to get me started.

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?60. ?50.

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50 I am bid. At 50. The bid is there at 50.

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At 50. Do I hear 60 now? 60, madam?

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60, 70, 80.

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80 in the centre of the room. At 80. 90?

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We're selling. At 80, centre of the room. Is that 90 at the back?

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At ?80, the bid is with the lady at ?80.

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And it will be sold at 80. Squeaking away.

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Make no mistake, ?80.

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Sailed away. THEY LAUGH

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So, it's gone. That's good.

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Well done. Well done, both of you.

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I think those are going to be really treasured by someone.

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I'll take five from anyone else.

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Well, there you are, our first three lots under the hammer.

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We are coming back here later on in the programme,

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hopefully, fingers crossed, for that big surprise I keep promising you.

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But the great thing about being in an auction room

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is we are surrounded by history, little windows into the past.

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And right now, it is time for me to take a trip back in time.

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In the middle of the 17th century, Britain was in the early stages

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of a great rebellion, which resulted,

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for the first and only time in British history,

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in the country cutting off its king's head.

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The conflict between the king and his parliament, which placed

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the country in such great turmoil,

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became known as the English Civil War.

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It was right here on the fateful morning of 23 October, 1642,

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that King Charles I stood looking down on those fields there.

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This is where his Royalist troops, the Cavaliers,

0:16:570:17:00

came face-to-face with the Parliamentarian force,

0:17:000:17:03

the Roundheads, led by the Earl of Essex,

0:17:030:17:07

in the Battle of Edgehill.

0:17:070:17:09

Due to his unpopularity with both the people and Parliament,

0:17:130:17:17

the king had fled to the North from London, where he had raised an army.

0:17:170:17:22

That army was now marching for the capital.

0:17:220:17:24

Meanwhile, Essex's force was attempting to head them off.

0:17:270:17:30

Extraordinary as it may seem, with lack of intelligence

0:17:330:17:36

and poor communications,

0:17:360:17:37

each of these huge armies had no idea where the other side was.

0:17:370:17:42

It was only by pure chance that they met up here in Warwickshire.

0:17:420:17:48

So, how did Britain get to the point

0:17:570:17:59

where the king was fighting his own parliament?

0:17:590:18:02

To find the answer, I have travelled just seven miles down the road from

0:18:020:18:06

Edgehill to this delightful ancient moated manor house, Broughton Castle.

0:18:060:18:10

This was the home of William Fiennes, a Puritan, pro-Parliament leader

0:18:140:18:19

opposed to Charles's more Catholic beliefs and dictatorial behaviour.

0:18:190:18:23

The causes of the English Civil War were complex.

0:18:270:18:30

The King's continual disagreement with Parliament over taxes,

0:18:300:18:33

the Protestants' fear of a return to Catholicism

0:18:330:18:37

and the desire to move away from the old feudal system

0:18:370:18:40

were all major factors.

0:18:400:18:42

But it was the king's pretensions and his arrogant attitude that was key.

0:18:420:18:47

Charles believed in the divine right of kings,

0:18:480:18:51

which asserted that monarchs derived their authority straight from God.

0:18:510:18:57

As far back as 1215, the Magna Carta had established that the king

0:18:570:19:01

was no more above the law than his subjects.

0:19:010:19:04

And yet, Charles I continued to behave autocratically,

0:19:040:19:08

dissolving Parliament on a whim if they did not agree to pass laws

0:19:080:19:12

introducing new taxes to raise more money for his coffers.

0:19:120:19:17

So, where does William Fiennes and Broughton Castle

0:19:230:19:26

fit into this picture of England in turmoil?

0:19:260:19:29

Well, the politically-minded William played host to

0:19:290:19:32

several of the most important meetings of the rebel leadership.

0:19:320:19:36

It is said that they all gathered here in the tower.

0:19:360:19:40

Now, we know that William was away in London at the time of the battle,

0:19:430:19:47

but his regiment and all of his four sons fought

0:19:470:19:50

the Royalists at Edgehill, and it is said that a number of the regiment

0:19:500:19:54

slept up here, in these attic rooms, the night before the battle.

0:19:540:20:00

So, what actually happened on that memorable day?

0:20:000:20:03

Well, for that, we need to return to Edgehill

0:20:030:20:05

and the site of the battle to talk to historian Julian Humphrys.

