Reading 30 Flog It!


Reading 30

Paul Martin presents from Reading in Berkshire. Anita Manning and David Harper come across a large Victorian gold and garnet pendant and a 1930s toy aeroplane.


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Transcript


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Today we're in the town of Reading, in Berkshire,

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and our production team and crew are already hard at work

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preparing this magnificent concert hall, ready for filming.

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And just in case you've missed it,

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the centrepiece of this magnificent building has to be

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this gigantic organ. Later on in the programme,

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we'll be finding out more about it,

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and David, here, has kindly agreed to give us a demonstration.

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Now, I've just been told there's quite a queue gathering outside,

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so take it away, maestro, and welcome to "Flog It!"

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Reading boasted the third most important

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Benedictine abbey in England during the medieval period

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and the ruins can be seen in the town today.

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Then, in the Victorian era,

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the coming of the railway contributed to the success

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of local manufacturing, and Reading prospered.

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It was during this time that the beautiful town hall

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was remodelled and extended.

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Inside the town hall is Reading Museum,

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which is comprised of 11 galleries

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and the town hall also boasts a superb concert hall,

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where we are setting up our valuation tables today.

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HOARSELY: The concert hall opened in May 1882

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and the first performance was the Hallelujah Chorus.

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But in the year 2000, it underwent magnificent restoration

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and today it's one of the finest examples of its kind in the country.

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I'm keen to get inside to find out more,

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but I know this lot are keen to get on with those valuations.

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They are here to see our experts to ask that all-important question,

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-which is... ALL:

-What's it worth?

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And if you're happy with the valuations,

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what are you going to do? Flog it!

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We haven't even opened the doors yet and I've already lost my voice.

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I'm so excited!

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And searching the queue to find treasures to take off to auction,

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we have Anita Manning...

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-That's lovely!

-..and David Harper.

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I really like that.

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And Anita is already building a rapport with the crowd.

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Aren't the Reading folk wonderful?

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You say it... She says it about everybody!

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Anita, you charmer!

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It's time now to open those doors so we can get the proceedings underway

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and, whilst everyone gets inside the concert hall,

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let's take a look at what's coming up later on in the show.

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Anita finds a silver sugar shaker in need of a polish...

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We thought we shouldn't over-clean it.

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-There appears to be no chance of that happening!

-No.

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..and emotions run high at the auction.

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I'm going to start crying in a minute.

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Did you hear that result? That was fantastic, wasn't it?

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Oh, bless you!

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'And I'll be getting hands on,

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'learning the art of making stained glass.'

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Phew, I'm hot!

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Well, everybody is now safely seated inside the concert hall,

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so it's time to get on with those all-important valuations.

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Let's hand the proceedings over to our experts.

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Here's the first lucky owner. Who's it going to be?

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Now, Amanda, that is a very posh bowl.

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Tell me about it. Are you a very posh person?

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No, not at all. Car-boot sale.

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What?! No!

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-Yeah.

-Tell me, which car-boot sale?

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It was somewhere outside Salisbury and, yes,

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it was just one of those things.

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I saw it and I liked it and I bought it.

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I thought it was a Lalique, but I wasn't too sure.

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OK, why did you think it was Lalique?

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Just because of the colouring and the shapes and I just thought,

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"Well, you know, it has to be something lovely."

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Right, OK, so when we're looking at Lalique,

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I'm just going to handle it here, what did you see?

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I just saw the bluey, kind of...

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Like opalescent, yes?

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I mean, the design is absolutely fantastic.

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You've got fish, there, swimming amongst waves.

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When you pick it up and you feel it,

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you can feel the texture and the weight

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and it's just such a lovely piece of glass.

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It really is. It's very, very tactile.

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And how does it ring? Have you given it a bit of a ding?

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-No!

-Do you trust me?

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-Yeah...

-Amanda, trust me, I've only broken four pieces today.

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Ready?

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-GLASS RINGS

-Oh, wow!

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-I've never done that before!

-It rings well.

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There are no cracks there.

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So, how much did you pay for it?

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-£70.

-£70.

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OK. Now, then, let's discover whether, in fact, it is Lalique.

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Well, I can tell you from 20 feet away that this is in fact...

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Rene Lalique.

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And I emphasise the Rene bit

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because Rene Lalique formed his business in 1885.

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When he makes the glass, he marks it R Lalique.

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Rene dies in 1945

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and, as soon as he dies, the company continues trading,

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his son takes it over, but they drop the R.

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Yeah? So, there's a big difference between an R Lalique and a Lalique.

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So if it's R, we know it's pre-1945.

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It's a genuine thing, it's a gorgeous thing,

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it's in great condition.

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You've got a very good eye

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to spot that Rene Lalique bowl before anyone else.

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Because if I was there, I would have been in and out like a shot.

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-I was in and out like a shot!

-You were? Right, OK.

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Well, now we've got to talk, Amanda, about valuation, haven't we?

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So, you've got to, when you're putting things into auction,

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make sure that you get them in at a sensible estimate

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to get people interested.

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So that interesting estimate for me would be

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-300 to 500, so that's a pretty good return.

-Yeah.

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-Sounds good.

-Is it in line with what you were thinking? Yeah.

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-Are we going to reserve it at 300?

-Yes.

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OK. Rene Lalique bowl, going to auction, 300 to 500.

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-You've done really well.

-Thank you.

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Next, it's a family affair over on Anita's table.

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Are you two sisters?

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-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-And it's Heidi?

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-Yes.

-And Laurie?

-Yeah.

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And you've brought along this poor wee thing

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that hasn't been cleaned, doesn't look as if it's been loved.

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Tell me where you got it.

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We had it left to us by our mother,

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but it's been in the family for as long as we can remember,

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but it's just been in the cupboard, hidden.

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Even before we lost our mum, I think it was in the cupboard, hidden.

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We thought we shouldn't over-clean it.

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That's really... Yeah, what we've done.

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Sometimes that's a good thing

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cos we don't want to erase the hallmarks,

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-but there appears to be no chance of that happening!

-No.

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We thought we'd make your job easier!

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And do you know what it is, girls?

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-We presume is a sugar shaker...

-Yeah.

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..but, other than that, don't know anything.

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Well, it's from the late 1800s,

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the Victorian times,

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and if you can imagine, big families at that time -

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big tables, elaborately decorated with all the bits and pieces

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and, at pudding time, this would have sat on the table

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and it would have been used to dispense sugar

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onto your strawberries and cream.

