Greenwich 24 Flog It!


Greenwich 24

The Flog It! team visits the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich. Antique experts Mark Stacey and Jonathan Pratt find a varied collection of objects.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Greenwich 24. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

There's something so special about London.

0:00:020:00:04

It makes one feel like anything could happen,

0:00:040:00:06

and judging by the size of this queue, I think we could bank on it.

0:00:060:00:09

Today, we're at the Old Royal Naval College

0:00:090:00:11

in Greenwich, and this iconic landmark is as impressive

0:00:110:00:15

on the inside as it is on the outside,

0:00:150:00:17

so let me take you on a journey.

0:00:170:00:19

Welcome to "Flog It!"

0:00:190:00:22

Once a rural marshland used for animal pasture,

0:00:430:00:46

the Isle of Dogs is now the financial hub of London

0:00:460:00:49

and home to the impressive skyscrapers of Canary Wharf.

0:00:490:00:53

It's bounded on three sides by one of the largest meanders

0:00:530:00:56

of the River Thames, a river which stretches for 215 miles,

0:00:560:01:01

making it England's longest river.

0:01:010:01:04

Well, they say the best views of this place are from up there,

0:01:060:01:09

from the sky, or from the river,

0:01:090:01:12

but we don't have time to be getting on a boat right now

0:01:120:01:15

because this queue is growing bigger and bigger by the minute.

0:01:150:01:18

Hundreds of people have turned up from London and beyond.

0:01:180:01:21

They're eager to get inside to see our experts,

0:01:210:01:24

to find the answer to that all-important question, which is...

0:01:240:01:28

-ALL:

-What's it worth?

0:01:280:01:29

If you are happy with the valuation, what are you going to do?

0:01:290:01:32

Flog It!

0:01:320:01:34

So who are our experts today?

0:01:340:01:36

Well, if you have a problem,

0:01:360:01:38

our expert Mark Stacey is on hand to help...

0:01:380:01:41

We can talk about your gas problem when we get inside, all right?

0:01:410:01:45

-Oh, yes.

-Yes, I mean, it's lovely.

0:01:450:01:48

..while Jonathan Pratt is ensuring the items brought in

0:01:480:01:51

are above board.

0:01:510:01:54

Coach and Horses. Did you have a good night there

0:01:540:01:56

-and you walked away with it?

-LAUGHTER

0:01:560:01:58

It seems we're in for a fun-filled day,

0:02:010:02:03

so before the valuations get under way,

0:02:030:02:06

here's a glimpse of what's coming up in today's show.

0:02:060:02:09

There are no holds barred on Mark's valuations.

0:02:120:02:15

What on earth made you think we'd be interested in this item?

0:02:150:02:18

I didn't know that you was going to be!

0:02:180:02:21

SHE CHUCKLES

0:02:210:02:23

And can Jonathan do the didgeridoo?

0:02:230:02:24

It's going to be a bit loud, everybody.

0:02:240:02:26

BUM NOTE

0:02:270:02:29

And later on, I take a tour of London

0:02:310:02:33

on a truck that can swim in the River Thames,

0:02:330:02:35

and we find out how amphibious vehicles like this

0:02:350:02:38

played a key role during World War II.

0:02:380:02:41

While everybody gets safely seated inside,

0:02:430:02:45

let me quickly tell you about this fantastic building.

0:02:450:02:48

It was designed by one

0:02:480:02:49

of England's most renowned architects,

0:02:490:02:51

Sir Christopher Wren.

0:02:510:02:52

In 1696, he was given the task of building a refuge

0:02:520:02:55

for retired or injured sailors,

0:02:550:02:57

and he was told to make it grand.

0:02:570:03:00

And that he surely did.

0:03:000:03:01

And as you step inside, just look at this grand hall.

0:03:040:03:07

It's called the Painted Hall.

0:03:070:03:09

What greets you at first is that above you, 90 feet up there,

0:03:090:03:14

spectacular dome.

0:03:140:03:15

One of the finest in London.

0:03:150:03:17

The ceiling and the walls were painted by Sir James Thornhill,

0:03:170:03:21

and he got a knighthood for his work,

0:03:210:03:22

and it's hardly surprising because it's absolutely jaw-dropping.

0:03:220:03:25

And at 5,683 square feet,

0:03:250:03:27

it is the largest figurative painting in the country.

0:03:270:03:32

And right now, we're going straight over to our experts' tables,

0:03:320:03:35

and let's take a closer look at what they've spotted.

0:03:350:03:37

Hopefully, it's equally as impressive.

0:03:370:03:39

-Theresa.

-Hello.

0:03:410:03:43

Hello, thank you so much for bringing in this wonderful sampler.

0:03:430:03:46

Is it a family piece?

0:03:460:03:48

Well, it belonged to my aunt, I think,

0:03:480:03:50

but otherwise I don't know very much about it.

0:03:500:03:53

Well, it's wonderful.

0:03:530:03:55

You know, samplers we see quite a lot

0:03:550:03:57

and they're made in all periods.

0:03:570:03:59

This type of work was educational

0:03:590:04:01

and it also filled time,

0:04:010:04:03

because before the enjoyments of television and radio and computers,

0:04:030:04:08

people used to learn skills,

0:04:080:04:10

and these sort of pictures go back

0:04:100:04:12

to the sort of 16th and 17th century and stump work.

0:04:120:04:16

As soon as you see this, without even looking for the date,

0:04:160:04:19

you can see it's going to be 18th century.

0:04:190:04:21

-Yes.

-Because it's very, very fine stitch work.

0:04:210:04:25

When you look at a sampler, collectors are looking for quality

0:04:250:04:29

and looking for certain features.

0:04:290:04:31

This wonderful floral border, very formalised.

0:04:310:04:34

You've got what you find on a lot of samplers, the religious text,

0:04:340:04:38

because everything was put into the morality of life.

0:04:380:04:41

I love this scene here.

0:04:420:04:44

-Yes.

-The country house.

0:04:440:04:45

Terribly Georgian, isn't it?

0:04:450:04:47

-Yes.

-Everything symmetrical.

0:04:470:04:48

And I love the little bird table here, the little dog.

0:04:490:04:53

-I love these parrots.

-Yes.

0:04:530:04:55

And then when you come down to the bottom panel,

0:04:550:04:59

you've got Elizabeth Harding's work, year of her age March 1791,

0:04:590:05:04

-so late 18th century.

-Yes.

-So it's been around an awfully long time.

0:05:040:05:09

-That's right.

-And it's got a little bit of wear here and there.

0:05:090:05:12

But it is absolutely charming. And these samplers

0:05:120:05:15

from this particular date are, I think, still quite sought-after.

0:05:150:05:19

Up until the 1820s.

0:05:190:05:22

When you get after 1820, the Victorian samplers,

0:05:220:05:25

they become less desirable.

0:05:250:05:27

-Why is that?

-Well, I think because...

0:05:270:05:28

-Too many of them.

-There's a lot of them around.

0:05:280:05:31

The silk work isn't so detailed.

0:05:310:05:35

You often find much more text than actual pictorial imagery.

0:05:350:05:39

This just screams 18th century.

0:05:390:05:41

And if you own a house like this,

0:05:410:05:43

you would love to have that up on the wall, wouldn't you?

0:05:430:05:46

I actually feel quite guilty. I've not really looked at all this.

0:05:460:05:49

Well, when you own something, though, you don't, do you?

0:05:490:05:53

Where has it been? Has it been on the wall?