0:20:050:20:09

I tell you what, it is quite overcast and misty. It is very atmospheric.

0:20:110:20:15

And there's some sounds going off in the background!

0:20:150:20:17

Are the Roundheads still here?

0:20:170:20:19

I know this looks like the perfect day for a battle,

0:20:190:20:21

but what was the weather like on that particular day? Was it like this?

0:20:210:20:24

No, it was crisp and clear. So, it was bright?

0:20:240:20:26

It was, but of course, it wouldn't have stayed clear for very long

0:20:260:20:29

because the moment people started to shoot their muskets,

0:20:290:20:32

you got smoke everywhere.

0:20:320:20:33

'Fire!'

0:20:330:20:35

You would have seen about 30,000 men,

0:20:350:20:37

which was an extraordinary number of people together at that time.

0:20:370:20:40

It was like a small town travelling around.

0:20:400:20:42

The Royalists coming down from the high ground...

0:20:420:20:44

So they were up there? ..the Parliamentarians

0:20:440:20:46

over towards Kineton.

0:20:460:20:47

Infantry in the centre with muskets and pikes, cavalry on the wings.

0:20:470:20:51

The two armies came together.

0:20:530:20:55

The Royalists, who had superior cavalry, swept

0:20:550:20:57

the Parliamentarian cavalry away off the battlefield almost immediately.

0:20:570:21:01

Now, if all had gone to plan then,

0:21:010:21:03

the Royalists would have stopped,

0:21:030:21:04

they would have turned inwards and enveloped

0:21:040:21:06

the Parliamentarian infantry,

0:21:060:21:08

who were left on their own in the centre. But they didn't do that.

0:21:080:21:11

"Tally-ho, chaps!" They charged off because, very temptingly,

0:21:110:21:15

back towards village of Kineton

0:21:150:21:17

was the Parliamentarian baggage train full of stuff.

0:21:170:21:19

And that's what they were interested in. Yes.

0:21:190:21:21

Don't forget, they're quite short of stuff anyway,

0:21:210:21:24

so if they could nick a few things, it would help.

0:21:240:21:26

In a chess analogy, it was a queen for a queen.

0:21:260:21:28

They'd gone, so it was left with just the infantry in the centre.

0:21:280:21:32

But the Parliamentarian infantry got the upper hand

0:21:330:21:36

and they actually pushed the Royalists back.

0:21:360:21:38

But the Royalists were saved by two things -

0:21:380:21:40

one was the advent of night,

0:21:400:21:42

because the battle went right on till the end of the day,

0:21:420:21:44

and secondly, the return of the Royalist cavalry.

0:21:440:21:47

So, the result - a draw.

0:21:470:21:48

These were all amateurs, really. Sure. In their first major conflict.

0:21:480:21:51

Absolutely. Armed conflict. Yeah.

0:21:510:21:54

1,500 people were killed here, which was a lot of people at that time.

0:21:540:21:57

And it shocked people throughout England.

0:21:570:21:59

They were really shocked by this.

0:21:590:22:01

It would be enough to really turn you, wouldn't it?

0:22:010:22:03

And want some sort of...well, I guess some sort of result out of it,

0:22:030:22:08

or it would have made you carry on believing in the cause.

0:22:080:22:11

I think the big tragedy was that it wasn't decisive.

0:22:110:22:13

People thought at the time perhaps it would all be over by Christmas.

0:22:130:22:16

Exactly, no more fighting. But, no, it was indecisive,

0:22:160:22:19

so the war dragged on for years as a result of that. Yeah.

0:22:190:22:21

Because of the indecisive nature of the battle, it tipped the country

0:22:260:22:30

into civil war, and around 10% of England's population were killed.

0:22:300:22:36

The Parliamentarians realised they couldn't win a war

0:22:360:22:39

without professional soldiers,

0:22:390:22:40

so they set up and started to train the new model army.

0:22:400:22:44

And from that day onwards, we have always had professional soldiers.

0:22:440:22:49

More importantly, though, eventually the Royalists finally lost the war.

0:22:490:22:54

Charles I was beheaded in 1649.

0:22:540:22:57

Eventually, the monarchy was restored to the throne with his son,

0:22:570:23:00

Charles II, but it never really had the same power.

