Basingstoke 3 Flog It!


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Basingstoke 3

Antiques series. This episode comes from the Milestones Museum in Basingstoke, where transport is the name of the game.


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Just look at this. As stately an interior as any grand country house

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you're likely to come across,

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but I'm not on dry land.

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Today, we're following the fortunes of the great ocean liners

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and seeing how they've survived the ups and downs

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of 177 years of the ocean waves.

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But before all that, it's all aboard and welcome to "Flog It!".

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During the Industrial Revolution,

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the county of Hampshire, close to London and the south coast,

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became a thoroughfare for commerce as goods were traded

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by road, canal and rail.

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Hampshire also attracted some of the stars of the day

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in vehicle development, who designed everything from boats to buses

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and, on top of that, led the way in aeronautical technology.

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Right now, it's planes, trains and automobiles

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as we join this fantastic crowd of people,

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here at Milestones Museum in Basingstoke,

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which is crammed full of interesting articles like this.

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And of course, this lot have brought their artefacts along

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to show our experts and they're going to ask

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-that all-important question, which is...

-What's it worth?!

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Stay tuned and you'll find out.

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And our experts are determined to win the race as they head

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into the crowds to find the best objects to value.

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Nick Davies has his sights on a gem,

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while Elizabeth Talbot has found her own precious object.

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-Well, can I sticker somebody?

-Yeah, go on, stick it on her.

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-There you go.

-There you go, perfect.

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And it's not always about good sporting play.

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I have the most beautiful thing, which I'm keeping for myself.

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-And what is it?

-Well, it's a linesman's flag,

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so I'm giving you the red card.

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-All right then, be like that.

-Steady on, you two.

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And we've got a cracking show for you today.

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Nick gives a history lesson...

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You've got this sunburst guilloche enamel radiating from the bottom.

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-It's a complete set.

-..while Elizabeth gets one...

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That new angle and the difference between those two is declination.

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..and gives a masterclass in the classics.

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You can see influence from Egypt, from Rome...

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But which of these items will win the school prize?

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-We are about to sell...

-THEY GASP

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-..at £4,200.

-GAVEL BANGS

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As the crowds pile in, there's just enough time to give you

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a flavour of what's in this fascinating museum.

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Our valuation day is taking place amongst shops

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recreated from high streets across Hampshire

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going back to Victorian times.

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A big theme of the museum is transport and this place

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is filled with all kinds of vehicles,

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which we're going to be finding out about later on in the show.

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I'm on top of a tram that was used in Portsmouth in the 1880s,

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taking the dockyard workers to the quayside, and it really does

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take you back in time. Originally, this would have been horse-drawn,

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but it was later converted to electricity.

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If you look closely, you can see it's in original untouched condition

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and that's what we like to see with our antiques,

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so hopefully we're going to find something like this.

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Let's join up with our experts.

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The valuation day is already gearing up and we're ready to hit the road.

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Our first stop is with Nick and Alan on a vintage 1930s bus.

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-Well, Alan, welcome aboard. Nice to see you.

-Thank you.

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Thank you for coming to "Flog It!".

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Now, 1930s bus, Art Deco surrounding... What do you need when

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you go on holiday? You've brought the ideal thing, haven't you?

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-Yes.

-You need a suitcase.

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But what's in the suitcase? This is great. Look at that.

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-It's a lovely Art Deco travelling set.

-Yup.

-Tell me about it.

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Where did you get it?

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It has come down from the my mother's side of the family.

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I believe it was my aunt's originally.

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She worked for a wealthy family in Mayfair and we believe it was

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a present to her from them, and she passed it onto my mother,

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-hence to me.

-It looks like it's hardly ever been used.

-Exactly.

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-It's absolutely pin clean.

-Yep, the brushes are clean.

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There are a couple of little issues with it. We're obviously missing the mirror in the back, here.

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Not too much of a problem. It probably would have just been a plate mirror anyway,

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without any border at all, so it doesn't really retract from it.

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And there's a tiny little, and I mean tiny,

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nibble to one of the bits of enamel but, hey, I'm being ultra-picky.

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There are two hallmarks on it. It's not an issue, don't worry about it.

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It's the same manufacturer, a company called Adie Brothers

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from Birmingham, my neck of the woods, up in the Jewellery Quarter, in Hockley,

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a big manufacturers of all sorts of silverware.

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Often they spread their work over a couple of years and they'd do

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a run of these, and so some would be hallmarked one year and another

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and they'd just put them together,

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so that's explained away, it's not a problem at all.

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The enamel boxes are... Ah! ..beautiful.

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You've got this sunburst guilloche enamel radiating from the bottom

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They all match. It's a complete set.

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-It's pushing 100 years old and it's all together.

-Yes, indeed.

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I even love this one because still, inside,

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you've still got the hair grips.

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I mean, it's fantastic.

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Brushes aren't so popular.

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People don't tend to like the brushes for obvious reasons.

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So, Alan, tell me, why are you thinking of selling such a beautiful thing?

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At the moment, it's sitting in the loft. Nobody uses it.

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You've not got a holiday planned or anything?

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No, I haven't got a holiday planned. It weighs too much

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-to go on an aircraft.

-It does weigh a bit, doesn't it? It does.

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-So, I'd put a valuation on this at £400-to-£500.

-Yup.

-OK?

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-Yup.

-So, you're happy with that?

-That sounds reasonable. I'd like to put a reserve on it.

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Absolutely, I couldn't agree with you more. Should we say £400 with a little bit of discretion?

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-Yup, that sounds good.

-Perfect.

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Looking at that travel case, you can just see it strapped

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to the new invention of the day, the car, as the rich and fancy free

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travelled across Europe.

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Here, at Milestones Museum, they've housed a wonderful collection

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of vintage Thornycroft cars,

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which were as prestigious as the Rolls-Royce, in their day.

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In fact, Hampshire boasts of many successful businesses

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when it came to transport.

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By the 1920s, they were attracting some of the greatest minds

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to the area for the development of vehicles like this

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and one of them was R J Mitchell.

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Mitchell designed this seaplane, a cross between a boat and a plane,

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which he thought would take off as the next big mode of transport.

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Although the seaplane's life was short-lived,

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Mitchell's greatest work was still to come.