0:05:530:05:55

No, it's not the sort of thing I would put on a wall.

0:05:550:05:57

So it's been hidden in a box?

0:05:570:05:59

Well, tucked in a recess.

0:05:590:06:01

Well, it needs to come out of the recess, doesn't it?

0:06:010:06:04

I think there will be a lot of collectors for this.

0:06:040:06:06

-Oh, really?

-I really do, I think it's charming, I love it.

0:06:060:06:10

What do you think it might be worth?

0:06:100:06:12

I haven't any idea whatsoever.

0:06:120:06:14

I think, if we put it in the auction,

0:06:140:06:16

we should be looking at something like £150-250,

0:06:160:06:19

with a reserve of 150.

0:06:190:06:23

OK.

0:06:230:06:24

Now, if you get two or three collectors,

0:06:240:06:26

it might even go higher than that.

0:06:260:06:29

It has got star quality about it, and I absolutely love it.

0:06:290:06:33

I think it will do very well.

0:06:330:06:35

-Yes.

-I love it.

-All right. Good, thank you.

0:06:350:06:37

It looks like Mark's got that all stitched up...

0:06:390:06:42

..while Jonathan's gone down under

0:06:430:06:45

to the undercroft of the Painted Hall.

0:06:450:06:47

So, Sue, you've got everything here.

0:06:490:06:51

It looks like you've got a whole tribe's worth.

0:06:510:06:54

You've got boomerangs and you've got spears and clubs

0:06:540:06:57

and all sorts of stuff, pretty much everything bar the didgeridoo.

0:06:570:07:00

Well, actually, Jonathan, we have one.

0:07:000:07:04

Ah. Concealed upon the person.

0:07:040:07:06

-Indeed.

-I'm guessing. These great labels tell me a lot of things here.

0:07:060:07:10

-Who did the labels?

-I did.

0:07:100:07:12

-You did.

-Many years ago.

0:07:120:07:13

I was a teacher of geography and so I was able to use these artefacts in

0:07:130:07:18

-my teaching.

-You see a lot of these sort of things,

0:07:180:07:21

people have travelled and they've come back over the last few years,

0:07:210:07:24

I see a lot of them in houses hanging on walls and stuff,

0:07:240:07:26

but this doesn't look like this, so where has this come from?

0:07:260:07:28

-How did you get them?

-Well, it goes back to early 1960s.

0:07:280:07:32

-Mm-hm.

-My father was in the Royal Air Force.

0:07:320:07:36

He had a posting to Australia.

0:07:360:07:38

I accompanied him with my mother.

0:07:380:07:40

And whilst we were there, a little lady used to visit,

0:07:410:07:46

and she had contacts to one of the aboriginal reservations.

0:07:460:07:51

She actually brought these items to be sold,

0:07:510:07:54

and we think it was probably

0:07:540:07:56

the proceeds went to help the aborigines in the reservation,

0:07:560:08:00

some of which were utilitarian and some were ceremonial items.

0:08:000:08:05

Yeah, and you can see the difference straightaway.

0:08:050:08:07

I mean, something like this very simple hardwood,

0:08:070:08:09

a heavy dense wood...

0:08:090:08:11

-Yes.

-..that have whatever uses

0:08:110:08:13

and you can see it's been used quite a lot.

0:08:130:08:15

What's this? It's a sort of spear of sorts.

0:08:150:08:17

It is a ceremonial... I think they called it a sort of yam stick,

0:08:170:08:22

but again, those with the decorations

0:08:220:08:25

were used for ceremonial occasions.

0:08:250:08:28

And that's... That's a weighty old lump

0:08:280:08:31

with some rather sinister looking discolorations on it, which,

0:08:310:08:35

you know, you've got a very heavy club end,

0:08:350:08:38

does look like blood would stain.

0:08:380:08:40

So they look like objects that have been used.

0:08:400:08:42

These guys, they're using this for hunting.

0:08:420:08:45

Yes, it was used as a club.

0:08:450:08:47

It's called a nulla nulla, to finish off their prey.

0:08:470:08:50

I reckon, I mean, look at that, there's cracks in the grain.

0:08:500:08:54

It's a tough, tough wood, but it's curved from use.

0:08:540:08:57

-Yes.

-This intrigues me. A bullroarer.

0:08:570:08:59

So this is something that is spun around.

0:08:590:09:01

It is, and it makes a roaring sound.

0:09:010:09:03

The chief would use that to summon the tribesmen to meetings.

0:09:030:09:08

As a collection, it's very interesting.

0:09:080:09:10

Why are you selling it?

0:09:100:09:12

I'm hoping to move shortly, downsize,

0:09:120:09:15

and they'd only go into storage again,

0:09:150:09:17

so it's time for these to move to a new home.

0:09:170:09:20

Looking at them as a collection,

0:09:200:09:23

I would suggest their value is something of the region of

0:09:230:09:26

between £300-500 as a collection.

0:09:260:09:27

£300, we can have it as a reserve for that

0:09:270:09:29

and what they'll do is they'll look at the lots

0:09:290:09:31

and then maybe if they split it into two, they'll

0:09:310:09:34

try and make two £150 lots.

0:09:340:09:36

Last object here, the didgeridoo.

0:09:360:09:38

Do you didgeridoo?

0:09:390:09:40

I don't didgeridoo.

0:09:400:09:43

But do you do didgeridoo?

0:09:430:09:45

I don't do. Well, I can try the didgeridoo.

0:09:450:09:47

Does it matter which end you blow?

0:09:470:09:48

-This end.

-Good.

0:09:480:09:50

Which has got a slightly softer end to it.

0:09:500:09:53

OK. Now, I think I've tried once in the past.

0:09:530:09:56

You have to try and make, you have to... "Pffft!" Is that right?

0:09:560:10:00

-A sort of...

-Here we go.

0:10:000:10:02

BUM NOTE

0:10:020:10:03

Oh!

0:10:030:10:04

Right.

0:10:050:10:06

Let's make to make it a bit louder, everybody.

0:10:070:10:10

PARP!

0:10:100:10:11

LAUGHTER

0:10:110:10:13

How do they do it?

0:10:130:10:15

And they keep it going for so long!

0:10:150:10:17

Well, I'm not even going to bother now.

0:10:170:10:19

I've got a note, and that's good enough for me.

0:10:190:10:21

-Yes.

-Thank you very much. Well, um...

0:10:210:10:23

Yes, well, I think we should leave it

0:10:250:10:27

for the auctioneer now, don't you?

0:10:270:10:28

I think so. Thank you so much.

0:10:280:10:30

What little monstrosity have you brought in to show us?

0:10:330:10:37

What on earth made you think we'd be interested in this item?

0:10:370:10:40

I didn't know that you was going to be!

0:10:400:10:42

SHE LAUGHS

0:10:420:10:44

Um, because "Flog It!" was here in Greenwich,

0:10:440:10:46

I decided to bring it along.

0:10:460:10:47

I've had it all that time, so I just wanted you to see it.

0:10:470:10:50

I'm so glad you have. Where did you get it from?

0:10:500:10:53

My mother-in-law. She died about 25 years ago and we just acquired it.

0:10:530:10:58

So where's it been living, in a drawer?

0:10:580:10:59

-In a cupboard.

-Oh, no!

0:10:590:11:01

At least we've elevated it into the Painted Room at Greenwich.

0:11:010:11:05

-Yes, we have!

-Did she ever show it to you?

0:11:050:11:07

Did you ever know where it came from?