0:23:000:23:04

From that day onwards, the country embarked on that difficult pathway

0:23:040:23:08

that has resulted in the democracy we have today.

0:23:080:23:11

Back to Ragley Hall, which I think I am right in saying

0:23:190:23:22

was on the king's side in the Civil War.

0:23:220:23:25

We are in the Great Hall, which is still bustling with activity -

0:23:250:23:28

happily, in a well-ordered and peaceful way.

0:23:280:23:31

Time to tune in to Will.

0:23:310:23:33

RADIO STATIC

0:23:330:23:35

Sylvia, it is not often that I use the words funky and radio

0:23:350:23:39

in the same sentence, but in this instance, wow.

0:23:390:23:43

What a looker! Yeah, it's lovely. Where has this come from?

0:23:430:23:46

Tell me, is this something you have had from new?

0:23:460:23:48

Yes, it was from new. Wow.

0:23:480:23:50

Dad bought it about 65 years ago.

0:23:500:23:53

Have you ever seen such a thing? No. A round radio.

0:23:530:23:56

But it has been quite a talking point over the years. Has it?

0:23:560:23:59

Have you got it on display? Does it work?

0:23:590:24:01

No, not now. I don't know whether it works, I'm not sure.

0:24:010:24:04

Well, I am not brave enough to plug it in, I'm afraid.

0:24:040:24:06

No, the wire looks a bit dodgy to me. I know, exactly.

0:24:060:24:09

So, it would need to be rewired... That is it, yes.

0:24:090:24:12

..by whoever wants to use it.

0:24:120:24:14

You have got this wonderful sort of textured speaker cover.

0:24:140:24:19

And I love the way that they have continued the circular theme...

0:24:190:24:22

That's it. ..with the actual dial itself going around the edge.

0:24:220:24:25

Yeah. The knobs here, the on and off, of course, and volume.

0:24:250:24:29

And then, of course, here to actually tune it in. That's it.

0:24:290:24:31

And here you have got the EKCO Radio mark.

0:24:310:24:34

When this was designed, produced, it was really cutting edge,

0:24:340:24:39

wasn't it? That's it.

0:24:390:24:40

Was it the focal point of the evening?

0:24:400:24:42

Well, we hadn't got television, you see, so we used to have

0:24:420:24:46

the radio on a lot. And as soon as I came from school, it went on for,

0:24:460:24:51

you know, all the programmes. There used to be

0:24:510:24:54

a Saturday Night Theatre or something, it was called. Yeah.

0:24:540:24:58

You were literally sat down...

0:24:580:24:59

And it was your equivalent of the television. That's it.

0:24:590:25:02

It would have been a new product, just out. Yes.

0:25:020:25:05

Your father thought, "I've got to keep up with the Joneses here

0:25:050:25:08

"and get my Bakelite radio." That's it.

0:25:080:25:11

What do you think it is worth now? I've no idea, to be honest.

0:25:110:25:15

I could see this at auction at around a couple of hundred pounds.

0:25:150:25:19

What do you think to that? Yeah, very nice. Yeah? Yes.

0:25:190:25:22

It is a bit of a high estimate to risk having no reserve,

0:25:220:25:25

so why don't we tuck the reserve in

0:25:250:25:26

just under the bottom estimate at 150?

0:25:260:25:28

Yes, that would be fine. Just to protect it.

0:25:280:25:30

But I am pretty sure that is going to find a new home. Yes.

0:25:300:25:33

It has been a pleasure meeting you and hearing your stories.

0:25:330:25:35

It's been a pleasure meeting you.

0:25:350:25:37

It's been good fun meeting you. Yes. SHE CHUCKLES

0:25:370:25:40

Of course, radios were just one of many products made of Bakelite.

0:25:400:25:44

This early plastic was first developed in New York in 1907.

0:25:440:25:48

During the Depression,

0:25:480:25:49

it sold more than any other commercial product in America.

0:25:490:25:53

Bakelite's cheerful colours and affordability meant it was loved

0:25:530:25:57

across the world for decades, until finally replaced

0:25:570:26:01

by more modern plastics.

0:26:010:26:02

It was known as "the material of a thousand uses",

0:26:050:26:08

this coffin being one of them,

0:26:080:26:09

which must be the last word in Bakelite.