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Do you girls like strawberries and cream?

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-Yes. I do.

-Not so much the cream.

-I like the sugar on it as well.

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Yeah. That's why we've not used it,

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it's been in the cupboard cos I don't like strawberries and cream.

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That's no excuse.

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If we look at the hallmark, we can see the Britannia mark.

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Now, Britannia silver has a slightly higher silver content

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than our usual standard hallmarked silver.

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The letter mark tells us that it was made in 1899,

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so it was the last year, really, of the Victorian era.

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The decoration is very attractive.

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We have this nice engraved top with leaves, flowers and so on.

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So, it's a nice item.

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It's in good condition apart from one part,

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and that is the dent here.

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-So it's taken a tumble at some point.

-Yeah.

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Price on it, girls, I would say that,

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going into auction with this damage,

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-I would like to put it in about £60-£80.

-Mm-hm.

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-I think that that might invite the bidding.

-Yeah.

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Would you feel happy parting with this?

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-Yeah, I don't think we are going to miss it.

-OK, girls,

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see you at the auction and I hope we make lots of dosh for you!

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# Halleluia

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# Halleluia

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# Halleluia, halleluia

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# Halleluia... #

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Well, look at that, we've got a full house!

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Now, this concert hall was designed to have great acoustics...

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Just listen to this. CLAP ECHOES

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..which perfectly accompanies this magnificent organ.

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We heard a few bars at the top of the show,

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played by our organ player here, David.

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Now, this is a Father Willis organ.

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The chap who built it is called Henry Willis,

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the greatest Victorian organ builder.

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He built over 2,000 organs,

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including the one at the Royal Albert Hall,

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so he is affectionately known as Father Willis

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because he's the master builder.

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Now, this one here in Reading is the least altered example

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of his work left in the country.

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It's a real gem and I'm going to catch up with David

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so we can hear a bit more.

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Those few bars you played were absolutely fantastic.

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Is it difficult to play?

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Well, it's a problem of coordination, I think,

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is the main thing.

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If you've got some keyboard skills, you are halfway there.

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-OK.

-People often say to me,

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"How do you cope with all the pedals?"

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-There are a lot of pedals down there.

-There are, yes,

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and, yes, it takes a long time to get used to that,

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but I say to people, "You don't think about looking at the pedals

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"when you're driving your car after you've practised for a while,

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"and it's much the same here."

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-Although I've got 30 pedals rather than just three!

-Yes.

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And also, the consequences of getting a wrong note here

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are rather less severe than getting the wrong pedal in a car.

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Mind you, the wrong note with this, with a packed house...

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-Oh, it could be deafening!

-Well, yes, I wouldn't like to be you!

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-It's like the human octopus, one of my friends often says.

-Yes!

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Hey, you'd be... You need an octopus to play one of these!

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Well, look, play us out with something,

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-one of your favourite tunes.

-OK.

-Just a few bars.

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-Thank you, David.

-Thank you.

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HE PLAYS

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Finlandia, composed by Jean Sibelias.

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Beautiful! But now it's time for a change of key

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as we enter the world of pop over on David's table.

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Tony, what on earth are we looking at here?

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This is meant to be an antiques valuation day!

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Yeah, well, it's pretty old, goes back to 1967.

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'67, OK.

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-What are we looking at?

-In 1967, Radio 1 started...

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-Yeah.

-..and just after it,

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I think there must have been some sort of publicity campaign

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or something like that,

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suggesting that people write in for posters, so I wrote in

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and these are posters that I got.

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OK, so you must have been just a young boy.

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I was about 14, yeah.

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-14. Radio 1 just had started in September.

-Yeah.

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-This is the original envelope.

-The envelope they came in, yeah.

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And that is dated the 9th of the 11th, '67,

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just a couple of months into it.

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-Yeah.

-Tell me more, because this must have been an amazing time

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-to be a 14-year-old.

-It was quite, yeah.

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I used to listen to Radio Caroline and things like that,

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-under the bedclothes.

-So you used to listen to the pirate radio?

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-Yeah.

-And, of course, Radio 1 came in, didn't they,

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to combat the scourge of the pirate radio?

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-That's it.

-That was the idea, wasn't it?

-That's it,

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and they stole quite a lot of the people from pirate radio.

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-This chap, Emperor Rosko.

-Emperor Rosko!

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-Do you remember him?

-I remember the name.

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-Kenny Everett, looking remarkably conservative.

-Yes.

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Yeah, very conservative.

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It's incredible. And the badges, tell me about the badges.

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Well, they came with the posters, and I think they're a bit naff.

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I think they're not naff, Tony.

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I think they're so 1967!

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Ring-a-ding, Radio 1, 24/7.

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It's such a '60s thing.

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They're fascinating, and remarkable that you've kept them

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in their original envelope as well.

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Well, that's really because I didn't like them much,

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I was very disappointed when I received them.

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-Right.

-So they did go on the wall for a few months, I think,

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but then I decided I didn't like them that much and put them away.

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Gosh! OK, have you seen them anywhere else for sale?

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I've never seen them before, but there must have been

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-thousands and thousands produced.

-You're right,

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these would have been produced in the hundreds of thousands,

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but most found themselves binned after six months.

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-I guess so.

-But what would you do with them today?

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I mean, 1960s stuff is incredibly fashionable.

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-Hence your shirt.

-Hence my shirt, exactly!

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Bang on trend!

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So, I think they'd be very popular, but what they're worth...

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Would you be disappointed if they sold for 20 quid?

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-Well, no, I wouldn't.

-OK.

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Well, then I think we are on safe ground

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because I'd like to put them into auction

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as an interesting collection,

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-at 30-50...

-All right.

-..and see what happens.

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-You never know.

-That's jolly good.

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Do you...? Would you be happy to take them home again

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-and put them in the drawer if they don't sell?

-If they do come home,

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they are going to go back into the loft, so probably not, so let's...

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-Shall we let them go?

-OK.

-Shall we be brave, Tony?

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We'll put 30 to 50, but they're going to sell anyway.

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OK. I love your style.

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'60S MUSIC PLAYS

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Well, we've certainly had a busy morning

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and our crews are working extremely hard,

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but we have found our first three items to take off to auction.

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-This is where it gets exciting!

-It does.

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It's hard to put a value on an antique, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-You know that, you know that, you've been watching the show.

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Who's your favourite expert?

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You are.

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-Oh! Well, I'm not really an expert.

