Telford Flog It!


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Telford

Paul Martin visits Telford for more attic clearance surprises. Experts Philip Serrell and Adam Partridge give their valuation and everything goes under the hammer at a local sale.


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-Coming up on today's show... We'll take that.

-That's lovely.

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I can feel the energy!

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All that's to come on Flog It!!

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And today's Flog It! is in Telford, named after the famous engineer

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Thomas Telford, one of the principal architects of the Industrial Revolution.

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It's famous for the world's first iron bridge, which was built across

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the River Severn in 1779 by local metal master Abraham Darby III.

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However, Telford is a new town, forged over 25 years ago

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by joining up existing towns and villages in the area.

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And it attracted a lot of high-tech Japanese and Taiwanese firms.

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It's got a population of over 125,000 people, some of whom

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have come to our valuation day at the Telford International Centre to show us their antiques.

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Slick, hi-tech and sophisticated - that's our two experts today,

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Philip Serrell and Adam Partridge, who are keen to test the mettle of our owners' antiques.

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And both of them are hoping to pick an item that will turn a white heat in the auction room.

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Well, we've got our owners into the warm, and Adam's really found a hot little number.

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-This is one of my particularly favourite subjects, Michelle.

-Great.

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Very beautiful art-deco dancing lady.

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What can you tell me about her?

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It was my mother's, and it's been in my dad's house, and we said we

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were coming down today, so he said "Bring it along"

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We think it's in the style of Joseph Lorenzl,

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an Austrian sculptor.

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-That's right.

-And that's about it.

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It's nice to see you've done a bit of research.

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You're quite right - Lorenzl was a prolific sculptor

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of this sort of subject, these glamorous, art-deco ladies.

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She's got this short skirt and quite a skimpy top,

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and a very glamorous cape in the form of some wings.

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Whichever way you look at her,

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she's gorgeous.

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Of course she's a table lighter. This bit comes out here.

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And that would cause a spark, which would ignite a wick.

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And there we have a lighter. She's on a marble plinth,

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which, sadly, has been damaged at some point.

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It's been quite neatly glued together.

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That will affect the value a bit.

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Lorenzl signed pieces - Lorenzl -

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and they were in bronze.

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This is a gilded spelter figure, which is a cheaper alloy than bronze.

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So she's not really of massive value,

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but she's really evocative of the deco period. She's total 1930s -

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a period that's in vogue at the moment.

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So she should sell very well in the auction room.

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What I mean by very well is probably between £100 and £180.

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Because she's a spelter one.

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Bronze Lorenzl figures are from £500 to £2,000,

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depending on size and condition.

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-So is that all right by you?

-That is, yes.

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Although it's from my dad's house, he's got plenty of other clutter.

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As much as I like her, she's not really something I'd have my own home.

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Not your style, maybe?

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I do like the Art Deco/Art Nouveau period, but not something that I would have personally.

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-Interesting. How are you doing?

-I'm fine, thank you.

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You've brought along a pair of earrings.

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-What can you tell me about these?

-Not a lot really.

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I just had them left to me. I don't wear them.

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So it's a shame - they're just stuck in the drawer.

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I think that's a real crying shame.

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This green stone that's at the bottom is what we call a peridot.

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It's in a teardrop shape.

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We've got these little seed pearls set.

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Let's see if we can find any mark that tells us whether they're gold or not.

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And there we are - nine-carat gold.

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So we've got a pair of nine-carat gold peridot and seed pearl earrings.

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I would think they're probably Edwardian.

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I think they're really sweet. Why don't you like them?

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-I've never worn them.

-Never worn them?

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-Just not your thing?

-Not really.

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I think their auction value isn't gonna be great.

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I would think you're looking at probably £60 to £90.

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We'll put a fixed reserve of £50.

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I think that represents super value for money for someone who'd buy them.

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I believe that those in the shop might be £200 to £300.

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I'm hopeful that they'll sell well.

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And you don't want them, so if they make £80,

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will you go and buy something else that you do like with the £80?

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Yes.

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-You're gonna buy something?

-Yes.

-What?

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I like platinum, so I'll probably put it towards that.

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-That sounds expensive to me.

-Yes.

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Well, good luck to you.

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Malcolm, thank you very much for bringing in this architectural gem.

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It's a gorgeous internal post box.

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How did you come by this?

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It's my mother-in-law's. She remembers it being in her house as a little girl.

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When her mother died it was passed on to her.

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It's been left inside one of the spare bedrooms ever since.

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-That's the only history you know about it?

-Yes.

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My wife remembers playing with it when she was a little girl as well.

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Just putting little notes in and opening the door.

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Well, this is Edwardian.

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It's early 1900s.

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This would belong in a country house hotel, and would be used for

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a lot of internal mail - all the guests that would be staying there for the shoot, say,

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or the fishing meeting, would send each other notes.

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This would be left on the counter at reception, and the receptionist

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would sort the mail out for the guests.

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It's made of solid oak.

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And it's craftsman-built. And he's selected the timbers to make this, because he's cut across the grain

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to create this wonderful decorative finish.

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And that's a medullary ray,

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which is a fissure which feeds the wood to make it grow.

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It feeds those annual rings.

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If you cut across the trunk, this is where you see all those fissures running through.

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Yeah, I understand that now.

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And that makes this side look a lot more pleasing.

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Otherwise it would look quite boring.

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Likewise, I've noticed this side has faded a lot.

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It's been in the sun somewhere.

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But a little bit of polish would bring that up.

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It will bring the golden hue back out. In needs TLC.

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If I lick my finger, watch, you can see the colour, the hue, glow from this. Look.

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-See that?

-Yes I do.

-It's in original condition.

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It's got an eight-sided door knocker made of brass, typical of the era.

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The original key, which would have been removed.

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Original lock

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and original hinges.

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And I love the fact that the craftsman who made this, the cabinet maker,

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has put the two panes of glass in, but he's actually bedded them in with little cot-beadings,

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which is how you should bed in glass in a door.

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Everything is perfect about this.

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I would say this is about 1910, 1920.

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Why do you want to flog this?

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Well, it's just been sitting in the bedroom and doing nothing, really.

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My mother-in-law said to take that along.

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Has Mother-in-law or you any idea what this is worth?

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No. My mother-in-law hasn't.

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I thought she may be lucky to get £40, something like that.

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40, 50 quid?

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-Something like that.

-60 tops? Well, I think if we put this into auction,

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if two people fall in love with this it's gonna sell for £800.

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-How much?

-£800.

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You've shocked me there!

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My God!

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I'd like to put this into auction with an estimation of £600-800.

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-It's wonderful.

-And we're gonna put a fixed reserve of £600 on it,

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so you mustn't sell it for any less than £600.

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Fine. We'll go by what you say.

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-That taken you by surprise!

-It has.

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You've shocked me completely.

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When I looked at it I thought, "It's a piece of wood".

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I didn't really register that it could be quite that valuable, to be honest.

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Fingers crossed then.

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In the meantime, what's Philip got his eye on?

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"Fear God and honour the Queen and do good to all men.

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"Elizabeth Lewis worked this in the year of Our Lord 1838."

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-Who's Elizabeth Lewis?

-I haven't got a clue.

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My mum says it's something to do with her grandmother -

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it's my mum's side of the family, but we're not Lewises.

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-So you've no idea who this belongs to?

-No, it doesn't mean anything.

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But it's a family piece?

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-It's been passed down, but nobody's very sentimental.

-You've brought it here to sell?

-Yes.

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A tip for everyone at home, if you do have things like this in your family, write as much

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information as you can about who the person was, when they lived, what they did, who their relationship was,

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and record it all on a bit of paper. We're gonna have a history lesson.

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-Can you remember history at school?

-Just about.

-When it refers to

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"honour the Queen," which Queen was that?

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-(Victoria.)

-Victoria! Of course!