0:26:090:26:12

Now over to Charlie, who has found a quiet spot in the library.

0:26:160:26:19

Cath, did you ski here today? SHE LAUGHS

0:26:210:26:24

No. I drove. You drove?

0:26:240:26:27

Well, I must say, you really have dressed for the occasion.

0:26:270:26:30

It is fantastic. I thought I was going to be cold.

0:26:300:26:32

You look wonderful. Thank you. Wonderful.

0:26:320:26:34

And you've brought a funny old pot along. I have, yes.

0:26:340:26:37

Yes. Where did you find that?

0:26:370:26:39

On the kitchen shelf. SHE CHUCKLES

0:26:390:26:41

How long has it been there? 20 years.

0:26:410:26:43

20 years. What is it? It is a tea caddy.

0:26:430:26:48

It is a tea caddy! Correct.

0:26:480:26:49

Do you know where this comes from? No, I don't.

0:26:490:26:51

I am going to give you a little clue. OK.

0:26:510:26:54

You're going to pick it up and you're going to look at the front.

0:26:540:26:56

Yes. Windmill. What is on the front? A windmill.

0:26:560:26:58

Where do you think it comes from? Holland.

0:26:580:27:00

Correct! Absolutely marvellous.

0:27:000:27:03

Every object has a clue in it, doesn't it? Yes!

0:27:030:27:05

And how old is it?

0:27:050:27:08

18th century?

0:27:080:27:10

Very good. Yes. It is 18th century.

0:27:100:27:14

Now, it either had a lid, tin-glazed lid over the top,

0:27:140:27:20

Or actually, they weren't all made with that.

0:27:200:27:22

Could have just had a cork stopper.

0:27:220:27:24

And it is very simply decorated.

0:27:240:27:26

It is not like buying a piece of fine English Worcester porcelain

0:27:260:27:30

that has been decorated wonderfully by a specific hand.

0:27:300:27:34

This is very loosely decorated.

0:27:340:27:36

But nevertheless, charming because of it. It has got a bit of damage.

0:27:360:27:40

You can see where the glazing has been knocked at the corners. Yes.

0:27:400:27:44

But I don't mind that.

0:27:440:27:45

That is part of the age, part of the history of it.

0:27:450:27:48

It has got no, as far as I can see, serious cracks. No.

0:27:480:27:53

I think that is a charming little object.

0:27:530:27:55

There's collectors of delftware, which is what it is.

0:27:550:28:00

Holland, so we are appealing to delft collectors.

0:28:000:28:05

We are also appealing to tea caddy collectors.

0:28:050:28:07

So, we are getting into two different spheres there.

0:28:070:28:11

We are doubling our chances of finding someone that will

0:28:110:28:14

want to buy it.

0:28:140:28:15

Value. What about it? Give us a clue.

0:28:150:28:19

20 to 30? 20 to 30. Well, I have got ?20, I'll give you ?20 now for it.

0:28:190:28:24

How is that? Would you take that? No.

0:28:240:28:25

No. Very sensible. I think you are more...

0:28:250:28:29

?100 plus, probably. Wow! Yeah, I know, I know.

0:28:290:28:33

I am going to suggest that we put a reserve of ?50 on it. OK. All right?

0:28:330:28:38

Yep. And I think if they probably estimate it at 80 to 100, 80 to 120,

0:28:380:28:43

I think there should be plenty of interest in it.

0:28:430:28:46

Good. A couple of bidders. Lovely. And who knows?

0:28:460:28:48

SHE CHUCKLES Hopefully.

0:28:480:28:50

What a delightful thing, and it is not a lot of money.

0:28:520:28:55

Ragley has on display a wonderful family collection

0:28:580:29:01

of First World War memorabilia.

0:29:010:29:03

These were the belongings of Brigadier General Lord Henry Seymour.

0:29:030:29:07

He was the current Marquess's grandfather, who saw active service

0:29:070:29:11

with the Grenadier Guards between 1914 and 1918.

0:29:110:29:16

Among them, you can see the German machinegun that he is believed

0:29:180:29:21

to have captured at the Battle of the Somme.

0:29:210:29:24

One of the most fascinating of his possessions has to be

0:29:240:29:27

his war diaries. It was a horrifying part of our history.