-Anita.

-Anita! Well,

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let's find out if she's on the money, shall we?

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We're going straight over to the auction room.

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Here's a quick recap of all the items we're taking with us.

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Amanda bought her Rene Lalique bowl for £70 at a car-boot sale,

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so fingers crossed for a healthy profit at the auction.

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Heidi and Laurie's silver sugar shaker

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has been languishing unpolished in a cupboard,

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so let's find it a new home.

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And finally, Tony's Radio 1 posters and badges

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are heading under the hammer.

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We are staying in Berkshire for our auction today,

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but we're relocating to the market town of Wokingham,

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to Martin & Pole.

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Well, it's the day of reckoning.

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It's auction time and I'm feeling terribly excited

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and I haven't even set foot inside this saleroom.

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I know our owners are in there, we've got our items in there.

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It's got all the ingredients of a classic sale,

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so let's get inside and enjoy it.

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You can sit back and watch this rollercoaster ride of emotions

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as we put our items under the hammer.

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Remember, whether you're buying or selling at auction,

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there is commission and VAT to pay.

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Here, sellers pay 15% plus VAT.

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Our auctioneer Matt Coles is already hard at work on the rostrum.

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Our first lot under his gavel is the silver sugar shaker.

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Laurie and Heidi, good luck.

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Good luck. I've got my voice back today, I lost it at the valuation.

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-You did.

-I remember seeing this.

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We're getting some good prices for silver here in the saleroom,

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so fingers crossed we can get the top end.

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We're on now, it's going under the hammer. Good luck.

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Got some interest in this and I'll start it with me

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at £90. 95 anywhere?

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-Straight in with that.

-High!

-Four bids on the books.

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£90. At £90.

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95, 100.

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There you are, girls!

0:16:070:16:09

With me at £100, and 10 on the internet.

0:16:090:16:11

120, 130, 140, 150,

0:16:110:16:14

160 with me now.

0:16:140:16:15

170 on the internet now, £170.

0:16:150:16:18

Any more? Selling, then, at £170.

0:16:180:16:21

-Good.

-That was great!

-That was a terrific result.

0:16:220:16:25

-That's respectable, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-It is, yeah.

0:16:250:16:27

-You're both happy?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:16:270:16:28

-We never thought that.

-No.

0:16:280:16:30

-The kids will eat tonight!

-Yeah!

0:16:300:16:32

-Well, no, they can sort themselves out, we'll eat!

-Yeah...

0:16:330:16:36

-I think someone's going down the pub, maybe!

-Me.

0:16:360:16:39

10? 10 I have, thank you.

0:16:400:16:42

Next up, Tony's Radio 1 posters and badges.

0:16:420:16:45

Let's hope our next lot is pick of the pops,

0:16:460:16:49

so they say if you're a DJ!

0:16:490:16:50

That's right, isn't it, pick of the pops?

0:16:500:16:52

Tony, it's great to see you again.

0:16:520:16:53

They're probably worth a lot more now than back then.

0:16:530:16:56

-Hopefully they've got...

-They were free then.

-Exactly!

0:16:560:16:58

So let's find out what they're worth.

0:16:580:17:00

They're going under the hammer right now.

0:17:000:17:02

Here's the four Radio 1 posters and the badges.

0:17:030:17:06

-Retro!

-Retro, this is where it's at!

0:17:060:17:09

£20 anywhere? 20 on the internet, I have.

0:17:090:17:11

On the internet at £20.

0:17:110:17:12

25 now on the internet.

0:17:120:17:14

It's all online, isn't it?

0:17:140:17:16

There's two people on the internet fighting away amongst themselves.

0:17:160:17:19

It's at £30 now.

0:17:190:17:20

See, nobody in the room.

0:17:200:17:22

It's at £30 on the internet.

0:17:220:17:23

Any more? Fair warning now. All finished?

0:17:230:17:26

They've gone. 30 quid's better than nothing, isn't it?

0:17:270:17:29

Yes, I've got six hangers-on here

0:17:290:17:31

and they all want a cup of coffee, so...

0:17:310:17:33

-You're going to blow the 30 quid in about five seconds!

-On coffee,

0:17:340:17:37

-yes!

-After all these years...

0:17:370:17:39

That's rock and roll!

0:17:390:17:40

Finally, it's time to test the market for Amanda's Lalique bowl.

0:17:460:17:49

I don't think you're taking this home.

0:17:510:17:53

-No.

-No, not at that sort of price.

0:17:530:17:54

-No, I hope not. I hope not.

-It's signed, it's an early one.

0:17:540:17:57

-It's pre-1945, it's got everything going for it.

-Yeah.

0:17:570:18:00

OK, let's find out what the bidders think, it's going under the hammer.

0:18:000:18:04

Start this with me at £250.

0:18:050:18:06

260 anywhere?

0:18:060:18:08

260, 270.

0:18:080:18:10

280, 290.

0:18:100:18:14

It's with me at 290.

0:18:140:18:15

Any more? At 290.

0:18:150:18:17

300 on the internet.

0:18:170:18:18

Any more? 320 on the internet now.

0:18:180:18:21

-At 320...

-Well, we're selling, aren't we?

0:18:210:18:23

It's going to go.

0:18:230:18:24

Any more? £320.

0:18:240:18:25

350, 380 on the internet.

0:18:250:18:27

400 in the room.

0:18:270:18:29

-A bit better than 70 quid, eh?

-At £400 in the room now.

0:18:290:18:32

All done. At 400...

0:18:320:18:34

-That's good, that's really good.

-Respectable, mid-estimate.

0:18:360:18:39

-It's about right, isn't it?

-Yes.

-And a good margin for you.

0:18:390:18:41

She's got a really good eye, this one.

0:18:410:18:44

She can spot a good thing from ten feet away.

0:18:440:18:46

What will you go out and buy with that, then? More...more...

0:18:460:18:49

-Go to the boot fairs?

-Yeah, I'll just keep my eye open.

0:18:490:18:52

-More Lalique?

-Do some more shopping.

-Studio portrait, anything?

0:18:520:18:55

Glass, pottery, silver.

0:18:550:18:58

And then put it back into another saleroom?

0:18:580:19:00

-Probably.

-Good for you, good for you!

0:19:000:19:02

30, 30 I have.

0:19:070:19:09

Well, there you are, that's our first three lots.

0:19:090:19:11

Three happy owners. So far, so good.