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And it says here that this was her work in the year 1838.

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When did Victoria come to the throne?

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-('37.)

-1837.

-Well done! So this is quite interesting,

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cos I don't know how long this would have taken, but Elizabeth Lewis

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-did this in the first 12 months of Queen Victoria's reign.

-Yes.

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-I think that's interesting. It's not been loved at all, has it?

-No.

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-Its condition isn't great.

-No.

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You just want it sold?

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We want it sold. It was ready for the skip.

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-You just want it gone? Sold?

-Flogged.

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-No reserve?

-No.

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We will stick what we call a "come and buy me" estimate on it,

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which is £20 to £40.

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You could have a bit of luck. It might make two or three times that.

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-That's what we'll do.

-Lovely.

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Poor old Lizzie! What on earth are we doing to her?

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Next up is Danielle, with two Arts and Crafts-style napkin rings.

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I brought these napkin rings, cos I don't know anything about them.

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And they're made of?

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-Copper?

-That's right. Where did you get them from?

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They belonged to my granddad, and he told me to bring them today.

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Did he tell you anything about them?

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No, he doesn't know anything about them at all.

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Well, they date from what we call the Arts and Crafts period, which is at the beginning of the 20th century.

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They are made from copper, and most of the time

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you're not gonna get very excited about a copper serviette ring.

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But these are hand-made, they're hand-riveted at the end, and they've each got this little monogram on.

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The monogram is not one that any of us recognise, but there's a lot of Arts and Crafts metalworkers.

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There was the Newlyn School... These may well be from the Lake District,

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where there is the Keswick School of Industrial Arts. Hand decorated,

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and these are ceramic, or pottery, plaques in there. They look a bit like precious stones, don't they?

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That's the intention, but they're made from pottery.

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We call these insets cabochon.

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These may well be Ruskin Pottery - they often are.

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We'd probably say, "Two Arts and Crafts napkin rings

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"with Ruskin-type pottery cabochon".

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So how much do you think they're worth?

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Not an awful lot, but if they weren't so stylish they wouldn't be worth anything, really.

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I'd say, at auction, estimate at the moment would be £40 to £60 for the pair.

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-Are you gonna put them in the auction?

-Yeah.

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And who's gonna get the money?

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My mum, probably.

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-The auction is on a Saturday, so you'll be able to come.

-Yeah.

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I look forward to it. I'll be there as well. Thanks for coming in.

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So, time to take our first batch of antiques off to auction in Stourbridge.

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Will our owners' items impress the bidders of the West Midlands?

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Well, here's our cast.

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Michelle doesn't like her mum's stylish dancing lady,

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but Adam thinks she should strike up a reasonable price at auction.

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These earrings have come out of a dark drawer

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to see a sparkling £60 to £90 estimate from Philip.

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This sampler nearly went in a skip!

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Luckily Flog It! came to town,

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and Philip gave Patricia a bit of history and his estimate.

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Danielle brought along her granddad's copper napkin rings - hand-made but unsigned.

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Adam says they're worth £40 to £60.

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My favourite was this Edwardian post-box, belonging to Malcolm's mother-in-law.

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With original detailing I hope I haven't gone too far with my estimate of £600-£800.

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Home for our auction today is Fieldings, right here in Stourbridge.

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We have two auctioneers on the rostrum today - Will Farmer,

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who specialises in pottery, porcelain and glass,

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and Nick Davies, who specialises in basically everything else.

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Their most famous sale here was a painting by Birmingham-born artist Walter Langley,

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which sold for a staggering £22,000 - not bad for something with an estimate of £6,000.

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I know we're not gonna see anything like that here today, but have any of our owners' items caused a stir?

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Let's go and find out.

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A classy little lot here, Nick. Earrings, nine-carat gold, seed pearl, belonging to Christine.

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She's flogging them because she prefers platinum.

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She wants £60 to £90 - that's what Philip, our expert, put on them.

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What do they mean by seed pearl?

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Seed pearls are river pearl - another name for a river pearl.

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Not cultured, they'd be plucked out of a river and popped into the metal mounts.

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-Are they always smaller?

-Very small, often split in half as well, so they lie flush to the metal.

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These will have been made in Birmingham, about 1900, 1910,

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there were literally millions of items coming out of Birmingham in the jewellery quarter. They're lovely.

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I would have thought something like that, I don't anything about jewellery,

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would be slightly more expensive. I would have put £100 to £150 on.

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I understand what you're saying. At auction...

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People are often slightly timid of buying jewellery at auction.

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But these, at the guide price given, they should sell.

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Well, it's time to take the gavel to the rostrum and see if any of our estimates are bang on.

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Let's see if this lights up the sale room.

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It's Michelle's dancing lady in the Art-Deco style.

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We've got a valuation of £100 to £180.

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Why are you flogging this?

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Well, it was in my dad's house, and when Flog It! was on in Telford he suggested taking it down.

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It was my mum's. In effect, it's going to pass on to me.

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-Are you happy with the valuation?

-Yes.

-Adam's spot-on on this one.

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Well, this is his field, you see.

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You mean glamorous girls?

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-Yeah, with long legs. This should do the business then?

-I think so.

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It's quite nice with those back wings that hang down.

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I'd like to think we'd get the top end of £150-ish - maybe a bit more.

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-OK.

-That would be good.

-Very decorative.

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We're gonna find out right now. This is it.

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870, the Art-Deco table-lighter.

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We have to start here at £120, I believe. £120 I'm bid.

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Do I see 125 in the room? £120 on a commission. 125. 130.

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135. 140. 145. 150. 155. 160. 165.

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Says no. 160 on a commission. 165 anywhere else?

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165. 170. 175.

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180. 185.

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190. 185. 190 anywhere else? At £185 for the table-lighter.

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All done at £185. Are we all finished this time?

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£185. That's pretty good. Now, what are you putting that towards?

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My daughter's trip to Italy next year.

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-Wonderful. A school trip?

-Yes it is.

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-Great.

-Good price, Paul. You know I'm gonna say it...

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I know you're gonna say - "Everything you touch...

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"..turns to sold." That's it.

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We have those lovely nine-carat gold pearl seed earrings going under

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the hammer right now, which Christine has brought in.

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We had a chat to the auctioneer - Philip doesn't know this.

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You put in an original valuation of 60-90.

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It could have been an 80-120, cos we think that's what they're gonna do.

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Hopefully they might do the top end.

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By the time somebody's paid commission, they'll reach £140.

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And I know you're putting the money towards platinum earrings.

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-Afraid so.

-She's never won the gold ones! Never ever!

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Obviously allergic to gold.

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Expensive taste.

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You'll never guess what Christine used to do for a living. Tell them, go on.

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I used to drive a coach part-time.

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-And you were the second woman in the country to be able to drive a coach?

-Yes.

-Quite an accolade.

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I'll be doing that if I get my valuation wrong!

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Well, it's going under the hammer right now.

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A cased pair of nine-carat peridot and seed pearl drop earrings,

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these are the ones with the floral stems, they're lovely little things.

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Bids and interest, you're gonna have to start me at £80.

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Yes!

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80. 85 anywhere in the room? 85. And 90? And five? 100.

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95 there. 100 anywhere else in the room?

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At 95 for the earrings, and 95 and selling at 100 anywhere else?

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All done at £95.

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Still got a job.

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Yeah. You don't have to drive those big coaches. Happy with that?

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-That's fine.

-Yeah? How much are the platinum earrings gonna cost?

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200.

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-Have you got your eye on some already?

-I have, yes.

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Happy shopping, anyway. Something towards them.

0:19:180:19:20

Cracking little lot, this, the Arts and Crafts napkin rings.

0:19:250:19:28

I love them, and they belong to Danielle.

0:19:280:19:31

Now, Mum's really, aren't they?

0:19:310:19:33

-Yeah.

-So Mum's gonna get the money.