0:29:270:29:31

And when you read these first-hand accounts, it really is...

0:29:310:29:36

so moving. I am just so pleased that I haven't experienced

0:29:360:29:40

anything like this in my life, and I hope my children never do as well.

0:29:400:29:44

And now over to Will, who has found our final item of the day.

0:29:540:29:58

Well, Pat, I feel a little bit like the opening of Pandora's box here.

0:29:590:30:04

I think there should be a glow lighting our faces as we do so.

0:30:040:30:08

But let's open up this...what hopefully contains...

0:30:080:30:12

Oh, my word. Look at that. It is a piece of Royal Worcester, of course.

0:30:120:30:16

A Royal Worcester coffee set

0:30:160:30:18

together with the silver gilt spoons, which is a lovely touch.

0:30:180:30:23

Beautifully painted, isn't it?

0:30:230:30:25

Yeah, they're lovely. That is what I like about it. Stunning quality.

0:30:250:30:29

And the scenes of Highland cattle have been

0:30:290:30:31

painted by one of the Stinton brothers.

0:30:310:30:34

The Stintons were a family that were employed by Worcester to paint their

0:30:340:30:39

designs on their porcelain and, to be honest, I think they're probably

0:30:390:30:43

rated as one of the best porcelain painters that there has been.

0:30:430:30:48

Do you know who these one are by? Is it Jas? Harry.

0:30:480:30:52

Oh, Harry, that one. These are Harry Stinton.

0:30:520:30:54

His speciality was the Highland cattle.

0:30:540:30:57

It dates from around 1937. Oh, right.

0:30:570:31:00

1930s. If that is not enough, what is this here?

0:31:000:31:04

Harrods! Harrods, yeah. Retailed by Harrods.

0:31:040:31:07

I mean, that is a word synonymous with quality, luxury.

0:31:070:31:11

Why are you selling it?

0:31:110:31:13

Well, we have downsized and I've got nowhere to display it.

0:31:130:31:17

It is just shut away, and it's a shame.

0:31:170:31:19

It needs to be on display, doesn't it?

0:31:190:31:21

It needs to be shown off. It needs to shine.

0:31:210:31:24

I mean, in my mind, I am thinking this is ?1,000, all day long.

0:31:240:31:27

Yeah, yeah.

0:31:270:31:29

Is that a sort of figure you would be happy with? Well, yeah.

0:31:290:31:32

You'd be happy at ?1,000? Yeah.

0:31:320:31:34

If we use that as the bottom estimate,

0:31:340:31:36

we would have an estimate of 1,000 to 1,500. Yeah.

0:31:360:31:39

Are you sure you want good on this route? Well, yeah.

0:31:390:31:43

Yeah. Go on, Pat. Don't worry.

0:31:430:31:44

We're going to have to put a reserve on it.

0:31:440:31:47

It shouldn't go for less than ?1,000. Oh, no, no.

0:31:470:31:49

I don't think so. Do you agree?

0:31:490:31:51

I would rather keep it if it was less than that. Yeah.

0:31:510:31:54

Let's reserve it at ?1,000, fixed reserve.

0:31:540:31:58

And, well, I think...say bye-bye.

0:31:580:32:01

Say bye-bye! Oh, shame. THEY CHUCKLE

0:32:010:32:04

Listen, we're going to keep it safe for you.

0:32:040:32:06

And you can take pleasure in knowing that whoever buys it, wants it.

0:32:060:32:09

That's right. And will love it as much as you did. Yeah.

0:32:090:32:12

Do you know, it's made me a bit thirsty.

0:32:120:32:14

I think I will go and get a coffee. But in a plastic cup. I know, yeah.

0:32:140:32:17

Not the done thing.

0:32:170:32:20

What a cracking set of Royal Worcester.

0:32:200:32:22

Well, that is it. Our work is done here at Ragley Hall.

0:32:280:32:31

Our experts have now found their final items

0:32:310:32:34

to take off to the auction room,

0:32:340:32:36

so sadly, we have to say goodbye to this magnificent venue

0:32:360:32:39

as we head over to Bigwoods for the very last time.

0:32:390:32:41

And hopefully, fingers crossed, we've got that big surprise.

0:32:410:32:44

Here's a quick recap of all the items that are going under the hammer.