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He took what he'd learned about aerodynamics

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and designed a plane that would rule the skies during World War II,

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giving the British air superiority over the Germans

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during the Battle of Britain in 1940,

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and that aircraft was of course the Supermarine Spitfire

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And now, back on safe ground, is Elizabeth,

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who's found something homely.

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Maureen, hello. I was attracted to your spinning wheel in the queue.

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I know it's a spinning wheel,

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but I recognise it as a piece of furniture

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from probably the first half of the 19th century because, to me,

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it reminds me of the wonderful turning

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that one sees on Windsor chairs

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-and other pieces of country furniture.

-Yes.

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But I'm reliant very much on you to tell me more about your wonderful piece.

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-Well, I found this at a re-enactor's market about three years ago.

-Right.

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I knew nothing about it at the time.

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It was looking a little battered, but my husband lovingly polished

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-it all up and did a few repairs, and we got it working.

-Uh-huh.

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So, tell me more. Is this is particular type of spinning wheel?

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Yes, I believe, from what I've found out,

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this is a wheel made for spinning flax.

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The main difference, as far as I'm aware,

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is that on a wheel for spinning wool,

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the ratio between the wheel and the bobbin

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is one to four, so this wheel goes round once for every time this

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-goes round four times.

-Yes, yes.

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-Whereas, on a flax wheel, it's one to 12.

-Interesting.

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Yes. In fact, if I...

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-..get it going, you can see that it does go quite fast.

-Very.

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It's quite hypnotic, actually. It makes a lovely sound, that tick-tick sound. It's lovely.

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So, you're coming here to find out a bit more about it

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-but to sell it as well?

-Yes. I just don't have the space for it any more.

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-I have two other wheels at home.

-Two other spinning wheels?

-Yes.

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-That must mean you're a practitioner of spinning and weaving.

-Oh, yes.

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-I have been for about 25 years or more.

-Have you?

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It wasn't till cleaning it up that I found some initials, here - I G.

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So I went online, as one does these days,

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and tried to find out who I G was.

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It turns out it's somebody by the name of Isaak Grobli.

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The wheel was made in Switzerland, so I presume he was Swiss.

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I think it dates from the 1840s.

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From what I can make out, his son invented

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an industrial automatic embroidery machine of some sort.

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-So, it was a father-son interest that went through?

-Yes.

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So it was obviously very, very important to him

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-in that line of work.

-Yes.

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He was really bridging the time between the hand-spinning

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-and hand-woven cottage industries and the Industrial Revolution.

-Yes.

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I mean, they are very technical and it's both technical and practical,

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-but also beautifully sculptural.

-Yes.

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-Do you have any idea of value in terms of the market?

-Not really, no.

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No? I think that they will appeal to people like yourself,

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who are keeping the craft very much alive and they want to use them,

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-they are bought to be used.

-Yes.

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Some people buy them because they have lovely cottages

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-or properties where they set the scene.

-Oh, yes. Yes.

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They're nice furnishing pieces.

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My instinct is that it should fetch somewhere between £100 and £150

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at auction. Now, would you be happy to sell it for that?

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That's fine, yes.

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I think we will take it along, we'll offer it for £100, £150.

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-Would you like a reserve on it?

-I don't think so, no.

-Even better.

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We'll sell it, we'll see what happens and we'll try

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-and get the interest going on the day!

-That's lovely, thank you.

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Maureen really has done her research.

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Now let's see if we can weave some magic

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with that spinning wheel at auction.

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Nick is still waiting for this bus to leave on time

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and, appropriately, he's found something that would have

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helped people keep to schedule belonging to Anne.

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Well, here we are. I'm on this lovely open-top bus

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having a great day and what do you need to check the bus is on time?

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You need a travel watch and you've brought one with you today.

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A beautiful snakeskin example, silver it is, as well.

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-Do you like it?

-I like its quirkiness but I wouldn't use it.

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-They've been in a drawer, haven't they?

-Yes, sorry. Guilty.

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OK. Another one of these drawers. I wish I had one of these drawers.

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-Tell me a little bit about it. Where did you get it from?

-Well, I know it belonged to an aunt of mine

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and she emigrated to South Africa in the mid-'60s

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and then onto Australia, where she remained,

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and I used to go and visit her and she gave it to me

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-on one of those visits.

-Lovely.

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Well, it's an Art Deco example.

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It's by a company called Texina, which is a Swiss company.

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The best of this range, the Rolls-Royce if you like,

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of this model and design is a company called Movado

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-and they can run into hundreds and hundreds of pounds.

-Right.

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Unfortunately, we haven't got one of those but we've got a baby brother,

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so we're happy with that. But it's nice.

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It's typically Art Deco,

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with this square dial with the Arabic numerals,

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and it looks Deco and Deco through. It's beautiful.

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It's really nicely made and it's in fairly good condition.

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I know the movement's not working but, horologically,

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it shouldn't be too much of a problem to repair.

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There's a tiny little bit of damage there to the glass,

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a little crack in the corner, but it shouldn't cause too much problems.

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-And can you tell me about the second item?

-Not a lot.

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She gave me that, as well. That might have been her mother's.

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Right, well, it predates the watch. It's late-Victorian.

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It's by a company called Sampson Mordan,

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who were very good at making this type of novelty silver

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or little toy silver, so to speak.

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And there are collectors who like that type of thing.

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There's just a little problem with it, though. When we open it up,

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we can see that there's a cork in the centre

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and really there should be a glass bottle or collar in there.

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The cork should be in the lid, so something's gone on there

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but it might not be too much of a problem.

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But lovely items. So, value-wise,

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I think the watch is probably around about £80-to-£100 and the bottle,

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-in that condition, is probably around about £40.

-Right.

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So let's put them in at 100-to-150

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and we'll use the £100 as a discretionary reserve.

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I think that gives the auctioneer a little bit of like flexibility.

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That's lovely. Thank you very much.

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Before we leave for the saleroom,

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there's just enough time to look at another mode of transport

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they have here,

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and this one is slightly unusual.

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In 1885, a caravan like this would have been used

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by travelling Romany gypsies for hop-picking,

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and this one has been lovingly restored, as you can see.

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It's got everything that you would need,

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but you wouldn't go to sleep in there.

