Colchester Flog It!


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Colchester

Antiques. A Troika vase gets temperatures rising in a Colchester auction house, and presenter Paul Martin finds out how equestrian painter Alfred Munnings upset the art world.


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Today, Flog It! is in Colchester - Britain's first Roman city.

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Can we dig up some treasures here?

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-I've never seen one as big as that.

-I bet you haven't!

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We can go and spend some more!

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Yes!

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Bid. Are you all done?

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Before all that, let's get to the valuations

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with today's experts, Mark Stacey and Will Axon.

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Will is an auctioneer from Cambridge and he's the new kid.

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Check the size of that queue out.

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The doors have just opened, so the queue's on the move now.

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We've got our work cut out.

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Looking at this crowd and their collectables, we should be in for a cracking day.

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Let's kick off the proceedings with Mark Stacey.

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-Hello, Georgina and Mary.

-Hello.

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What an interesting item. It's not yours, is it, Georgina?

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-No. It belongs to a friend.

-What do you know of the history?

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I know that she's had it for some time

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and it's come to her through her family.

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Apart from that, I know nothing.

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It's a very interesting box - this year, particularly -

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because it's a little brass box

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made to commemorate the death of Admiral Lord Nelson

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after the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805.

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And it's the bicentenary this year,

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so if you're going to sell Nelson memorabilia, this is the year to sell it.

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It's very nicely made. We have a portrait or Lord Nelson.

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Then we have a nice classical Greek key border going around it.

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Then on the bottom, we have "Conqueror" and the various battles.

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Copenhagen...as well as Trafalgar, of course.

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Then "Where the glorious fell".

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Hidden underneath, we have a maker's initial,

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which is "M & P Fechet".

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They were specialists in making medals and novelty items for the military.

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One of their designers became the chief dyer at the Bank of England.

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They're very well-known for this type of thing.

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Several of their works are on display in the Maritime Museum in Greenwich.

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A very interesting object.

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We've got a piece of period Nelson memorabilia here.

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I think your friend will be excited.

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-You phoned to tell her I was interested.

-I did.

-What was her reaction?

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She was quite excited, yes.

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She would be happy for it to be sold - to go to a collector, hopefully.

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-So she wants to flog it?

-I think so.

-Fantastic.

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I like the idea of a collector owning this - somebody who will appreciate it.

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-I think so. Quite a lot of people collect boxes anyhow.

-Absolutely.

-Small things.

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And particularly military history. Let's get on to the price.

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I think we should put a wide estimate on it of £100-£200.

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I think there will be a lot of interest in it.

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We'll put a reserve of £100.

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But I have a feeling there'll be a battle over this.

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Hopefully it'll go for more.

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Michael, good morning. What have you brought in for us?

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Well, I've got two Battle of Britain Dinky toys

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and two Schuko motor cars.

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And these are yours, are they?

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No. They were given to my smallest brother,

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but my mother's had them for ages

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and she's more or less ordered me to sell them.

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-Without him knowing?

-No. I expect he does.

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He'll soon find out when he watches.

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Well, we've got two Dinky aeroplanes here.

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Obviously, by the box, Battle of Britain.

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These were produced in 1969,

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shortly before Dinky were taken over by Airfix and the quality somewhat slumped.

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So these are nice quality. Nice crisp moulding and good colours.

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We've got the English Spitfire - obviously for the Battle of Britain.

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The most important plane involved.

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Then we've got the German aeroplane.

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A nice little touch is the addition of the dropping bomb.

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That's a nice touch. Nice you've still got that piece.

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It hasn't been lost, as a lot do when they're played with.

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Then at the front we've got the die-cast Schuko micro-racer,

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probably dating from the 1960s.

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Then we've got the late '50s Schuko car with a rather nice touch...

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SQUEAKING

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With the little horn.

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Have you had these valued before?

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No. No idea at all.

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Well, with collectable toys, condition is of primary importance

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and these are in reasonable condition - I wouldn't say mint.

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They haven't been thrown out of a bedroom window to re-enact the Battle of Britain.

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I think, in the present market,

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if you sold them as a combined lot,

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you should be putting a figure of £60-80 on them at auction.

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The sale isn't a specialist collectors' sale, but there will be interest,

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especially with the Schuko and the planes having original boxes.

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They should still find buyers in an antiques sale.

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So if you're happy with an estimate of £60-80 as a combined lot...

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Yeah. That'd really be OK. That's fine.

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-Do we have to check with your brother?

-No. It'd be my mother!

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She'd say, "Sell them!"

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We'll follow her lead then.

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We'll try £60-80 and reserve them at £60 with 10% discretion.

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Yeah. That'd be fine.

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Linda and Stuart, thanks for your patience - there's hundreds of people here.

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You've struggled in with some furniture - miniature furniture!

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Tell me about it.

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We don't know anything really.

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An elderly friend of my mother's gave it to us

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because they knew I liked odd things - and it is odd.

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But it needs a bit of love and care.

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-A bit of TLC.

-It does.

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And it doesn't really fit in our home.

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You know it's a table-top chest-of-drawers...

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-I'd no idea.

-Put it on a table top or a low dresser or sideboard.

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When I first saw it, I thought, "This is an apprentice piece",

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but on close inspection, it's not really good enough for that.

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I think this has been done by a loving, doting husband for his wife as a present.

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So it's a one-off. You could call it folk art - in a way.

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To point out its virtues - the drawers are of different dimensions.

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Normally we have them on a graduating dimension -

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narrower, getting larger at the bottom where the weight is,

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maybe for hats or jumpers.

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Here you've got a small drawer, a large one and two narrow ones.

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But whoever built this...I admire

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because he had a love for wood.

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This must have taken hours to do.

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It's not going to reflect in the valuation!

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The whole construction is made of pine

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and pine is a cheap material

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and you can adhere veneers to it very well.

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What the craftsman's done here - or not craftsman, but someone who's had a jolly good go! -

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is used a walnut veneer on all the face sides, top and bottom.

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Then he's used wonderful marquetry detail.

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He's using boxwood, satinwood.

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He's staining some of the satinwood with greens and yellow.

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If I turn this around, on the sides and top

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you've got some lovely shell motifs.

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These really came onto furniture in the early 1800s, around 1805,

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with Nelson's victory in Trafalgar.

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We were conquering the seas and anything to do with a sea motif on furniture

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just acknowledged that factor.

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And I love the barber pole chevrons here.

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That's an ebonised look.

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That's satinwood stained to look like ebony.

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This detail - the beading around the drawer fascias - gives the date away for me.

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Typically Edwardian, so we're looking at 1920s.

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-1920s?

-Yeah.

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But it's survived the passage of time.

