Herstmonceux 35 Flog It!


Herstmonceux 35

The team visit Herstmonceux Castle and antiques experts Jonathan Pratt and James Lewis find treasures to take to auction, including some beautiful bronze sculptures.


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Transcript


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Today, we're at Herstmonceux Castle in Sussex.

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Now this is the stuff that fairy tales are made of.

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Just look at that!

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And just look at that amazing crowd we've got today.

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People have come from far and wide, laden with bags and boxes

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and all sorts of treasures for our experts to see.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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Even though it was built in 1441, this magnificent castle,

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circled by a moat,

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has weathered the centuries in remarkably good condition.

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That's because it was built as a grand home,

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rather than a military castle,

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and for hundreds of years, it's been home to wealthy owners.

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These days, it's a university campus,

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with students coming from all over the world to study

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in the unique surroundings of a medieval castle.

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Today, our Flog It! faithful are gathered outside,

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like a mighty army laying siege to a castle.

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Only, they're armed with their bags

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and boxes full of antiques and treasures.

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They're here to see our experts, to get a valuation.

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And, if you're happy with that valuation, what are you going to do?

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Flog It!

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Welcome to the show.

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And today, ready to inspect the items brought in by this happy horde

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of Flog It! fans, we've recruited two of our finest antiques experts,

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-..Jonathan Pratt...

-I'll give you one of these stickers.

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It means that we will have a look at them in a bit.

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..and James Lewis.

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-What have we got in there?

-It's a Model T Ford.

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-Have you got a real one?

-No!

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They'll be battling it out, to find the owners with the best objects

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to take off to auction.

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I've sat on that railway, eating croissants, drinking coffee.

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Oh, hard life. Hard life.

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Wow! Don't bicker, boys.

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There's plenty of antiques for everyone.

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And there's not a moment to lose.

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We've got many items to look through,

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so, as everyone gets settled in in the colourful ballroom,

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here's a sneak preview of what's coming up later on in the show.

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Jonathan discovers one collection isn't to everyone's taste.

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He tends to be a bit of a Womble for collections.

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-But Wombles pick up rubbish, don't they?

-Well, yes.

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James tries to make off with one of his finds.

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The best place for that...

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And I get the chance to ride on a steam train with a big difference.

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Well, as you can see,

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everybody is now safely seated inside the ballroom,

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so let's get on with that first valuation.

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It's straight over to Jonathan Pratt's table

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and I know he's spotted something

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which could give us a real surprise in the auction room.

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Let's take a closer look at what he's talking about.

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So, Sally... welcome to Herstmonceux Castle.

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You've brought a great bunch of stuff along.

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-Yeah.

-Where has it all come from?

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My husband's aunt had them and...

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..they've just been in the family forever.

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OK. I spotted these in the queue.

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-Yes.

-And I spotted that to start with.

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That's right. A nice cigarette case.

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-Beautiful, isn't it?

-Gold, black enamel...

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It's hallmarked 14K on the inside of the lid,

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and that's often a purity that you associate with American gold work.

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The front here, this little rectangle, is set with diamonds.

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I wondered whether that was, yes.

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There is a lot of workmanship involved.

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But it didn't look like this when I saw it.

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What happened?

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Well, you saw it in the queue,

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and then I took it out of the box and it just had a life of its own.

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-Oh, no!

-And it just shattered onto the floor and I'm absolutely gutted.

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It's difficult to restore, because you have to get the...

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The refractive indices of the glass has to match.

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It's a real shame.

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Yes, it is. It just flew out of the box.

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But a fabulous piece of '20s history, OK.

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-Yes.

-And then, moving on, maybe a slightly later date.

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This is about 1930, still with the Art Deco feel.

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This is silver and black enamel again.

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-Yes.

-And...

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Ka-ching! Oh, gosh, look at that! You've got the marks on here,

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which are import marks, silver import marks.

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But it's circa 1930.

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-Yeah.

-That's a really cool thing.

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-Yeah.

-It ticks many boxes.

-Yeah.

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-The collectors of Art Deco, the collectors of sewing...

-Yeah.

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And then you've brought...

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You've brought a whole bunch of goodies along.

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And then, these three here.

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This is a very well-known picture by Thomas Gainsborough.

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-The Blue Boy, isn't it?

-The Blue Boy, yes.

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Silver and enamel, again.

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-It didn't get dropped.

-It didn't get dropped.

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-No.

-Not by you, anyway.

-No.

-But you've got engine turning,

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so that you get the pattern of the silver and the glass laid over.

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So, a really nice thing.

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People call them patch boxes,

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but it might have been a little powder box, perhaps.

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-Yeah.

-The same thing again. Nice traditional shape.

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Basket of flowers. It's nice.

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-Pretty.

-Mid-early century, last century.

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And then, finally, you've got this one, which is French silver,

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19th-century, slightly different.

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So, I've purposely put them in these little areas.

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I see them as three distinct...

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-Lots.

-Collectors' areas.

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-I'll start with this one.

-Be gentle with that one.

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Yeah, you know, I think, in the way it is at the moment,

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I think it's sensible to price it at £200-300.

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And what would it have been valued at, had it not have been that?

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-Come on.

-I would say, probably £600-£800.

-Oh, my goodness.

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Yeah, and maybe a little bit more. I haven't done the research,

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but I think a collector will be put off.

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The dealer will then take it on as a restoration job, perhaps.

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It's 14 carat gold and there's quite a lot of it there.

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So, that's the first lot, £200-£300.

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Collectors love sewing, silver, it's Art Deco.

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£100 to £150, thereabouts.

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And then, this little group here, £200 to £300.

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-OK.

-And reserves will fix just below the lower estimate, I would say,

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with what we call discretion.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes, that's fine.

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Fabulous. Well, I really love them

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and I hope we do really well for you.

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I hope so, too.

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It's such a shame Sally damaged one of the cases here today,

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but it's still a lovely collection.

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Next up is James and it looks like he's struck gold.

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Well, there's one thing you know will always sell well at auction

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and that is gold.

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Lorraine, why are you selling it?

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I'm selling it because I've just bought a new house.

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And I think it would be quite nice to put it towards the new house,

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with the family together, especially as I inherited it from my nan.

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So I think that's what she would like, really.

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-What do you know about it?

-I know it's 1904.