0:19:330:19:35

-Do you like them?

-No.

-Can't bear them?

-No.

0:19:350:19:39

If I was you I'd be keeping these.

0:19:390:19:40

I'd talk Mum into letting you have them.

0:19:400:19:42

But it's too late now, because they're gonna go under the hammer.

0:19:420:19:44

-And I know Adam particularly them.

-Yeah.

0:19:440:19:47

They're pure Arts and Crafts, hand-made, hand-riveted, hand-decorated.

0:19:470:19:51

Yeah, they're nice.

0:19:510:19:53

Nice little things. And we have to start at £50, I believe.

0:19:530:19:57

£50 takes the under-bidders out. Do I see 52 in the room? I'll go.

0:19:570:20:02

£50 made and bid on a commission. Do I see 52 anywhere in the room?

0:20:020:20:05

£50 made and bid on a commission.

0:20:050:20:06

Don't be shy.

0:20:060:20:08

All done and finished at 50. All done?

0:20:080:20:10

Spot on. Spot on, Adam.

0:20:100:20:13

Right in between the estimate.

0:20:130:20:15

-£50. Happy with that, aren't you?

-Yeah.

0:20:150:20:18

Mum's gonna be delighted as well. Thank you very much for coming in.

0:20:180:20:21

Right, now on Flog It! it's time for us to weave our magic, because we have Patricia

0:20:260:20:31

and that lovely framed tapestry, which is all about your family.

0:20:310:20:34

And it's being flogged for 20 to £40.

0:20:340:20:37

-Yes.

-Otherwise it was going on a skip.

0:20:370:20:39

-Yes.

-There's a lot of sentimentality here.

0:20:390:20:42

-No, not attached.

-Just not attached.

0:20:420:20:46

-No.

-It doesn't do anything for you.

0:20:460:20:48

-No.

-There's no danger there and you can go and spend whatever

0:20:480:20:51

-you want to spend and you'll get more enjoyment out of it.

-Yes.

0:20:510:20:54

Lot 70 is the Victorian framed and glazed wallwork sampler.

0:20:540:20:58

Elizabeth Lewis, 1838.

0:20:580:21:01

Bids and interest enough to start me at £80.

0:21:010:21:03

£80 takes the under-bidders out.

0:21:030:21:05

Do I see 85 in the room?

0:21:050:21:07

£80. 85. And 90. And five.

0:21:070:21:11

95, madam. 95. 100?

0:21:110:21:14

95 there, standing.

0:21:140:21:16

-100 anywhere else?

-These are now worth a lot of money.

0:21:160:21:19

100 at the back. 105?

0:21:190:21:21

110. 115. 120. 125?

0:21:210:21:24

120, right in the distance. We'll finish at 120. All done.

0:21:240:21:28

-£120.

-Lovely, lovely.

0:21:300:21:34

-What are you going to do with that?

-Give it my mum.

0:21:340:21:37

-Aww...

-Because it was my mum's family.

-She's a big part of the family.

0:21:370:21:40

A proper family day out. Flog something from the family.

0:21:400:21:45

-What a good result.

-Yeah, really, really pleased.

0:21:450:21:48

Obviously, someone values your family more than you do.

0:21:480:21:50

-That's lovely.

-Well done, you.

-That's such a shock,

0:21:500:21:54

-such a shock.

-Tell your mum to enjoy the money.

-I will. Thank you.

0:21:540:21:58

And talking of enjoying the money -

0:21:580:22:00

OK, for me, this is my favourite lot of the show. It is the star of the show.

0:22:000:22:05

We've got £600-£800 riding on this gorgeous little Edwardian internal post box, which is yours, Malcolm.

0:22:050:22:12

It was the mother-in-law's.

0:22:120:22:14

Your wife, your mother, you have both played with this.

0:22:140:22:17

So we have three generations of people that have played with this.

0:22:170:22:19

-So what's your name?

-Heather.

0:22:190:22:21

-Heather. Did you like it?

-Yes.

0:22:210:22:23

I know it's gonna do the six. And I hope I don't let you down.

0:22:230:22:26

It's definitely worth 600.

0:22:260:22:28

Let's find out what the bidders of Stourbridge think, shall we?

0:22:280:22:30

-Shall we do it?

-Yes.

-Right. Let's do it.

0:22:300:22:33

830, which is the Edwardian oak internal post box showing down here.

0:22:330:22:39

Interests on the telephone as well. And where do we start?

0:22:390:22:42

£600. 610. 620. 630. 640. 650.

0:22:420:22:48

660. 670. 680?

0:22:480:22:51

670 in the room. 680 anywhere else before I go to the phones?

0:22:510:22:55

670 in the room. 680, William?

0:22:550:22:58

680. 690. 700.

0:22:580:23:01

720. 740.

0:23:010:23:06

760.

0:23:060:23:09

760 on Helen?

0:23:120:23:14

780, Will?

0:23:140:23:18

800. 820? 820 anywhere else in the room?

0:23:180:23:23

At £800. 820. 850?

0:23:230:23:27

880.

0:23:270:23:29

-900.

-That's brilliant.

0:23:290:23:32

920. £900 on the phone.

0:23:330:23:36

920 anywhere else? At £900. Are we all done and finished at £900?

0:23:360:23:41

All done? You sure?

0:23:410:23:43

Well, we'll take that for sure.

0:23:450:23:46

900 quid!

0:23:460:23:48

-Very good.

-Put it there.

-Well done.

0:23:480:23:51

Thank you very much for bringing that in, because that made my day.

0:23:510:23:55

It's not often on Flog It!

0:23:550:23:56

we see quality items that the bidders really, really like.

0:23:560:24:00

And that's why it got £900.

0:24:000:24:02

It's not a purist antique or anything, but it's something that is so fashionable at the moment.

0:24:020:24:07

Well, how exciting was that? Some great results so far.

0:24:120:24:14

And lots more auction action later on in the show.

0:24:140:24:18

I'm going to take myself off

0:24:180:24:21

to explore the rich, rural cultural heritage of this part of the world.

0:24:210:24:25

"It was a wonderful feeling to work with horses, to plough with a single

0:24:290:24:33

"furrow plough, following two of our draught horses plodding ahead.

0:24:330:24:38

"The swingletrees swaying as the traces, or chains, tightened.

0:24:380:24:42

"The wave of earth rearing up and turning over with the soft whisper of the shear.

0:24:420:24:47

"The bright breast of the plough gleaming like a curved sunflower."

0:24:470:24:52

That is exactly what Tarka The Otter author, Henry Williamson, felt in 1972.

0:24:530:24:59

But he was remembering a bygone age when the power of the horse was at the very heart of agriculture.

0:24:590:25:06

By the 1950s, heavy horses had all but disappeared from British farms, as the tractor took over.

0:25:060:25:13

They were introduced to Britain by William the Conqueror,

0:25:130:25:16

used to carry the immense weight of the knights in full armour.

0:25:160:25:19

And they've been used in the frontline of battle right up to and including the Second World War.

0:25:190:25:25

To find out more about these heavy horses and their use in agriculture,

0:25:250:25:29

I've come to Acton Scott Historic Working Farm.

0:25:290:25:33

These Shire horses were needed for their pulling power.

0:25:330:25:35

In their heyday, cargoes were determined by the amount of horses it took to pull that load.

0:25:350:25:40

And that expression has stayed with us today in the term of "horsepower".

0:25:400:25:44

We're gonna learn more about that.

0:25:440:25:46

Here is head wagonner Mike Bingham. What are we going to get up to today?

0:25:460:25:50

We're going to continue the ploughing of the root land

0:25:500:25:53

in preparation for sowing of spring oats next week.

0:25:530:25:56

We'll be using Penny and her sister, Emily, to pull the plough.

0:25:560:26:00

Good! lovely crisp, frosty morning. So shall we get on with it?