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Just a bit of TLC, some lovely beeswax, a couple of handles,

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which wouldn't cost a lot, and you've got the complete item.

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Value-wise... £50-80 is all it's going to achieve.

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I didn't expect it to be more than that.

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-I'm about right then?

-Yeah.

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I'd like to see it get the top end.

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I like it because it's not one for the academics - there's no "book" price on this.

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You can't compare it to something else.

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That's it. It's a one-off

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and the value's in the eye of the beholder really.

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-But we'll put it in at £50-80.

-No, that's fine.

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-It sounds mean for what it is.

-It is, but you don't get the money for the workmanship in there.

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Margaret, Jackie, thanks for coming.

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You've brought some jewellery. What can you tell me about it?

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It belonged to a neighbour of ours.

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She left it to my mother when she passed away and my mother left it...

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-She just gave it to Jackie.

-She gave it to you?

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-Yes.

-Out of the blue.

-Yes.

-Have you been tempted to wear it at all?

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I've worn it a couple of times, but it's not my style. It's a bit too big.

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-I go for very small jewellery.

-Yeah.

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Let's have a closer look at the ring.

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If I take it out of its box,

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we can see that we've got a nice cluster set of diamonds

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set into platinum on a gold band, stamped 18 carat.

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So nice quality.

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Circa 1900. That's when they started setting diamonds into platinum.

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It's a miligrain setting,

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which gives the impression that the stones are larger than they actually are.

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If you look at it from a distance, when it catches the light, it seems larger.

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But looking at it closely, there's about a quarter of a carat of diamonds there.

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Obviously, the larger a carat a stone is, the more valuable it becomes.

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They become rarer and rarer the larger they get.

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So you've got nice quality white diamonds, commercial.

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And having looked at them under the glass,

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there's some minor imperfections in the diamonds.

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That's to be expected.

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They're not too bad. Once you see them with the naked eye it becomes a problem.

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-I think a sensible estimate would be £150-250.

-Yeah.

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Would you be happy to give it a go?

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-Definitely.

-Yes.

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And you're going to use the money towards something?

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It's going towards my wedding dress. Anything is a help.

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I've good friends to be married and everything helps.

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We'll put that in the auction. £150-250.

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Reserve it at the bottom figure with discretion

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and hope there's someone getting engaged who fancies a go at this.

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Hopefully, yes.

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-Hello, Dennis.

-Hello.

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You've brought a nice piece of Doulton in. Give us the background.

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It belongs to my stepmother and it was passed down to her.

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She gave it to me about a year ago to sell it on ebay for her and I forgot.

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I saw you were coming, so I brought it here.

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-Is your stepmother a drinker?

-Not to my knowledge.

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Because that's what it was originally - a little spirit decanter.

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-Right.

-The little cork is still there

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and we've got a nice silver ring on there and a chain.

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and a rather nice character.

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This type of design is called Kingsware.

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Nicely moulded, very well made, and a full set of Doulton marks

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for between 1902 and 1932.

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It's a rather nice thing. They come in larger sizes too. A good object.

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-You don't like it yourself?

-It's not my kind of thing.

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Not your cup of tea. At auction, I would put around... £40-60 on it.

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-Would she be happy with that?

-I know she'd like to get rid of it.

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That's the sort of punter we like. Just flog it. I think it'll do well.

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We'll put it into the sale with a £40 discretionary reserve on it,

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so we don't sell it for nothing.

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-We might even top that.

-That'd be good.

-I'll look forward to seeing you.

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We're halfway through the day and the room is still jam-packed.

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Our experts have to give a valuation to every one,

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but we've found our first batch to take to auction.

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Here's a quick run-down of all the items.

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Is Mar right to predict a battle over the £100-200 price tag

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on the Lord Nelson snuff box?

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Michael's mother ordered him to sell these Battle of Britain toys,

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but can he come away victorious with £60-80?

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It may need some TLC, but I'm sure Linda and Stuart's drawers will make £50-80.

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And will this diamond cluster ring dazzle the auction crowds

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into paying £150-200?

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Finally, Dennis's desperate to sell this Doulton spirit flask,

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but will it make the £40-60 he wants?

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How will our antiques fare in the Reeman Dansie auction rooms?

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That depends on the local bidders.

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And a man who knows his market is auctioneer James Grinter.

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Let's find out what he thinks of some of our owner's items.

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Derek's spirit vase. I think this is great. It's quite a curio.

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I love the face. I love the expression.

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Mark Stacey's put £40-60 on this and I'd like to see it do more.

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-I think it's a very conservative estimate.

-"Come and buy me!"

-It is.

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-Despite him looking ugly, he'll do well...

-You think he's ugly?

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-I think so, yes.

-He's got a lot of character.

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-There's something about his face that makes you want to own it.

-You could be right.

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We've looked up the hallmarks on the silver.

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It's 1905, so it's a nice early piece.

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A collector will be very keen to own it, so we should double if not quadruple his estimate.

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-Quadruple?

-Quadruple.

-Quadruple, James?

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Yeah? Cross your heart, hope to die?

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-I think it will do.

-Brilliant. Thank you very much.

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Could James be right? Well, we'll just have to wait and see.

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Mary's here, Georgina's here. We're ready to do battle in the sale room

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because we've got Lord Nelson's memorabilia up for grabs.

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It's the bicentenary. It's the right time to sell it. It's a lovely snuff box.

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£100-200 - I think it's a sniff at that price.

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-He put it on. Did you agree with that?

-Yes.

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-We could see the top end and a bit more. I pray for that.

-So do I.

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-Will we though?

-On your knees.

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I'm sure we will.

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This shows the interest after Nelson's death at the Battle of Trafalgar.

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These were originally seal cases,

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but they reduced them for the mass market to snuff boxes.

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It's a wonderful object and we should get £200 plus, I hope.

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Let's do it. This is it.

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459 is the early 19th-century gilt brass circular box,

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commemorating Lord Nelson.

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I've two commissions on this. Start the bidding at £150. £150?

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At 150... 160?

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160...170?

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180...190... 190.

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190 with me now. 200...

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210...220...

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At 220 now... 220... Are you all done at 220?

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-Happy?

-Yes.

-Very happy?

-Very.

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What are you going to do with that?

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-Go to the pub, perhaps?

-Yeah. I would.

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-A good meal out.

-Yeah. A nice bottle of wine.

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I'm joined by Michael, who's about to flog his spoilt brother's toys.

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That's what it says in my researcher's notes!

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A bit of jealousy going on there.

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We've got two Schuko toys and two Dinky aeroplanes, which I absolutely love.

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They're splendid. They were brought in from Berlin.

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We had a friend who was in at the end of the war - something to do with the Navy -

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and he brought these for my much younger brother - the last of four.