0:19:110:19:13

And we're coming back here to Martin & Pole

0:19:130:19:15

later on in the programme, so do not go away.

0:19:150:19:18

While I was in Reading,

0:19:180:19:19

I had the opportunity to get hands-on

0:19:190:19:22

and have a go at an art form I have greatly admired -

0:19:220:19:26

stained glass!

0:19:260:19:27

The craft of stained glass dates back to the medieval era,

0:19:320:19:36

when churches had windows that told Christian stories through pictures

0:19:360:19:40

to a population that was largely illiterate.

0:19:400:19:44

Today, new pieces of stained glass are created

0:19:440:19:46

using many of the original medieval techniques.

0:19:460:19:50

Reading boasts many churches which have beautiful examples,

0:19:500:19:53

and the town also has row upon row of Victorian houses,

0:19:530:19:57

which would have been built with stained-glass panels in them.

0:19:570:20:00

Today, many people are either restoring

0:20:000:20:03

or reinstating the stained glass in their period homes.

0:20:030:20:07

Of course, it isn't just about historic pieces.

0:20:090:20:12

There's also growing demand for new, ambitious pieces,

0:20:120:20:16

like this magnificent installation.

0:20:160:20:18

Isn't that special?

0:20:180:20:20

Now, the homeowner of this house has given me permission to come inside

0:20:200:20:23

and have a look, and it really does have the wow factor.

0:20:230:20:27

It's made up of thousands of pieces of coloured glass.

0:20:270:20:31

Quite breathtaking.

0:20:310:20:33

It's the work of a local man called John London

0:20:330:20:36

and his team of artists and craftspeople

0:20:360:20:38

and now I'm going to join up with him and do some stained glass,

0:20:380:20:41

get hands-on, but on a much more modest scale.

0:20:410:20:44

Reading Stained Glass is situated on a busy road

0:20:500:20:53

on the way into the town.

0:20:530:20:54

John and his team of dedicated craftsmen and women

0:20:560:20:58

restore period stained glass

0:20:580:21:00

and create new pieces for homes and churches.

0:21:000:21:03

They've even made windows for feature films such as Harry Potter,

0:21:030:21:07

where they created hundreds of genuine leaded windows for the sets.

0:21:070:21:10

-What a great workshop! Hi, everyone.

-Hello.

0:21:130:21:15

I'm really excited to do this.

0:21:150:21:17

Where do we start? What do we do, John?

0:21:170:21:19

OK, this is the drawing, which I've already prepared for you,

0:21:190:21:21

to make your little panel. Yeah.

0:21:210:21:23

So, first we're going to cut the glass.

0:21:230:21:26

When we're talking about history, talking about the Victorian period,

0:21:260:21:29

the medieval period, what sort of colours were in vogue then?

0:21:290:21:32

In the little borders, you'd have red glass.

0:21:320:21:34

-Yeah.

-Red glass is actually coloured in the metal oxide of gold dust,

0:21:340:21:38

so it actually represented wealth,

0:21:380:21:40

so you would have that in just small pieces,

0:21:400:21:43

because it has to be used sparingly because of the cost involved.

0:21:430:21:47

So if we'd picked this glass for the outside,

0:21:470:21:50

-that'd work for it very well.

-Yeah.

0:21:500:21:52

-OK.

-And then if we have some pastel colours on the inner borders,

0:21:520:21:56

quite pale colours, but they let plenty of light through.

0:21:560:21:59

-That's a different technique?

-This is English muffle glass.

0:21:590:22:01

You get this in old Victorian windows.

0:22:010:22:03

-So we've got that and now we pick the roundel?

-Yeah.

0:22:030:22:05

-The dark blue with that?

-Yeah, lovely.

0:22:050:22:07

-Very rich.

-Yeah, that's perfect.

0:22:070:22:09

Right, I guess it's time to get stuck in.

0:22:090:22:11

I'm going to take my... I'll take this off.

0:22:110:22:13

Where do we actually start? What do you do? The borders?

0:22:130:22:15

First thing you're going to do is cut all the pieces of glass.

0:22:150:22:18

We're going to cut the glass with this glass cutter.

0:22:200:22:22

-One more?

-That's it.

0:22:230:22:25

And then we put these on the line.

0:22:250:22:27

-This will apply pressure evenly on both sides of the line?

-Yeah.

0:22:270:22:31

-We hope!

-It will.

0:22:310:22:32

-Ready?

-Yeah.

0:22:320:22:34

There we go.

0:22:350:22:36

-Did it.

-Lovely.

0:22:360:22:38

-Right, I'm going to cut this side of the line, about there?

-That's it.

0:22:380:22:42

That's it, you just line that up where you've cut.

0:22:420:22:45

That's it, that's fine.

0:22:450:22:47

-That's delicate!

-You've cut your first piece.

0:22:470:22:49

-That's quite a good fit.

-That's a good fit?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:22:490:22:51

So, now I just go around and do all the red?

0:22:510:22:54

So, the next piece and then the next piece and so on.

0:22:540:22:56

One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight...

0:22:560:22:59

-11.

-Yeah.

0:23:000:23:01

OK.

0:23:020:23:03

Has glass always been cut this way?

0:23:060:23:08

Well, in medieval times,

0:23:080:23:09

-they didn't have things such as a glass cutter.

-No.

0:23:090:23:12

-They used to have a steel pole...

-Yeah.

0:23:120:23:14

..and they would heat it up in the fire until it was glowing red

0:23:150:23:19

and then drag it across the glass

0:23:190:23:21

and the glass would crack in that place

0:23:210:23:23

-where the metal rod had touched the actual glass.

-Gosh!

0:23:230:23:27

Thankfully, I've got it a bit easier today.

0:23:270:23:30

Here we go, the last one.

0:23:300:23:31

OK.

0:23:320:23:33

'But now it's time for the challenging part -

0:23:330:23:36

'guiding the cutter freehand around the curve.'

0:23:360:23:38

Gosh, this is difficult. Agh!

0:23:420:23:45

-There's a squiggle towards the end!

-I'm sure it'll be fine,

0:23:460:23:50

if you tap that off with this end of the glass cutter.

0:23:500:23:53

-There we go.

-It did pop off OK, didn't it?

0:23:550:23:57

-That's it, that's fine. Lovely.

-Are you sure that's all right?

0:23:570:23:59

Yeah, that'll be fine.

0:23:590:24:01

-That's the frightening bit.

-Yeah.