0:26:000:26:04

-An absolute perfect ploughing day.

-Is it?

0:26:040:26:07

I'm going to thoroughly enjoy this.

0:26:120:26:14

Well, I hope so. The day couldn't be better for us.

0:26:140:26:17

Ah, this is the life.

0:26:240:26:26

Mike, how long did it take you to learn this?

0:26:290:26:32

Well, I still haven't learnt it, Paul, and I've been having a go for 25 years.

0:26:320:26:37

Well, I've got a good teacher. That's the main thing.

0:26:370:26:40

The great thing about ploughing is it's an essay in perfection, and one can never achieve perfection.

0:26:400:26:44

I'm quite lucky I just have to follow that, in a way.

0:26:440:26:47

The horse should go in the furrow.

0:26:470:26:50

You do indeed. Penny is the furrow horse. Emily's the wagon horse.

0:26:500:26:52

And that's how they always work on ploughing jobs.

0:26:520:26:55

So, Penny will follow the furrow for you.

0:26:550:26:58

Walk on, Pen and Em. Walk on!

0:26:580:27:01

So you've got to really keep your head up,

0:27:050:27:07

and stand high so you can see where the wheel's going.

0:27:070:27:10

Yes, keep that furrow wheel at the furrow side.

0:27:100:27:12

Actually, this is pretty good, isn't it?

0:27:120:27:14

Oh, it's going very nicely.

0:27:140:27:17

D'you know, that blade cuts like a dream.

0:27:170:27:19

Yes.

0:27:190:27:22

-And in the old days, of course, to do an acre, which a good man would do in a day...

-Yeah.

0:27:220:27:26

..you would've walked nine miles at the back of a pair of horses.

0:27:260:27:30

-Gee back!

-Wait!

0:27:320:27:35

Wait! So there's your furrow slice.

0:27:350:27:38

That is pretty good.

0:27:380:27:39

I'm impressed with that for the first go.

0:27:390:27:43

Right, this is the difficult bit, as we've got to the end of the field

0:27:430:27:46

and we've got to turn the horses round. So how?

0:27:460:27:49

This is quite difficult, but you're going to sit on the handle at the far side.

0:27:490:27:53

I'm going to bring horses round for this first attempt.

0:27:530:27:56

-OK.

-Em, Pen, gee back, steady.

0:27:560:27:58

Steady, darlings. Steady. Steady.

0:27:580:28:01

Steady. Steady.

0:28:010:28:04

Oh, dear. Whay!

0:28:040:28:06

It doesn't move.

0:28:090:28:11

Actually, it is some weight, isn't it?

0:28:190:28:21

There we are.

0:28:210:28:23

Actually, Paul, I was very unfair because I told you the wrong handle to sit on.

0:28:230:28:27

It's this handle you need to sit on.

0:28:270:28:29

I thought so. Because if you're turning that way and I put all the weight on, I'm bound to fall over!

0:28:290:28:34

I thought I had a good teacher.

0:28:340:28:36

Right.

0:28:360:28:39

-Joke's over.

-Yes.

0:28:390:28:41

Of course, Paul.

0:28:410:28:44

-Come on.

-Come on then, girls.

0:28:440:28:45

-Em, Pen, walk on.

-Gently, gently.

0:28:450:28:48

Gee back. Gee back.

0:28:480:28:50

Gee back.

0:28:500:28:52

Em, Pen, walk on.

0:28:520:28:53

-Steady...

-Steady, steady, steady.

0:28:570:29:00

Whay! D'you know, we are moving at some pace, aren't we?

0:29:000:29:04

They always go quicker uphill and there's just a little hill there.

0:29:040:29:08

Whay!

0:29:150:29:16

Gosh! That was hard work, but I thoroughly enjoyed that.

0:29:200:29:23

That was brilliant. Thank you very much.

0:29:230:29:25

What would I have been paid back then in the 1900s?

0:29:250:29:29

Well, I can remember, just remember, grandfather telling me that he was taken into service in 1900

0:29:290:29:35

as a 14-year-old boy, and he was paid keep plus a pair of boots plus a guinea at the end of the year.

0:29:350:29:42

And that was hard work. They were up at early hours.

0:29:420:29:45

It was extremely hard work. They started at 5 o'clock.

0:29:450:29:48

They groomed their horses, fed their horses, harnessed their horses up,

0:29:480:29:52

and then went in for breakfast at about 6:15 or 6:30.

0:29:520:29:57

And if they weren't out of the yard by seven in winter time

0:29:570:30:01

then the farmer would consider they weren't going to work that day.

0:30:010:30:04

And they would work right through, then, until three.

0:30:040:30:06

We call it one yoke.

0:30:060:30:08

They worked from seven to three, particularly ploughing, that was the traditional hours of work.

0:30:080:30:15

It was a hard life for the man and also for the farm's most valuable asset - the horse.

0:30:150:30:21

What's the average working life of one of these heavy horses?

0:30:210:30:25

We always talk, in heavy-horse terms, in "three sevens".

0:30:250:30:28

We say it takes seven years to train them, seven years when they're at their best,

0:30:280:30:32

and seven years they're like me, they wind down towards retirement.

0:30:320:30:36

And any years after 21 are really a bonus.

0:30:360:30:40

Pen and Em are nine and seven years old, respectively.

0:30:400:30:43

So they've both got many happy ploughing years ahead of them.

0:30:430:30:46

Together with Mike, they're continuing a proud tradition that has helped to make this country great.

0:30:460:30:52

So a lot of respect to those horses. Where would we be without them?

0:30:520:30:56

And, of course, a little bit of respect to our experts

0:30:560:30:58

ploughing their way through hundreds of antiques back at evaluation day. Let's go and see what they've found.

0:30:580:31:03

Well, Christina. These are lovely, aren't they?

0:31:130:31:16

-Mm-hmm.

-How long have you had them?

-About six to eight weeks.

0:31:160:31:18

-Six to eight weeks?

-Yeah.

-So you've not had them long.

-No.

0:31:180:31:21

-I can sense that you've purchased them for a cheap amount, then.

-Yep.

0:31:210:31:26

-They've been a bargain, haven't they?

-Yep.

-Where have you had 'em from?

0:31:260:31:29

-Local charity shop.

-Really. Which?

-I can't tell you.

-You can't tell me, or I'll be straight down there after.

0:31:290:31:34

-That's right.

-Now, what attracted you to them?

0:31:340:31:36

Did you recognise them straight away?

0:31:360:31:37

Liked the colour of them, turned them up, saw the name, put it down, asked the assistant how much.

0:31:370:31:43

-And how much were they?

-£2 each.

-£2 each?

-Yep.

0:31:430:31:46

Well, they're clearly Moorcroft.

0:31:460:31:48

Moorcroft is so distinctive.

0:31:480:31:50

You don't have to look at the bottom to show they're Moorcroft, but we'll show the bottom off there,

0:31:500:31:55

with the signature there.

0:31:550:31:58

-And they're the pansy pattern, aren't they?

-Yes.

-You've done a bit of research?

-Yep.

-What have you done?

0:31:580:32:03

Went up to the Moorcroft factory and, actually, to the museum.

0:32:030:32:05

-You went to that? At Stoke?

-Yes.

-Did you take them with you?

-No, we took photographs, just for safety.

0:32:050:32:10

And they said that they're pansy pattern on a blue ground.

0:32:100:32:14

Because they did pansy on green and on different grounds,

0:32:140:32:17

but the blue's the nicest or the most popular, really, apart from the flambe ones, which are red

0:32:170:32:22

and incredibly desirable in the marketplace nowadays.

0:32:220:32:27

So your four quid would probably make you 200, 250, maybe even £300.

0:32:270:32:34

-Brilliant.

-So, not bad.

-No.

0:32:340:32:37

-So, you want to sell them?

-Yes, definitely.

0:32:370:32:39

I'm glad, because this is Flog It!