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They've been played with. The boxes are a bit worn.

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Mint and boxed it's about £150-200.

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-We're talking £60-80.

-It's a bit sad to have them and not play with them.

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Exactly.

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473 now. A Dinky Battle of Britain Spitfire and various other toys.

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What shall we say for this lot?

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£50? 50 I have down there now. 50...

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-There is a bidder there.

-£60 I have now. £60 bid.

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65...70...75...

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80...85...

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90...95...

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£95 I'm bid.

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All done now at 95? £100...

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110...

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120...130...

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130, sir. At 130... Are you all done?

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-£130. That was a surprise.

-And how confident were you?

-Not very!

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You can treat yourself now.

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Like heck. Mother's going to say, "How much did they go?" and the whole lot will go to her.

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-What's her name?

-Lucy.

-Lucy, keep an eye on him.

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Something to raise your spirits now - some Doulton Kingsware.

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A little spirit vase belonging to Dennis.

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Valuation £40-60. Happy with that?

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I hope it's going to make more, but we'll see.

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I can cheer you up now. Mark doesn't know this but I had a chat to the auctioneer.

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He really loves it and he said four times its estimate.

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-That'd be good.

-That was a big smile. Not Mr Grumpy anymore.

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I love it. I wouldn't sell it if it was mine.

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Not my cup of tea or not my tipple.

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-Not your tipple? Humbug.

-It's good quality, but not my sort of thing.

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-But it should do all right.

-This is it.

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Number 62 is the Edwardian Royal Doulton character spirit flask.

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See this one? I've two commissions.

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-Start the bidding at £60.

-Straight in at the top end.

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80...85...90...

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95... £95 bid down here now. £95...

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£100?

0:20:580:21:00

110...120...

0:21:000:21:02

130 is bid down here now. 130...

0:21:020:21:06

Any advance on 130? All done now at 130.

0:21:060:21:10

-Hammer's gone down. That's not bad.

-He was right.

-He was.

0:21:100:21:15

What are you going to do with that?

0:21:150:21:18

-It gets put into the holiday fund.

-Into the kitty.

-That's it.

0:21:180:21:23

In a biscuit tin on the shelf!

0:21:230:21:26

-Good luck.

-Thank you very much

0:21:260:21:28

We've got a touch of sparkle now.

0:21:320:21:34

Not only have we got Margaret and Jackie, but we've also got the diamond cluster ring.

0:21:340:21:40

-A valuation of £150-200, yeah?

-Yeah.

0:21:400:21:44

Let's hope it's a little gem and we get the top end

0:21:440:21:47

because I know the money's going to a very important cause.

0:21:470:21:50

-Yes. My wedding dress.

-Your wedding dress.

0:21:500:21:54

And all the other paraphernalia that goes with weddings that I'm sure Mum's going to help you with.

0:21:540:22:00

-Yes.

-Congratulations with that.

0:22:000:22:03

We're in the right place because there is a huge jewellery collection here that we didn't know about.

0:22:030:22:10

So I think the right buyers are here

0:22:100:22:12

and hopefully they'll be bidding against another bride-to-be

0:22:120:22:16

who, instead of trudging down the high street, will think this ring is a good buy.

0:22:160:22:22

-18 carat gold, nice quality.

-Yup.

0:22:220:22:24

-Let's hope it gets 250.

-I hope so. It helps with expensive weddings.

0:22:240:22:29

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:22:290:22:32

243. It's the ladies' gold and platinum set diamond cluster ring.

0:22:320:22:37

£100 to start me?

0:22:370:22:39

£100? £100 I have now.

0:22:390:22:42

110...120...

0:22:420:22:44

130...140...150... At 150 down here now...

0:22:440:22:48

150... Do I hear 160? 160... Against you.

0:22:480:22:51

Seated now at 160... Any advance...? 170...

0:22:510:22:55

-180...190...

-They love it.

0:22:550:22:57

£200 still seated now. At £200... Any advance?

0:22:570:23:02

All done now at £200.

0:23:020:23:03

Yes. £200. That's not bad, is it?

0:23:030:23:06

I'm really thrilled to get £200.

0:23:060:23:10

-Yeah?

-Yes. That's wonderful.

-I'm pleased with that.

0:23:100:23:13

-Mid-estimate - I can't ask for more.

-Thank you.

0:23:130:23:16

I'm sitting with Linda and Stuart and feeling rather confident

0:23:190:23:23

because we've got that table-top chest-of-drawers with inlay

0:23:230:23:28

going under the hammer with no reserve.

0:23:280:23:31

-No reserve.

-We've got about £50-80 on this, haven't we?

0:23:310:23:36

I'd like to see it do the top.

0:23:360:23:38

-There is no reserve.

-We'd like to see it sell.

0:23:380:23:41

-I know. You've been spending money here.

-We have, yes.

0:23:410:23:46

Linda said to me they're flogging the trash to buy the treasure!

0:23:460:23:51

Don't say that. Somebody's going to buy it.

0:23:520:23:55

Somebody will because it's adorable.

0:23:550:23:57

And it's going under the hammer right now.

0:23:570:24:00

Number 488 is the Edwardian bow-front table-top chest.

0:24:000:24:04

As shown.

0:24:040:24:07

£50 for it? 50 I have down here.

0:24:070:24:10

55...60...65...

0:24:100:24:12

70...75...80...

0:24:120:24:14

85...90...95...

0:24:140:24:16

100...110...120...130...140...

0:24:160:24:21

LINDA: I never knew it was so good.

0:24:210:24:23

Here at 140... Are you all done? 150.

0:24:230:24:26

155...160...

0:24:260:24:29

160 on my right now... 160...

0:24:290:24:31

Are you all done?

0:24:310:24:33

-Yes!

-Well done.

-£160!

0:24:330:24:36

We can go and spend some more.

0:24:370:24:40

-No. That's recuperating some coffers.

-Amazing.

0:24:420:24:45

I'm so pleased for you. I'm pleased you're putting money back into antiques as well.

0:24:450:24:50

This is the first time we've done this. We love it.

0:24:500:24:53

Auctions are great fun. They're an arena of excitement, so get down to your local sale room.

0:24:530:25:00

Live dangerously.

0:25:000:25:02

I've left the hustle and bustle of the auction room

0:25:090:25:12

and come for a bit of peace on the River Stour for a journey through time.

0:25:120:25:18

We'll end up upstream in Dedham

0:25:180:25:20

and along the way we'll see how the rivers fortunes have ebbed and flowed, just like its waters.

0:25:200:25:26

The Stour's history takes it from a vibrant industrial past

0:25:330:25:36

through to a holiday destination after being a deserted relic

0:25:360:25:41

and finally ends up as a modern waterway.