0:32:440:32:47

The Bakelite radio is right on trend, so it should do the business.

0:32:500:32:54

The delft tea caddy is a proper antique,

0:32:560:32:58

which gives you a glimpse into what life was like in another age.

0:32:580:33:02

And the coffee set is top notch, but Worcester has lost its value

0:33:040:33:08

recently, so it will be interesting to see what it makes.

0:33:080:33:11

Back at the auction house, we have a stylish start.

0:33:190:33:23

Anybody give me 310? 310, 320...

0:33:230:33:26

Sylvia, let's hope the whole nation is tuned in to your Bakelite radio.

0:33:260:33:31

It is online, it is on the net. Yeah.

0:33:310:33:33

The whole world can buy this right now. Oh, good. I like this.

0:33:330:33:37

At one stage, everybody in the country owned a bit of Bakelite,

0:33:370:33:40

it was that popular.

0:33:400:33:41

It was such a talking point that you grew to like it.

0:33:410:33:44

Let's hope this one is a talking point.

0:33:440:33:46

It is going under the hammer right now. Here we go. Here we go.

0:33:460:33:49

The Echo, or EKCO, electric receiver.

0:33:510:33:55

Anybody like to start me at, say, 150?

0:33:550:33:58

The machine is starting at 180.

0:33:580:34:01

180. Went straight in.

0:34:010:34:02

I have got 220 here, 230 in the room.

0:34:020:34:05

Let it finish. I can see you.

0:34:050:34:08

This is the internet bidders all bidding against each other,

0:34:080:34:11

so he is just letting it settle online.

0:34:110:34:13

Let this thing finish what it's playing at.

0:34:130:34:16

260. 280?

0:34:160:34:17

300, and 20, 340, 360,

0:34:170:34:20

380, 400, and 20,

0:34:200:34:23

440, 460, 480,

0:34:230:34:25

500. This is fabulous. I know! 480 with you, sir.

0:34:250:34:28

Is this finished? I think it has. 480 with the gentleman.

0:34:280:34:32

Are we all done?

0:34:320:34:33

?480, sold in the room. How about that? Oh...

0:34:340:34:38

Oh, that's a result! Are you pleased with that? Yeah. Oh!

0:34:380:34:40

I was hoping for around the ?400 mark

0:34:400:34:42

because I've seen them make that before. I did...

0:34:420:34:45

That was a good result. We hit the late frequencies there,

0:34:450:34:47

that's for sure. Happy? Oh, thank you ever so much.

0:34:470:34:49

Oh, bless you. Thank you. Enjoy the money, won't you?

0:34:490:34:53

Excellent. That did better than expected.

0:34:530:34:55

Now for Charlie's final choice.

0:34:570:34:59

Now it is time for a cup of tea with Cathleen's little tea canister.

0:35:000:35:04

I love it! I love it and I don't mind the fact that there's a lid missing

0:35:040:35:07

and it is a bit chipped. It is great 18th-century delft,

0:35:070:35:09

and that is what it is all about.

0:35:090:35:11

Could be Dutch, could be London. Not quite sure.

0:35:110:35:14

But the market will determine that.

0:35:140:35:16

It is such an academic subject. Yes. Why are you selling it?

0:35:160:35:19

Because I didn't think it had any value whatsoever.

0:35:190:35:22

Oh, it has got such charm! Yes.

0:35:220:35:24

It looks like it has had a useful, used life, and I love that

0:35:240:35:27

because that is its social history.

0:35:270:35:29

For me, it is not necessarily about the maker, it is about the user

0:35:290:35:32

and the period of time that it has been loved and cherished

0:35:320:35:35

and handed down through the generations.

0:35:350:35:36

That's what you can't put a price on. Good luck, Cathleen. Thank you.

0:35:360:35:40

Here we go. This is a lovely thing.

0:35:400:35:41

Not a lot of money but a cracking bit of history. This is it.

0:35:410:35:45

The 18th-century English tin-glazed earthenware,

0:35:460:35:49

possibly Bow, tea canister there.

0:35:490:35:51

For all that are light in there, who has got, I don't know, ?50 for it?

0:35:510:35:56

30 to start. 30 I am bid.

0:35:560:35:58

30, five, 40, five, 50, is it?