0:24:060:24:08

Right, here we go.

0:24:080:24:10

-That's my best bit.

-That's your best bit.

0:24:120:24:14

-That's the best bit.

-The last bit was the best bit.

0:24:140:24:16

How satisfying is that?!

0:24:160:24:19

Now, look, the pieces of the jigsaw.

0:24:190:24:21

-That's a lovely colour.

-Ta-da!

0:24:210:24:24

Phew, I'm hot!

0:24:240:24:26

-Are you tired out now?

-Yeah, I am tired!

0:24:260:24:28

-Gosh.

-It's hard work.

0:24:280:24:30

It was the pressure, the pressure of getting it wrong.

0:24:300:24:32

I wouldn't like to sort of pick out knights in armour

0:24:320:24:35

and do all of that kind of thing, you know.

0:24:350:24:37

-That's very, very skilful, isn't it?

-That's very, very advanced, yeah,

0:24:370:24:39

it's an original Victorian panel from about 1850.

0:24:390:24:43

-It's all hand painted and then kiln fired.

-Beautiful!

0:24:430:24:46

'Stained-glass styles varied drastically

0:24:520:24:54

'throughout the centuries,

0:24:540:24:55

'but the one thing they have in common

0:24:550:24:57

'is that they're usually set in a lead framework...'

0:24:570:25:00

That's it, lovely.

0:25:030:25:04

'..and creating the leaded frame is painstaking work.'

0:25:040:25:08

That's it.

0:25:080:25:09

-OK.

-Next piece of lead in.

0:25:090:25:12

'The lead borders, or channels,

0:25:120:25:14

'slot in between the pieces of glass.'

0:25:140:25:16

-You need three hands, don't you, doing this?

-So...

0:25:160:25:19

'And then, when it's all done,

0:25:190:25:20

'it all needs to be soldered together.'

0:25:200:25:23

That's it, if you put that on there and then take the iron off.

0:25:230:25:26

HE SQUEALS

0:25:260:25:28

There is a slight awkwardness and clumsiness to it,

0:25:280:25:31

which I'm kind of enjoying.

0:25:310:25:32

Yeah, I think it's going to look super when it's finished.

0:25:320:25:35

I know it's not as good as you would do cos I know it's a bit uneven.

0:25:350:25:38

It's very good for a beginner, and it's got charm.

0:25:380:25:40

-Right, I guess the final stage now is the puttying.

-That's right.

0:25:430:25:47

Let's get dirty with the putty!

0:25:470:25:48

That's it, and you work it in all the way round...

0:25:510:25:53

'The black putty is worked in with a brush

0:25:530:25:56

'between the glass and the lead.

0:25:560:25:57

'Overnight, the putty turns hard like cement

0:25:570:26:00

'and it makes the panel rigid and waterproof.'

0:26:000:26:03

Right, I think that's the last little bit now.

0:26:030:26:05

-That's it.

-Got to clean that up.

0:26:050:26:07

That's it, so you clean it all up with one of those.

0:26:070:26:11

So, basically, we're still just following traditional methods.

0:26:110:26:14

Exactly, yeah.

0:26:140:26:15

-Someone did exactly this hundreds of years ago.

-Mm.

0:26:150:26:18

'Once the excess putty is removed,

0:26:180:26:21

'whiting or chalk is brushed onto the glass to take the grease off.'

0:26:210:26:26

-Enough?

-That's...

0:26:260:26:28

-Too much?

-Bit too much, yeah.

0:26:280:26:30

A polish is then applied

0:26:320:26:34

to stop the lead oxidising and forming a white film

0:26:340:26:37

and then one last final brush.

0:26:370:26:40

-Getting really hot now!

-Yeah.

0:26:420:26:44

-How much more?

-I think that's about ready.

0:26:440:26:47

Ready for what? Just to hold up and admire?

0:26:470:26:49

Yeah.

0:26:490:26:50

That's brilliant, that's fantastic. It's really brilliant, John.

0:26:550:26:58

-It's good, isn't it?

-Yeah, thank you so much!

0:26:580:27:00

-I bet you're really pleased with that, aren't you?

-I am.

0:27:000:27:03

I'm proud of it. I'm going to find a place,

0:27:030:27:04

you know, pride of place at home, let the whole family enjoy it.

0:27:040:27:07

You can stand it on a windowsill

0:27:070:27:08

and when the sunlight comes through, it'll just look amazing.

0:27:080:27:11

Yes, thank goodness for people like you, you know,

0:27:110:27:13

passing on these skills, these long-lost skills.

0:27:130:27:15

A bit of patience and...wow, you've got something to be proud of.

0:27:150:27:19

Welcome back to the Concert Hall here in the heart of Reading.

0:27:280:27:32

As you can see, we've still got a full house,

0:27:320:27:34

so let's raise the curtain and get on with our second performance.

0:27:340:27:37

It's straight over to Anita Manning.

0:27:370:27:39

Dave, one of my loves is paintings.

0:27:400:27:44

Tell me, where did you get it?

0:27:440:27:46

Well, the story began quite a number of years ago when my mother,

0:27:460:27:50

who was born in Greece, put an advert in a lonely-hearts column.

0:27:500:27:54

-Oh, wow!

-And my father, living in England, he saw the advert,

0:27:540:27:59

he replied and, on the third visit, they were married.

0:27:590:28:03

-Oh, wow!

-And Mum came to live in England

0:28:030:28:07

and still lives in Aldershot today.

0:28:070:28:10

And I'm here today to hopefully sell the painting on her behalf.

0:28:100:28:14

So, this was your mum's picture.

0:28:140:28:17

Where did she get it?

0:28:170:28:19

When mum came to England, she became very,

0:28:190:28:21

very good friends with another Greek lady.

0:28:210:28:24

Sadly, a number of years ago,

0:28:240:28:25

the lady passed away and the painting was left to my mum.

0:28:250:28:29

Given to your mum. Oh, that's lovely.

0:28:290:28:31

And did your mum like the picture?

0:28:310:28:33

She did, and initially, it was on display in the home, but, you know,

0:28:330:28:37

you decorate and, sadly, for quite some time it's been in a cupboard.

0:28:370:28:41

And what I'm seeing here is, I would say, a typical Victorian picture,

0:28:410:28:46

maybe from the mid-1800s.

0:28:460:28:49

It's a charming scene.

0:28:490:28:51

-Yes, it is.