0:25:410:25:43

To take me on this journey, I've got John Critten, who's the skipper.

0:25:430:25:48

-Hello, John.

-Morning, Paul. Welcome aboard.

-Thank you.

0:25:480:25:52

The River Stour's 42 miles long.

0:26:030:26:05

It flows four miles in Cambridgeshire, eight miles in Suffolk

0:26:050:26:09

and then it forms the borders between Suffolk and Essex.

0:26:090:26:12

Suffolk is on this side of the boat and Essex is on this side.

0:26:120:26:17

But our journey starts here in Flatford.

0:26:170:26:20

This beautiful part of the country has been immortalised in history

0:26:270:26:32

by the 18th-century artist, John Constable, who grew up at Flatford.

0:26:320:26:36

His paintings, like The Haywain and Dedham Lock depict scenes of idyllic rural life

0:26:360:26:42

and also echo the importance of the river's industrial past.

0:26:420:26:47

Horse-drawn boats called lighters used to haul cargo -

0:26:520:26:56

often weighing up to a massive 26 tons -

0:26:560:26:59

along the river to the London markets.

0:26:590:27:01

They transported everything - from bricks to wheat and barley.

0:27:010:27:06

The lighters were operated in pairs and shackled together, then steered like a modern articulated lorry.

0:27:060:27:13

If the horses came across an obstacle on the tow path, like a fallen tree or a bridge,

0:27:130:27:19

they were trained to jump on board the boat.

0:27:190:27:22

Upriver, we can see how it's not just been affected by industry.

0:27:300:27:35

The Victorian era saw a boom in holidaymaking,

0:27:350:27:38

made possible by better wages and a better transport system.

0:27:380:27:42

The Stour Valley was a popular destination

0:27:420:27:44

as Victorians tried to escape the grime and the dirt of the cities.

0:27:440:27:49

The tourist boom proved a double-edged sword for the Stour.

0:28:040:28:07

The railways that brought the visitors also starved it of trade

0:28:070:28:12

and the horse-drawn boats proved to be no competition for the power and the speed of the steam engine.

0:28:120:28:19

By the turn of the 20th century, the Stour had gone from an economic powerhouse to a forgotten waterway.

0:28:220:28:29

But it wasn't finished.

0:28:290:28:32

The River Stour Trust came to its rescue

0:28:380:28:41

and set about repairing the rotting locks and crumbling banks.

0:28:410:28:45

The person to tell us all about this work is the Trust's Secretary -

0:28:500:28:55

Lesley Platt, who we're just about to pick up.

0:28:550:28:57

What's the River Stour Trust doing for the river?

0:29:090:29:13

Without it, there wouldn't be boats on the river.

0:29:130:29:16

It was formed in 1967 with the aim of restoring through navigation,

0:29:160:29:22

so putting the locks back in and getting people in boats.

0:29:220:29:25

What's the scale of the project and do you have a completion day?

0:29:250:29:29

I'd love to see it all done in my lifetime, but I'm runing out of lifetime!

0:29:290:29:35

It could all be done, with the right support from the Environment Agency and from government,

0:29:350:29:42

within ten years.

0:29:420:29:43

Fully reopened with the locks reinstated. That's one lock a year.

0:29:430:29:48

So you've got ten locks to go.

0:29:480:29:50

-What about the original lighters?

-There aren't any left, but for one.

0:29:500:29:56

The volunteers of the River Stour Trust dug out a lighter at Sudbury.

0:29:560:30:01

It's now berthed near our education centre at Cornard

0:30:010:30:04

and we hope to restore that.

0:30:040:30:06

It will cost us £75,000.

0:30:060:30:08

-It'll be worth it.

-It's the only one of its kind, so it must be restored.

0:30:080:30:13

Then we hope to have it horse drawn by a Suffolk Punch, probably, along the river.

0:30:130:30:18

So what will the tourists get from the river?

0:30:180:30:22

It's this wonderful sense of tranquillity and peace.

0:30:220:30:26

-You've experienced that.

-I have.

0:30:260:30:29

It's relaxing, it's beautiful, it's peaceful

0:30:290:30:32

and it's the timelessness of this river that was so busy for trade

0:30:320:30:37

and now is just for tourism and for people to pootle about in boats.

0:30:370:30:42

-It's very therapeutic.

-Absolutely.

0:30:420:30:44

We've been here three or four hours and I feel completely chilled out.

0:30:440:30:49

I don't want to go back to work now!

0:30:490:30:51

In Colchester, hundreds of people are waiting for valuations, so we'd better get on.

0:30:580:31:03

Helen, thanks for coming. Have you picked this up from some exotic Far Eastern country?

0:31:050:31:12

No. When my gran died she left that to my mum

0:31:120:31:16

and my mum's given that to me.

0:31:160:31:18

But my gran got it from an old lady who lived across the road from her who knew people that travelled.

0:31:180:31:24

Right. So she may have acquired it through her acquaintances.

0:31:240:31:29

It's not English which brought me to the travel question.

0:31:290:31:34

Do you know what these are?

0:31:340:31:36

-They're porcupine quills.

-Yeah. Dead right.

0:31:360:31:40

Porcupine quills. Obviously not native to England.

0:31:400:31:44

And this use of this very dark wood, dalbergias - the rosewood family -

0:31:440:31:51

is very typical of Indian boxes and furniture.

0:31:510:31:55

But I like this. It's got a nice decorative appeal

0:31:550:31:59

whilst not being over the top.

0:31:590:32:01

It's using the natural colours of the quills as decoration.

0:32:010:32:06

-Have you used it? If I open it...

-No, I haven't used it.

0:32:060:32:11

This helps set it off. You've got this lovely inlay -

0:32:110:32:14

almost polka dot inlay -

0:32:140:32:17

with these lidded compartments.

0:32:170:32:19

I would think it's probably used as a work box, maybe a sewing box

0:32:200:32:26

to keep your various accoutrements in for sewing.

0:32:260:32:30

It may even have been a jewellery box, perhaps.

0:32:300:32:34

Unusual that it's not lined with anything if it's for jewellery.

0:32:350:32:40

So I would say it's more of a work box.

0:32:400:32:44

It's going to be 19th century.

0:32:440:32:47

-Have you any idea of what it's worth?

-No, I've got no idea.

0:32:470:32:52

OK.

0:32:520:32:54

You do see them quite often without the interiors, just as plain boxes.

0:32:540:32:59

This one attracts your attention when you see it

0:32:590:33:03

and then opening it just makes it that much crisper.

0:33:030:33:08

I would suggest we try it at the auction

0:33:080:33:12

with an estimate of £100-150.