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It's a bit cramped for a family of four, so you would go to sleep

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underneath a tree with a bit of canvas over you.

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This is called a bender.

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It's called a bender because it's made from sprung saplings,

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as you can see. Look at that. With tarpaulin over the top.

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Wouldn't fancy that, really, but if it does get too wet in the night,

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at least you know where you could take shelter and make a cup of tea.

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Well, right now, our experts have made their first choices of items

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to go off to auction, so we're travelling right over there

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and leaving you with a recap of all the items going under the hammer.

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We'll be taking Alan's evocative Art Deco travel case.

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It's in tiptop condition,

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so it should be as irresistible to the buyers as it was to Nick.

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There's also that early 19th-century spinning wheel

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with a good yarn from Maureen.

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And Anne's classic duo, the Swiss watch and English perfume bottle.

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But will they appeal to the collectors?

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We're travelling to Winchester today for our auction,

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where we can see yet another vintage piece of Hampshire transport.

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WHISTLE BLOWS

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Nearby, is the Watercress Line, otherwise known

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as the Mid Hants Railway. It gets its name from the days

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when it took locally grown watercress to markets in London.

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Today, it's been restored

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and there are ten miles of track to enjoy for all you steam enthusiasts.

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Well, I've been dropped off at our auction house,

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Andrew Smith & Son in Winchester,

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and our auctioneer is already on the rostrum steaming ahead.

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And don't forget that the saleroom will add commission to everything

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they sell, so keep that in mind when you're looking at your profit.

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Today, it's 18% including VAT

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and on the rostrum is auctioneer Nick Jarrett.

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First up are Anne's travelling watch by Swiss manufacturer Texina

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and that silver perfume bottle by

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highly-collectable British company Sampson Mordan.

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Thank you for bringing them in and hopefully we can get the top end of the estimate.

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-Which is your money on?

-I think the watch is better.

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The scent bottle's got a bit of damage, so the watch is a bit better...

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-OK. That's the lot to have.

-I think it's the one to have, yeah.

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-OK, we're going to find out right now. Ready?

-Yes.

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This is it. Good luck.

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Now, lot 160 is the Texina Impervo purse watch, there,

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and you also get the little silver smelling salts bottle.

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I'm going to have to start you here, to clear bids, at £65.

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70 can I see in the room?

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65, 75, 85, 95...

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-He's got a commission bid, there, look.

-..5, 100?

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£100. There's £100 at the back of the room.

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110, 120,

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130, 140,

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150, 160, 170, 180...

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Oh, this is very healthy.

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-Come on, 200, please.

-..190.

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There at the door at 190. Yours at 190.

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200, are you filling in? Last chance at 190. I'm selling at 190.

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-GAVEL BANGS

-Yes! The hammer's gone down.

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£190. Great result. You're happy with that, aren't you?

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-I'm very happy.

-Anything else you want to sell? Would you like to see us in the future?

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Anything else in that drawer? Get that drawer out again.

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Don't tempt me.

0:16:330:16:35

What a great start to the auction.

0:16:350:16:37

Now, will the bidders be tempted by Maureen's

0:16:370:16:40

early 19th-century spinning wheel that she still puts to good use?

0:16:400:16:44

-It takes you back, doesn't it?

-Yes.

-I remember seeing it

0:16:440:16:47

at the valuation day and walking past, and...

0:16:470:16:49

Everyone walked past it and gave it a good old spin, didn't they?

0:16:490:16:52

It looks fantastic in the room, doesn't it? Here we go.

0:16:520:16:54

It's going under the hammer.

0:16:540:16:56

Lot 105 is the turned wood spinning wheel.

0:16:560:16:59

Now, where are we going to start with this?

0:16:590:17:02

-I'm going to start you here at £48.

-Ooh.

0:17:020:17:06

..with me, £50, is it? At £48.

0:17:060:17:08

50 somewhere. At £48. 50 surely?

0:17:080:17:13

-Come on!

-50 I have.

0:17:130:17:14

At 50. It's on the net at 50 and I will sell for that at 50.

0:17:140:17:18

5 can I say? It's going on. What have you got now?

0:17:180:17:21

55 now, on the net at 55. Nobody in the room, here?

0:17:210:17:24

At £55 and still on the net at £55.

0:17:240:17:27

-All done.

-That is disappointing.

0:17:270:17:29

-GAVEL BANGS

-No reserve, we sold it.

0:17:290:17:31

-No, I just needed it out of the way.

-Oh, it's gone!

0:17:310:17:34

-I'm disappointed by that but never mind.

-Never mind.

0:17:340:17:36

It'll have been bought by somebody who loves it anyway, so...

0:17:360:17:38

Hopefully someone's going to use it and make something with it, yes.

0:17:380:17:41

Let's hope someone has bought that to carry on the tradition.

0:17:410:17:46

Now for that near-pristine travelling vanity set

0:17:470:17:50

by well-known Birmingham maker Adie Brothers.

0:17:500:17:53

I absolutely love this, with all that wonderful blue enamel.

0:17:530:17:56

-Alan, it's good to see you again.

-And you.

-Who have you brought along with you?

-My wife, Sheila.

-Sheila.

0:17:560:18:01

-Hello, nice to meet you.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:18:010:18:03

Well, what do you think of this?

0:18:030:18:04

Well, it's really different cos we've never been to a sale before.

0:18:040:18:07

And I think this will go, as well. 400-to-600, not a lot of money.

0:18:070:18:11

Not a lot of money. Break it down, there's a lot amongst it, isn't there?

0:18:110:18:14

There's a lot of collectors that want these kind of things.

0:18:140:18:16

The condition is good and if you add up what's there,

0:18:160:18:19

-for £400-to-£500, it's pretty reasonable.

-Pretty good, yeah.

0:18:190:18:23

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:18:230:18:25

Hopefully it travels well. Here we go.

0:18:250:18:27

I'm going to start here, to clear bids, at 260.

0:18:290:18:34

280 now. 320...

0:18:340:18:37

-Interest in the room.

-Yeah.

0:18:370:18:39

All right, 310. 320 with me. 330, then. Yes?

0:18:390:18:45

340, 350?

0:18:450:18:48

360, 370?

0:18:480:18:51

-380, 390?

-It's getting there.

0:18:510:18:54

At £390 then. At £390. I have in the room at 390.