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It is a 20 gold coin,

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which my grandfather bought from a jeweller's in the Strand in London.

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He used to have a business in Covent Garden.

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He used to purchase a few items there for my nan

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and, hence, why I inherited it, really.

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Brilliant. Well, it's a great coin.

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On the front of the coin here, we've got Liberty.

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Let's have a look on the back.

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There we've got United States of America,

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20, and the US eagle in the centre there.

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It's just under pure gold.

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It's 21.6 carat.

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Our gold sovereigns in this country are 22 carats.

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-OK.

-So just a slightly better quality.

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Known as the Double Eagle.

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Designed by James Barton in 1849.

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And produced all the way through until 1907.

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James Barton was an engraver and a designer for the mint in America.

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And this is one of his most famous coins.

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I think that might do very, very nicely.

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-It's a good coin.

-Really?

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So, almost all the values of these

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fluctuate with the international gold price.

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At the moment, that's worth about 700.

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-OK.

-So 700-900, as an estimate, and I think it'll do jolly well.

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-OK.

-Is that all right for you, that sort of price?

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I was hoping it would be a little bit more.

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-Go on, then. What...?

-I did a little bit of research on the internet.

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I know it could go up to about 1,500.

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The internet prices vary.

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They're trying to get significantly more than the gold value.

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It does have a chance of selling to a coin collector,

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rather than a bullion dealer,

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Because the coin itself is in really lovely condition.

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It's not worn, it's not rubbed, it's not been drilled for a pendant.

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So it's got a chance.

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Where would you be happy? This is your coin and it's your inheritance,

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so you've got to be happy with it.

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If I said something along the lines of 1,000,

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would that be too much, or... What do you think?

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Would that put bidders off?

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You can try it, if you want to.

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Shall we go for 1,000 and see how it goes?

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Let's go for 1,000. Do you want that firm?

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-Yes.

-Yeah?

-Yes.

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-Let's go for it.

-Let's do it.

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-Let's try it.

-OK. Let's give it a go

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and, hopefully, somebody will buy it

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for the history and for the coin, as a coin, not the gold.

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Definitely. Lovely. Let's give it a go.

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Thanks very much. Thank you.

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Fingers crossed.

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There are still plenty of antiques for our experts to sift through

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and it looks like Jonathan has found a colourful little collection.

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I think you've brought

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a fascinating object along with you.

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I absolutely love it.

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A collection of postcards from the Swiss Alps.

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Brian, where did you get them from?

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Well, I bought them at a charity auction about 30 years ago.

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-Oh, OK.

-And they were all to a family called Carr

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and my father was a wholesale grocer and I remember vaguely going to this

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Carr's water biscuit factory in Portsmouth years and years ago.

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So you think they might have been associated to that family?

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I think they could well be, but they all come from a chap

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called Arnold Bally,

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who wrote these hundreds of cards and sent them to the Carr family

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between the period of 1910 and 1912.

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So, all of them are written by this chap.

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-All of them, yes.

-I mean,

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it's nice to see a collection that are from one person.

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-Yes.

-With a theme. At this date,

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the climbing centres were becoming really popular.

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-Yes.

-It kind of pre-dates, it really pre-dates skiing,

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so this was the Alpine sport of the day.

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And you've got images here of people summiting, you know,

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roping up and climbing up the side here.

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They would carry a picnic with them.

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You know, nowadays it's all about having lightweight gear and there,

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they were wearing tweed, with hemp ropes.

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-Absolutely.

-It's a fascinating collection of the 1900, 1912 period.

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The Romantic poets and the Romantic writers of the 19th century created

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a lot of interest in Switzerland. I mean, there was a lot of people

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interested in travelling out to Switzerland and holidaying

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and seeing the mountains.

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It's well written about, funnily enough.

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But you know, each one of these tells a story.

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I could just pore through this.

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-Keep going through it.

-Yes.

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But, Dee, what do you think of your husband's collecting?

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Well, he tends to be a bit of a Womble for collections.

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Wombles pick up rubbish, don't they?

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Well, yes, I didn't class this as rubbish,

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but I didn't really think it was anything of note,

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so it sat in the back of our cupboard for the last 30 years

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and then, we were coming today and I said to Brian,

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"What do you think we should take?"

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He said, "Well, you can see what they think of the cards."

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I really like them. I think a lot of people will like them, as well.

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I would have thought at the moment an estimate of sort of £60 to £80.

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-Yes.

-Maybe a little auctioneer's discretion somewhere around the £50

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-mark.

-Yes.

-I have great hopes. I really love it.

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Thank you very much for bringing it along.

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Many thanks, indeed. Well done.

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Well, there you are, you've just seen them. Our experts have now

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found their first three items to take off to auction.

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This is where it gets exciting.

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You've heard what they've had to say,

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you've probably got your own opinions, but, right now,

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it's down to the bidders.

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Let's find out what they think. Let's find out exactly

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what it's worth as we go over to the sale room.

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Here's a quick re-cap of all the items we're taking with us.

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We're auctioning Sally's silver cases as three separate lots,

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but can they achieve one big pay-out for her?

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Lorraine's gold coin might only be 20, but will it be worth a mint?

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And can those Swiss postcards make enough to open a Swiss bank account?

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We'll find out very soon.

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We're off to the picturesque town of Rye.

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In medieval times,

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it was a key part of England's coastal defences in the south.

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These days, the warships have been

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replaced by fishing and sailing boats.

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Our sale room is Rye Auction Galleries.

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The man on the rostrum is Kevin Wall.

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Remember, if you're selling at auction, there's commission to pay

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and here today, it's 15% plus VAT.

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Our first lot is Lorraine's 20 gold coin.

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Will it fetch the £1,000 she wants?

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I've just been joined by Lorraine and is it heads or tails?

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-Heads, I think.

-Or two eagles?

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-Maybe.

-That 20 gold coin.

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I'd never seen one before until the valuation day,

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so thank you for bringing that in.

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-You're welcome.

-I've learned a lot from that.

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What a lot of money, as well.

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-I know, I can't wait to see...

-What a lucky girl!

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It's a rare thing, but at the same time, there's a lot of gold in it,

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-as well. There were two... I'm just hoping...

-Two schools of thought.

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-Yeah.

-OK.