0:35:580:36:02

At ?45 only. At 45. 50, surely?

0:36:020:36:05

At 45. Are you all done at 45?

0:36:050:36:07

You all finished?

0:36:070:36:09

45! Oh, dear.

0:36:110:36:12

Well, it wasn't Bow, was it? No. It was Dutch.

0:36:120:36:15

The reserve was 50. Yes, the reserve was 50. One bid short.

0:36:150:36:19

Love it! Give it some love. Oh, go on. It is a nice thing.

0:36:190:36:23

Well, I do love it now, but...I didn't before.

0:36:230:36:26

Well, it didn't sell, but I don't think Cathleen minds taking it home.

0:36:280:36:33

Over to Will now, who has found our final item of the day.

0:36:330:36:36

All boxed and ready to go and hand-decorated by Harry Stinton.

0:36:360:36:39

It doesn't get much better than that, the expert in the Highland cow.

0:36:390:36:42

Patricia, what a lovely set

0:36:420:36:43

of Royal Worcester. They are nice, aren't they?

0:36:430:36:46

Especially if you like drinking coffee. Did you have a little...?

0:36:460:36:49

No, I didn't! I tell you what,

0:36:490:36:50

it looks like no-one has ever touched them.

0:36:500:36:52

They are cracking quality, aren't they? Mint condition. Mint!

0:36:520:36:55

In the box there, as they were bought.

0:36:550:36:57

As good as the day they were made. Oh, lovely.

0:36:570:36:59

It doesn't get much better than that for collectors. It really doesn't.

0:36:590:37:02

Why are you selling these? We're downsizing.

0:37:020:37:04

We've got nowhere to display them any more now,

0:37:040:37:07

so it is a shame, really. We're going to put them to the test.

0:37:070:37:10

They are going under the hammer right now. Not literally.

0:37:100:37:12

No. This is where it gets exciting. What are they going to make?

0:37:120:37:16

Let's hope they sell. Here we go. Keep your fingers crossed.

0:37:160:37:19

We are onto Harry Stinton now.

0:37:200:37:22

This is very nice Royal Worcester porcelain tea set for Harrods.

0:37:220:37:26

Birmingham 1939 is the date of the hallmarks there.

0:37:260:37:30

In a nice presentation box. I have got multiple bids on the book,

0:37:300:37:33

which means I am going to start straight off at ?1,600.

0:37:330:37:36

Yes! ?1,600, straight in.

0:37:360:37:39

At 1,600. Do I hear 1,800? 17 at the back of the room.

0:37:390:37:43

I have got 1,800 here.

0:37:430:37:44

19, sir. 19.

0:37:440:37:46

I've got to go 21 here. 22, sir. 22, and I'm out and you're in.

0:37:460:37:50

2,200 at the back of the room. 23? 23.

0:37:500:37:54

24, sir? Good price. ?2,300 on the telephone.

0:37:540:37:59

At ?2,300. Last chance and done.

0:37:590:38:02

It is going to be sold at 2,300 on the telephone. Are we done?

0:38:020:38:06

Yes! On the phone, ?2,300. That was a good day out, Patricia.

0:38:060:38:12

Yes, it was very good. That was great.

0:38:120:38:14

The market decided. Do something else with it! Yes.

0:38:140:38:16

And do you know what? That ends our show beautifully today.

0:38:180:38:21

We've run out of time here.

0:38:210:38:23

It was the last lot in the sale, and what a day it has been.

0:38:230:38:26

I hope you have enjoyed it.

0:38:260:38:27

Join us again for many more surprises, but until then,

0:38:270:38:30

it is goodbye from Tricia, Will and myself. Goodbye.

0:38:300:38:33

Star Wars, Harry Potter,

0:39:010:39:04

ET, Indiana Jones.

0:39:040:39:06

The BBC Proms celebrates the extraordinary film music

0:39:070:39:11

Paul Martin presents from Ragley Hall in Warwickshire, a beautiful 17th-century Palladian house owned by the Marquess of Hertford. Antiques experts Charlie Ross and Will Axon find great treasures among hundreds of visitors to the stately home. Charlie models an interesting busby hat and Will gets a surprise when a Worcester coffee set goes under the hammer. Meanwhile, Paul explores the Battle of Edgehill.