0:32:390:32:41

I think we put an estimate of 200 to 300,

0:32:410:32:44

reserve of 180, so they don't go for less.

0:32:440:32:48

-And then, it's a nice profit, isn't it?

-Yes.

-So what would you do with that profit?

0:32:480:32:52

-We've already planned a holiday.

-Oh.

-We're planning for Canada next year.

0:32:520:32:56

-So that will be a...

-..bit of a deposit towards it, yeah.

-Nice deposit towards a holiday.

0:32:560:33:01

Yeah. But I will give a bit back to the charity shop.

0:33:010:33:02

-That's a really nice idea, because a lot of charity shops are more clued up now.

-Exactly, yeah.

0:33:020:33:07

-And it's a shame, in a way, that they're depriving themselves of much-needed funds.

-That's right.

0:33:070:33:12

But I think, for spotting it, then you should obviously have your reward out of it as well.

0:33:120:33:16

-Yeah, definitely.

-Well done.

0:33:160:33:18

Helen, where'd this come from?

0:33:220:33:24

It came from my mother-in-law's house.

0:33:240:33:26

We were quite surprised to find it there, because she wasn't the kind

0:33:260:33:29

of lady who liked anything that looked old.

0:33:290:33:32

-What was her vintage?

-Ercol.

-1960s.

0:33:320:33:36

-Yes.

-D'you know, it's bizarre, because that stuff now is really quite collectible.

0:33:360:33:38

Yes, I know. I wish I had kept the chairs and things now.

0:33:380:33:41

Well, I think I'm of a different age, really. How old do you think this is?

0:33:410:33:45

-Well, that's what I was dubious about because it looks...

-How old do you think it should be?

0:33:450:33:49

I think it should be 1600 and something.

0:33:490:33:52

-So this is a C17th stool.

-Yeah.

-And what type of stool do we call it?

0:33:520:33:59

-Joint stool?

-A joint stool. And what's it made of?

0:33:590:34:00

-Oak?

-Oak.

0:34:000:34:02

Do you want to stand here and have my job?

0:34:020:34:06

There are a few things, first, I just want to point out to you. Can you see that there?

0:34:060:34:11

-There's a new bit of timber just been spliced in there.

-Well, I never noticed that.

0:34:110:34:15

Right. So that's either an old repair or they were

0:34:150:34:19

being a bit cautious with the timber when they made it.

0:34:190:34:23

Now let's just turn it over. Now, you called it a joint stool.

0:34:230:34:26

-Why?

-Because it's joined together with wooden pegs.

0:34:260:34:29

Right. So if we just look here, you can see one of these wooden pegs.

0:34:290:34:34

-Yeah.

-But in fact, this is tenoned into there and the pegs don't come all the way through.

0:34:340:34:40

If this has been around for the thick end of 300 years,

0:34:400:34:44

wouldn't there be some wear here - more wear?

0:34:440:34:47

These are obviously... have been tacked on in the 20th century.

0:34:470:34:52

But I would've expected to see some wear there.

0:34:520:34:54

People would have sat on this and perhaps put feet on here and there would've been more wear here.

0:34:540:35:00

-Can you just see that this dark patina here...

-Yeah.

0:35:000:35:06

..it almost suddenly stops there...

0:35:060:35:08

-Yes.

-..like it's been painted on. Which just makes me think it's been got at a little bit.

0:35:080:35:13

And if you just hold it there.

0:35:130:35:15

Can you see here... and here?

0:35:150:35:18

There are marks where someone has just bashed it to actually sort of fake age. So this is oak.

0:35:180:35:25

It's almost a joint stool.

0:35:250:35:27

But I think it's C19th rather than C17th.

0:35:270:35:30

-Right.

-In terms of value,

0:35:300:35:33

if this was C17th

0:35:330:35:36

I think it would've have been £600 to £900.

0:35:360:35:40

-So, I'm afraid, we're gonna have to take a nought off.

-Well.

0:35:400:35:44

I think we need to put £60 to £90 on this, and we'll reserve it for you at £50.

0:35:440:35:50

That will ensure that it will sell. And I actually think that represents cracking value for money for someone.

0:35:500:35:55

-Yeah.

-Because, you go and try and buy a modern little coffee table

0:35:550:36:00

made out of solid oak for between £50 and £100, you can't do it.

0:36:000:36:05

-But you can if you buy this.

-Yep.

0:36:050:36:07

-So let's keep our fingers crossed.

-OK. Thank you.

0:36:070:36:10

Well, Penny, what a lovely piece of Charlotte Reid you brought.

0:36:160:36:19

Well, you might think it's wonderful. I think it's absolutely vile.

0:36:190:36:24

Do you? I can tell it's not treasured.

0:36:240:36:26

I can see that straight away. There's no chips or cracks, but there's paint on it, there's muck and dirt.

0:36:260:36:33

-Where has it been living? Outside? In the shed?

-No.

0:36:330:36:36

It's actually been underneath the sink with the old paintbrushes in it, which accounts for the paint.

0:36:360:36:41

OK. That accounts for all the paint, and bits and pieces.

0:36:410:36:45

Living under the sink, it's not treasured, it's not out on display, in a cabinet.

0:36:450:36:48

I did see on a programme that Charlotte Reid was...

0:36:480:36:52

And I thought, "Oh, that reminds me, that's what's underneath the sink," and I did get it out.

0:36:520:36:55

That's why you've dug it out this morning and brought it along to Flog It.

0:36:550:37:00

Presumably you're keen on selling it because you don't like it.

0:37:000:37:03

-I'm desperate to sell it. I loathe it.

-Well, some people like Charlotte Reid.

0:37:030:37:07

There's quite a good collector's market for it. It's from the 1930s.

0:37:070:37:12

Art Deco period, which is always popular.

0:37:120:37:15

And you've got a few Art Deco elements here, this sort of stepped design.

0:37:150:37:19

This is a tube lining decoration here.

0:37:190:37:22

There's various patterns. I think this is "Autumn".

0:37:220:37:25

The two main factories that made Charlotte Read were Crown Ducal, like this one and Burleigh ware.

0:37:270:37:32

They also made Charlotte Read designs.

0:37:320:37:35

This one's signed, as well, by Charlotte Read - some aren't signed. And you've got the pattern reference.

0:37:350:37:41

That could easily be looked up and you could find the name of the pattern.

0:37:410:37:45

It's also got quite a pleasing handle, hasn't it?

0:37:450:37:48

-Yes...(!)

-I'm going to try and make you like it before you sell it.

0:37:480:37:52

-I think you've got your work cut out.

-I have.

0:37:520:37:55

Any idea what it might be worth?

0:37:550:37:57

-Um... 50 quid? Something like that?

-Probably about right, there.

0:37:570:38:02

£40 - £60 would be an estimate I'd suggest.

0:38:020:38:06

Promote a bit of interest in it.

0:38:060:38:09

Clearly, you don't want it back. So shall we do the risk of selling it without reserve?

0:38:090:38:14

That sounds like a really good idea.

0:38:140:38:17

We rarely recommend that but, when a vendor really doesn't like an object,

0:38:170:38:22

and it's not a major piece that's going to be undersold, then it'll find its own value without reserve.

0:38:220:38:29

It's fun to see what happens.

0:38:290:38:31

If it makes you 50 quid, how are you going to commemorate getting 50 quid for your unwanted paint-pot holder?

0:38:310:38:37

-Theatre tickets.

-Theatre tickets. Much better.

0:38:370:38:40

-How are you, Pat, all right?

-I'm fine thank you.

0:38:450:38:48

What have you brought along today? A pot-pourri. It's Worcester.

0:38:480:38:51

I just wanted to know if it was genuine, actually.

0:38:510:38:54

Why do you want to know if it's genuine?

0:38:540:38:56

I don't know. We bought it from the National Exhibition Centre and I liked it because of all the roses.