0:18:540:18:59

It's a lovely thing, that. £400, I should think so.

0:18:590:19:02

420, 440?

0:19:020:19:04

-We've got 450. 470?

-This is better, isn't it?

0:19:070:19:11

At 450, then. It's on the net at...

0:19:110:19:13

470, new bidder. 500?

0:19:130:19:16

Keep going.

0:19:160:19:18

It's £470, then. In the room at 470.

0:19:180:19:21

500? No?

0:19:210:19:23

£500. And 20?

0:19:230:19:26

At £500, then. It's £500 on the net. Is anybody going that I've missed?

0:19:260:19:30

At £500. All done at £500.

0:19:300:19:33

-GAVEL BANGS

-Top end.

0:19:330:19:34

Yes, I'm pleased with that. That's a good result, isn't it?

0:19:340:19:37

-That's good. Excellent.

-That was a slow old climb, wasn't it?

0:19:370:19:40

-It travels very slowly.

-It did travel very slowly.

0:19:400:19:44

But we got there in the end and what a great result.

0:19:440:19:49

Well, that's our first lots done and dusted here today.

0:19:490:19:52

We are coming back, so don't go away.

0:19:520:19:54

Now, whilst I've been in Hampshire, I've had the chance to visit

0:19:550:19:58

Southampton, the busiest cruise port in Europe.

0:19:580:20:02

Every year, over 1.5 million passengers head out from here

0:20:020:20:07

to foreign shores. I've come down to the docks

0:20:070:20:10

to learn about the history of the great cruise liners

0:20:100:20:13

and to find out why it's not always been plain sailing.

0:20:130:20:18

Ocean liners first took off in Southampton 177 years ago

0:20:200:20:25

and during that time many vessels have been berthed here.

0:20:250:20:28

I've been given special permission today to come aboard

0:20:280:20:31

the P&O ship the Oceana.

0:20:310:20:32

And, like all these modern cruise ships,

0:20:340:20:36

it really feels like the height of luxury.

0:20:360:20:38

But riding the waves hasn't always been

0:20:410:20:43

about glamour and entertainment.

0:20:430:20:45

When the first cruise liners took passengers across the oceans,

0:20:450:20:48

it all looked very different.

0:20:480:20:50

For hundreds of years, ships had been used for trade

0:20:520:20:56

but, in 1840, there was a sea change.

0:20:560:20:59

Companies like Cunard

0:20:590:21:00

and The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Group,

0:21:000:21:04

now known as P&O, got the first contracts to take mail

0:21:040:21:07

around the world on scheduled voyages,

0:21:070:21:10

and diplomats and merchants went along for the ride.

0:21:100:21:13

By the late 1800s, the transatlantic cruises had become

0:21:160:21:20

big business as ships took immigrants to America and Australia.

0:21:200:21:24

But the long trips meant weeks at sea

0:21:240:21:27

that could be harrowing for the passengers.

0:21:270:21:29

Journeys to the far reaches of the British Empire,

0:21:320:21:35

like the Middle East, were so hot that,

0:21:350:21:38

despite awnings being rigged up over the decks

0:21:380:21:40

and stewards operating fans, people took to sleeping on the decks.

0:21:400:21:46

Men would sleep on one side, women on the other for decorum, of course.

0:21:460:21:53

Britain was steeped in the class system

0:21:530:21:56

and from the early days of the ocean liner, passengers were

0:21:560:21:59

allocated three classes of travel - first, second and steerage.

0:21:590:22:04

As Peter Boyd, a leading expert on the history of cruise liners

0:22:070:22:10

and the Titanic, can tell us.

0:22:100:22:13

Steerage on Titanic, for instance...

0:22:140:22:16

There was one bath for 750 passengers.

0:22:160:22:21

-One bath?

-One bath. That was third class.

0:22:210:22:25

And that would have been cold water probably.

0:22:250:22:27

Cold water or saltwater. PAUL GASPS AND LAUGHS

0:22:270:22:31

The ships themselves would have been very, very luxurious,

0:22:310:22:33

especially the Cunard and the White Star ships.

0:22:330:22:36

They were the most luxurious on the North Atlantic route.

0:22:360:22:39

What was the food like?

0:22:390:22:40

Excellent, it really was.

0:22:400:22:42

For dinner, you'd probably have five or six courses in third class.

0:22:420:22:46

You'd have up to 12 courses for first class.

0:22:460:22:49

So, when did the first cruise holiday kick in

0:22:490:22:52

as opposed to the necessity of travel,

0:22:520:22:54

getting to America or Australia?

0:22:540:22:55

When could you just go for a jolly one week somewhere?

0:22:550:22:58

The first purpose-built cruise ship was a German ship, Hamburg America,

0:22:580:23:03

in round about 1900, 1902, thereabouts.

0:23:030:23:06

She carried around about 200 passengers

0:23:060:23:09

and she was the world's first purpose-built cruise ship.

0:23:090:23:12

Wow.

0:23:120:23:13

But the days of these early cruise liners were short-lived.

0:23:180:23:21

During World War I, they were requisitioned as troop carriers

0:23:230:23:27

and hospitals. And, after the war, the fate of the transatlantic liners

0:23:270:23:32

looked sealed for good when, in 1919,

0:23:320:23:35

America put a cap on immigration.

0:23:350:23:38

Companies had to find new ways to fill their ships

0:23:380:23:42

and they had just the ticket.

0:23:420:23:45

They created a new tourist class,

0:23:450:23:47

which appealed to the cash-strapped public.

0:23:470:23:50

You still had first and second class,

0:23:500:23:52

but tourist class replaced steerage class,

0:23:520:23:55

which appealed to a wider group of people. And this early film shows

0:23:550:24:00

how they began to lay on organised entertainment

0:24:000:24:03

like balls, dinners and promote the benefits of exercise.

0:24:030:24:08

But this heyday wasn't to last.

0:24:210:24:23

During World War II, liners were requisitioned again

0:24:230:24:27

and this time cruise companies lost half their ships,

0:24:270:24:30

along with thousands of merchant seamen.

0:24:300:24:33

After the war, the liners had a brief resurgence

0:24:330:24:36

thanks to a new wave of immigration.