0:11:070:11:09

No, no, never saw it before.

0:11:090:11:11

-So you have no idea?

-No.

-Gosh, how interesting.

0:11:110:11:14

I mean I spotted it in the queue hours ago,

0:11:140:11:16

and there's just something a bit quirky about it, isn't there?

0:11:160:11:20

Because you've got this sort of car clock, which is made by Smiths.

0:11:200:11:24

-Yes.

-And Smiths is quite an interesting maker.

0:11:240:11:26

The actual first Smith, Samuel Smith,

0:11:260:11:30

ran a clock shop in London,

0:11:300:11:32

in the middle of the 19th century, so a long time ago.

0:11:320:11:35

But in the 1930s, they turned their hand to modern household clocks,

0:11:350:11:40

electric clocks, and car clocks.

0:11:400:11:42

-Right.

-So there's a lot of history connected there,

0:11:420:11:45

-and they are still going today.

-Yes.

0:11:450:11:46

You see what I liked about it is it's a complete one-off item.

0:11:460:11:50

-Yes.

-You can't go round finding one of these.

0:11:500:11:52

-No.

-Because somebody obviously loves this car clock

0:11:520:11:56

and decided when they got rid of the car, "I want the clock."

0:11:560:12:00

They keep the clock!

0:12:000:12:02

They've had someone, they've taken it to a little engineer or something

0:12:020:12:06

and they've had this very Art Deco mount made for it,

0:12:060:12:09

which is completely handmade.

0:12:090:12:11

You've got these little sort of drums, almost, as the feet,

0:12:110:12:14

but actually I did notice on the bottom here as well,

0:12:140:12:16

that's the winder.

0:12:160:12:18

It's SO aesthetically 1930s Art Deco.

0:12:180:12:21

-Right.

-And I love that, what we call a lion rampant,

0:12:210:12:26

holding the whole thing up.

0:12:260:12:28

I think it's just great fun and I think there must be people out there

0:12:280:12:32

with sort of minds like mine, I hope,

0:12:320:12:34

who like these individual, quirky items.

0:12:340:12:36

I love it, you can see that,

0:12:370:12:39

I think it's great.

0:12:390:12:40

-Do you like it?

-No.

0:12:400:12:42

-No?

-No.

-Now I'm glad you're sitting down.

0:12:420:12:45

-Right.

-Because it's not going to be worth a fortune.

0:12:450:12:48

-No.

-You know? But you are happy to sell it.

-Yes, of course.

0:12:480:12:50

I think your little novelty clock should have an estimate

0:12:500:12:54

of something like £40-60.

0:12:540:12:56

That's more than I thought.

0:12:560:12:57

And we should put a reserve, let's put a £30 fixed reserve.

0:12:570:13:01

-OK.

-So we don't give it away for nothing.

0:13:010:13:03

-No, that's fine.

-But hopefully on the day you get two or three people,

0:13:030:13:07

particularly on the internet.

0:13:070:13:08

-Yeah.

-There might be mad collectors out there

0:13:080:13:12

and it might make 50, 60, 70, who knows?

0:13:120:13:14

-Who knows, yeah.

-But a truly one-off item.

0:13:140:13:18

-Like us!

-Yes!

0:13:180:13:20

-Thanks for bringing it in, Carole.

-Thank you.

0:13:200:13:23

We do love those quirky items.

0:13:240:13:26

Well, I tell you what, as a backdrop to a valuation day venue,

0:13:320:13:35

it doesn't get any better than this,

0:13:350:13:37

the Painted Hall at the Old Royal Naval College.

0:13:370:13:40

It's an honour to be here.

0:13:400:13:41

Isn't it great, everyone?

0:13:410:13:43

-ALL:

-Yes!

-What surroundings.

0:13:430:13:44

We need items and collectables worthy of these surroundings,

0:13:440:13:47

and I tell you what, our experts have found three right now,

0:13:470:13:50

and we're going to put those valuations to the test

0:13:500:13:52

in the auction room.

0:13:520:13:53

Here's a quick recap of all the items we're taking with us.

0:13:530:13:57

The fine craftsmanship in this late 18th-century sampler

0:13:580:14:02

should ensure we sew up a good deal.

0:14:020:14:04

Boomerangs, spears and a didgeridoo, right from the heart of the outback,

0:14:080:14:12

should draw in the collectors.

0:14:120:14:14

And let's hope this one-of-a-kind car clock catches someone's eye.

0:14:180:14:22

Our auction destination today is in Chiswick.

0:14:270:14:30

This West London suburb was originally a fishing village,

0:14:300:14:34

with houses clustered around its 15th-century medieval church.

0:14:340:14:38

Today, it still maintains its riverside charm,

0:14:390:14:42

so let's hope we can lure the buyers to Chiswick Auctions

0:14:420:14:45

just down the road.

0:14:450:14:47

William Rouse is our auctioneer.

0:14:470:14:48

Remember, when you're selling or buying at auction,

0:14:500:14:53

you need to pay a commission fee, which, here today, is 15% plus VAT.

0:14:530:14:58

First up, Carole's car clock.

0:15:010:15:05

-Good luck, Carole.

-Thank you very much.

0:15:050:15:06

Now, is this something for the motor enthusiast, or clock enthusiast,

0:15:060:15:10

or just people that love quirky things?

0:15:100:15:11

We have that car clock, and I like it

0:15:110:15:13

because it's been adapted over the years

0:15:130:15:15

and made into something, and it is quirky.

0:15:150:15:17

That's why I fell in love with it, Paul.

0:15:170:15:19

Somebody obviously hasn't wanted to chuck it away

0:15:190:15:21

and made that lovely mount for it, so it's very Art Deco.

0:15:210:15:24

I like the fact that it's scratch built.

0:15:240:15:25

And you can't do your comparables.

0:15:250:15:28

-It's finite. It's a one-off.

-Yes, it's a one-off.

0:15:280:15:30

You wouldn't see another one anywhere.

0:15:300:15:31

No, you won't see another one.

0:15:310:15:33

-And that's the beauty of it. Happy?

-Yes, of course I am.

0:15:330:15:35

Happy enough? HE LAUGHS

0:15:350:15:37

We always want a bit more, don't we?

0:15:370:15:39

Right, let's find out what the bidders think.

0:15:390:15:41

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:15:410:15:43

And 411, a vintage Smiths clock.

0:15:430:15:46

What's it worth? Start me, £40 to go.

0:15:460:15:50

£40 for it. £30 for it, then, to go.

0:15:500:15:53

For the clock. It's got to be worth that, come on.

0:15:530:15:55

-£30, surely?

-BIDDER:

-Yes, 30.

-30 is bid, thank you.

0:15:550:15:58

-Oh, 30 is bid.

-Phew!

0:15:580:16:00

£30 in the room. One maiden bid so far of £30.

0:16:000:16:03

-Come on.

-Anybody else? It's going to sell, for you.

0:16:030:16:05

It's going, then, 30...

0:16:050:16:07

How much is that?

0:16:070:16:08

£30, in the room, then, at 30.

0:16:080:16:10

Oh, I think they're sitting on their hands.

0:16:110:16:14

£30, it's gone.

0:16:150:16:17

-It's... Only just.

-That's all right. I don't have to take it home.

0:16:170:16:20

We're happy, aren't we? We're happy.

0:16:200:16:21

-You didn't... I liked it.

-We're happy.

0:16:210:16:23

-You didn't like it, did you?

-No. No.

-Thank you so much.