0:38:560:39:02

I'm a roses person, a pink person.

0:39:020:39:05

And we fell in love with it and after I bought it, I just wondered if it was genuine.

0:39:050:39:09

It is undoubtedly a piece of Worcester.

0:39:090:39:12

Worcester pots have a shape number.

0:39:120:39:14

This is shape No. 1286.

0:39:140:39:16

And it's called a crown topped pot-pourri.

0:39:160:39:18

And there's the crown top and there's the inner cover.

0:39:180:39:22

So the way it works is that this would be filled with scented rose petals, in there,

0:39:220:39:26

and then this would've been shut so there'd have been no scent coming out.

0:39:260:39:31

And when you wanted the scent to come out, this inner cover stayed off

0:39:310:39:35

and through this pierced crown you would get the fragrance coming out.

0:39:350:39:40

We can have a look at the bottom, and there it is - there is the shape number we discussed - 1286.

0:39:400:39:45

It's got this dot system which started in 1891,

0:39:450:39:49

and there are 16 dots there,

0:39:490:39:51

so we can date this quite precisely to 1907.

0:39:510:39:55

It just strikes me as being a little bit odd.

0:39:550:39:57

Can you see, this is like an ivory and what we call "shot silk" decoration?

0:39:570:40:03

And yet there, it's totally different.

0:40:050:40:07

I had thought that myself.

0:40:070:40:08

I just wonder whether it may have been that...

0:40:080:40:13

if this cover has been a replacement at some point in time, because they produce

0:40:130:40:19

Worcester painted fruit now, that has a crown-topped cover like that to it.

0:40:190:40:24

-When did you buy it?

-About eight to 10 years ago.

0:40:240:40:28

-How much did you pay for it?

-We think about £180.

0:40:280:40:31

I think it will show you a profit on that, provided there's no restoration and it's all A-OK as I said.

0:40:310:40:36

My estimate for it would be probably £200-£400.

0:40:360:40:41

And put a reserve on it of £200. On the basis that it's not restored. It looks very crisp around here.

0:40:410:40:46

It LOOKS OK, but it's difficult in these lights.

0:40:460:40:50

-Why have you decided to sell it?

-Well, my children aren't very keen on it.

0:40:500:40:56

Obviously, they've got modern houses.

0:40:560:40:58

It wouldn't go in their house.

0:40:580:41:00

And obviously, I dust it occasionally, and I'm just frightened of almost dropping it.

0:41:000:41:05

What is fascinating is that roses aren't that collectible.

0:41:050:41:08

So you have got a pot there that is £200-£400.

0:41:080:41:11

If that was decorated in sheep by Harry Davis, it would probably make £3,000 - £5,000.

0:41:110:41:15

Like it's not fashionable any more.

0:41:150:41:17

Absolutely. But we're going to sell it.

0:41:170:41:20

Hello! ...That's the end of our Telford valuation day and we've found all our items.

0:41:250:41:31

So I've taken the opportunity to come back here to Acton Scott historic working farm, where, earlier,

0:41:310:41:37

we looked at the history of the heavy horse.

0:41:370:41:39

Lots of other related crafts revolve around the horse.

0:41:390:41:43

That's an absolutely brilliant word to use right now because I'm going to take a closer look

0:41:430:41:48

at one of man's earliest but greatest inventions.

0:41:480:41:51

The first wheels invented were simply a solid disk carved from one lump of wood.

0:41:540:41:59

But this had two main disadvantages.

0:41:590:42:02

First, they were extremely heavy and second, they tended to snap and break along the line of the grain.

0:42:020:42:08

So to overcome this, to make the wheels a lot lighter, yet still maintain its strength,

0:42:080:42:13

they had to invent something called the spoked wheel.

0:42:130:42:16

This has been around since the year 2000 BC.

0:42:160:42:19

This is a very fine example of one.

0:42:190:42:22

Before the first-world-war in this country, every village had its own wheelwright, making these.

0:42:220:42:27

Here at Acton Scott Farm, we have filling this role,

0:42:270:42:31

the appropriately named Mike Wright. How do you do?

0:42:310:42:34

Now, you made this wheel, and what a wonderful job you have done. Let's just talk about carts, first.

0:42:340:42:40

Is it true you can identify what part of the country you come from by the cart you drive?

0:42:400:42:45

Well, yes, every county has its own style of wagon.

0:42:450:42:49

And their own colour as well.

0:42:490:42:51

Shropshire wagons were solidly built with heavy wheels, and solidly framed, whereas Oxfordshire wagons

0:42:510:42:58

where much lighter, narrow wheels, and had more graceful curves.

0:42:580:43:03

And is there one standard wheel size?

0:43:030:43:06

No, there isn't a standard size.

0:43:060:43:09

It depends entirely on the size of the vehicle and the use it was put to.

0:43:090:43:12

Wagons had big, heavy wheels to take the weight of a wagon weighing perhaps a ton,

0:43:120:43:18

but because of that they only have a very limited turning circle.

0:43:180:43:22

Whereas drays - a flatbed cart - would have smaller wheels and were much more manoeuvrable.

0:43:220:43:29

You've done a wonderful job on this wheel. Do you still use traditional methods?

0:43:290:43:34

Yes. This is almost entirely made by hand.

0:43:340:43:37

How long would a wheel take to make by hand? This sort of size?

0:43:370:43:40

That would be about a month's work for me.

0:43:400:43:42

-That's a long time, isn't it?

-It is.

0:43:420:43:45

Let's talk through the parts on the wheel. What have we got here?

0:43:450:43:49

In the middle we have the stock, or the hub of the nave, depending what part of the country you come from.

0:43:490:43:54

-And what wood's that made of?

-It's made of elm.

0:43:540:43:56

Elm has a very twisted grain and it resists splitting when the spokes are driven into it.

0:43:560:44:02

Here we have the spokes, and they're made of oak for strength.

0:44:020:44:07

-And the rim...

-That's ash, isn't it?

-Because ash is very springy and it takes the shocks of the road well.

0:44:070:44:12

The rim is divided up into seven sections which are called "fellows"

0:44:120:44:16

-and, across the joint, they are dowelled.

-Why are the spokes shaped?

0:44:170:44:23

They are wider at the back than the front because most of the stress is at the back.

0:44:230:44:28

Wherever you can on a wheel, you want to save weight, so you...

0:44:280:44:32

take more material off the front of the spoke than off the back.

0:44:320:44:37

And it weighs in absolute ton! It is a good job it rolls.

0:44:370:44:41

I can see you are working on what looks like a spoke.

0:44:410:44:44

Can you show me how you do it?

0:44:440:44:46

Yes indeed... This is a draw knife.

0:44:460:44:51

We start with the draw knife and then I'll start moving on to the spokeshave.

0:44:510:44:55

I'm taking off fairly heavy pieces with the draw knife.

0:44:550:45:02

And working towards the lines that I've drawn on the middle of the spoke, there.

0:45:020:45:07

So, as I get nearer to it,

0:45:070:45:09

I shall use the spoke shave to finish it off.

0:45:110:45:14

That gives me a nice, smooth face.

0:45:180:45:20

-That's right.

-Tapering it back.

0:45:210:45:24

Nice curve on the edge there.

0:45:240:45:27

'Carpentry skills are not the only skills required by a wheelwright.

0:45:290:45:34

'He also needs to be something of a blacksmith, too.'

0:45:340:45:37

The whole wheel is held together with a tyre, and the tyre is made of steel.

0:45:400:45:44

Just like these ones. It is about two inches wide and half an inch thick.

0:45:440:45:48

That's essential for a working cartwheel.

0:45:480:45:50

Mike and Malcolm have already put one in the fire, to get it into shape and, as you can see,

0:45:500:45:56

it's cooking nicely.

0:45:560:45:58

The placing of the tyre on the wheel is the most crucial stage of all.