0:24:360:24:38

Liners gave passage to hundreds of thousands of immigrants,

0:24:420:24:45

including the Ten Pound Poms,

0:24:450:24:47

people leaving Britain to go to Australia for a fare of only £10.

0:24:470:24:51

A one-way ticket, mind you.

0:24:510:24:53

Now, despite it being prosperous times here,

0:24:530:24:56

the liners faced another challenge for their survival.

0:24:560:24:59

In the 1950s, the new jet airliner shot onto the world stage,

0:25:020:25:06

offering a safe quicker route to any destination.

0:25:060:25:10

Yet again, the shipping companies found a way to weather the storm.

0:25:100:25:15

They began to offer a new type of cruise,

0:25:170:25:19

many of which came out of Southampton.

0:25:190:25:22

They were short, affordable and this time one class for all.

0:25:220:25:26

In 1966, social commentator and broadcaster Alan Whicker

0:25:280:25:33

made this documentary for BBC's Whicker's World,

0:25:330:25:36

which captured the appeal of cruising

0:25:360:25:38

to the growing the clientele.

0:25:380:25:40

Everybody speaks to each other.

0:25:420:25:43

There's no such thing as a class onboard a ship.

0:25:430:25:46

You're all the same person.

0:25:460:25:48

I expected millionaires and very glamorous ladies,

0:25:480:25:52

and there just aren't.

0:25:520:25:54

-TV NARRATOR:

-..while the phlegmatic British, inspired perhaps

0:25:540:25:57

by all that African abandon,

0:25:570:25:58

initiate their own quaint tribal ceremonies.

0:25:580:26:01

-Ready? Go!

-Come on, Daddy!

0:26:010:26:04

This had become cruises for the masses.

0:26:040:26:07

THEY CHEER

0:26:070:26:09

Good evening. Evening, governor.

0:26:100:26:13

By the late 1970s,

0:26:140:26:16

the transatlantic crossings had become things of the past.

0:26:160:26:20

In their place was a new growing package of cruises

0:26:200:26:23

accessible to anyone

0:26:230:26:25

and that resurgence has continued to the present day.

0:26:250:26:28

Now, cruising is a global industry.

0:26:280:26:30

So slickly run, it's not uncommon for 2,000 passengers

0:26:300:26:34

to be brought on and off the ship

0:26:340:26:36

in just four hours on changeover day.

0:26:360:26:40

It doesn't faze seasoned sailor and bar manager Jamie Collins.

0:26:400:26:44

Jamie, you're the bar manager and it's changeover day today.

0:26:450:26:48

-It must be chaotic.

-Hectic.

0:26:480:26:51

Very hectic day, Southampton turnaround day, as you can imagine.

0:26:510:26:53

-Yeah.

-Hi, there, welcome onboard.

0:26:530:26:55

We have to prepare all the cabins.

0:26:550:26:57

All the cabins have to be turned round, all the bedcoverings changed,

0:26:570:27:01

-cleaned, hoovered. You name it, it happens today.

-Yeah.

0:27:010:27:04

On top of that, there's nearly 300 tonnes worth of stores.

0:27:040:27:07

-Yes. You can't have a dry ship, can you?

-Of course not, no.

0:27:070:27:10

What's the most difficult thing about getting the ship ready?

0:27:100:27:13

It's that last half hour, when you're expecting 2,000 passengers

0:27:130:27:17

to come up that gangway and their expectation.

0:27:170:27:20

We need to match that. I think we do.

0:27:200:27:22

With 20 years in the business, you're still smiling.

0:27:220:27:25

There must be a big attraction. There's got to be, hasn't there?

0:27:250:27:29

Well, Paul, it beats nine-till-five.

0:27:290:27:31

It's nice waking up in a different port every day.

0:27:310:27:34

One day you'll have the Sydney Opera House outside your porthole,

0:27:340:27:38

the next day you're in Madeira. It's hard work but it's worth it.

0:27:380:27:41

Brilliant. I think there's only one thing left to say.

0:27:410:27:44

Bartender, I think we'll have a drink.

0:27:440:27:45

What would you like, sir?

0:27:450:27:47

Welcome back to Milestones Museum, here in Basingstoke.

0:27:570:28:01

In case you're wondering, did I get the full cruise?

0:28:010:28:03

No, I didn't. Better luck next time. But here I am anyway.

0:28:030:28:06

This area is known as the holding bay.

0:28:060:28:08

This is where the research is done behind the scenes

0:28:080:28:11

by our off-screen experts and, right now, I'm going to hand you

0:28:110:28:14

over to our on-screen experts for our next item.

0:28:140:28:18

Paul's brought something in to show Elizabeth

0:28:180:28:21

that was perfect for a trip on the high seas in its day.

0:28:210:28:24

Paul, I was drawn to your box in the queue.

0:28:260:28:28

I thought it might have contained something intriguing

0:28:280:28:30

and sure enough it does. Now, what can you tell me about your sextant?

0:28:300:28:33

I received it as a birthday present about 20 years ago, or so.

0:28:330:28:38

I was very enthusiastic at the time. I was an amateur sailor

0:28:380:28:41

and I wanted to go across the Atlantic in a small boat.

0:28:410:28:45

That was my passion, my bucket list item. Unfortunately...

0:28:450:28:50

time has gone on. The friend that I was going with...

0:28:500:28:53

It didn't quite work out, so here I am with a sextant

0:28:530:28:56

that actually hasn't been used anywhere, really.

0:28:560:28:59

I'm intrigued. So you took your course

0:28:590:29:02

and were all ready to set sail, but you were going to use what is

0:29:020:29:05

actually a traditional hand-held historic kind of instrument.

0:29:050:29:09

You weren't going to go for hi-tech modern things

0:29:090:29:12

-or do sailors still use the traditional method?

-Well, no.

0:29:120:29:14

There was nothing at that time, 20 years ago.

0:29:140:29:17

There wasn't satellite GPS when I was...

0:29:170:29:20

Right. So, up until 20 years ago, this was the best it got?

0:29:200:29:23

-This was the best option, yes.

-Wow.

0:29:230:29:26

Given the passing of time, can you give me

0:29:260:29:28

a demonstration as to how it's held?