0:33:120:33:15

If we set the reserve at £100 and at the auctioneer's discretion -

0:33:150:33:19

give him 10% discretion -

0:33:190:33:21

with a printed estimate of £100-150.

0:33:210:33:24

That would be fine. Thank you.

0:33:240:33:27

-Hello, Rita.

-Hello.

-What an interesting book you've brought.

0:33:310:33:35

Before we start investigating it, can you give me some background.

0:33:350:33:40

-This has been in my husband's family for years.

-Gosh.

0:33:400:33:43

Yes. And he always thought it was valuable.

0:33:430:33:47

-OK.

-So that's why I'm here.

0:33:470:33:48

I'm glad you're here. It's a very interesting book.

0:33:480:33:52

"The History of the Wars occasioned by the French Revolution."

0:33:520:33:58

-So you've got all the main characters in this.

-Yes.

0:33:580:34:01

One of the things we need to do is to open it up and see the villain of the piece...

0:34:010:34:08

Right. Napoleon.

0:34:080:34:10

As it says there, "Napoleon Bonaparte, Emperor of France."

0:34:100:34:14

This was printed in England because the English were so pleased that they didn't have a revolution here.

0:34:140:34:20

This was printed in about 1816.

0:34:200:34:23

After all the battles with Napoleon, so it's a very historical book.

0:34:230:34:28

There was one other print which I really liked...if we can find it.

0:34:280:34:35

It's at the time of the Prince Regent

0:34:350:34:38

and we don't think of him often as charging into battle.

0:34:380:34:41

-I wonder if he did.

-I think it's probably artistic licence.

0:34:410:34:46

But it's a wonderful book.

0:34:460:34:48

-So you've had it a long time?

-Yes.

0:34:480:34:51

And why did you decide to think of flogging it now?

0:34:510:34:55

Well, I'm downsizing.

0:34:550:34:57

I think it's a lovely book and it's never looked at,

0:34:570:35:01

so why not let someone who would appreciate it?

0:35:010:35:06

Yes. It's an interesting book.

0:35:060:35:08

-The condition is against it.

-Yes.

-The cover has already come off.

0:35:080:35:13

It's one of those books which might be what they call a breaker.

0:35:130:35:17

-I thought you'd say that.

-So somebody will buy it and take out all the coloured engravings.

0:35:170:35:23

-It's a shame, but it does happen.

-They'd look very nice, wouldn't they?

-They'd look stunning.

0:35:230:35:30

It's quite a well-known book. It does come up.

0:35:300:35:34

I think in very good condition, these books can fetch £400-500.

0:35:340:35:39

-Goodness.

-But this is in pretty shocking condition.

0:35:390:35:43

I think a more sensible estimate would be about £150-250,

0:35:430:35:48

with 150 discretionary reserve.

0:35:480:35:50

-That sounds all right.

-And see what happens on the day.

0:35:500:35:54

-I'm prepared to go with that.

-Fantastic.

0:35:540:35:56

Thank you for agreeing to flog it with us today.

0:35:560:36:00

I'm not a particularly strong book valuer,

0:36:000:36:02

so I hope I won't meet my Waterloo at the auction.

0:36:020:36:07

It'll be me meeting my Waterloo!

0:36:080:36:11

John and Debbie, tell me the story behind this oil painting.

0:36:160:36:20

My dad used to be head porter at rental apartments.

0:36:200:36:24

One particular woman that he looked after - he looked out for her quite a lot -

0:36:240:36:29

left this painting to him.

0:36:290:36:31

Then when he died last year he left it to me.

0:36:310:36:35

-So it's been through the family.

-Yes.

0:36:350:36:38

-Why are you flogging this?

-We both like it.

0:36:380:36:40

Every winter we go to Gambia for a holiday and there are two people we'd like to take.

0:36:400:36:45

So we're trying to raise the money to take them with us.

0:36:450:36:49

Have you tried researching the history to find out a bit more about Z Gruner?

0:36:490:36:55

I have tried to research but haven't got anywhere,

0:36:550:36:58

so I've got absolutely no idea.

0:36:580:37:01

I've just looked in the Art Index guide and on the Internet and I can't find Z Gruner.

0:37:010:37:06

It's continental, painted on an oak panel - which is quite nice

0:37:060:37:11

and gives it a bit more credence.

0:37:110:37:13

I'm pretty sure he's Austrian.

0:37:130:37:14

There is an Elioth Gruner

0:37:140:37:17

and he was around from about 1880 to 1936.

0:37:170:37:21

A painting this size by Elioth Gruner

0:37:210:37:24

will set you back somewhere between £10,000-20,000.

0:37:240:37:29

Now they're thinking, "What's he going to say about this one?"

0:37:290:37:33

There's no reference to a Z Gruner. And it's about the same time.

0:37:330:37:39

I've conferred with the other experts and we all think this is the last quarter of the 19th century,

0:37:390:37:46

so it's about that time.

0:37:460:37:47

Maybe he's a relation. Maybe it's a popular name.

0:37:470:37:51

There's nothing I can tell you about it,

0:37:510:37:54

except that he's a very good artist.

0:37:540:37:56

Look at the light and shade here. Look at the face.

0:37:560:38:00

It really is "contentment". I just wonder what he's reading.

0:38:000:38:04

It's going to put a smile on anybody's face.

0:38:040:38:08

It's signed on the frame so we know it's contemporary.

0:38:080:38:12

If you turn it over, you can see.

0:38:120:38:15

They've not been separated. That's what the collectors want.

0:38:150:38:19

It's got its right backing and here's the evidence of the oak panel.

0:38:190:38:24

It's a lovely continental picture.

0:38:240:38:26

I think we should put this into auction with a reserve of £150 to tempt some people in.

0:38:260:38:33

-But a fixed reserve because I don't want you to give this away.

-No.

-Happy with that?

-Yeah.

0:38:330:38:40

-Very.

-Let's hope this does raise some money towards the Gambia trip.

0:38:400:38:45

-What will you do over there?

-We do two things, really.

0:38:450:38:48

Basically, it's a holiday, first,

0:38:480:38:51

but we're involved in a couple of charities there.

0:38:510:38:54

One is called Endanka Endanka, which produces computer...

0:38:540:38:58

It teaches people inland about computers and other technologies

0:38:580:39:03

which they can't get when they go to school.

0:39:030:39:07

-Sharing skills in IT.

-Exactly.

0:39:070:39:09

Sounds really good. Enjoy that and let's hope this goes towards it.

0:39:090:39:14

Fred, Binky, you've brought in a Flog It! favourite -

0:39:140:39:18

a piece of Troika work. Tell me the history of it.

0:39:180:39:21

We was holidaying in Cornwall

0:39:210:39:24

and we pulled into a shop in St Ives.