0:16:230:16:26

-Thank you.

-We did our very best.

-Yeah, thank you.

0:16:260:16:28

Next, it's the collection of aboriginal items.

0:16:300:16:33

Sue, good luck. Ethnographica is big business worldwide now.

0:16:340:16:38

We've seen it on the show before.

0:16:380:16:39

We get a lot of aboriginal items going under the hammer

0:16:390:16:42

that Jonathan put a value on.

0:16:420:16:43

Your father was in the RAF in the '60s?

0:16:430:16:46

-Yes, yes.

-He brought all of this back?

-He did.

0:16:460:16:48

I hope we don't disappoint.

0:16:480:16:49

We've got £300-500.

0:16:490:16:50

I think it's a "come and buy me."

0:16:500:16:52

It's one lot. It's going, hopefully, to a new owner.

0:16:520:16:54

Are you pleased with this?

0:16:540:16:56

-I am, yes.

-Is it going to be a sad moment to say goodbye?

0:16:560:16:58

Have you got lots more things?

0:16:580:17:00

Erm, no, no, I think it's time they found a new owner.

0:17:000:17:03

-Time they moved on?

-Yes.

-OK. Good luck, both of you.

0:17:030:17:05

Let's hope these boomerangs don't come back.

0:17:050:17:07

Lot 495 is a collection of Australian artefacts.

0:17:070:17:13

Interesting little lot, 495, and start me, £200, start me for it.

0:17:130:17:18

200 is bid on the internet.

0:17:180:17:19

210. 230. 240.

0:17:190:17:22

250. 260. 270.

0:17:220:17:25

270 with me.

0:17:250:17:27

280. 290.

0:17:270:17:28

290. 300.

0:17:280:17:31

Internet bid now of 300.

0:17:310:17:33

Is that it? 320.

0:17:330:17:36

-Slowly, slowly.

-340. 340 on the internet.

0:17:360:17:40

£340, Internet bid.

0:17:400:17:42

340, you all finished and done?

0:17:420:17:44

Selling, then, for 340.

0:17:440:17:46

It's gone. It's going, it's going.

0:17:460:17:48

Oh, yes, it's gone. £340.

0:17:480:17:50

No big surprise, there, but you were spot on with your three to five.

0:17:500:17:53

-Good, good.

-And you're happy because you don't have to take them home.

0:17:530:17:56

-Yes.

-That's the main thing.

0:17:560:17:57

Now, let's see if we can get this next lot sewn up.

0:17:590:18:02

Right now on the show, we've got some textiles

0:18:050:18:07

in the form of a wonderful late-18th-century sampler

0:18:070:18:09

belonging to Theresa. And thank you for bringing that in

0:18:090:18:12

because we don't see too many samplers.

0:18:120:18:14

We used to, about ten years ago, but they've fallen out of fashion.

0:18:140:18:17

-Oh, right.

-And I like this one, and I agree with Mark -

0:18:170:18:20

when you're buying a sampler,

0:18:200:18:21

you've got to get one with a good central architectural image.

0:18:210:18:24

Let's hope we get a couple of hundred pounds. This is it.

0:18:240:18:26

361 is a George III needlework sampler.

0:18:260:18:30

361, good little lot, this.

0:18:300:18:33

There we go. What's it worth? Start me at £100 to go.

0:18:330:18:36

180. 200.

0:18:360:18:38

240. 260.

0:18:380:18:39

-Yes, yes, yes.

-240 on the internet.

0:18:390:18:42

260. 280.

0:18:420:18:45

280 on the internet.

0:18:450:18:47

300 on the internet.

0:18:470:18:49

300. Do you want 320?

0:18:490:18:51

320 in the room. 340.

0:18:510:18:53

360. 380. 400.

0:18:530:18:56

420. 440. 460.

0:18:560:19:00

-480. 500.

-500!

0:19:000:19:03

Thank you, sir, £500. Internet bid of 500.

0:19:030:19:05

Are we...? Is that it? I'm selling it, then, £500.

0:19:070:19:12

Fantastic. £500!

0:19:120:19:13

Do you know, that's a good result.

0:19:130:19:15

A proper document of social history,

0:19:150:19:17

those wonderful skills.

0:19:170:19:19

But it's nice that the market still responds well

0:19:190:19:21

-with these good quality ones.

-Yes, yes.

-Faith.

0:19:210:19:24

Yeah, faith in the market.

0:19:240:19:25

-Absolutely.

-Yeah. Thank you for bringing it in.

0:19:250:19:27

OK, thank you.

0:19:270:19:28

Well, that concludes our first visit to the auction room today.

0:19:350:19:38

Not bad so far.

0:19:380:19:39

We're coming back later on.

0:19:390:19:40

Do not go away.

0:19:400:19:42

While we're in London, I took the opportunity

0:19:420:19:45

to explore the city on a truck that both drives on land and water.

0:19:450:19:50

London is currently one of the world's

0:19:550:19:58

most popular travel destinations,

0:19:580:20:00

accommodating more than 17 million visitors in recent years.

0:20:000:20:04

# London calling

0:20:040:20:06

# To the faraway towns

0:20:060:20:08

# Now war is declared... #

0:20:080:20:10

People are just drawn to the sights such as the London Eye, Big Ben,

0:20:100:20:13

the Houses of Parliament and the list just goes on and on and on.

0:20:130:20:17

There are many tour buses you can take

0:20:170:20:18

that give you a fantastic view of the city by road,

0:20:180:20:21

and there are also boats that give you a view

0:20:210:20:23

of the London skyline from the River Thames.

0:20:230:20:26

But I'm taking a truck that can do both.

0:20:260:20:29

My name's Matt and this is Nelson, our driver.

0:20:400:20:44

Matt and Nelson have kindly agreed

0:20:440:20:46

to give me a special private tour of London.

0:20:460:20:49

..abolished in the 1980s, and it's now the London Aquarium.

0:20:510:20:57

I have to admit that my reason for taking a special tour

0:20:570:20:59

is not only because of the London sights.

0:20:590:21:02

I want to find out more about these amphibious DUKW vehicles,

0:21:050:21:09

or Ducks as they're affectionately nicknamed.

0:21:090:21:12

Nowadays, they're a fun way of sightseeing around London,

0:21:120:21:15

but the original vehicles, the original Ducks,

0:21:150:21:18

played a key role during World War II.

0:21:180:21:20

In the early 1940s, as the war entered its most critical phase,

0:21:240:21:27

Allied forces needed a more efficient way

0:21:270:21:30

to transport men and urgent supplies.

0:21:300:21:33

Too much time was being wasted with ships waiting for barges,

0:21:340:21:38

barges waiting for trucks and trucks waiting for trains.

0:21:380:21:41

The answer was to develop a new kind of landing craft

0:21:420:21:46

so that cargo could be delivered directly onto the beach.

0:21:460:21:50

Or a truck that could swim.

0:21:510:21:54

Now, that was the brief

0:21:540:21:55

given to General Motors Corporation in America.

0:21:550:21:58

It needed to be able to handle rough sea swells,

0:21:580:22:02

high surf and have the ability

0:22:020:22:05

to drive over coral reefs and sandbanks.

0:22:050:22:08

It was decided that they would try and convert

0:22:090:22:11

the already successful six by six, two and a half tonne army truck.

0:22:110:22:16

An American-based marine company designed the hull,

0:22:190:22:22

which made the truck seaworthy, and they were soon put into operation.

0:22:220:22:26

Britain put in an order for 2,000 of them.