0:29:280:29:29

Well, I'm very rusty on it, but the basic principle is

0:29:290:29:33

that if you're up midday in the middle of the Atlantic,

0:29:330:29:37

you look through the eyepiece, you adjust the mirrors

0:29:370:29:41

so that you can see the sun, and you check that reading.

0:29:410:29:46

Then you adjust it so that the mirrors come down to the horizon,

0:29:460:29:50

and that new angle and the difference between those two is declination,

0:29:500:29:57

-and from tables you can find out what your latitude is.

-Right.

0:29:570:30:01

So, do you know much about this actual example of a sextant?

0:30:010:30:04

Cos obviously there are lots of sextants out there

0:30:040:30:06

and they've been made for many, many centuries now.

0:30:060:30:09

Well, I know who made it, which is B Cooke & Son

0:30:090:30:12

because it says there, and I know it was dated,

0:30:120:30:15

tested and the various angles checked

0:30:150:30:20

on 14 September, 1950.

0:30:200:30:24

Well, B Cooke... The firm was established in the 19th century

0:30:240:30:28

by Bernard Cooke - the B stands for that.

0:30:280:30:31

They were established in 1863.

0:30:310:30:33

-They're actually still going, which is rather nice.

-Gosh.

0:30:330:30:36

It has been used. To me, that is quite a charming thing

0:30:360:30:39

because it was made to be used.

0:30:390:30:40

The miles that will have travelled and the voyages

0:30:400:30:43

-and adventures that's seen...

-Yeah, incredible.

-If only it could speak.

0:30:430:30:47

But you're now looking to sell it.

0:30:470:30:49

Do you know what you might expect to realise on it?

0:30:490:30:51

-No, I haven't any idea.

-A lot of the earlier sextants,

0:30:510:30:54

for example the 18th and 19th-century ones,

0:30:540:30:56

are now SO expensive, but you must always remember

0:30:560:30:59

there are collectors coming onto the market all the time.

0:30:590:31:01

So although this is a relatively recent example, quite a late one,

0:31:010:31:06

-it's a good one to start with.

-Right.

0:31:060:31:09

I think that a fair estimate would be £100-to-£150.

0:31:090:31:12

-Fair enough, yes.

-I think that would be expected and be fair.

0:31:120:31:16

We'll put £100 discretionary reserve on it for you

0:31:160:31:19

and you've got peace of mind, and I do hope we do well for you.

0:31:190:31:22

And thank you very much for bringing it in to sell at "Flog It!".

0:31:220:31:25

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:31:250:31:27

They certainly don't make them like they used to.

0:31:270:31:30

Well, our experts are working flat out.

0:31:310:31:33

You could say the wheels of industry keep on turning.

0:31:330:31:37

Nick's found something that is still considered synonymous

0:31:370:31:40

with the best of Danish jewellery

0:31:400:31:43

from a company that emerged at the turn of the 20th century.

0:31:430:31:47

How come it's here?

0:31:470:31:49

My wife emigrated to Canada in Calgary and,

0:31:490:31:52

while she was over there,

0:31:520:31:53

she saw this piece and decided to buy it back in the 1970s.

0:31:530:31:58

Well, it's a very well-travelled deer.

0:31:580:32:00

It's by a company called Georg Jensen,

0:32:000:32:02

who I'm sure you've heard of.

0:32:020:32:03

And with these brooches,

0:32:030:32:05

Georg Jensen used to put a model number on the back all the time.

0:32:050:32:08

This model is 256 - it's the deer or fawn brooch -

0:32:080:32:12

and they make all sorts of things. They're still in production today

0:32:120:32:15

and the brooch you've got here is really typical Georg Jensen.

0:32:150:32:19

It couldn't be any more. It's so stylised and Deco in its design.

0:32:190:32:24

You've got this these lovely little stylised leaves

0:32:240:32:26

at the top, there, and the arch of the neck

0:32:260:32:29

in this double-reeded border round the outside.

0:32:290:32:33

It's just absolutely Georg Jensen to a T

0:32:330:32:36

and that's what the buyers are after at the moment

0:32:360:32:38

for this type of thing.

0:32:380:32:40

It's got these nice marks on the back, it's nice and clean

0:32:400:32:42

and it's in great condition. It looks like it's hardly been worn.

0:32:420:32:45

So, how come you're thinking of selling it?

0:32:450:32:49

It just sits at home in the safe. It's not doing anything.

0:32:490:32:52

My wife doesn't wear it any more.

0:32:520:32:54

We're planning to spend on our new grandchild coming along.

0:32:540:32:58

-Oh, fantastic. Good.

-Yeah. Daughter.

-Excellent.

0:32:580:33:01

-So, it comes down to price really, doesn't it?

-It does indeed.

0:33:010:33:05

They're always popular at auction, they always sell well.

0:33:050:33:07

Quite fashionable at the moment.

0:33:070:33:09

They seem to be quite in vogue in the auction world.

0:33:090:33:11

It's a silver brooch so, from the silver content,

0:33:110:33:14

-there's probably about £10 or £15 there.

-Mm-hm.

0:33:140:33:18

But with the artist behind it and the factory name,

0:33:180:33:21

it's probably worth around about £100-to-£150.

0:33:210:33:24

-Oh, right.

-Pleased with that?

-Yes, very pleased.

0:33:240:33:26

Excellent, excellent.

0:33:260:33:28

So what we'll probably do is put a reserve on it, just to cover it.

0:33:280:33:31

I'd put a reserve at £100. I think that's absolutely fine.

0:33:310:33:33

It should do that. It might go on and do a bit more. Fingers crossed.

0:33:330:33:36

Thanks very much.

0:33:360:33:38

The buyers really like Georg Jensen, and that deer is popular,

0:33:380:33:41

so we have high hopes for that piece.

0:33:410:33:43

-Enjoying yourselves, obviously.

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:33:450:33:49

So it could be you, you or you going home with lots of money.

0:33:490:33:51

You never know, do you?

0:33:510:33:53

Now, will our next owner, Barbara, be the lucky one?

0:33:530:33:56

Elizabeth is certainly looking interested

0:33:560:33:59

in the vases she's brought in.

0:33:590:34:01

Barbara, you've obviously eaten a lot of breakfast this morning

0:34:010:34:04

to come in with such heavy vases.

0:34:040:34:06

Tell me about them because they are really quite magnificent.