0:39:240:39:27

We were looking around and I saw this piece.

0:39:270:39:31

My wife didn't like it very much,

0:39:330:39:36

but I insisted on coming away with something.

0:39:360:39:40

When she saw the price, she said, "We haven't got enough money to eat to get home."

0:39:400:39:46

We've got enough for petrol, but not enough to have any food.

0:39:460:39:50

So I said, "We'll have to go hungry all the way."

0:39:500:39:54

It's been down in his garage at the bottom of the garden on his tool chest, wrapped up,

0:39:540:40:01

for about 20-odd years.

0:40:010:40:04

-Good Lord.

-When I was watching Flog It! one day, I said, "We've got a bit of that in the garage."

0:40:040:40:11

It was covered in dust.

0:40:110:40:13

I said we ought to have it valued.

0:40:130:40:17

It's a lovely story and it sums up what Troika was about.

0:40:170:40:21

They were based in St Ives.

0:40:210:40:24

It started in the 1960s.

0:40:240:40:27

It's called Troika because of the three-horsed Russian carriage

0:40:270:40:32

and there were three directors. that formed the company.

0:40:320:40:36

This is a very impressive-looking piece.

0:40:360:40:39

Normally we see the smaller vases.

0:40:390:40:41

There's a lot going on here - the top, the middle bit and this base.

0:40:410:40:46

The colours are a bit muted.

0:40:460:40:48

Sometimes the colours are much brighter.

0:40:480:40:51

But if you were looking for a piece of Troika, then this is your piece.

0:40:510:40:56

Can you remember what you paid for it in the 1970s?

0:40:560:41:00

-I think it was about £16.

-£16?

-Something like that.

0:41:000:41:05

I must say that most things bought in the '70s for £16 would today be worth nothing.

0:41:050:41:11

But you have bought well on this.

0:41:110:41:15

We've got interesting marks.

0:41:150:41:17

Obviously the Troika mark, England

0:41:170:41:21

and then a designer's signature

0:41:210:41:23

or artist's signature here.

0:41:230:41:25

It's a bit roughly painted, but I think it's for Avril Bennet.

0:41:250:41:29

-We didn't know that.

-That's quite nice.

0:41:290:41:31

Now, if we were putting this... And it is quite a big piece, isn't it?

0:41:310:41:36

-I've never seen one as big as that.

-I bet you haven't!

0:41:360:41:39

But, looking at an auction estimate,

0:41:390:41:43

I'd like to give a conservative estimate to bring in a lot of people.

0:41:430:41:49

I think we should put something like £400 on it.

0:41:490:41:52

-Right.

-Something like that. Maybe 400-500.

0:41:520:41:55

-Would you be happy with that?

-Yes.

0:41:550:41:57

And a reserve of 400 with a bit of discretion.

0:41:570:42:01

The market for Troika does go up and down and at the moment there's a bit of a ripple,

0:42:010:42:07

-but it's a good example of its type and I think it will do well.

-Lovely.

0:42:070:42:13

I've left the valuation day and come out here to Dedham,

0:42:200:42:24

hot on the trail of one of Suffolk's most famous sons.

0:42:240:42:28

He was a prolific artist, known for his controversial views

0:42:360:42:41

and he lived here in Castle House for 40 years.

0:42:410:42:44

It's now a museum dedicated to the life and work of Sir Alfred Munnings.

0:42:440:42:49

The man who can tell me about this 20th-century artist

0:42:510:42:55

is Ron Jones, Chairman of the museum.

0:42:550:42:59

Gosh, Ron. I never realised how prolific he was.

0:42:590:43:02

There's volumes of his work. Where did he get his inspiration?

0:43:020:43:06

As the son of a miller from Mendham in Norfolk,

0:43:060:43:09

he'd always been in empathy with nature, liked the world around him

0:43:090:43:14

and was particularly keen on the rural scene.

0:43:140:43:17

This is at Lavenham, 20 miles from here, painted in 1901.

0:43:170:43:21

What I like about the painting is that the horses come out clearly.

0:43:210:43:25

He's caught the different colours and tones of the horses he was using as models.

0:43:250:43:31

He's also juxtaposed them in such a way

0:43:310:43:34

-as to create a sense of movement.

-Oh, I can see that.

0:43:340:43:38

He's got a really good eye. I bet he was a rider.

0:43:380:43:41

He's got heels down, feet forward, and that's how you ride a horse.

0:43:410:43:45

-That's something I wouldn't have known.

-Oh, it is.

0:43:450:43:48

He also brought to life the foreground.

0:43:480:43:51

-Yes. It's quite busy there.

-It really seems to be growing.

0:43:510:43:56

I love this. This is so dark and moody.

0:43:580:44:01

Who's the young lad there?

0:44:010:44:03

Well, in the East Anglian countryside, he loved to watch the gypsy way of life

0:44:030:44:08

-to the extent that he bought a gypsy caravan.

-Really?

0:44:080:44:11

Which he took out in the countryside with all his painting gear.

0:44:110:44:16

In this picture, called The Ford, painted in 1911,

0:44:160:44:20

the horses are coming back at dusk - it's a "grey" picture.

0:44:200:44:25

Again, there's a suggestion from the angling of the horses

0:44:250:44:29

that it is actually in movement.

0:44:290:44:32

That's gorgeous.

0:44:320:44:34

'Munnings hadn't always painted thoroughbreds.

0:44:400:44:43

'In his early years he concentrated on the landscapes of rural East Anglia.

0:44:430:44:47

'But it was his equestrian pieces that caught the public's eye.'

0:44:470:44:52

-Why did he paint horses?

-He was fascinated by the anatomy of the horse.

0:44:520:44:57

He read Stubbs' book on that title when he was very young

0:44:570:45:03

and he also studied horse skeletons.

0:45:030:45:06

But also he was good at painting them.

0:45:060:45:09

What I like about this is that you can see the tension in the sinews of the horse.

0:45:090:45:15

You can see their flared nostrils.

0:45:150:45:17

-But you can also see the tension in the riders.

-Mmm.

0:45:170:45:21

And the fact there's one broken horse adds a bit of interest.

0:45:210:45:25

It always happens, doesn't it?

0:45:250:45:27

And you've got a nice Suffolk skyline.

0:45:270:45:30

Although Munnings wasn't a keen jockey himself,

0:45:360:45:39

he was encouraged by his wife - an accomplished horsewoman and winner of the Gold Cup.

0:45:390:45:45

She used her connections to get him commissions

0:45:480:45:50

from which he built a formidable reputation as an equestrian artist.

0:45:500:45:56

Munnings also had to overcome great adversity.

0:45:560:46:00

A freak accident nearly cut short a promising career.