0:22:260:22:30

I'm meeting with John Bigos, who is the managing director,

0:22:350:22:38

and he can tell me more about how these vehicles work.

0:22:380:22:41

John, we know these have been converted for the tours,

0:22:410:22:43

but are they operating very much

0:22:430:22:45

like they did when they saw active service?

0:22:450:22:47

Absolutely, yes. They have a lot of the original features.

0:22:470:22:50

It has six-wheel drive.

0:22:500:22:52

It is able to operate on soft sand, tarmac, gravel, shingle,

0:22:520:22:57

anything like that. And, yes, she's a lovely old girl.

0:22:570:23:01

What was their role during the war?

0:23:010:23:02

What were they really good at?

0:23:020:23:04

One of the main areas was carrying equipment.

0:23:040:23:07

I've personally seen two of the original Ducks

0:23:070:23:10

with what I would refer to as scaffold boards going across,

0:23:100:23:13

carrying original tanks, and they would travel together

0:23:130:23:16

-and go across rivers and things like that.

-Wow, acting as a bridge?

0:23:160:23:19

-Yes.

-It's some weight, though, isn't it?

-She weighs...

0:23:190:23:22

Seven to eight tonnes She is eight tonnes, yes.

0:23:220:23:24

-Phew!

-And, erm, when we've got passengers on,

0:23:240:23:28

that brings it up to about 10.5-12 tonnes, yeah.

0:23:280:23:31

The duality is just perfect and the fact that it trundles along

0:23:310:23:34

and it has so much original history with it,

0:23:340:23:36

many, many people stop and stare at it

0:23:360:23:38

and think, "What on earth is that?"

0:23:380:23:40

It's more of a boat than a truck, isn't it? Let's face it.

0:23:400:23:43

-I would agree.

-Yeah.

-I think it's more of a boat than a truck.

0:23:430:23:46

-And...

-I'm pleased you said that

0:23:460:23:48

because I've got to go out in it in a minute!

0:23:480:23:50

Very good, very good. I hope you enjoy your tour.

0:23:500:23:52

So, everyone, welcome to London's Amazing Amphibious Adventure!

0:23:560:24:01

Well, we are travelling on a Duck called Mistress Quickly,

0:24:130:24:16

and she's equipped with a full complement of life jackets

0:24:160:24:19

and life rafts situated on the roof.

0:24:190:24:22

These Ducks played a significant role during the Second World War,

0:24:230:24:26

for example, the invasion of mainland Italy.

0:24:260:24:29

In September 1943, as part of the Allied invasion of Salerno in Italy,

0:24:310:24:36

Ducks moved 190,000 troops,

0:24:360:24:39

30,000 vehicles and 12,000 tonnes of supplies across the invasion beaches

0:24:390:24:45

to Salerno.

0:24:450:24:46

The Ducks also played a vital role

0:24:500:24:52

in one of the biggest invasions of all -

0:24:520:24:54

the D-Day landings in Normandy, in France, on June the 6th, 1944.

0:24:540:24:59

This account by Ronnie Frankland, one of the drivers,

0:24:590:25:01

gives us a fascinating insight into what it was really like.

0:25:010:25:05

In June 1944, on the D-Day landings,

0:25:100:25:12

I found myself crossing the Channel on a coaster,

0:25:120:25:15

along with the Duck I was to drive.

0:25:150:25:17

As I had been loaded on last,

0:25:190:25:20

I was the first to embark on the beaches at La Riviere, Normandy.

0:25:200:25:23

And a terrifying moment that was,

0:25:240:25:26

as I drove into the sea with shells and mortars exploding all around me.

0:25:260:25:30

My friend who was following

0:25:320:25:33

signalled for help as the rudder had been damaged on his Duck

0:25:330:25:35

and he was unable to steer.

0:25:350:25:37

We pulled alongside and threw a rope to give him a tow to shore.

0:25:380:25:41

Unfortunately for the third Duck embarking,

0:25:430:25:45

he was now in the lead on the race to the beach.

0:25:450:25:47

He hit a mine, killing the driver and injuring the rest of the crew.

0:25:470:25:50

My good deed had saved my life.

0:25:520:25:54

I continued to drive the Duck throughout Europe

0:25:560:25:59

for the rest of the war and became very attached to my vehicle,

0:25:590:26:01

naming her the Normandy Beauty.

0:26:010:26:03

Ronnie survived, but more than 57,000 men

0:26:080:26:11

lost their lives during the Battle of Normandy.

0:26:110:26:14

Undoubtedly, the D-Day landings and further battles in World War II

0:26:170:26:21

around Asia and the Pacific

0:26:210:26:22

were heavily influenced by vehicles like this.

0:26:220:26:24

They allowed men, supplies and materials to be taken ashore

0:26:240:26:28

before the port was taken, in pretty unpleasant seas.

0:26:280:26:32

Today, these reconditioned machines

0:26:330:26:36

are giving tourists a fun way of sightseeing, not just in London

0:26:360:26:39

but other cities all around the globe,

0:26:390:26:41

and they've taken to it like a duck to water!

0:26:410:26:44

Welcome back to our valuation day venue

0:26:550:26:58

here at the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich.

0:26:580:27:01

It's now time to catch up with our experts

0:27:010:27:03

to see what other items we can find to take off to auction.

0:27:030:27:06

So, Valerie, you've got this lovely silver mesh purse.

0:27:080:27:11

-Yes, I have.

-Where's it come from?

0:27:110:27:13

Well, I like going through, erm, charity shops,

0:27:130:27:16

and I bought it in my local charity shop.

0:27:160:27:19

-Really?

-Mm-hm.

-Oh, my word!

0:27:190:27:22

I think it was the fringing because I have a lot...

0:27:220:27:24

I love fringing. So I just saw that and thought, "Ooh!"

0:27:240:27:26

And I wondered if it was silver, but I wasn't sure.

0:27:260:27:29

OK, and what made you think it might be silver?

0:27:290:27:31

Well, the colour is silver, and this looks like jewellery, you know,

0:27:310:27:34

-silver jewellery.

-Yeah.

-I thought to myself, "Well, it can't be, can it?"

0:27:340:27:37

Well, it is silver, as you were quite right to assume.

0:27:370:27:40

-OK.

-Erm, but this is a nice touch.

0:27:400:27:42

I love this fringe, like this, around here, and along the bottom.

0:27:420:27:45

-I love that.

-Erm, it's... There is a hallmark on the side, here.

0:27:450:27:49

It's not made in England but it's imported into England, OK?

0:27:490:27:52

-Oh, right.

-So the mark on the side is an import mark.

0:27:520:27:54

Obviously, the style of this is...

0:27:540:27:56

-..sort of alluding to sort of the Art Deco you'd expect.

-OK.

0:27:560:28:00

So it's got to be post-1920s.

0:28:000:28:02

-So how much did you pay for it?

-Well, I paid £5.

0:28:020:28:05

OK, well, it went £5 to charity but then, that's what people do,

0:28:050:28:08

-don't they?

-Yeah.

-OK, well, that's a really good buy for £5.

0:28:080:28:11

Would you have dressed up specially to wearing it, taking this?

0:28:110:28:13

Or is it the normal Saturday night gear?

0:28:130:28:16

It would be the normal... Yeah, bling, lots and lots of bling!

0:28:160:28:18

Well, it's definitely bling, yeah, absolutely.

0:28:180:28:20

-Did you have to clean it?

-No, I wouldn't touch it!