0:34:060:34:09

I first saw them when I was ten and they belonged

0:34:090:34:11

to a friend of my mother's,

0:34:110:34:13

and I always liked them. And about 30 years ago,

0:34:130:34:17

she just gave them to me...

0:34:170:34:18

Oh, really?

0:34:180:34:20

..which was a lovely surprise, but they didn't look like that.

0:34:200:34:24

They were filthy and you couldn't see any of this pattern.

0:34:240:34:28

-So, you inherited them or you were given them 30 years ago?

-Yes.

0:34:280:34:31

So, subsequently had learnt more about them?

0:34:310:34:33

Have you found out...?

0:34:330:34:35

Well, we found out that they were a well-known French foundry

0:34:350:34:39

and that they were about 1840/1860, but other than that...

0:34:390:34:43

-Not much else?

-I don't know anything. This is...

-Cloisonne.

0:34:430:34:46

..cloisonne, that's right.

0:34:460:34:48

You mentioned a very famous foundry and on this little band, here,

0:34:480:34:51

is the stamp of the gentleman, Ferdinand Barbedienne...

0:34:510:34:55

Who indeed... He was French and he was associated

0:34:550:34:59

with a very important foundry,

0:34:590:35:02

but in his early days he actually was a dealer in wallpaper,

0:35:020:35:06

but he obviously learnt the trade and appreciated interior decor,

0:35:060:35:11

decorative arts.

0:35:110:35:13

By late 1840s, 1850s certainly, this combination of classic artefacts,

0:35:130:35:20

this very Grecian influence, very classical influence...

0:35:200:35:23

Combining that with fine quality metal mounts,

0:35:230:35:26

the bronze influence, there and then combining it with the enamel.

0:35:260:35:32

And actually, if you look at this,

0:35:320:35:34

I think you can see influence from Egypt, from Rome,

0:35:340:35:38

but you can also see influence from early 19th-century wallpaper.

0:35:380:35:42

I can see all that coming to bear.

0:35:420:35:43

-Now you've said that...

-It's quite fascinating, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:35:430:35:46

And this of course is alabaster and onyx, so you've got this mixture

0:35:460:35:51

of the use of polished stone, the use of cast metal,

0:35:510:35:57

the use of the enamel and all the influences come to bear,

0:35:570:36:00

and it's lovely that they are signed, they're stamped.

0:36:000:36:02

Have you any idea of value?

0:36:020:36:04

I don't really know what they're worth.

0:36:040:36:06

I think they're kind of tricky because they're quite rare.

0:36:060:36:09

-Oh, are they?

-We don't find the quality

0:36:090:36:12

of this type of artefact coming through very often these days.

0:36:120:36:16

They are harder and harder to find, so it's instinctive, really.

0:36:160:36:19

I'm thinking that a realistic estimate would be

0:36:190:36:21

-between £2,000 and £3,000.

-Wow. That's good.

0:36:210:36:25

-And I would hope they'd make more.

-Well, I would too.

-But...

-But...

0:36:250:36:30

-But the market is so tricky at the moment.

-That's it.

0:36:300:36:32

So, if we put a £2,000 reserve

0:36:320:36:34

on it, it would be wonderful if they took off and we had an exciting day.

0:36:340:36:37

It would be.

0:36:370:36:39

Agreed, Elizabeth, and I think they stand a good chance of success.

0:36:400:36:44

Well, Milestones Museum, with its fantastic array of vintage vehicles,

0:36:460:36:49

has certainly given us a chance to travel all over Hampshire today.

0:36:490:36:54

I've thoroughly enjoyed myself

0:36:540:36:55

and I know hundreds of people here have, too.

0:36:550:36:58

But, sadly, it's time to say goodbye to this host location

0:36:580:37:01

as we go over to the auction room for the last time today

0:37:010:37:03

and I wish I could travel on this open-top 1930s Leyland bus.

0:37:030:37:08

I've got a ticket to ride and so have you.

0:37:080:37:10

See you in the saleroom

0:37:100:37:11

and here's a quick recap of all the items going under the hammer.

0:37:110:37:15

The last three treasures we found are a sextant used for navigating

0:37:150:37:19

the oceans, as ex-sailor Paul ably demonstrated.

0:37:190:37:23

There's a classic brooch

0:37:270:37:28

by the ever popular Danish designer Georg Jensen

0:37:280:37:31

And the fabulous duo of Grecian-style 19th-century vases.

0:37:340:37:39

Will the buyers appreciate

0:37:390:37:40

the refined craftsmanship of these pieces?

0:37:400:37:43

So, back of the saleroom,

0:37:470:37:48

Nick Jarrett is joined on the rostrum by Andrew Smith,

0:37:480:37:51

who's selling our next item, that 1950s sextant used for navigation,

0:37:510:37:55

belonging to ex-sailor Paul.

0:37:550:37:58

-A good, early navigational tool.

-Indeed, yes.

0:37:590:38:02

-Where would we be without that?

-Well, absolutely.

0:38:020:38:04

This is quite a late example of that,

0:38:040:38:06

but the principle hasn't changed in all that time.

0:38:060:38:08

-And it's a nice-looking thing in original box.

-Yeah.

0:38:080:38:11

That's going to sell. That's going to sell.

0:38:110:38:13

-For how much?

-We don't know yet.

0:38:130:38:16

We're going to put that to the test right now

0:38:160:38:19

because it's going under the hammer.

0:38:190:38:21

Lot 475. This is a post-war sextant.

0:38:210:38:24

We've had interest in this - two commission bids.

0:38:240:38:28

I'm going to start the bidding at £120.

0:38:280:38:32

Is there 130 in the room?

0:38:320:38:34

£120. Is there 130?

0:38:340:38:38

-At £120, 130, 140, 150...

-That's picked up.

0:38:380:38:42

£140 and selling. Is there 150?

0:38:420:38:45

At £140, are you done? At £140.

0:38:450:38:50

Is that a bid, sir?

0:38:500:38:52

No. At £140. Any more?

0:38:520:38:54

At £140, if you're sure. For the last time...

0:38:540:39:00

-GAVEL BANGS

-There we go.

-He's done it.

0:39:000:39:01

-Nice and simple.

-£140.