-I'm hoping that it will make more than the gold value and

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survive the week, otherwise it's straight into a pot,

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probably to the Birmingham Jewellery Quarter,

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melted down and you'll never see it again,

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so I'm just hoping it'll go at this value.

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OK. It's time to find out what the bidders think.

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The 1904 gold 20 American Liberty Double Eagle coin,

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designed by James B Longacre.

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At 750.

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Do I see 800 now?

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At 750. 800. 850. 900.

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Come on, come on, we need a bit more.

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-950. 1,000.

-Yes.

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-You've done it, you've done it.

-At 1,000, do I see 1,050?

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At 1,000. It's on the net. I can sell it.

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At £1,000. Are we all finished here?

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At £1,000.

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Gone. £1,000.

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-Good result.

-Phew!

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-Well, you're happy.

-Yeah. I'm glad.

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I'm really pleased Lorraine got the price she wanted.

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Next up are Brian and Dee's postcards and there's only one word

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to describe these.

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Lovely, lovely! And the fact that they're all from one family, really.

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One person sending back, I think that's really nice.

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-Quite amazing, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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-300-odd cards sent to the Carr family in Portsmouth.

-Yes.

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Exploration is really popular.

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I really hope they do well.

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OK. This is getting exciting.

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Whatever you do, don't go away, anchor yourself in your armchair

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right now, because this is going under the hammer.

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Here we go. Good luck, Dee.

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Lot number 250 is an early 20th century and later postcard album,

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mainly depicting scenic views of the Swiss Alps.

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42 I've got. 42.

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Do I see 45? At 42 now.

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At £42.

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Still here with me at 42.

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Nothing on the net. Nothing in the room?

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No? No?

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I'm afraid I'm going to have to

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pass on those. They're not going to sell, I'm afraid.

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Well, thank goodness you put a reserve on there.

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-I'm gobsmacked.

-So am I.

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You know, if I were allowed, I would have bought them myself.

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-But I'm not allowed.

-Do your own research, OK?

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Contact the families, if you can,

0:15:410:15:42

because that belongs back with the family somewhere.

0:15:420:15:45

-I think it does.

-Yeah.

-Yes.

0:15:450:15:47

Ah, the mysteries of auctions.

0:15:480:15:50

On another day, those cards would have been fought over by the buyers.

0:15:500:15:55

Finally, it Sally's cases, which we're selling as

0:15:550:15:59

three separate lots.

0:15:590:16:00

Going up first, we've got that lovely Art Deco sewing case,

0:16:000:16:03

that's the first one up. Oh, it's beautiful!

0:16:030:16:05

Why are you selling this?

0:16:050:16:06

Because it was Flog It! and I was here.

0:16:060:16:08

Oh, no, you just went, "Oh, it is nice, isn't it?

0:16:080:16:10

"What am I doing?" Good luck with this, Sally.

0:16:100:16:12

-What's with the boxing gloves?

-My husband was a boxer.

-Oh, was he?

0:16:120:16:15

-Yes.

-As a professional?

0:16:150:16:16

-No, amateur.

-But a good boxer?

0:16:160:16:18

-Very, very good. Very good, yes.

-OK, well, let's hope we can deliver

0:16:180:16:21

a sucker punch to the bidders right now.

0:16:210:16:23

-Absolutely.

-This is it.

0:16:230:16:24

One of the best items in the auction today, I believe,

0:16:260:16:28

the Art Deco miniature silver sewing case in black enamel.

0:16:280:16:32

And I start it at 65.

0:16:330:16:36

At 65. 70 are we now?

0:16:360:16:38

75.

0:16:380:16:40

85.

0:16:400:16:41

95.

0:16:410:16:43

100. 100 with you, sir.

0:16:430:16:45

110, is it now? 110. 120. 130. 140. 150.

0:16:450:16:51

-I love this.

-At 140, in the middle of the room.

0:16:510:16:55

150. 160. 150, with the young lady on the right now.

0:16:550:16:59

At 150. Do I see 160 now?

0:16:590:17:02

At £150.

0:17:020:17:04

-Hey!

-Oh, it gone.

-Thank you.

0:17:040:17:07

That's going to a good home.

0:17:070:17:10

-She looks pleased.

-One down, two to go.

0:17:100:17:12

The Art Deco cigarette case set with diamond chips to the front

0:17:120:17:18

and I've got to start this one at £130.

0:17:180:17:22

At 130. 140. 150.

0:17:220:17:25

160. 170. 180. 180 is here in the room. I'm out.

0:17:250:17:31

At 180. Have we all done here?

0:17:310:17:33

And finished at £180.

0:17:330:17:36

-180.

-That's fine.

-One more to go.

0:17:360:17:38

-That's good. Yes, OK.

-Here we go.

0:17:380:17:40

So, three boxes. There they are.

0:17:420:17:43

And I can start you at £130.

0:17:430:17:46

At 130. Do I see 140 now?

0:17:460:17:49

Beautiful little boxes here. At 130.

0:17:490:17:52

140, is it, now?

0:17:520:17:53

140. 150. 160. 170. 180 at the back.

0:17:530:17:59

I'm out. At 180.

0:17:590:18:00

Do I see 190 now?

0:18:000:18:02

At £180.

0:18:020:18:03

Have we all finished here?

0:18:030:18:06

At £180, the gentleman there at 180.

0:18:060:18:10

Brilliant! I have to say it like they say in the darts.

0:18:100:18:12

"180!" And it's sold.

0:18:120:18:15

And if my maths are right, 510. Is that right, Jonathan?

0:18:150:18:17

-Yeah, I would say so.

-510, Sally.

0:18:170:18:19

-Lovely.

-That's a good day's work here in Rye.

0:18:190:18:22

-Wonderful.

-You're going home with a big smile on your face.

-I am.

0:18:220:18:25

What a day we're having here in the auction room. It's so exciting.

0:18:280:18:32

Things are flying out. We're getting some great results.

0:18:320:18:35

I'm losing my voice, but more importantly, the owners are happy.

0:18:350:18:38

I love auctions. Things come in all shapes and sizes.

0:18:380:18:40

Now, before we go back to our valuation day,

0:18:400:18:42

to find some more treasures,

0:18:420:18:43

I'm taking a trip up the coastline, to have a look at a unique piece

0:18:430:18:47

of British history. It's a familiar shape,

0:18:470:18:49

but it's a rather unusual size. You'll love this.