-It's oil on board,

0:28:510:28:53

a beautiful woodland scene with a little girl who looks like

0:28:530:29:00

Little Red Riding Hood...

0:29:000:29:01

-Yes, she does.

-..coming through the wood.

0:29:010:29:04

What I love about this picture are the wonderful strong and clear

0:29:040:29:11

autumnal colours and, if you look at the bark here,

0:29:110:29:16

how realistic is that?

0:29:160:29:18

The light as well.

0:29:180:29:20

The wonderful light coming through the wood from behind.

0:29:200:29:25

Now, we've searched and we can find no signature.

0:29:250:29:30

But sometimes the back of a picture can tell you so many things.

0:29:300:29:37

And we have...

0:29:370:29:38

This label here is the label of the suppliers of the board and it's a

0:29:380:29:45

London board, so we think maybe it would be a London artist.

0:29:450:29:48

-OK.

-On here, we have a torn label and we've got Red Riding Hood.

0:29:480:29:56

-Yes.

-But not all of the letters, and then we have what looks like "Henry"

0:29:560:30:03

and then what looks like the beginning of the surname Darvall.

0:30:030:30:07

-OK.

-So, I know that there is a Victorian painter

0:30:070:30:11

called Henry Darvall.

0:30:110:30:13

-There is, OK.

-And I know this...

0:30:130:30:15

the subject of this painting is something

0:30:150:30:18

that he might have painted.

0:30:180:30:20

Let's look at this, and we'll need to turn the picture up this way.

0:30:200:30:26

What we have, again, Riding Hood, Little Red Riding Hood,

0:30:260:30:29

here and we have Henry Darvall, Camden.

0:30:290:30:34

So, if it came to me, I would attribute it to Henry Darvall.

0:30:340:30:38

OK, yeah.

0:30:380:30:40

Because there's enough evidence in the back.

0:30:400:30:43

That he was the painter.

0:30:430:30:44

That he was the painter.

0:30:440:30:46

-OK.

-I would probably put it in at perhaps £400-£600.

0:30:460:30:52

-We'll put a reserve on it.

-I'm happy with that. Absolutely.

0:30:520:30:55

Well, shall we put a reserve on it?

0:30:550:30:57

-Yes.

-We'll put a reserve of 400 on it,

0:30:570:31:00

but I hope that this lovely picture will soar and make lots and lots of

0:31:000:31:06

-dosh for your mum.

-You never know,

0:31:060:31:07

we may get an aeroplane ticket and go to Greece for a holiday.

0:31:070:31:10

Oh, I would love that to happen!

0:31:100:31:12

DAVE LAUGHS

0:31:120:31:13

Fingers crossed Dave and his mum, Maria,

0:31:130:31:15

will be flying high after the auction.

0:31:150:31:17

Over on David's table, things are taking off too.

0:31:170:31:21

Now, Sue and Robert, I've got to tell you,

0:31:230:31:26

I absolutely adore classic cars and classic aeroplanes.

0:31:260:31:31

Now, let me guess, Robert, who owns this one?

0:31:310:31:34

Well, we inherited it from my father-in-law and...

0:31:340:31:37

-You own it, then?

-I do! Yes!

-Oh, I see.

0:31:370:31:42

-OK, so, this was your dad's?

-It was indeed.

0:31:420:31:44

Yes. When he passed away, he had a shed full of

0:31:440:31:48

lots of interesting items.

0:31:480:31:50

It was actually packed to the gunnels

0:31:500:31:53

with different items and hidden away

0:31:530:31:55

in one corner, we found this little aeroplane.

0:31:550:31:57

He must have had it since he was a young boy.

0:31:570:32:00

He was born in 1925, so he probably had it something like the 1930s,

0:32:000:32:06

-I would imagine.

-Yeah, well, good guess,

0:32:060:32:08

that's exactly the period it dates from.

0:32:080:32:10

It screams the 1930s, doesn't it?

0:32:100:32:13

-Oh, right.

-It has been so incredibly well engineered,

0:32:130:32:17

made in the days when things that were made in Britain were renowned

0:32:170:32:21

for being the best quality in the world.

0:32:210:32:25

-Wow!

-Let's talk, Sue, about the box.

0:32:250:32:28

-Right.

-Boxes with toys, as we know, are so vitally important.

0:32:280:32:33

-Yes, yes.

-Because they're often

0:32:330:32:35

much rarer than the objects themselves.

0:32:350:32:38

-Yes.

-It's the Frog interceptor fighter.

0:32:380:32:41

-Do you know what Frog stands for?

-No, I did wonder.

0:32:410:32:44

It stands for Flies Right Off The Ground.

0:32:440:32:49

-Oh!

-Isn't that just fantastic?

0:32:490:32:52

-Oh, it's amazing, yes.

-So, let's look at the plane itself.

0:32:520:32:55

If you just lift that, that is so remarkably light,

0:32:550:32:59

it is ridiculous. The structure itself is aluminium.

0:32:590:33:02

You have your working propeller. And the wings, which, of course,

0:33:020:33:06

have to detach so it goes back into its box,

0:33:060:33:08

they're just pegged there and they're made from paper,

0:33:080:33:12

as are the tail fins, so it is so incredibly light.

0:33:120:33:16

So, what you do is, you dismantle the aeroplane, you take its wings

0:33:160:33:20

off, you place the body of the aeroplane into its winder box,

0:33:200:33:25

here, so the propeller joins this little

0:33:250:33:29

instrument and you literally wind up the mechanism.

0:33:290:33:32

You take it back out of the box, you fit its wings,

0:33:320:33:35

you place it on the ground and it flies right off the ground,

0:33:350:33:41

and it takes off and where it lands, nobody knows.

0:33:410:33:45

Well, he used to have a very big garden in his young days,

0:33:450:33:48

so he probably flew it in the garden quite a bit, I should think.

0:33:480:33:51

I'm sure he did, and I'm sure he flew it into the neighbours' garden.

0:33:510:33:54

-Probably.

-It's probably been through a window or two.

0:33:540:33:57

It's probably got him into all sorts of bother.

0:33:570:34:00

And that's maybe why he put it back in the box and put it away!

0:34:000:34:03

Maybe! Yes!

0:34:030:34:04

The toy market is fabulously buoyant.

0:34:040:34:07

-Oh, right.

-What value do you think it might have?

0:34:070:34:11

I only thought probably about £30.

0:34:110:34:13

You know what, I think you're about right.