-Oh, OK.

0:28:200:28:23

I would say it's probably worth £60-80.

0:28:230:28:26

Oh, that's much more than I thought it would be.

0:28:260:28:29

I mean, I wasn't thinking of it being any more than, like, 30?

0:28:290:28:32

-£30?

-And were you planning to use it?

0:28:320:28:35

I would use it. Now I've found out it definitely was silver,

0:28:350:28:38

then there's no way I was going to go out, you know...

0:28:380:28:40

What would you do with it anyway, if you did?

0:28:400:28:42

-What would you put in it?

-Well, my mobile phone.

0:28:420:28:46

-Come on!

-My lipstick and that's all I need.

0:28:460:28:48

-Yeah, I suppose so.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:28:480:28:50

I'm only going out on the tiles. I don't need much!

0:28:500:28:52

Yeah, you know, just don't leave it behind. Well, there you are.

0:28:520:28:55

It's much nicer than that,

0:28:550:28:56

in the sense of it has that intrinsic value and, erm...

0:28:560:28:59

..we can happily sell it for you.

0:28:590:29:00

So if we say £60-80, and, erm, set a reserve just around the £60 mark?

0:29:000:29:06

-That sounds fabulous. I didn't expect that.

-OK.

0:29:060:29:08

-Brilliant.

-Well, I'm very pleased.

0:29:080:29:11

-Thank you.

-And we'll find out exactly what happens.

0:29:110:29:13

Oh, I can't wait!

0:29:130:29:14

That was a good find.

0:29:180:29:19

Now I'm keen to see what Mark has spotted.

0:29:190:29:22

Liz. I love this item you've brought in.

0:29:220:29:25

-I'm so glad.

-I think it's wonderful but before we look at it,

0:29:250:29:28

there's an interesting history to this object, isn't there?

0:29:280:29:31

-Can you tell us?

-Yes.

0:29:310:29:32

Erm, in 1938, my father sponsored a young girl of 18 from Vienna.

0:29:320:29:39

-From Vienna?

-Yes, and things were getting very sticky in Vienna,

0:29:390:29:43

so she came to our family, and later,

0:29:430:29:46

my father tried to get her parents over.

0:29:460:29:49

They got as far as Italy,

0:29:490:29:51

were turned back and ended up in concentration camps.

0:29:510:29:54

Oh, gosh. So, obviously, they were Jewish?

0:29:540:29:56

-Yes, yes.

-And in Vienna at the time...

0:29:560:29:59

Things were very bad.

0:29:590:30:00

She wanted to be a doctor, but, erm, her parents said, "Things are bad,

0:30:000:30:04

-"better not."

-Get...get her to safety.

0:30:040:30:07

Yes. She was sort of adopted by our family,

0:30:070:30:10

an extra grandma to all of us.

0:30:100:30:12

-Oh, how lovely.

-And she left me, erm, this, which I have to say,

0:30:120:30:17

I loved her dearly, but I'm not very fond of it!

0:30:170:30:20

-I know you like it.

-I love it.

0:30:200:30:22

And we all can't like the same things.

0:30:220:30:24

-Absolutely.

-It's very interesting, this, that you mention Vienna.

0:30:240:30:29

Because, of course, I think this is Austrian.

0:30:290:30:31

-Yes.

-And it's what we generally refer to as cold-painted bronze.

0:30:310:30:36

Originally, I think this would all have been painted.

0:30:360:30:39

-Oh, really?

-Erm, towards the late 19th century,

0:30:390:30:41

just into the beginning of the 20th century,

0:30:410:30:44

these little novelty cold-painted bronze items

0:30:440:30:47

were very fashionable items for a Victorian house,

0:30:470:30:50

right throughout Europe and the Western world.

0:30:500:30:53

And there were a lot of odd items made.

0:30:530:30:56

This is one of those.

0:30:560:30:57

This is a little baby seated on a stork.

0:30:570:31:01

And, of course, one of the stories is that storks delivered the babies.

0:31:010:31:04

-Of course.

-Which is lovely.

0:31:040:31:06

-Yes.

-There's one particular firm

0:31:060:31:08

that everybody looks out for, and that's Bergman.

0:31:080:31:12

-Yes.

-Franz Xavier Bergman,

0:31:120:31:14

born in the 1860s, died in the 1930s.

0:31:140:31:18

He produced the most collectable cold-painted bronze figures,

0:31:180:31:21

but he always marked his pieces, or pretty always marked his pieces,

0:31:210:31:25

with a little B in an urn.

0:31:250:31:27

Some of his risque ones, which involved nudity,

0:31:270:31:31

he signed his name backwards.

0:31:310:31:34

-Really?

-So it was Namgreb, rather than Bergman.

-Oh, wow.

-I love this.

0:31:340:31:37

I think it's got everything

0:31:370:31:39

a collector of this sort of thing would like.

0:31:390:31:42

You've got the stork, who looks quite evil, actually.

0:31:420:31:45

-Does it?

-Yes, well, I think it's got quite an evil eye.

0:31:450:31:48

-It does, it's got a very long...

-A very long beak.

-Yes, yes.

0:31:480:31:51

And the baby's clinging on, there.

0:31:510:31:52

The baby looks rather sad, or has fallen asleep, maybe.

0:31:520:31:55

But it's great. It was made about 1900.

0:31:550:31:57

It's not marked, so we can't say Bergman.

0:31:570:31:59

-No.

-But it's certainly got an edge of quality about it.

0:31:590:32:02

Hopefully, when we put it into the sale,

0:32:020:32:04

-we will find someone who loves it and wants to collect it.

-Yes, yes.

0:32:040:32:08

I'm holding it, of course, because

0:32:080:32:09

when I put it down, it's a little bit unstable.

0:32:090:32:11

-Yes.

-So that needs to be addressed, but we need a professional

0:32:110:32:13

to repair that. I don't want to twist the leg and break it off.

0:32:130:32:16

-No, no.

-It's got a fascinating history.

0:32:160:32:19

-It's not your favourite item in the world.

-Absolutely not, no.

0:32:190:32:21

It's one of my favourite items.

0:32:210:32:23

-Well, I'm glad.

-And I think there will be a lot of favourites at the

0:32:230:32:26

-auction for this.

-Really?

0:32:260:32:27

In terms of value, I'd like to keep it realistic.

0:32:270:32:30

-Yes.

-If it's all right with you, Liz, because it's not marked.

0:32:300:32:33

I'd like to put £100-150 on it.

0:32:330:32:36

-Great, that would be perfect.

-And we'll put a £100 fixed reserve.

0:32:360:32:38

-Yes.

-So if it doesn't make 100, we'll try it another day.

0:32:380:32:42

-Thank you.

-I don't think we need to worry.

0:32:420:32:45

How can I say it? Not to make too fine a point, I think it might fly.

0:32:450:32:48

-Well, it should fly.

-With the baby, hopefully.

0:32:480:32:50

With that thing, shouldn't it?

0:32:500:32:52

-With the baby, hopefully.

-Yes, yes.

0:32:520:32:53

Wonderful. Thanks for bringing it in.

0:32:530:32:55

-Thank you very much. Really enjoyed it.

-Thank you.

0:32:550:32:58

Now, this building is full of nooks and crannies,

0:33:080:33:11

and I'm off to take a snoop around.

0:33:110:33:13

Imagine a life at sea

0:33:140:33:16

and then coming to live in this grand setting.

0:33:160:33:19

The naval pensioners must have felt this was a gift from God.