0:18:490:18:52

In the south of Kent, the Romney,

0:19:000:19:02

Hythe & Dymchurch Railway has been running regular services along

0:19:020:19:07

13 miles of coastline between Hythe and Dungeness since 1927.

0:19:070:19:12

But this is a railway with a big difference.

0:19:120:19:16

They look like perfectly-maintained vintage steam engines,

0:19:160:19:19

but in fact, they're one-third normal size,

0:19:190:19:22

with carriages and 15-inch track.

0:19:220:19:25

But just look at them.

0:19:250:19:26

They are beautiful working machines in miniature.

0:19:260:19:29

The level of detail is absolutely superb and the workmanship

0:19:290:19:33

is fantastic. They are a joy to look at.

0:19:330:19:38

But this isn't just a tourist attraction,

0:19:420:19:44

it's a timetabled daily rail service used by commuters and travellers,

0:19:440:19:49

making it the smallest public railway in the world.

0:19:490:19:53

The Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch railway owes its existence to two

0:19:580:20:03

quite remarkable men - Captain John Howie and Count Louis Zborowski.

0:20:030:20:08

These two friends, who lived near each other in Kent,

0:20:100:20:13

were amongst the richest men in the country,

0:20:130:20:15

but what really united Howie and Zborowski was they both loved

0:20:150:20:20

miniature railways. So much so,

0:20:200:20:22

each one had one built on the vast grounds of their Kent homes.

0:20:220:20:26

Zborowski used his trains to make his own Hollywood-style movies,

0:20:260:20:30

complete with damsels in distress, starring himself in the lead role.

0:20:300:20:35

But what both men really dreamed of

0:20:350:20:37

was creating a fully working public railway, but in miniature.

0:20:370:20:42

So they recruited Henry Greenly,

0:20:420:20:44

the greatest railway designer of the day,

0:20:440:20:47

and they commissioned two of the finest locomotives

0:20:470:20:49

to be custom-built.

0:20:490:20:50

Sadly, the dream was brought to a sudden and tragic halt.

0:20:530:20:56

In 1924, Count Zborowski was killed in a racing accident, aged just 29.

0:20:560:21:03

However, Howie wasn't daunted.

0:21:060:21:08

He was determined to complete the project and he continued with their

0:21:080:21:11

plans. He decided to build the line from here in New Romney to Hythe,

0:21:110:21:16

which is nine miles up the coastline.

0:21:160:21:19

In July 1927, the Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway was born

0:21:210:21:27

and it was an instant hit, with people coming from all over

0:21:270:21:31

the world to ride on this special little railway.

0:21:310:21:34

All went very well for the next 12 years, until 1939,

0:21:340:21:38

when the Second World War arrived.

0:21:380:21:40

With the country under attack from enemy planes,

0:21:430:21:45

Captain Howie's railway was requisitioned by the army

0:21:450:21:49

and given a very special role. One entire train was fully

0:21:490:21:54

armour-plated and fitted with anti-aircraft guns,

0:21:540:21:57

helping to defend this stretch of the English coastline

0:21:570:22:01

in its own unique way.

0:22:010:22:03

Unfortunately, being part of the war effort,

0:22:060:22:09

the line and the locomotives were left in a bit of a sorry state,

0:22:090:22:12

with large parts of the line completely unusable.

0:22:120:22:15

But Captain Howie soon got it all fixed up again and the rolling stock

0:22:150:22:19

operational. He even recruited two of the biggest names of the day

0:22:190:22:23

to launch the grand re-opening in 1947 -

0:22:230:22:26

Laurel and Hardy.

0:22:260:22:28

There's one man who knows all about Captain Howie.

0:22:300:22:33

After a career driving full-size trains for British Rail,

0:22:330:22:36

Andy Nash now works here, as the archivist.

0:22:360:22:40

He knows what a tough character Howie was.

0:22:400:22:43

He once sacked a driver because he saw him from a distance,

0:22:430:22:47

there wasn't a puff of steam from the whistle at the level crossing,

0:22:470:22:50

and he'd beat the train to Hythe

0:22:500:22:52

and he took the driver off and sacked him

0:22:520:22:54

and he drove the train the rest of the day himself.

0:22:540:22:56

That sounds like he was a formidable character.

0:22:560:22:58

-He must've been a hard man to work for.

-He could be, if you...

0:22:580:23:00

Got on the wrong side.

0:23:000:23:01

Yes, if you got on the wrong side of him or if he took a dislike to you,

0:23:010:23:05

but equally, he would run the train service on his own.

0:23:050:23:08

What, to give staff time off?

0:23:080:23:10

To give staff time off and he would put a show on,

0:23:100:23:12

maybe get people down from London,

0:23:120:23:14

and they would put a show on in the social club and he would work

0:23:140:23:17

the train service in the evening on his own.

0:23:170:23:19

So that is a man really playing with his railway set?

0:23:190:23:22

Playing is... an extension of it, but, yeah.

0:23:220:23:26

-The railway came first.

-Yeah.

-Trains came first.

0:23:260:23:28

And it was running a public service.

0:23:280:23:30

We still do to this day.

0:23:300:23:31

So, if we publicise a train, it has to run.

0:23:310:23:34

Well, you've driven full-sized trains and you've driven these.

0:23:340:23:37

What is the attraction with these?

0:23:370:23:39

These have more spirit to them.

0:23:390:23:42

A modern electric or a diesel train is fun to drive,

0:23:420:23:45

I'm not saying it's not a thrill, but these are the top-notch.

0:23:450:23:49

-Absolutely fantastic.

-Is there something quite rewarding

0:23:490:23:52

about being there, you know, open to the elements?

0:23:520:23:55

Absolutely. The smells, the feel of the engine.

0:23:550:23:58

-It is alive.

-It's the atmosphere?

0:23:580:23:59

Absolutely fantastic.

0:23:590:24:01

It's something that got in my blood when I was four years old.

0:24:010:24:04

This is the greatest place to be.

0:24:040:24:06

You never grow up, do you...?

0:24:060:24:08

Little boys never grow up.

0:24:080:24:09

The Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway has continued

0:24:190:24:22

to run smoothly and gracefully up and down

0:24:220:24:25

this stretch of the Kent coastline.

0:24:250:24:27

The likes of Walt Disney, Her Majesty the Queen, Prince Philip

0:24:270:24:30

and countless other famous people have ridden on these rails.