0:46:000:46:03

He overcame tremendous challenges.

0:46:030:46:06

He lost the sight of an eye in 1898 when he was 20 years of age.

0:46:060:46:12

-How did he do that?

-He was lifting a terrier over a sty

0:46:120:46:16

and the briar fell back into his eye.

0:46:160:46:19

Gosh. Well, it didn't affect his ability as an artist.

0:46:190:46:22

No. It does, to some extent, affect the pressure he applied to the canvas.

0:46:220:46:27

In fact, early on, he applied too little pressure and the brush just airbrushed, as it were.

0:46:270:46:34

To compensate he applied more pressure -

0:46:340:46:36

sometimes adding far more paint to the canvas than was the intention.

0:46:360:46:41

Munnings' reputation as an artist reached its height in 1944

0:46:410:46:46

when he became President of the Royal Academy.

0:46:460:46:49

Later, he used his position to launch an attack on the growing popularity of Modern Art.

0:46:490:46:55

'I find myself a president of a body of men

0:46:550:47:00

'who are what I call "shilly-shallying".

0:47:000:47:04

'They feel that there is something

0:47:040:47:08

'in this so-called Modern Art.

0:47:080:47:11

'If you paint a tree,

0:47:110:47:14

'for Lord's sake try and paint it to look like a tree.

0:47:140:47:19

'And if you paint a sky, try and make it look like a sky...'

0:47:200:47:25

Munnings' attitude to abstract artists like Picasso went beyond words

0:47:280:47:33

and spilled over into his own art.

0:47:330:47:36

I have to single this one out

0:47:360:47:38

because this is so different to the rest.

0:47:380:47:41

-It looks more like a caricature.

-Well, it is.

0:47:410:47:45

There's a Henry Moore there and a Picasso. Who are the figures?

0:47:450:47:49

The one on the left is Lord Rothenstein,

0:47:490:47:53

Chairman of a the Tate Gallery and a supporter of Modern Art.

0:47:530:47:57

Humphrey Brooke, to the right side, was the Secretary of the Royal Academy.

0:47:570:48:05

The gentleman to the extreme right was a Professor of History at Oxford University.

0:48:050:48:11

The title of the picture is Does The Subject Matter?

0:48:110:48:15

-So he really is ridiculing everybody there.

-Yes.

0:48:150:48:18

It was used as a cartoon by Low and other cartoonists in the papers.

0:48:180:48:24

The controversial views Munnings held on Modern Art saw him shunned by his fellow artists

0:48:290:48:35

and this drew attention away from the fact that he was a brilliant painter.

0:48:350:48:41

Recently, more people have discovered that and one of his works just sold for £4.4 million.

0:48:410:48:47

Shows how collectible he has become.

0:48:470:48:50

All this will keep this little part of Suffolk on the map for many years to come.

0:48:500:48:55

Let's have a reminder of what we're going to flog today.

0:48:560:49:01

Rita wants her History of the Wars book to conquer the bidders

0:49:010:49:05

and bring home a bounty of £150-250.

0:49:050:49:10

Helen's hoping her porcupine quill box will feather her nest

0:49:100:49:14

with £100-150.

0:49:140:49:16

Can John and Debbie's continental oil raise the £200-300 they need

0:49:190:49:24

for a charity trip to the Gambia?

0:49:240:49:27

We've seen plenty of Troika on Flog It!

0:49:270:49:30

but nothing like this tall vase.

0:49:300:49:33

Fred and Binky are hoping it'll make an even bigger impact

0:49:330:49:36

by fetching £500.

0:49:360:49:38

Let's see what auctioneer James Grinter makes of this valuation.

0:49:400:49:44

-Is this the biggest lump of Troika you've ever seen?

-It is.

0:49:470:49:51

Mark Stacey's put £400-500 on this, which I think is a good valuation,

0:49:510:49:56

but I can see this doing 5-6, maybe 6-7.

0:49:560:50:00

You're probably right. We've had more interest in this one lot than a lot of other things in the sale.

0:50:000:50:07

But it's a fashion item now.

0:50:070:50:09

It's also quite a rare one.

0:50:090:50:11

Apparently, because it's so top-heavy,

0:50:110:50:15

a lot of them fall over and smash.

0:50:150:50:17

So to find one in a perfect state is quite a rare thing.

0:50:170:50:21

So it's a hardy survivor.

0:50:210:50:23

-Hopefully they'll get £700 and they can then go on another holiday to Cornwall.

-Indeed.

0:50:230:50:29

This is a great lot. It's an Anglo-Indian porcupine quill box.

0:50:350:50:40

It belongs to Helen, but not for much longer

0:50:400:50:42

because at £100-150 this is going to fly out of the room.

0:50:420:50:46

-It's quality.

-It is.

0:50:460:50:48

-I agree with Will's valuation.

-Yeah. The interior lifts it to £100-150.

0:50:480:50:54

If it had just been a plain interior, you see a lot. But the market's good for Anglo-Indian.

0:50:540:50:59

Exactly. I think this comes from the Galle area of Sri Lanka

0:50:590:51:03

because I've seen a lot there.

0:51:030:51:05

Obviously, Sri Lanka was Ceylon then.

0:51:050:51:08

It's great. And they are collectable.

0:51:080:51:11

-I hope so.

-We're going to find out now. This is it, Helen.

0:51:110:51:15

438 is a Victorian ivory hardwood and porcupine quill workbox.

0:51:150:51:21

The one as shown.

0:51:210:51:23

£80 for it?

0:51:230:51:25

£80 for it? 60?

0:51:250:51:27

60. At 60...

0:51:270:51:29

At £60 now. 60... At 65...

0:51:290:51:31

£65 bid now. 65... 70...

0:51:310:51:34

Five. 80... Five. 90... Five...

0:51:340:51:38

£100 bid now here. At £100...

0:51:380:51:41

Any advance? All done now at £100.

0:51:410:51:44

£100. It was short and sweet. What are you going to put it towards?

0:51:440:51:49

I'm going to give some money to my eldest daughter for her wedding

0:51:490:51:53

and my youngest daughter who's at university.

0:51:530:51:56

-Great. Exciting times.

-Yes.

0:51:560:51:58

Rita's joined me. You look gorgeous and I love this book you're selling.

0:52:030:52:09

It's full of engravings and I love the Napoleonic War ones.

0:52:090:52:13

I have a feeling it might get cut up.

0:52:130:52:16

The dealers might separate it. You never know.

0:52:160:52:19

Let's hope we get the top end. I'd like to see the £220-250 mark.

0:52:190:52:24

-It's on at £150-250.

-It is. Top end again?

0:52:240:52:28

-I know.

-Always the top end of the estimate.