0:33:190:33:23

This corridor connects the Old Royal Naval College

0:33:250:33:29

to the chapel, and this is the way

0:33:290:33:30

that the pensioners would have come on a wet day.

0:33:300:33:33

I have to show you inside

0:33:350:33:37

because the chapel of St Peter and St Paul is a feast for the eyes.

0:33:370:33:42

Gosh! Just look at the architectural detail here.

0:33:440:33:49

This is incredible.

0:33:490:33:52

Every square foot of the walls and the ceiling have been applied

0:33:520:33:57

and adorned with architectural motifs.

0:33:570:34:00

It's absolutely superb.

0:34:000:34:03

And up there, look, figures in niches, but that's trompe l'oeil,

0:34:030:34:07

it's a trick of the eye.

0:34:070:34:09

It looks like they are in a recess, but it is just a flat surface.

0:34:090:34:12

This is really quite breathtaking.

0:34:120:34:15

This neoclassical masterpiece took ten years to build

0:34:150:34:19

and it was completed in 1789.

0:34:190:34:21

Today, it still serves its original purpose as a place of worship,

0:34:210:34:26

as well as being used for recitals and concerts.

0:34:260:34:30

Now, you know I love wood,

0:34:310:34:34

so it's inevitable that I'm drawn to this fabulous pulpit.

0:34:340:34:37

It is constructed of oak, mahogany, and carved lime wood detail.

0:34:370:34:41

It is absolutely fabulous.

0:34:410:34:43

It's also got these medallions around the outside

0:34:430:34:45

which depict Biblical stories - the lives of St Peter and Paul.

0:34:450:34:50

Originally, this would have been placed in front of the altar,

0:34:500:34:53

over here,

0:34:530:34:55

rising well above the floor level for audibility and visibility.

0:34:550:35:00

But looking at the height of that,

0:35:000:35:02

and looking at the image on the wall,

0:35:020:35:04

looking at the painting,

0:35:040:35:05

you could see that the flames right in the middle,

0:35:050:35:07

if the chaplain was on top of the pulpit,

0:35:070:35:10

it would look like those flames were coming out of his head

0:35:100:35:12

as he delivered the sermon.

0:35:120:35:14

Now, that would create such a dramatic effect

0:35:140:35:17

and I'm sure it would keep the congregation transfixed.

0:35:170:35:21

Now, I wonder if our experts

0:35:210:35:23

are engrossed back at the valuation tables?

0:35:230:35:25

Let's join up with them.

0:35:250:35:28

Hello, Vicky. You've brought this lovely watch along.

0:35:280:35:30

-Yes.

-Tell me, whose was it?

0:35:300:35:31

-How did you get it?

-Erm, it was my husband's.

0:35:310:35:34

We were married for 55 years and, unfortunately, he died in March.

0:35:340:35:38

-Oh, OK.

-Erm, but...

0:35:380:35:41

I think it was a collective present from his family.

0:35:410:35:43

-OK.

-I think so, anyway.

0:35:430:35:45

It's lovely. I mean, I look forward to the collective present myself

0:35:450:35:49

when they bring themselves round to buying a Rolex for me!

0:35:490:35:52

When was that, roughly?

0:35:520:35:55

Erm, he was born in 1931, so it would have been about...

0:35:550:35:57

-'31...

-1952, wouldn't it?

0:35:570:35:59

That's fairly accurate, obviously,

0:35:590:36:01

so we know that we're dealing with the right thing.

0:36:010:36:03

This is a 1950s watch. What did your husband do?

0:36:030:36:06

-Erm, he was actually a watchmaker.

-Oh, was he?

-Yes, he was, yes.

0:36:060:36:09

And that is apparent in the watch, actually cos, OK,

0:36:090:36:11

we're dealing with a watch which is circa 1950.

0:36:110:36:13

It's a gold case.

0:36:130:36:15

Behind the, erm, the minute hand,

0:36:150:36:17

very, very faded now, is the magic name, Rolex.

0:36:170:36:19

And the chap who set up the Rolex factory was trying to think of

0:36:190:36:23

a name that was memorable in every language,

0:36:230:36:26

and apparently he was riding on the top deck of a bus

0:36:260:36:29

and, supposedly, an angel whispered in his ear,

0:36:290:36:31

"Rolex", and that's how he...he chose the name.

0:36:310:36:34

-Really?

-Apparently so, yeah.

-Oh, that's amazing.

0:36:340:36:36

Amazing, isn't it? The other magical word down there

0:36:360:36:39

is the fact that it says chronometer.

0:36:390:36:40

And a chronometer is a precision watch.

0:36:400:36:43

And everyone knows Rolex are precision watches, but, erm,

0:36:430:36:45

it has to meet very strict criteria, where over 15 days,

0:36:450:36:49

it has to be tested at three different temperatures,

0:36:490:36:53

in...in a number, in numerous different ways.

0:36:530:36:55

Under the Rolex, it says perpetual. OK?

0:36:550:36:58

-Yes.

-And the "perpetual" is that it's an automatic watch.

0:36:580:37:01

-Yes.

-Erm, Rolex invented the...the self-winding mechanism.

0:37:010:37:06

This will come off, so let's unscrew the back.

0:37:060:37:09

You'll see on the back, the weight that spins round.

0:37:090:37:12

It doesn't want to move much at the moment, but it does say on there,

0:37:120:37:16

"Rolex perpetual chronometer", and it's got the date,

0:37:160:37:18

the warranty date on there.

0:37:180:37:20

It's a really good watch, actually. It's a really good watch.

0:37:200:37:24

Erm, now, I'll just see if I can get that back in.

0:37:240:37:26

This is a market now which is becoming very fashionable,

0:37:260:37:29

with the rising sort of wealth in countries around the world,

0:37:290:37:32

a watch is a status symbol for gentlemen.

0:37:320:37:34

It would be great if it was ticking now and I could know that it was,

0:37:340:37:36

it was sort of a pretty much working condition.

0:37:360:37:38

The feeling is, it's probably worth between £600-1,000.

0:37:380:37:42

What sort of value would you be comfortable with selling this for?

0:37:420:37:45

I wouldn't want less than 800.

0:37:450:37:47

You wouldn't want less than £800?

0:37:470:37:48

If we said £800-1,200...

0:37:480:37:50

Yes. And for now, what,

0:37:500:37:52

just to have a reserve of £800 and if it didn't sell for 800,

0:37:520:37:55

you'll just happily have it back?

0:37:550:37:57

-Yes.

-I think it has a very good chance of...

0:37:570:38:00

-Do you?

-Surprising us, I think so, yeah.

0:38:000:38:02

I really like it. I'd love to have one of these for myself.

0:38:020:38:05

-Would you?

-There we are.

-Yeah.

-Thank you very much.

0:38:050:38:08

Oh, you're very welcome.

0:38:080:38:09

And, erm, I'm sure it will go well on the day.

0:38:090:38:11

Thank you. Thank you very much.

0:38:110:38:13

Well, sadly, it's time to say goodbye to all of this.

0:38:200:38:23

We've had a marvellous day

0:38:230:38:24

at the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich.

0:38:240:38:27

Everybody's thoroughly enjoyed themselves, but right now

0:38:270:38:29

we're making our way up the River Thames

0:38:290:38:31

to the auction rooms in Chiswick,

0:38:310:38:33

and here's a quick recap of the final items

0:38:330:38:36

that are going under the hammer.