0:24:300:24:34

Today, it's my turn.

0:24:340:24:36

This marvellous railway and its trains may be small,

0:24:400:24:43

but I think they're as exciting as the full-sized variety.

0:24:430:24:47

And I think that's the thing about things in miniature,

0:24:480:24:51

they bring out the inner child in us and I think that's what helped

0:24:510:24:54

build this railway in the first place and why thousands of people

0:24:540:24:58

each year keep coming back, nearly a century later.

0:24:580:25:02

Back at Herstmonceux Castle,

0:25:160:25:17

the valuation day is still in full swing.

0:25:170:25:20

There are plenty of visitors arriving with their treasures

0:25:200:25:23

for us to enjoy and James is ready to paint a picture

0:25:230:25:26

of a miniature antique on his table.

0:25:260:25:29

Let's go back to the 1830s - 1820s, 1830s.

0:25:290:25:34

You are somebody who is a salesman for your company's furniture

0:25:340:25:39

and you travel with your samples.

0:25:390:25:43

This is the sort of thing that a furniture salesman

0:25:430:25:47

would have taken with him from one place to another.

0:25:470:25:50

It's also the sort of thing

0:25:500:25:53

that a trainee cabinet-maker would have made, as an apprentice piece.

0:25:530:25:58

Let's just say I arrived at your home and I said, "Julia,

0:25:590:26:03

"look at the wonderful pieces of furniture that we could make."

0:26:030:26:07

And you looked at that. Would you be totally impressed?

0:26:070:26:10

I can see there are a few faults.

0:26:100:26:12

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-And it's not good enough, for that reason.

0:26:120:26:16

But if I were a student and I said, "Look what my apprentice piece is",

0:26:160:26:21

-then you'd be far more impressed, wouldn't you?

-Yes.

0:26:210:26:24

And that's why I like to think it's probably that.

0:26:240:26:27

But the colour is wonderful and it's a lovely little thing.

0:26:270:26:32

It dates to about 1820, 1840

0:26:320:26:37

and it's a linen press.

0:26:370:26:39

It's all in mahogany.

0:26:390:26:41

Kite-shaped boxwood escutcheons,

0:26:410:26:45

even working locks in there.

0:26:450:26:48

Then, at the top, a pair of doors and what you'd expect in a full-size

0:26:480:26:52

model, it would have sliding trays for you to put your linen out.

0:26:520:26:56

We open this one out...

0:26:560:26:57

..and there we've got another wonderful interior.

0:27:000:27:03

So, again in mahogany, but we see the difference of the colour.

0:27:030:27:07

Now, that's the same wood as that.

0:27:070:27:10

Oh, is it?

0:27:100:27:11

But this has got what we call patination.

0:27:110:27:14

It's years of dirt and polish and grime.

0:27:140:27:17

You see around the handle, it's slightly darker.

0:27:170:27:21

-Lighter here, lighter here, darker there.

-Yes.

0:27:210:27:25

And that is just oil from 150 years of fingers doing that,

0:27:250:27:30

and that's the sort of thing that you cannot fake

0:27:300:27:33

on a piece of furniture

0:27:330:27:34

and that's why I love antiques.

0:27:340:27:36

How did you come to have it?

0:27:360:27:38

Well, it's been in my life all my life.

0:27:380:27:41

It was inherited through my mother's family.

0:27:410:27:44

Her uncle, who she was adopted by, because her mother died,

0:27:440:27:49

was an antiques collector...

0:27:490:27:50

-OK.

-..and it was always by my bedside...

0:27:500:27:54

-Oh, really?

-..and so my father gave it to me when we had our own house.

0:27:540:27:58

-Oh, wow.

-In these drawers were some miniature books...

-Yeah.

0:27:580:28:01

..which aren't there today.

0:28:010:28:03

So, I was always fascinated by opening the little drawers

0:28:030:28:07

and the little drawers that are inside.

0:28:070:28:09

So, it's great sentimental value to me.

0:28:090:28:13

So, what's it doing here? Why are you selling it?

0:28:130:28:15

Well, I actually did bring it originally because of the little

0:28:150:28:18

-books in the drawers...

-OK.

0:28:180:28:20

..thinking they would be of far more interest.

0:28:200:28:22

So, it's, sort of, here by default, really.

0:28:220:28:25

Oh.

0:28:250:28:26

But...

0:28:260:28:28

Are you sure you want it to go?

0:28:280:28:29

I'm not absolutely sure.

0:28:290:28:31

I suppose I have to...

0:28:310:28:32

I'd have to be convinced that it would be worth me selling.

0:28:330:28:36

If that was a full-size cabinet on stand, in today's auction market...

0:28:360:28:42

..you would put an auction estimate of £200 to £300 on it.

0:28:430:28:47

And, you know, as a miniature,

0:28:470:28:49

as something that is made as an apprentice piece,

0:28:490:28:52

it's probably worth about the same, 200 or 300.

0:28:520:28:55

And I'd recommend a reserve of £200.

0:28:550:28:58

What do you think? Would you like it to go?

0:28:580:29:01

-Probably.

-Good.

0:29:010:29:03

I'm glad you said that, because I actually genuinely wasn't sure.

0:29:030:29:07

Why was it so dependent on the value?

0:29:070:29:09

Well, I'm soon to take early retirement...

0:29:090:29:12

-OK.

-..and I've got a few plans,

0:29:120:29:15

one of which is to realise a dream from the age of 18,

0:29:150:29:19

is to learn to play the oboe.

0:29:190:29:21

-Really?

-So I thought, well, whatever I get for this,

0:29:230:29:26

my father would be really pleased if I put it towards an oboe.

0:29:260:29:30

-Wow!

-So I could replace something special with something special.

0:29:300:29:33

Brilliant. You'll have to send us a little CD of your oboe playing

0:29:330:29:38

in a couple of years and see how you get on!

0:29:380:29:40

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:29:400:29:42

Let's hope that cabinet does well.

0:29:430:29:45

It would be nice to know Flog It! helped launch a new musical career.

0:29:450:29:50

After the thrill of riding that miniature railway earlier,

0:29:500:29:53

I found an even smaller train in the ballroom.

0:29:530:29:56

Take a look at this. Father and son team.

0:29:560:29:58

-What are your name is?

-Bernard.

-And?