0:45:580:46:02

The metal tyre is made slightly smaller than the wooden wheel.

0:46:020:46:05

As it's heated, the metal expands.

0:46:050:46:07

If the hoop is too large, it won't hold the wheel together.

0:46:070:46:10

Too small and it could crush it completely, wasting a month's work.

0:46:100:46:14

It's a tense moment for the wheelwright.

0:46:140:46:17

The cold water contracts the metal, causing it to crush the joints of the wheel tight in a permanent vice.

0:46:250:46:31

WOOD AND METAL GROAN

0:46:310:46:34

The process is completed on the anvil, with the edge of the tyre hammered into shape

0:46:420:46:47

to make sure that the finish is even and that the wheel has a good roll.

0:46:470:46:53

I've had a brilliant day out here at Acton Scott Farm, but right now it's time to return to the hustle

0:46:550:47:01

and bustle of the auction room, and let's hope it's gonna be a smooth ride for all our owners.

0:47:010:47:07

Our experts, Adam and Philip, have teased out the most tantalising of Telford's titbits.

0:47:210:47:26

Here's a quick run-down of what they've found.

0:47:260:47:29

This stool was nestling out of place in a '60s-style house.

0:47:290:47:33

Although C19th and not any older, it's still worth £60-90.

0:47:330:47:38

Penny will need a new paint-brush holder

0:47:380:47:40

when her Charlotte Read jug goes to auction.

0:47:400:47:43

Adam's put no reserve on it as Penny can't wait to get rid of it.

0:47:430:47:46

Pat wanted to check if her Worcester pot-pourri jar was real or fake.

0:47:460:47:51

Philip thinks it's the real McCoy and should be worth at least £200.

0:47:510:47:56

And Christina definitely brought in the bargain of the day,

0:47:560:47:59

a pair of Moorcroft vases bought for only £2 each.

0:47:590:48:03

I just can't wait to see what they sell for.

0:48:030:48:06

So what does the auctioneer think?

0:48:110:48:14

This is a tidy little lot, and it's rare.

0:48:140:48:17

It's a bit of Worcester, pomander and cover. It's nice to see the cover.

0:48:170:48:21

-Absolutely.

-And we've got a valuation of £200-400 on it.

0:48:210:48:24

Well, I was spoon-fed this. I was literally brought up from childhood days with Royal Worcester.

0:48:240:48:29

My late aunt collected it. This takes me back to being five years old

0:48:290:48:33

and being taught all about Royal Worcester, so I love this stuff.

0:48:330:48:36

Good grounding for you at an early age.

0:48:360:48:38

Oh, yeah, absolutely, had to learn. Now, the estimate, 200-400.

0:48:380:48:43

I think we've said 200-300 in the catalogue, absolutely fine, no problems at all.

0:48:430:48:47

-There has been some question with regard to, first and foremost, restoration.

-Right.

0:48:470:48:52

I've been all over this, top-to-toe.

0:48:520:48:54

It's absolutely sound.

0:48:540:48:56

There is not a problem at all.

0:48:560:48:58

Is the cover right for the pot?

0:48:580:49:00

That's where we fall down, no. It is what we've termed in the catalogue an associated cover.

0:49:000:49:05

It has a marginal effect on the price but not phenomenal, because

0:49:050:49:09

at the end of the day these things are rare, these are very expensive, and also - for anyone out there -

0:49:090:49:14

if you've got a smashed pot and got the cover, don't sling it

0:49:140:49:18

out, because people are desperate to buy the covers, cos these are often the first things that get broken.

0:49:180:49:22

Yeah, and how much would the cover cost somebody to buy?

0:49:220:49:25

-Oh, grief, I mean, I've sold covers alone at £80-100.

-OK, Will, so what do you think it's gonna go for?

0:49:250:49:32

I think it's gonna have a three in front of it.

0:49:320:49:34

It'd be nice if we could end up nudging it

0:49:340:49:36

with a four in front of it, but we're gonna sell, no problem at all.

0:49:360:49:40

It's just that cover that'll hold it back.

0:49:400:49:43

Christina's Moorcroft vases, what a story! Can you remember?

0:49:460:49:49

-Bought for just £2 six to eight weeks ago. That is astonishing, isn't it?

-Which charity shop was this, Paul?

0:49:490:49:55

I don't know, I think we're trying to squeeze the information out of her, we'll get it by the end of the day.

0:49:550:50:00

Adam, our valuer, has put £200-300 on this, and that is a stunning result, 1930s pansy pattern.

0:50:000:50:07

I think it's a stunning estimate!

0:50:070:50:10

And in the positive this, for me, is a complete teaser estimate. That is fantastic.

0:50:100:50:15

-Is that a "Come and buy me"?

-Oh, it's a complete "Come and buy me", I mean

0:50:150:50:18

this is one of my particular loves, and you're well into my comfort zone here. And they're gonna fly.

0:50:180:50:23

OK, come on, come on, tell me, let me into the little secret, what's fly?

0:50:230:50:27

There's a couple of things about them, one thing which I picked up on once they were delivered to us...

0:50:270:50:30

on this one we do actually have a factory fault there, it does run round.

0:50:300:50:36

Now, this is how they did leave the factory, so we can't be over-critical but...

0:50:360:50:41

taking that damage into consideration, I think they're gonna do comfortably twice estimate,

0:50:410:50:46

-and I wouldn't be surprised at three times.

-Wow, so you think three times estimate?

0:50:460:50:52

-Bottom estimate.

-OK, three times bottom estimate, 600-700.

0:50:520:50:55

Yeah, somewhere between £500-700 mark, something around that.

0:50:550:50:58

It would be a sorry day if they don't do that, but they're going to, they're going to.

0:50:580:51:01

Well, I do hope so! However, you'll just have to wait a bit for that one, so I hope you're sitting comfortably.

0:51:010:51:09

It's now time to flog that lovely C19th oak joint stool

0:51:090:51:12

brought in by Helen, valuation of £60-90, fixed reserve of 50.

0:51:120:51:17

-You're with your husband John. It was your mum's, was it not?

-That's right.

-Lots of memories there?

-Yes.

0:51:170:51:23

-Sad to see it go?

-Yes...

0:51:230:51:25

Well, they are handy pieces of kit, and loads of people use them for bedside tables.

0:51:250:51:30

-So I think we should do this, Philip.

-Yes, it should sell.

0:51:300:51:34

I mean, you couldn't buy the timber for that, could you? It's solid oak, so yeah, it should get away.

0:51:340:51:38

1060, we have a C19th oak joint stool.

0:51:380:51:42

Nice little lot. Where will we be on this? Do I see 40 to start me?

0:51:420:51:46

40 I have, 45 with me, and 50, sir.

0:51:460:51:49

50, I'll go five, and 60, and it's with you.

0:51:490:51:51

60, it's out and about at £60, and five anywhere else?

0:51:510:51:54

£60, then, back right-hand corner, are we all done at £60?

0:51:540:51:59

Yeah, the hammer's gone down, 60 quid, spot-on.

0:51:590:52:02

Whoo, that was touch-and-go, wasn't it, for a second?

0:52:020:52:05

It started at 30 quid. It's not a lot of money, less a bit of commission. What will you do with it?

0:52:050:52:09

Well, we'll probably treat ourselves to a night out.

0:52:090:52:11

We have something in the Art Deco style right now, it's a paint brush holder - or is it not? -

0:52:160:52:21

in the Charlotte Read style? It belongs to Penny!

0:52:210:52:24

It's not really a paint brush holder, but that's what you used it for.

0:52:240:52:28

It was, yes, it's not something I really like very much, so it was under the sink.

0:52:280:52:33

-I gather that. Are you an artist or a painter, or are you just sort of...?

-No, this was DECORATING brushes.

0:52:330:52:39

Well, at least you didn't throw this away, and we've got £40-60 on this with no reserve.