0:34:130:34:15

I would like, if you want to send it to auction,

0:34:150:34:18

to put it in with an estimate of £40-£60.

0:34:180:34:21

That seems to be what they sell for.

0:34:210:34:24

But it will sell and it will be sold to somebody who will absolutely

0:34:240:34:29

-treasure it.

-That's the main thing, yes.

-Well, I'm absolutely delighted.

0:34:290:34:33

I can tell you, I don't think it's going to fly again,

0:34:330:34:36

but I can see that,

0:34:360:34:37

you know, in a gentleman's office, displayed like so.

0:34:370:34:42

That's something we call in this business "mantique".

0:34:420:34:46

Yes. That's really nice, yes.

0:34:460:34:48

Fantastic. Thank you for bringing it in.

0:34:480:34:50

Well, we're certainly having so much fun here. This concert hall

0:34:550:34:59

makes the perfect venue to film in.

0:34:590:35:01

Having a good time, everyone?

0:35:010:35:02

-Yes!

-That's what it's all about.

0:35:020:35:04

-You're in good voice, aren't you?

-Definitely.

0:35:040:35:07

If you'd like to take part in the show,

0:35:070:35:08

this is where your journey starts -

0:35:080:35:10

at a valuation day just like this.

0:35:100:35:12

If you've got any antiques and collectables you want to sell,

0:35:120:35:15

we want to flog them for you. Bring them along.

0:35:150:35:17

Details of upcoming dates and venues you can find on our BBC website,

0:35:170:35:20

or check out our BBC Facebook page, or the details in your local press.

0:35:200:35:24

Come on - dust them down, bring them in and we will flog them.

0:35:240:35:27

Right, now for our final valuation of the day,

0:35:270:35:30

and something glittery has caught Anita's eye.

0:35:300:35:32

Barbara, tell me, where did you get it?

0:35:330:35:36

It was left to me by an aunt.

0:35:360:35:38

-Have you had it a long time?

-I think about 15 years.

0:35:380:35:41

Are you fond of jewellery?

0:35:410:35:43

I do like jewellery. I do wear the bit at the front, on a chain,

0:35:430:35:47

but not the actual complete lot.

0:35:470:35:49

This bottom piece here can be unhooked

0:35:490:35:53

so that you can wear the top piece on its own

0:35:530:35:57

or you can wear the bottom piece as a pendant or brooch.

0:35:570:36:02

It's a big, fabulous piece of bling, though, you have to admit!

0:36:020:36:06

-Oh, yes, yes.

-It's a yellow metal.

0:36:060:36:08

Now, there is no hallmark,

0:36:080:36:11

but it is my feeling that this is a high-carat gold.

0:36:110:36:16

-Yes.

-15, possibly 18.

0:36:160:36:19

And the reason that I'm saying that is because of

0:36:190:36:22

this lovely yellow, honey colour, which in Victorian times

0:36:220:36:26

you could associate with 18-carat or 15-carat gold.

0:36:260:36:31

But in auction, our auctioneer will only be able to

0:36:310:36:35

call it yellow metal, but those who know will know.

0:36:350:36:39

-Yes.

-It is encrusted with garnets.

0:36:390:36:45

And garnets are a wonderful stone.

0:36:450:36:48

They are not a precious stone,

0:36:480:36:50

like diamonds, sapphires, emeralds or rubies -

0:36:500:36:52

it's what we would call a semiprecious gemstone.

0:36:520:36:56

-Yes.

-Now, garnets have been used in jewellery

0:36:560:37:02

since Roman times

0:37:020:37:04

and it was a particular favourite of the Victorians.

0:37:040:37:08

Price on it...

0:37:080:37:10

I would estimate this at £200-£300 going into auction.

0:37:100:37:15

-Yes.

-I think it will be very well-fancied

0:37:150:37:19

-because it is a big statement piece.

-Yes.

0:37:190:37:23

Would you be happy to go forward and sell?

0:37:230:37:26

Yes, I think so. I'd like to put a reserve on it.

0:37:260:37:29

We will put a firm reserve.

0:37:290:37:31

-Yes.

-We will put a firm reserve.

0:37:310:37:33

Now, we can't put a reserve above the lower estimate,

0:37:330:37:36

so our reserve would have to be £200.

0:37:360:37:41

-Yes.

-Now, are you... You've got to be happy about it, Barbara.

0:37:410:37:45

Yeah, I wouldn't be happy to sell it for 200.

0:37:450:37:48

Shall we put it at 250?

0:37:480:37:50

-Yes.

-Let's do that.

0:37:500:37:52

A firm reserve of £250.

0:37:520:37:55

-Yes.

-Let's take it to auction

0:37:550:37:57

and I hope that this will fly because it's a splendid piece.

0:37:570:38:01

Yes, right, thank you very much.

0:38:010:38:03

-Thank you for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

0:38:030:38:05

Well, that's it - we've found our final three items

0:38:060:38:09

to take off to auction, so it's time to say goodbye

0:38:090:38:11

to the concert hall here, in the town hall at Reading.

0:38:110:38:14

But before we head back to the saleroom,

0:38:140:38:16

here's a quick reminder of all the items we are taking with us.

0:38:160:38:20

Fingers crossed the Victorian painting of Red Riding Hood

0:38:200:38:24

belonging to Maria, who is Dave's mum, will fly away at auction.

0:38:240:38:28

Sue's Frog interceptor fighter plane is in fabulous condition,

0:38:280:38:32

considering it dates from the 1930s and has paper wings.

0:38:320:38:37

And finally, let's hope Barbara's garnet and gold pendant brooch

0:38:370:38:40

shines in the saleroom as we head back to Wokingham,

0:38:400:38:43

where auctioneer Matt Coles is still hard at work on the rostrum.

0:38:430:38:47

-You wore it, didn't you, Barbara?

-Yes, I used to wear it.

-You used to.

0:38:490:38:52

-Good on you!

-I haven't for a long time.

-No, good on you.

0:38:520:38:54

I know, it's a fashion thing, isn't it?

0:38:540:38:56

But garnets are fashionable just now.

0:38:560:38:58

-They are coming back again, aren't they?

-Yeah, they are.

0:38:580:39:00

Well, hopefully you will get the top end of your valuation.

0:39:000:39:03

Are you ready for this? Are you going to say goodbye to it?

0:39:030:39:06

-I think we will today, don't you?

-Fingers crossed.

0:39:060:39:08

Here we go.