-Neil.

-And Neil.

0:29:580:30:01

-Who made this?

-Ernie Marshall.

-And whose Ernie Marshall?

0:30:010:30:05

-My uncle.

-He made it on his little lathe in the kitchen at home.

0:30:050:30:08

It took him about five or six years or so.

0:30:080:30:11

He made all the bits himself, put it together himself.

0:30:110:30:14

Very, very clever. The Flying Scotsman, and it's to scale.

0:30:140:30:17

It's incredibly detailed.

0:30:170:30:18

-It is.

-Yes.

-And what an iconic locomotive, as well.

0:30:180:30:22

You know, in terms of value, something like this,

0:30:220:30:25

if it came up for auction,

0:30:250:30:27

I think you're looking at around £3,500 to £5,000.

0:30:270:30:30

It doesn't sound a lot of money for the man-hours that have gone into

0:30:300:30:33

that, that's for sure. That was a labour of love,

0:30:330:30:35

but it's really hard to put a value on a scratch-built item like that.

0:30:350:30:38

But, I think that's kind of like the ballpark figure.

0:30:380:30:40

Do you know what, one of my dreams is to go on a little journey

0:30:400:30:43

on the Flying Scotsman. I'd love to do that one day.

0:30:430:30:46

-I really would.

-It'd be nice, wouldn't it?

0:30:460:30:50

Well, that train's not going off to the saleroom,

0:30:500:30:52

but over on Jonathan's table,

0:30:520:30:54

there's a couple of statues that we will be selling at auction.

0:30:540:30:58

Well, ladies, you brought two really, really lovely things today.

0:30:580:31:02

Who do they belong to, out of the two of you?

0:31:030:31:05

Right, OK. Where do they come from?

0:31:050:31:07

I inherited them from my father...

0:31:070:31:10

-OK.

-..and probably from his father, cos he had the money.

0:31:100:31:13

OK. I mean, you've got two very different objects here.

0:31:130:31:17

You've got this, which is Japanese, late 19th century bronze.

0:31:170:31:23

The casting's very good.

0:31:230:31:25

It's like in the golden age, really, in Japanese bronze making,

0:31:250:31:29

of this seated...

0:31:290:31:31

-Boy.

-..boy.

0:31:330:31:34

Yeah, I'll start with the boy, thank you!

0:31:340:31:36

On the back of a seated...

0:31:360:31:38

..cow. For want of a better word.

0:31:400:31:42

Sorry about the dust on the top.

0:31:420:31:44

You don't have to apologise about the dust.

0:31:440:31:46

One thing I noticed straightaway, this little chap here

0:31:460:31:49

-is missing something.

-Yes.

0:31:490:31:51

Oh.

0:31:510:31:53

Either he's eating a baguette...

0:31:530:31:55

-A little pipe.

-..or he's playing a pipe, yes.

0:31:550:31:57

-Oh, dear.

-Whether that was made of bronze, probably was.

0:31:570:32:00

-I'd forgotten about that.

-So he is missing something.

0:32:000:32:03

Yes, that's a shame.

0:32:030:32:05

My feeling is he's probably worth between £400 and £600.

0:32:050:32:08

-Right.

-And if you wanted to sell it at £400 to £600,

0:32:080:32:11

I would suggest a reserve around the lower estimate.

0:32:110:32:14

My favourite object is this one.

0:32:140:32:16

Again, a late 19th century bronze,

0:32:160:32:19

but this is what we call cold-painted bronze

0:32:190:32:21

and it's from Austria,

0:32:210:32:22

with a bird of prey perched on the side of a nest.

0:32:220:32:25

And this is beautifully constructed.

0:32:250:32:27

I've not seen the bird of prey on the side of a nest like this before,

0:32:270:32:30

so I'm really drawn to it.

0:32:300:32:32

I'm not sure whether there might have been something in the middle.

0:32:320:32:35

Never while I've had it.

0:32:350:32:36

No. But it has got a mark and the place you'd normally look, anyway...

0:32:360:32:39

Oh, well done.

0:32:390:32:41

There is a mark on the base of the tail here, on the tail feather,

0:32:410:32:44

which actually says depose - D-E-P-O-S-E,

0:32:440:32:48

which I believe is a French word for "made by".

0:32:480:32:51

-Oh.

-Oh?

-So, it's like French-made or handmade.

0:32:510:32:55

I don't know what the bit underneath says.

0:32:550:32:57

I still think it's Austrian.

0:32:570:32:59

But it's great quality, nice condition and it's a great subject,

0:32:590:33:02

so, my feeling for this is, at auction,

0:33:020:33:05

it's worth between £300 and £500.

0:33:050:33:08

OK.

0:33:080:33:10

And I would suggest a reserve at the lower estimate.

0:33:100:33:12

I really think it's a lovely object.

0:33:120:33:13

I think they're both really lovely, but I prefer that one.

0:33:130:33:16

-I agree.

-That's the one I'd take home!

0:33:160:33:17

We like that one, don't we?

0:33:170:33:18

-Have faith.

-OK.

-300 to 500, firm three reserve.

0:33:180:33:21

-OK.

-And watch it fly.

0:33:210:33:22

Things are ticking along nicely in the ballroom and we've got time

0:33:260:33:29

for just one more item, so take it away, James.

0:33:290:33:32

Now, Rosemary, Robert, this is an 18-carat, full hunter pocket watch,

0:33:330:33:37

good big size, as well.

0:33:370:33:39

The sort of thing that you would expect a big man to have.

0:33:390:33:42

It's far from a lady's watch.

0:33:420:33:44

It's lovely. A really good example.

0:33:440:33:47

Tell me, what's the history?

0:33:470:33:49

It belonged to my great grandfather, who was a baker in Scotland,

0:33:490:33:53

and he obviously thought it would be nice to treat himself to a really

0:33:530:33:57

-good watch.

-And he did.

0:33:570:33:58

-Yeah.

-It's a really lovely, lovely pocket watch.

0:33:580:34:02

Let's have a look. There we go.

0:34:020:34:05

We've got 18, which obviously means 18-carat.

0:34:050:34:09

We've got the wheatsheaves, for Chester,

0:34:090:34:11

and we've got the date letter there for 1905.

0:34:110:34:15

So it's in the first ten years of the 20th century,

0:34:150:34:18

which is when these top wind watches started to be used, until the 1930s,

0:34:180:34:24

-when wristwatches started to become fashionable.