0:52:280:52:31

413 is the early 19th-century volume, History Of The Wars by William Nicholson.

0:52:310:52:37

£100 to start me?

0:52:370:52:39

100? £100 I have.

0:52:390:52:41

-We're in.

-110... 120...

0:52:410:52:43

130...140...150...

0:52:430:52:47

150's bid down here.

0:52:470:52:49

150 is bid. Any advance? Are you all done?

0:52:490:52:52

-Hammer's gone down. Happy?

-Yes.

0:52:520:52:55

-Delighted.

-What will you do with £150?

0:52:550:52:58

-I've got my eye on a little Edwardian desk over there.

-There?

0:52:580:53:03

What do you hope to buy that for?

0:53:030:53:05

I hope not more than £150!

0:53:050:53:09

I've got to raise money now for John and Debbie's trip for the Gambia.

0:53:120:53:17

Let's hope this oil on board can get you some of the way there.

0:53:170:53:21

-Or one of you.

-I'm going too.

0:53:210:53:23

I don't mean you won't go, but you might have to pay for yourself.

0:53:230:53:28

Hopefully.

0:53:280:53:30

I love this picture. I just like the glowingness of it.

0:53:300:53:33

And the frame's contemporary. That's worth £80-100 alone.

0:53:330:53:38

Let's see what the bidders think.

0:53:380:53:40

544 is the attributed to Gruner, late 19th-century continental oil,

0:53:400:53:46

entitled Contentment.

0:53:460:53:48

I've two commissions and I start the bidding at £150.

0:53:480:53:51

At 150...

0:53:510:53:53

150... 155... 160?

0:53:530:53:55

165. 165's bid here now. 170 is bid.

0:53:550:53:59

180... At 180... 190... 200...

0:53:590:54:03

At £200, the lady's bid...

0:54:030:54:05

210 another place. 220...

0:54:050:54:08

230... 240... 250...

0:54:080:54:11

260... 270...

0:54:110:54:13

280... 290...

0:54:130:54:15

This is great.

0:54:150:54:17

340... 360...

0:54:170:54:19

380... Against you... 400.

0:54:190:54:23

You don't look so content now! 420?

0:54:230:54:27

At £400 down here... Are you all done?

0:54:270:54:30

Yes! A nice round figure. The hammer's gone down. £400.

0:54:300:54:34

-That's good.

-Really good.

0:54:340:54:36

-That will get you there.

-It will. We'll have to work on him.

0:54:360:54:40

I'll get halfway there now.

0:54:400:54:42

I'm ever so pleased for you. Thank you for bringing that in.

0:54:420:54:47

We've got some Troika coming under the hammer.

0:54:540:54:56

Wonderful memories of a trip to Cornwall and Fred and Binky's holiday.

0:54:560:55:01

Hopefully we'll get the £400-600 that we're looking for.

0:55:010:55:05

I think we'll do the top end.

0:55:050:55:08

-I know this is a cautious estimate, £400-500, from Mark.

-Well...

0:55:080:55:12

-If size is anything to go by, it's a whopper.

-This is it. Good luck.

0:55:120:55:18

Number 26 now is the 1970s Troika pillar sculpture or vase.

0:55:180:55:24

A splendid vase there.

0:55:240:55:25

£300 to start me?

0:55:250:55:28

Three I have down there. At £300... At 300...

0:55:280:55:33

340... 380...

0:55:330:55:37

420... 460...

0:55:370:55:39

460 against you. 500.

0:55:390:55:42

At £500 over here now...

0:55:420:55:44

Against you all at £500...

0:55:440:55:46

520 on the telephone. 540...

0:55:460:55:50

At 540... 560... 580...

0:55:500:55:53

-600... 620...

-Good.

0:55:530:55:56

620... 640... 660...

0:55:560:55:59

At 660... 680...

0:55:590:56:01

700... At 700...

0:56:010:56:03

700 against you.

0:56:030:56:05

720... 740... At 740...

0:56:050:56:08

760. 760 on the telephone on my right now, against you.

0:56:080:56:13

780. On the telephone at 780...

0:56:130:56:15

At 780... 800...

0:56:150:56:18

800 now. 820...

0:56:180:56:20

At 820...

0:56:200:56:22

-At 820... 840...

-Still going on.

-840... 860...

0:56:220:56:26

At 860... 880...

0:56:260:56:28

900... 920...

0:56:280:56:30

At 920... 940...

0:56:300:56:33

Make it 960? 960...

0:56:330:56:35

At 960... 980...

0:56:350:56:38

At 980... 1,000. I'll take 1,050.

0:56:380:56:42

1,050... At 1,050... Make it 1,100?

0:56:440:56:47

-1,100... 1,150?

-1,150.

0:56:470:56:52

1,150... 1,200... At 1,200...

0:56:520:56:56

At 1,200... 1,250...

0:56:560:56:58

At 1,250... At 1,250 now... 1,300...

0:56:580:57:03

1,300...

0:57:030:57:05

At 1,350... 1,400...

0:57:050:57:08

At 1,400... 1,450...

0:57:080:57:11

1,500...

0:57:110:57:13

-When's it going to stop, Binky?

-I don't know.

0:57:130:57:16

-I'm getting goose pimples on my face.

-I'm shaking.

0:57:160:57:20

1,650...

0:57:200:57:22

At 1,650... 1,700...

0:57:220:57:25

1,750...

0:57:250:57:27

At 1,750 over here now... At 1,750...

0:57:270:57:30

Against you all, I'm going to sell...

0:57:300:57:32

Are you all done?

0:57:320:57:34

-1,750!

-Lovely.

0:57:340:57:38

Yes!

0:57:390:57:41

-Great.

-That's a trip back to Cornwall, isn't it?

0:57:440:57:49

-You've got to do that.

-That is beyond all expectations.

0:57:490:57:53

-How exciting is that?

-From £16.

-£16. Yeah, I know.

0:57:530:57:57

-I went mad at him.

-God bless you for buying it.

0:57:570:58:00

-How much was it? I can't...

-Well done.

-Thanks, Mark.

0:58:000:58:03

-Mark, you're an angel.

-Thank you.

0:58:030:58:07

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:58:070:58:10

All I can say is, job done.

0:58:100:58:12

The auction's still going on, but it's all over for our owners.

0:58:170:58:22

We've had some super results - everything busting their estimates.

0:58:220:58:26

That's auctions for you.

0:58:260:58:29

I can't wait to see what happens at our next one. See you soon.

0:58:290:58:33

Paul Martin presents the series that takes antiques to auction. A Troika vase gets temperatures rising in a Colchester auction house, and presenter Paul Martin finds out how equestrian painter Alfred Munnings upset the art world.