0:39:080:39:09

Lot 548A is a Victorian golden garnet pendant brooch.

0:39:110:39:15

-I have absentee bids on this one.

-Good.

0:39:150:39:18

And I can start it with me at £260.

0:39:180:39:20

Yes! Straight in!

0:39:200:39:23

At £260.

0:39:230:39:25

Are we all done at 260?

0:39:250:39:27

Selling, then, at 260.

0:39:270:39:29

-All done?

-Yup, yup.

0:39:290:39:32

260. Well, straight in.

0:39:320:39:34

-That's all right, isn't it?

-Yes, yes.

0:39:340:39:37

-That's the price.

-It was a good thing.

0:39:370:39:39

Next up, it is Sue's Frog interceptor fighter plane.

0:39:410:39:44

I love this. This was your dad's, wasn't it?

0:39:450:39:47

-It was indeed, yes.

-And it's boxed! It's boxed!

-I know.

0:39:470:39:51

Doesn't it make you want to rip it out of its box and play with it?

0:39:510:39:55

Did you? I would have done as a kid.

0:39:550:39:58

-Yes!

-But your dad was so well-behaved to keep it all intact.

0:39:580:40:02

He must have been, yes.

0:40:020:40:03

It's all there and it's ready to go.

0:40:030:40:06

Let's hope it flies. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:40:060:40:09

The Triang Frog Mark IV interceptor fighter.

0:40:100:40:14

Absentee bids on this one.

0:40:140:40:16

I can start with me at £40.

0:40:160:40:19

Straight in at £40.

0:40:190:40:20

Selling. Any more at £40?

0:40:200:40:23

42, 45, 48,

0:40:230:40:25

50, 55, 60...

0:40:250:40:28

At £60 now. Any more at £60?

0:40:280:40:31

At £60, then, any more?

0:40:310:40:32

-£60, that's more like it, isn't it?

-That's really nice.

0:40:340:40:37

Brilliant. Well done for hanging onto that and bringing it along.

0:40:370:40:40

-It's been really, really good.

-We had fun.

-Yes.

0:40:400:40:43

It was really good.

0:40:430:40:44

And now for our final lot of the day,

0:40:470:40:49

the painting of Little Red Riding Hood.

0:40:490:40:51

We need two return tickets to Greece

0:40:540:40:56

so you can take your mum back to the village she was born in,

0:40:560:40:58

and this Victorian oil should do it,

0:40:580:41:00

and we have our own Little Red Riding Hood.

0:41:000:41:03

Look at this, you are dressed perfectly for it!

0:41:030:41:05

Yeah. Are you the big bad wolf?

0:41:050:41:06

HE GROWLS It's a great painting, isn't it?

0:41:060:41:10

It's just a shame it's not signed and dated.

0:41:100:41:12

We can attribute it to Henry Darvall,

0:41:120:41:14

but we are not quite sure.

0:41:140:41:15

Yes, in the end, the buyer has got to make up his own mind.

0:41:150:41:18

Exactly. Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:41:180:41:20

It is going under the hammer right now.

0:41:200:41:21

Lot 149.

0:41:240:41:26

I have absentee bids on this one, I can start it with me at £400.

0:41:260:41:30

With me at £400.

0:41:310:41:33

At £400.

0:41:330:41:35

And 20, 450. 480, 500.

0:41:350:41:39

520, 550, 580, 600.

0:41:390:41:44

620.

0:41:440:41:45

At 620. Any more?

0:41:450:41:47

-650 on the internet.

-Brilliant!

-680 in the room.

0:41:470:41:51

700 on the internet.

0:41:510:41:52

-Fantastic!

-At £700 now, on the internet.

0:41:520:41:56

-Are we all done in here?

-720.

-I'm going to start crying in a minute!

0:41:560:41:59

At £720.

0:41:590:42:01

Any more on the internet? 720, 750 now.

0:42:010:42:04

Yes! Yes!

0:42:040:42:06

780 in the room.

0:42:070:42:09

-800.

-Well done, well done.

0:42:090:42:10

800 on the internet.

0:42:100:42:12

At £800 on the internet now.

0:42:130:42:15

Any more at £800?

0:42:150:42:17

Are we all done, then? Fair warning now. £800.

0:42:170:42:19

-820.

-Oh, brilliant, brilliant.

0:42:190:42:22

Have we got 850 on the internet?

0:42:220:42:24

850 on the internet.

0:42:240:42:25

At £850 on the internet.

0:42:270:42:29

All done now? Fair warning.

0:42:290:42:31

At £850...

0:42:310:42:32

Yes! £850. Well, that's a great result.

0:42:340:42:36

-Wonderful, wonderful.

-That's the one we wanted.

0:42:360:42:38

Quality always sells. And your mum is here, isn't she?

0:42:380:42:41

-She's just sitting down there.

-Just behind the camera over there.

0:42:410:42:44

-Oh, how lovely!

-I've got a lump in my throat now

0:42:440:42:47

because we are going to get the plane tickets to Greece

0:42:470:42:50

-and that is for sure.

-Fantastic.

-Thank you both very much indeed.

0:42:500:42:52

Here she is now. Come on in, my darling, come and stand here.

0:42:520:42:55

Did you hear that result?

0:42:550:42:57

-Yeah.

-It was fantastic, wasn't it?

0:42:570:42:58

Oh, bless you! Bless you, look.

0:42:580:43:00

Come here, stand next to Dave. Well done, you two. And...

0:43:020:43:05

..that's a great way to end today's show, isn't it?

0:43:060:43:08

-Thank you very much.

-Flying off to Greece.

0:43:080:43:11

I'm going to Greece.

0:43:110:43:13

Well, look, thank you for joining us at the very last minute.

0:43:130:43:16

-Thank you very much.

-Enjoy Greece, and look after her. I know you will.

0:43:160:43:18

Mums are definitely the best. What a way to end today's show!

0:43:180:43:21

I knew there would be a surprise, and we certainly had one.

0:43:210:43:24

Join us again soon for many more, but until then, from Wokingham,

0:43:240:43:27

-it's goodbye.

-Yes, lovely, thank you.

0:43:270:43:30

Paul Martin presents from Reading in Berkshire, where experts Anita Manning and David Harper scour the crowd to find objects to take to auction. Anita gets excited over a large Victorian gold and garnet pendant, and David has some fun with a 1930s toy aeroplane. Paul rolls up his sleeves and gets stuck in when he learns the craft of stained glass.


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