-Oh, right.

0:34:240:34:27

-Yes.

-But, until this point,

0:34:270:34:29

you would have had a key to wind with it and you would open the back,

0:34:290:34:33

take your key, insert it and wind it up.

0:34:330:34:36

But this is good, because it is a stopwatch,

0:34:360:34:38

and we've got a little bar here,

0:34:380:34:40

and if you watch the second hand going round,

0:34:400:34:42

if we just move that bar at the bottom...

0:34:420:34:44

There we go, that stops it.

0:34:460:34:48

Now, we should see that in the back, so let's turn it over,

0:34:480:34:52

and you can see there the balance wheel.

0:34:520:34:54

The reason why it's called a Hunter is because it's got a solid piece

0:34:540:34:57

back and front, so if you're riding your hunter horse and you fall off,

0:34:570:35:01

there's no glass to get damaged.

0:35:010:35:04

So, everything's good about it.

0:35:040:35:05

It's got an alarm, it's in great condition, it's a lovely clean dial,

0:35:050:35:09

the gold's good, it's 18-carat.

0:35:090:35:12

It's everything you look for, really.

0:35:120:35:14

Now, family thing, been in the family a long time,

0:35:140:35:18

-you know what I'm going to ask.

-Yeah!

0:35:180:35:20

Why?

0:35:200:35:22

Well, you get to a certain age and you think you might as well

0:35:220:35:25

-enjoy life to the full.

-Yes.

0:35:250:35:28

As much as we love our boys, we're going to have the benefit of it.

0:35:280:35:32

What do you think it's worth?

0:35:340:35:35

I have an indication,

0:35:350:35:36

because it was valued a while back and the indication was £1,000.

0:35:360:35:42

OK, now that was probably four, five years ago?

0:35:420:35:46

Yeah, a bit more recent, but...

0:35:460:35:48

Maybe three?

0:35:480:35:49

We've lost about...

0:35:490:35:51

..30% on the gold value in that period.

0:35:530:35:56

So, I would say its gold value is about £550, £600,

0:35:570:36:04

and I think, as a pocket watch, it's about 600, 620.

0:36:040:36:07

So I would put 600-900 on it as an estimate, and a reserve -

0:36:070:36:11

firm reserve - of 600.

0:36:110:36:14

How do you feel? Do you want...?

0:36:140:36:15

-Now I can see, I can see...

-Yeah.

-Go on, go on.

0:36:150:36:18

Can we not put the reserve higher?

0:36:180:36:20

Of course you can, it's your watch.

0:36:200:36:21

Perhaps a fixed reserve at 800 and run it from there?

0:36:210:36:24

-Absolutely fine.

-Would that be all right?

0:36:240:36:26

-So we'll put 8-9 and a reserve of eight.

-Excellent.

0:36:260:36:28

Lovely. All right. It's a lovely watch, lovely.

0:36:280:36:32

-In fact, best place for that...

-THEY LAUGH

0:36:320:36:34

It's a good one.

0:36:350:36:36

-Had a good time, everyone? ALL:

-Yes!

0:36:390:36:42

Yeah, and so have I, so thank you so much for turning up.

0:36:420:36:45

The people of Sussex have given us such a warm welcome

0:36:450:36:48

and we've found some fantastic treasures

0:36:480:36:50

worthy of such a magnificent host location.

0:36:500:36:53

So, now it's time to say goodbye to Herstmonceux Castle, as we go over

0:36:530:36:56

to the auction room, for the very last time,

0:36:560:36:59

and here's a quick recap of all the items

0:36:590:37:01

that are going under the hammer.

0:37:010:37:03

Julia's cabinet may be small,

0:37:050:37:07

but we are hoping it will fetch a big price at auction.

0:37:070:37:10

We're selling these two bronzes as two separate lots,

0:37:110:37:14

but they should definitely appeal to the eagle-eyed collectors.

0:37:140:37:18

And the gold watch is sure to be a hit,

0:37:180:37:21

if we can get it out of James' pocket.

0:37:210:37:23

It's back to Rye now and the auction is still going strong.

0:37:280:37:32

Kevin Wall is still in full flow and he's nearly at our lots.

0:37:320:37:36

Julia, it's good to see you again.

0:37:360:37:38

-Thank you.

-We're going to be talking about this wonderful little

0:37:380:37:40

miniature cabinet. It's gorgeous, it's an apprentice piece.

0:37:400:37:43

And I saw this at the valuation day.

0:37:430:37:45

We need 200-300. Fingers crossed you sell this.

0:37:450:37:47

-This is your first auction, isn't it?

-It is, it's very exciting. Yes.

0:37:470:37:51

There we are, it's an apprentice miniature regency style mahogany

0:37:510:37:55

and satinwood strong linen press.

0:37:550:37:57

A lovely piece of furniture there.

0:37:570:37:59

And I can start it at 120. 130, I've got.

0:37:590:38:02

At 130. Do I see 140 now?

0:38:020:38:04

At 130.

0:38:040:38:06

At 130, 140, 150, 160, 170.

0:38:060:38:08

170, 180, 190.

0:38:110:38:13

I've got 195 here.

0:38:150:38:17

200. We've got new bidders.

0:38:190:38:20

-200. 210.

-Yeah, there's a chap in the room,

0:38:200:38:24

-bidding just there.

-260.

0:38:240:38:25

250 on my left.

0:38:250:38:28

-At 250.

-Come on, one more.

0:38:280:38:30

At 250. At £250.

0:38:300:38:33

Have we all finished?

0:38:330:38:34

At £250...

0:38:340:38:36

GAVEL BANGS

0:38:360:38:38

-We got it right.

-The heart was going!

0:38:380:38:40

THEY LAUGH

0:38:400:38:41

Oh. It was a good moment.

0:38:430:38:45

-Good.

-And somebody tells me you want to learn to play the oboe.

0:38:450:38:48

Yes, I do. It's been a childhood dream since I was 18,

0:38:480:38:51

so I'm going to put this towards one.

0:38:510:38:53

Good luck with that. And James, I gather,

0:38:530:38:55

is going to learn to play the bagpipes.

0:38:550:38:57

You never know, in a couple of years' time, we could have a duet.

0:38:570:38:59

-A little duet.