-Yeah! Happy with that. That's OK.

0:39:010:39:04

-Brilliant. Good estimate.

-Thank you very much.

0:39:040:39:06

That was a very good estimate.

0:39:060:39:09

I'll take the glory when I can. Thank you.

0:39:090:39:11

It's yours, Elizabeth. And now for our next lot, a Danish classic.

0:39:110:39:15

-Ready for this, Ian?

-I'm ready.

-Well, the ladies are going to love this next lot -

0:39:180:39:21

it's the Georg Jensen brooch. Need I say any more? £100-to-£150.

0:39:210:39:25

-It's got to go, surely?

-I'd be surprised if it doesn't sell.

0:39:250:39:28

-I'd be amazed.

-And you know straightaway,

0:39:280:39:31

looking at it from a distance, it's Georg Jensen. You just know.

0:39:310:39:34

I know. It's so stylistic. His work is so iconic now.

0:39:340:39:37

It's become stronger and stronger as the years tick by.

0:39:370:39:40

You've got to be here right now to bid

0:39:400:39:42

or online, or pick the telephone up.

0:39:420:39:44

Nick is on the rostrum right now

0:39:440:39:45

and fingers crossed we get the top end.

0:39:450:39:47

I've got a few bids. I have to start to clear bids at 110.

0:39:490:39:53

There you go. That's straight in.

0:39:530:39:55

120, 130, 140, 150, 160.

0:39:550:39:58

At 160 in the room now. 170?

0:39:580:40:00

Nope. At £160 here, then. At £160.

0:40:000:40:05

170 on the net. 180?

0:40:050:40:07

No? At 170, then. On the net at £170.

0:40:070:40:10

-At 170, all done?

-GAVEL BANGS

0:40:100:40:12

-£170. Yes!

-Excellent.

-And hopefully one happy new owner.

-Yes.

0:40:120:40:16

-I'm sure they will be. They'll wear that with pride.

-Yes.

0:40:160:40:20

What a great result.

0:40:200:40:22

Now, our final lot should really be displayed with pride

0:40:220:40:25

on the mantelpiece. They are the two ornate mid-Victorian

0:40:250:40:29

vases in onyx, metal and enamel by the king of bronzes,

0:40:290:40:33

the French Barbedienne foundry.

0:40:330:40:35

-Do you like these?

-Mm...

0:40:360:40:39

Be honest!

0:40:390:40:43

-I do, but it's finding somewhere to put them.

-Ish?

-Yeah.

0:40:430:40:46

They're quite a spacious market, quite academic and they're reasonably highly priced.

0:40:460:40:49

-It'll be touch and go...

-£2,000-to-£3,000 you've got on them.

0:40:490:40:52

-There is quality there.

-Yeah, there is.

-Well, good luck.

0:40:520:40:55

-I hope you sell them.

-So do I.

-It would be good to see a good result.

0:40:550:40:58

-It would, yes.

-Fingers crossed we're going to get it. Here we go.

0:40:580:41:02

Lot 350. This is the Ferdinand Barbedienne.

0:41:020:41:07

We should have two phones here.

0:41:070:41:09

THEY GASP

0:41:090:41:10

-One, two, there we go.

-That's what we want to hear, isn't it?

0:41:100:41:13

1,500. £1,500.

0:41:130:41:15

Thank you. 1,600? At £1,500.

0:41:150:41:20

1,600 to Catherine's phone.

0:41:200:41:23

1,700, 1,800,

0:41:230:41:27

1,900, 2,000.

0:41:270:41:30

-They're sold.

-At £2,000.

0:41:300:41:34

2,100, we'll take that.

0:41:340:41:37

2,200, 2,300, 2,400?

0:41:370:41:42

2,400, Catherine is winning.

0:41:420:41:43

-2,500.

-Two phone lines battling it out.

0:41:430:41:46

2,600,

0:41:460:41:49

2,700,

0:41:490:41:51

2,800,

0:41:510:41:52

2,900,

0:41:520:41:53

3,000. 3,000?

0:41:530:41:56

3,200?

0:41:560:42:00

3,102 to Sean's phone. 3,200.

0:42:000:42:04

3,300,

0:42:040:42:07

3,400,

0:42:070:42:08

3,500,

0:42:080:42:10

3,600,

0:42:100:42:12

3,700,

0:42:120:42:14

3,800...

0:42:140:42:16

-3,800!

-..3,900.

0:42:160:42:19

£4,000.

0:42:190:42:22

Can we tempt him to 4,200?

0:42:220:42:25

-4,100.

-He's going, he's going.

0:42:250:42:28

Barbara, 4,100.

0:42:280:42:29

4,200,

0:42:290:42:31

4,300.

0:42:310:42:34

-At £4,200.

-4,200.

0:42:340:42:37

At £4,200...

0:42:370:42:40

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yay! Well done.

-Hammer's gone down.

0:42:400:42:44

-£4,200.

-Wow. That's good.

0:42:440:42:46

Phew. Did you come here by yourself?

0:42:460:42:49

-No.

-You've got friends here?

-All up in the corner.

0:42:490:42:51

Great, great cos they'll have to drive you home.

0:42:510:42:55

Well, you spotted these, you knew they were quality.

0:42:550:42:57

-They were superb, yes.

-You said 2,000-to-3,000 straightaway..

0:42:570:43:00

-I was thinking, "I'm worried."

-Were you worried? Were you worried? Oh!

0:43:000:43:03

-I was, Elizabeth.

-I was worried.

-You were worried, as well.

0:43:030:43:06

Oh, ye of little faith. I don't know.

0:43:060:43:07

No, they did, they shone out as being different,

0:43:070:43:10

but I'm so pleased they got it today. Two phone bids, that was lovely.

0:43:100:43:13

-Thank you very much.

-And what a way to end the show, as well.

0:43:130:43:16

I hope you enjoyed that - we certainly did.

0:43:160:43:18

So, until the next time,

0:43:180:43:19

it's goodbye from all of us here in Winchester.

0:43:190:43:22

Flog It! comes from the Milestones Museum in Basingstoke, where transport is the name of the game. Elizabeth Talbot and Nick Davies take a ride through the best antiques and collectables, while Paul Martin takes a tour around a modern cruise ship to find out about the history of the Southampton cruise liners.