0:52:390:52:44

-Was that your decision?

-Well, it was a joint decision, because

0:52:440:52:46

Penny said, "I definitely don't want it back, whatever happens."

0:52:460:52:49

No, I just hoped I hadn't got to pay someone to take it away, cos that would be really sad.

0:52:490:52:53

-Good luck, this is it.

-And lot 70, we have the Charlotte Read

0:52:530:52:57

Crown Ducal stitch work jug. Nice one with the fruit decoration,

0:52:570:53:00

the hand to the right is saying...

0:53:000:53:01

£40 to open. I have on a commission, 40 straight in and five in the room.

0:53:010:53:05

Or two, if it helps. 42, 45, 48 and 50.

0:53:050:53:09

And two, 55, 58...58 looks away.

0:53:090:53:14

55, still, on my right, 58 anywhere else?

0:53:140:53:17

55, all sure and done?

0:53:170:53:20

Yes, 55 quid. Not bad, not bad for a paint brush holder!

0:53:200:53:25

It's a lovely jug, though.

0:53:250:53:27

Right, the money was going towards theatre tickets, wasn't it? So what are you going to see?

0:53:270:53:32

Well, we've changed our minds, I'm afraid, about that. I had some discussion with my husband,

0:53:320:53:36

because the jug belonged to his mother, and so the money's going to a prostate cancer charity now.

0:53:360:53:42

Excellent, wonderful.

0:53:420:53:43

Right now we've got one that's caused a bit of stir in the auction in chat with Will, because he's positive

0:53:490:53:54

this lot is gonna really race away.

0:53:540:53:56

It's that lovely bit of Worcester, that crown topped pot-pourri valued at 200-400 by Philip Serrell.

0:53:560:54:02

And here we are with Pat and Jeff.

0:54:020:54:04

I had a chat with the auctioneer, Will, earlier.

0:54:040:54:06

He seems to think that because the top's intact, although it's the wrong top, it's gonna add

0:54:060:54:12

possibly another £200 to Philip's top end.

0:54:120:54:14

We could be looking at £600 here.

0:54:140:54:17

-How does that sound?

-Lovely!

0:54:170:54:20

-It sounds a lot better than 200-400, doesn't it?

-Just a little.

0:54:200:54:23

But I hope I'm not teasing this up too much. Philip really does know his Worcester, he is a Worcester expert.

0:54:230:54:28

We know what you think. Now it's down to the bidders.

0:54:280:54:30

Let's find out what the bidders of Birmingham think. This is it.

0:54:300:54:34

Nice little lot there, associated cover, as you'd have seen.

0:54:340:54:38

Had a great deal of interest, and it's very, very close, and I believe

0:54:380:54:42

-for the top bidder to clear the under-bidders I open at £450.

-Yes!

0:54:420:54:48

£450 on a maiden bid clears everybody else.

0:54:480:54:51

I've got 450 on my right, do I hear 460 in the room?

0:54:510:54:54

It's on a commission bid, then, opening and closing at £450.

0:54:540:55:00

All sure? All done?

0:55:000:55:02

Bang, the hammer's gone down, short and sweet, £450.

0:55:020:55:07

Great result, top end of Philip's estimate, what is that going towards, Pat?

0:55:070:55:12

Well, we're looking for a painting for our dining room, and it's going towards that.

0:55:120:55:17

-OK, looking in here?

-Well, we have been, but I haven't seen anything at the moment, but we're still looking.

0:55:170:55:22

We have been looking quite a long time.

0:55:220:55:24

-I guess you're doing lots of art galleries, more auction rooms and antiques shops.

-That's right, yes.

0:55:240:55:29

OK, happy shopping, and I hope you find something really special.

0:55:290:55:32

Thank you very much indeed.

0:55:320:55:34

-Good result.

-Yeah, I was pleased with that, and I don't think the real top...

0:55:340:55:37

It might have made perhaps another £100-150, but it wouldn't have made

0:55:370:55:40

that much more, roses aren't that popular, but it's a good result.

0:55:400:55:43

Let's see if the Moorcroft can top that.

0:55:430:55:47

This is the one that Will has been musing and getting very excited over - our auctioneer -

0:55:470:55:51

it's the pair of Moorcroft vases bought in a charity shop not long ago for a couple of quid.

0:55:510:55:57

You lucky, lucky thing! I know you do feel a little bit guilty, don't you, Christina?

0:55:570:56:01

-And some of the money's going back to the charity shop.

-Yes.

-Adam, our expert, put £200-300 on this.

0:56:010:56:07

We had a chat with Will earlier, he seems to think they might do 400-600, 600-plus on a good day.

0:56:070:56:13

-Does he really?

-He does.

0:56:130:56:15

I'd be surprised if they made that much, and I'd ask him why he reduced the catalogue estimate in that case.

0:56:150:56:19

Because he's a typical auctioneer, he's teasing all the bidders in.

0:56:190:56:22

-You know the score.

-That's a bit too much, that, really, but we'll see. I think they'll do about 350-400.

-OK.

0:56:220:56:30

Well, it's gone up from Adam's estimate.

0:56:300:56:33

Yeah, but 200-300 and make 350, you know, that's the idea.

0:56:330:56:37

What a surprise, eh? What a surprise!

0:56:370:56:40

Let's hope they don't do 180 now, eh?

0:56:400:56:43

Yeah, there's us talking all this up.

0:56:430:56:45

Christina, don't worry, Will is a porcelain expert.

0:56:450:56:48

I think he knows his market here, and he's pretty sure these are gonna fly.

0:56:480:56:53

We have the near pair of William Moorcroft pansy pattern vases.

0:56:530:56:57

Have had a great deal of interest in these.

0:56:570:56:59

-believe I have to open to my right on a commission bid at £380.

-Whoa!

0:56:590:57:04

£380. Do I hear 400 in the room?

0:57:040:57:08

400, 420, 440, 460, 480, 500.

0:57:080:57:13

And 20, 540, 560, 580, 600.

0:57:130:57:19

And 20, 640, 660...

0:57:190:57:24

£640 there in the room, at £640. Do I hear 660 anywhere else?

0:57:240:57:29

Otherwise I'm selling away for £640.

0:57:290:57:35

That's a great result.

0:57:350:57:36

That is better than the 200-300, we'll take that, we'll take that.

0:57:360:57:40

What are you gonna do? Where's this holiday gonna be?

0:57:400:57:43

-Canada next year.

-Canada, well, that'll get you there.

0:57:430:57:45

That'll make the deposit, a big help towards it and...great, it's great.

0:57:450:57:49

-I can feel the energy coming off you, I'm tingling as well!

-I feel bubbly!

0:57:490:57:53

-I

-feel bubbly, I'm so pleased for you.

0:57:530:57:55

That's what it's all about, get down those charity shops,

0:57:550:57:57

get to those car-boot sales, because it still is out there. You've just got to know what you're looking for.

0:57:570:58:02

-That's right.

-So keep watching Flog It and learn.

0:58:020:58:04

As you can see, the auction's still going on behind me in the heart of the industrial Midlands,

0:58:090:58:14

where those Moorcroft vases proved to be hot, hot, hot!

0:58:140:58:18

And what about that lovely little Edwardian post box?

0:58:180:58:21

That had no intention of being "returned to sender".

0:58:210:58:24

But I hope you return the next time for lots more fun on Flog It!

0:58:240:58:27

For more information about Flog It, including how the programme was made,

0:58:350:58:39

visit the website at bbc.co.uk/lifestyle

0:58:390:58:43

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd 2006

0:58:470:58:51

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:530:58:56

Paul Martin visits Telford for more attic clearance surprises. Experts Philip Serrell and Adam Partridge give their valuation and everything goes under the hammer at a local sale. Paul visits Acton Scot Historic Farm and explores the history of the shire horse and the craft of the wheelwright.