-Let's meet up at a valuation day.

0:38:590:39:02

Oh, dear, I doubt I'll get there.

0:39:020:39:04

And who knows, we might end up with Flog It! - The Musical.

0:39:060:39:09

OK, maybe not.

0:39:090:39:11

Next up, those bronze sculptures

0:39:110:39:13

which we're selling as two separate lots.

0:39:130:39:15

Mary, we've got two lots going under the hammer.

0:39:170:39:19

It's good to see you again. Where's Sally today?

0:39:190:39:22

-In Budapest.

-She's on holiday, is she?

0:39:220:39:25

Yes. Unfortunately. She would rather have come here.

0:39:250:39:28

Ah.

0:39:280:39:30

Where all the action is. Standing next to Jonathan and myself.

0:39:300:39:33

Well, look, we're in the auction room, it's really exciting,

0:39:330:39:35

things are flying out today.

0:39:350:39:37

I love this Austrian bronze, I think it's beautiful.

0:39:370:39:39

-It's unusual.

-It's very unusual.

0:39:390:39:42

Why are you selling this?

0:39:420:39:43

-So, I can give my daughter some money.

-OK. Good for you.

0:39:430:39:47

Good for you, good for you.

0:39:470:39:49

Right, let's find out what the bidders think.

0:39:490:39:50

This is the first to go under the hammer. Here it is.

0:39:500:39:54

The 19th-century, cold-painted bronze of a hawk.

0:39:540:39:57

There it is, showing now.

0:39:570:39:59

I've got 100, 150, 160, I'm bid.

0:39:590:40:02

At 160. Do I see 170?

0:40:020:40:04

180, 190, 200.

0:40:040:40:06

220, 230, 240.

0:40:060:40:09

-It's flying.

-250, 260.

0:40:090:40:10

270, 280, 290.

0:40:100:40:12

Oh, this is lovely.

0:40:120:40:14

300 here. 310, 320.

0:40:140:40:16

310 on the net.

0:40:160:40:17

At 310, at 310.

0:40:170:40:19

320 at the back.

0:40:190:40:20

330, 340,

0:40:200:40:22

350, 360.

0:40:220:40:25

At 350. 360 now.

0:40:250:40:27

At 370. 380.

0:40:270:40:29

At 390. 400.

0:40:290:40:32

At 400. Still on the net.

0:40:320:40:33

At £400. Are we all done and finished now?

0:40:340:40:37

Selling on the net at 410...

0:40:370:40:40

-GAVEL BANGS One down.

-Fantastic.

0:40:400:40:42

-Good.

-That is fantastic, isn't it?

0:40:420:40:44

Well done, Mary. Thank you for bringing that in.

0:40:440:40:46

Right, here's the next one.

0:40:460:40:47

The 19th-century, Chinese bronze model of a recumbent oxen.

0:40:490:40:53

The flute is actually missing, but I can start you here at...

0:40:530:40:56

280, 300,

0:40:570:40:59

320, 340.

0:40:590:41:01

360, 380, 400,

0:41:010:41:03

420, 440 here. At 440 now.

0:41:030:41:07

-£440!

-I have 440. Do I see 460?

0:41:070:41:09

At 440.

0:41:090:41:10

Looking for 460 now.

0:41:100:41:11

At £440.

0:41:140:41:15

Are we all done? At £440...

0:41:150:41:18

GAVEL BANGS That's a great result. £440.

0:41:200:41:22

That makes 850 in total.

0:41:220:41:25

-Good.

-And that's going Sally's way.

0:41:250:41:27

So, well done, you.

0:41:270:41:29

So far, so good.

0:41:290:41:30

Two happy owners and our experts have been right on the money.

0:41:300:41:35

Will the gold watch help give us a hat-trick?

0:41:350:41:37

We've just been joined by Rosemary and Robert in the nick of time.

0:41:390:41:42

This is your lot, in a moment going under the hammer.

0:41:420:41:45

Good luck. In fact, it's your grandfather's gold pocket watch.

0:41:450:41:48

It is, yes.

0:41:480:41:49

Are you nervous about selling this?

0:41:490:41:51

I am nervous. I don't know why, because it's got to go.

0:41:510:41:55

Time's ticking. It's going under the hammer right now. This is it.

0:41:550:41:58

An Edwardian 18-carat gold full hunter pocket watch stopwatch.

0:42:000:42:04

And I can start it out 550. 600. 650.

0:42:040:42:08

At 650, 700, 750,

0:42:080:42:10

800. 800 is here.

0:42:100:42:13

850, 900.

0:42:130:42:15

Spot on.

0:42:150:42:16

Come on, let's have a bit more.

0:42:160:42:18

950. 1,000.

0:42:180:42:19

And 50, sir?

0:42:190:42:20

1,100.

0:42:200:42:22

1,150. 1,200.

0:42:230:42:25

1,250. 1,300.

0:42:270:42:29

At 1,250.

0:42:320:42:33

New bidder. 1,300 at the back now.

0:42:330:42:36

1,350?

0:42:360:42:37

1,300 for the gentleman at the back.

0:42:370:42:39

-1,350. 1,400.

-THEY GASP

0:42:410:42:44

1,450?

0:42:440:42:45

GAVEL BANGS Yes. £1,400.

0:42:460:42:49

Well done, you two, and well done, James.

0:42:490:42:51

-Thank you, James.

-Brilliant.

0:42:510:42:52

You were right, weren't you, you were right to push that reserve up?

0:42:520:42:55

-Well done.

-Way, way over gold value, as well,

0:42:550:42:58

-which is great news.

-Exactly.

-They're not going to melt it down.

0:42:580:43:01

-No, they're not. No, they're not.

-I don't mind it going now.

0:43:010:43:04

Well, you said you were going to treat yourself. What comes to mind?

0:43:040:43:07

Well, we've got lots of things on our tick list.

0:43:070:43:09

Yeah?

0:43:090:43:11

We saved the best till last.

0:43:110:43:12

I hope you enjoyed that one.

0:43:120:43:14

We certainly did. See you again next time for many more surprises

0:43:140:43:17

on Flog It!

0:43:170:43:18

The team visit Herstmonceux Castle and antiques experts Jonathan Pratt and James Lewis find treasures to take to auction, including some beautiful bronze sculptures. Paul Martin takes a trip on a very large miniature railway.


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