0:38:360:38:38

A lady would feel like the belle of the ball

0:38:380:38:40

with this silver cocktail purse.

0:38:400:38:42

We hope to see the bronze baby, sat on a stork, fly at auction.

0:38:470:38:51

And those timepiece collectors will have to be quick

0:38:540:38:57

to get their hands on this 1950s Rolex.

0:38:570:39:00

Back in the Chiswick saleroom, William Rouse and Stephen Large

0:39:050:39:07

are still in charge of the proceedings.

0:39:070:39:10

£100.

0:39:100:39:11

Time to find out how this silver purse will fare.

0:39:120:39:15

-Valerie, it's great to see you.

-Hi.

-Going under the hammer right now,

0:39:150:39:18

we've got that silver cocktail purse which Jonathan valued.

0:39:180:39:20

I don't know why you're selling this because, don't you think

0:39:200:39:23

you would look gorgeous carrying this to a ball somewhere?

0:39:230:39:26

-Thank you.

-And how much did you pay?

-Five.

-£5.

0:39:260:39:30

Did you go, "Yes, I've got to have it. £5, here's the money"?

0:39:300:39:33

-Yes, definitely.

-Don't blame you.

0:39:330:39:35

-Yeah, I liked it.

-Right, well, let's find out what it's worth, shall we?

0:39:350:39:38

Let's see if we're right with our value.

0:39:380:39:39

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:39:390:39:41

So, Lot 515 is this 1930s silver flapper's mesh handbag.

0:39:410:39:46

Good little lot, there. Start me, £60, it must be worth.

0:39:460:39:49

£60 to start me for the flapper's bag, £60.

0:39:490:39:53

For this silver bag. I thought so. £60 is bid on the internet.

0:39:530:39:56

-65.

-Good luck.

0:39:560:39:58

-Straight in at 60.

-£60.

0:39:580:40:00

Deathly silence. £60 on the internet is bid.

0:40:000:40:04

Doesn't seem a lot, but it can go...

0:40:040:40:05

-Come on, come on.

-It goes, then, for £60.

0:40:050:40:08

Are you all finished and done?

0:40:080:40:09

-It's gone! you can't wear it out again.

-I can't wear it again.

0:40:110:40:14

Hey, look, but go back to the charity shops.

0:40:140:40:16

-I will do.

-You know where they are.

-I do.

-You've got a great eye.

0:40:160:40:18

-Thank you.

-Go and kit yourself out.

-I will.

-Thank you.

0:40:180:40:20

It's all out there. Check it out.

0:40:200:40:22

Next, the bronze baby sat on a stork.

0:40:230:40:26

Elizabeth, you made Mark Stacey jump up and down with excitement

0:40:270:40:32

-at the valuation day.

-I'm so pleased.

0:40:320:40:34

And I saw it, and I thought, "Yes, quirky, quirky's in."

0:40:340:40:36

And it's hard to put a value on that because it could fly away.

0:40:360:40:38

It is, because I've never seen that model but it's charming.

0:40:380:40:41

It's a representation of the stork delivering the baby,

0:40:410:40:43

but the baby's on the back, clinging onto the stork.

0:40:430:40:46

And I think it's great fun.

0:40:460:40:47

I think this is going to find its own level and it may surprise us.

0:40:470:40:50

-Ready for this?

-Oh, I am, Paul.

0:40:500:40:52

Right, let's do it. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:40:520:40:54

311 is the bronze model of a baby riding a stork, an unusual subject.

0:40:540:41:01

What's it worth? Start me, £100 to go.

0:41:010:41:03

-80 then, to start.

-Come on.

-Come on.

-Come on, £80, surely.

0:41:030:41:07

80 is bid. £80.

0:41:070:41:08

85?

0:41:080:41:09

90. 95? £100?

0:41:100:41:13

-Oh, we've got the reserve.

-Selling on the internet now for £100.

0:41:130:41:16

Is that it?

0:41:160:41:18

£100 bid. I'm going to sell it, though.

0:41:180:41:21

All done? £100.

0:41:210:41:23

Oh, I feel quite deflated.

0:41:230:41:26

So do I, so do I, because if it was Bergman, it would be 300.

0:41:260:41:29

But we don't know that.

0:41:290:41:31

-It's going to a good cause.

-It's going to a good cause.

0:41:310:41:33

-It's going to a hospice.

-Oh, well, that's wonderful.

-Yeah.

0:41:330:41:36

Thank God we put a reserve on it.

0:41:360:41:38

-Yes, well...

-I'm glad we protected it.

0:41:380:41:40

Yeah, and it's been fun.

0:41:400:41:41

And finally, next up, the 1950s Rolex.

0:41:420:41:46

Going under the hammer right now we have a '50s Rolex watch,

0:41:460:41:49

belonging to Vicky,

0:41:490:41:50

and I think this could do the top end of Jonathan's estimate.

0:41:500:41:54

-And I know your husband's sadly passed away now, hasn't he?

-Yes.

0:41:540:41:57

But he loved his watches.

0:41:570:41:58

-He did.

-And this was one he picked out, so it means...

0:41:580:42:00

-It means a lot to you?

-Yes, yes.

0:42:000:42:03

Have you got any other watches that he had?

0:42:030:42:06

-Lots.

-Lots.

0:42:060:42:07

OK. I think you're right with the estimate, eight to 12.

0:42:070:42:10

It's a good-looking watch.

0:42:100:42:12

Well, look, fingers crossed we get that top end of Jonathan's estimate.

0:42:120:42:16

It is quality. We keep saying, quality sells,

0:42:160:42:18

but it's a great name as well,

0:42:180:42:19

and hopefully it's going to go to someone in the room.

0:42:190:42:21

-Let's put it to the test. Ready?

-Right.

0:42:210:42:23

A gents' Rolex Oyster perpetual,

0:42:230:42:25

a very nice thing and I've got to go straight in at £1,200 on the bid.

0:42:250:42:29

-£1,200.

-You were right.

0:42:290:42:31

-Got the phone on it as well.

-Straight in.

0:42:310:42:33

-He knew his stuff, didn't he?

-1,300 on the phone.

0:42:340:42:37

Commission's out. It's at £1,300.

0:42:370:42:40

Any more interest at 1,300?

0:42:400:42:42

Commission's out, no?

0:42:420:42:43

I think we're going to be selling to the phone bid.

0:42:430:42:45

It's going to be sold, fair warning, it's sold, £1,300.

0:42:450:42:49

-Well. Well done, you.

-Yeah, very pleased.

-Well done. You knew that.

0:42:490:42:52

-Yeah, so am I, so am I.

-He knew his quality, didn't he?

0:42:520:42:55

He did, yes, yes.

0:42:550:42:56

-It's a good thing.

-Well, great to see you again.

0:42:560:42:58

-OK, thank you.

-If you've got anything like that,

0:42:580:43:00

we'd love to sell it for you.

0:43:000:43:01

Bring it along to one of our valuation days.

0:43:010:43:03

That's where your journey starts.

0:43:030:43:04

Details of upcoming venues you can find on our BBC website,

0:43:040:43:07

or check our BBC Facebook page.

0:43:070:43:09

We're coming to an area, hopefully, very near you soon.

0:43:090:43:11

So dust them down, bring them in and we'll flog 'em.

0:43:110:43:14

The Flog It! team visits the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich. Antique experts Mark Stacey and Jonathan Pratt find a varied collection of objects among the hundreds of visitors. Paul Martin takes a ride along the Thames on board an amphibious vehicle.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS