Weymouth Flog It!


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Weymouth

Experts Susan Orringe and Mark Stacey dig up some gems for the sale in Weymouth. Paul Martin gets inspiration from Thomas Hardy.


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Sun, sea, sand and bathers just charging in the water there.

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What more could you ask for?

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Weymouth is reputed to have the highest sunshine record in England, and today, it's got Flog It!

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Weymouth is called England's Bay of Naples,

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because of its stunning coastline, cliffs

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and its golden sands.

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But there's no time for lazing on the beach.

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Our experts Susan Orange and Mark Stacey have got treasures to dig up.

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Everybody's been searching attics and cellars,

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looking for unwanted antiques to be valued here today.

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Our experts are getting a sneak preview before the doors open.

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Oh, that's nice, isn't it?

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-Oh, that's rather pretty, is that yours?

-Yes.

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Not of huge value because it's not an antique.

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It's under £100 but very decorative and very pretty.

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Our chosen lots will be going under the hammer here, at Duke's auction room in Dorchester,

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where hopefully there will be a few surprises for our owners.

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-£15.

-Come on!

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260, 280.

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-All done?

-Yes!

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Is that it now?

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He didn't sell it.

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60...

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-That's amazing.

-Well....

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Everyone's pouring into the pavilion so, without further ado, Mark's getting down to business.

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Keith, what an interesting biscuit barrel.

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Tell me, how did you come across it?

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I was at a jumble sale in Wolverhampton about 15 years ago,

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saw it there on the table, asked the lady how much it was.

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She gave me the price and I bought it.

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What attracted you to it?

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Well, when I saw it I knew that it was Art Nouveau from the style,

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and obviously about 100 years old, and for the price they mentioned I thought I couldn't go wrong.

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-And what was the price there?

-It was 10p.

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10p is not a lot of money to invest on a lovely object

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which is very stylistically influenced by the Art Nouveau period.

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And it's not an English one, it's not a Liberty's design piece.

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It's a continental factory, Urania.

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But the style is still there.

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It's just a little bit more Germanic -

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the style is a little bit more formal.

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I particularly like the decoration with the trees

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and these very high pointed handles.

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And the lid, I like that sort of undulating feel.

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It's got a very organic feel about it, hasn't it?

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Now, do you know what it's made of?

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Well, I thought possibly spelter.

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Right, well, I can understand why you think that. It's actually pewter.

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And a lot of pewter was used in the Art Nouveau period.

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Now you paid 10p which is a nonsense, even 15 years ago.

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Have you ever wondered what sort of figure it would be?

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Well, I thought maybe the £30 bracket, somewhere around that.

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Well I think it's a little bit more, at least I would like it to be more.

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I think it if we put this into auction,

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we should put £80 to £120 on it.

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-Oh, right.

-There is a little bit of wear here and there,

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but I think it would certainly do that and should attract the right collectors in for that price

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because it's a very nice object.

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But if you've had it for 15 years, why have you decided to sell it now?

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When in Wolverhampton, we lived in a vicarage - it fitted in with the decor.

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We moved to a modern house, and it just doesn't fit in, and my wife absolutely hates it.

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She thinks it's an urn for ashes.

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Well, it could be. I'm saying biscuit barrel, but who knows, you know,

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if anybody out there wants to use it for an alternative reason, and they want to pay more money,

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they're welcome to do that.

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But I think we'll call it a biscuit barrel, don't you?

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And if we get a good price for it, what do you think you might do with the money.

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Well, I think as my wife has had to put up with it for this length of time, a nice slap-up meal.

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Oh, wonderful, wonderful.

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Audrey, I'm pleased that you've brought along this little box

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and it's no ordinary box, is it?

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No, slightly more than an ordinary box, if you take the top off.

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-It's actually a nutmeg grater.

-You see some remains of the nutmeg, don't you?

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I don't think I ought to smell.

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It looks rusty, but it's not.

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Yes. It's a dear little box.

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If we just look at it a bit more closely, the inlay on the top is known as Tunbridge Ware,

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because it was made in Tunbridge and Tunbridge Wells.

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Tunbridge Ware has been made from the 17th century but they needed to make it more commercial

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and make more things. Tunbridge Ware after about 1820

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became the most typical sort with sticks from Tunbridge.

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And lots of different coloured sticks of wood were cut out, stuck together,

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and then they were put on a piece of cardboard and sliced through.

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And then laid in these different inlays in mosaic patterns.

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So they could get quite intricate.

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-They are, aren't they.

-Yes.

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They were able to mass produce it. So you get lots and lots of things, you know -

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glove boxes and tea caddies, card cases, cigarette cases.

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But you know, it's very collectable.

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So what's nice about this is you have the Tunbridge Ware on the top,

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and then the nutmeg grater.

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-Now if you turn it upside down, you'll find it opens again.

-Ah.

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And that's where you keep your nutmeg.

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Ah, yes, of course, you put that in there.

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And nutmeg, of course, was an important spice

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for flavouring and for preserving food.

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Why are you thinking of selling it?

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I'm at the time of life

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-where I want to cut down on all the stuff I have.

-Yes.

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-If anyone is a collector, I'm sure they'll be happy to have this.

-Yes.

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Well, I think it would certainly be worth putting in the auction.

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And if we put an estimate of £60 to £100

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and hope it would sell well within that.

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Well I hope every collector of Tunbridge Ware in the country

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-would put in a little bid for it.

-Well, that's it.

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-Liz, you've brought a wonderful piece of Clarice Cliff, do you like it?

-No.

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-Well, that's blunt! Why not?

-I don't know, it's the colours, it's too bright. I prefer glassware.

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-Oh, do you? It's a bit too garish for your taste, is it?

-Yes.

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What have you been doing to get scratches in there?

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I stood a plant in it.

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Oh, the old trick of putting a plant in it.

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You haven't done too much damage. There's a little wear.

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But I think if I get straight on to the pattern.

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It's called the melons pattern, and it's the general version

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with this very bright, vivid orange border

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and these sort of stylised geometric fruits.

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And it's a lovely octagonal shape.

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But it was made, I suppose, about 1930-1931,

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at the height, or the beginning of the Art Deco period.

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And, actually, underneath we'll see that it's hand-painted

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Fantasque, which is one the ranges of Clarice Cliff,

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by Clarice Cliff, made at the Wilkinson pottery.

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The design is bold, imaginative.

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The enamel colours are still in very good condition.

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But what's the history of it with you?

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It was an old lady that gave it to me

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and I don't think she thought it was valuable.

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And a friend came to visit and he offered me £10 for it,

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so I hope he's watching now!

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Are you sure he's a friend?

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And he said, " I should take care of that if I was you, because it's Clarice Cliff."

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So I took the plant out and polished it up and put it in the cabinet.

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I think it's worth a bit more than that.

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I think, bearing in mind that bowls are not the most commercial pieces -

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people prefer jugs or plates because they are more easy to display -

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but the pattern on this is delicious.

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I think if we put it in with an estimate of something like

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£250 to £350,

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we're going to attract a lot of interest.

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-Would you be happy with that?

-Yes, I think so, yes.

-It's a bit more than £10.

-Yes.

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If we get a good price for you, I hope that we can toast our success

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in a nice lead-crystal glass or something. We'll have a large gin and tonic

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-after the sale.

-We will.

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Joan, this is a really delightful basket.

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It looks in such lovely condition, doesn't it?

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-Yes.

-So, where did you get it from?

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I bought it in an antiques shop in Park Street, which is in Weymouth. It's no longer there.

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-How long ago was that?

-I think it must have been about 20 years ago.

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-Do you remember what you paid for it?

-No, I bought it with some Chinese rice bowls.

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I haven't the faintest idea what I paid for it.

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-What attracted you to it?

-I just thought the colours were lovely.

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Yes, it's so nicely decorated, isn't it?

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-I thought it was rather prettier than a mixture of flowers.

-Yes.

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The colours really were excellent, I thought.

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Yes, the fruit - the blackberries have been beautifully done,

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and the leaves all in different colours,

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and the different greens and the flowers.

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-They're almost very true-to-life, aren't they?

-Yes.

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When I first saw it, the glaze - this iridescent glaze -

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is very much like Belleek, you know, the Irish factory.

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I thought, "Ooh!" When I turn it over, I can see it is actually Crown Staffordshire.

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So, it's an English basket.

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The mark tells us it's around 1906.

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-Yes.

-That sort of thing which seems to date it quite nicely.

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What's remarkable is - the condition. How have you kept it so well?

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-It was like it when I bought it.

-How have you cleaned it?

-I have never cleaned it.

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I just wash it occasionally.

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It's in a cabinet, so it's hardly been touched.

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So, can I ask, why are you thinking of selling it?

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I really have a shower room which I've not completed. It was a coal house.

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There's a lavatory and a shower room between house and garden.

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I'm a keen gardener and I would like to have it insulated

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so that when I come in from the garden in winter, I can use it.

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-Yes, it's cold otherwise.

-It's restricted to summer use only.

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-Yes. Had you considered its value at all?

-No.

-No, you've no idea.

-No.

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I think, what we'll do is we'll put it in and try an estimate of £100 to £150.

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I think it should do well.

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It should do the top end of that.

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Joy, you've brought a wonderful little intriguing object in to show us.

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Before we have a look at detail, let's get a bit of the family history.

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This item was given to me by my grandfather when I was about ten years old.

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I really don't know where he got it from.

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Obviously, I've looked after it all that time.

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-I don't want to be rude but that was a little while ago!

-Er, yes.

-Yes, OK.

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-He didn't give you the history of it.

-No, not at the time. When you're 10, you don't think to ask.

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To me, then, it was a novelty thing to play with.

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It's remarkable that the pieces have survived.

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It's stayed wrapped up in tissue paper.

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Perfect! Does it have any sentimental attachment to you now?

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No, I'd be quite happy to see it go.

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I think it's a real collector's piece.

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-It's continental, I think. It's not English.

-Is it?

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It's made somewhere in Europe.

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It's what we call an articulated piece.

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-It moves. Actually, the movement is similar to fish.

-Fish, yeah.

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We've got very sort of little...

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naive detailing on the fins here.

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And we've got some nice, naive decoration on the face with two little gem-set eyes.

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Then, when we open it up, we can see three little sections.

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We've taken the pieces out but we've got a little tooth pick,

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an ear cleaner there,

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a little pair of scissors there and a little penknife.

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-Yeah.

-I would put the date - looking at the naivety of it -

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into the first half of the 19th century.

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-Oh, right!

-It's quite an old piece. It's a really intriguing item.

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It's for a collector.

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Someone who collects these little necessaires or etuis, as we call them.

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If we got a good price for it, have you thought of another way that you would remember your grandfather by?

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I could do. I could possibly think of something nice to buy.

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That would be a good idea actually. Something that I would display.

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Have you ever thought of a value?

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No, I haven't.

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I think if we were putting it into auction,

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-I would hope to see it making about £150.

-Oh, right!

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I think, if you asked me sensibly,

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I think we should put an estimate of £100 to £150 on it.

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But I can see two people...

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-Wanting it.

-Yeah, I can. Hopefully, at that estimate, it'll swim away.

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Right now, we're halfway through our day and it's time to put those valuations to the test.

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Just how good are our experts? We'll find out.

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Before we go to the auction room, here's a run-down of the items that going under the hammer.

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Keith's wife thinks this lot would be perfect

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for bringing home the Ashes.

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But she's in for a real treat if the biscuit barrel sells.

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Will Audrey's Tunbridge Ware nutmeg grater spice up the auction?

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Susan certainly thinks it will attract lots of attention.

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Lizzie's friend offered her just £10 for this Clarice Cliff bowl.

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Mark is hopeful it will do a lot better than that.

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Joan's delicate lattice basket is in remarkable condition.

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Let's hope the bidders agree.

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And lastly, Joy's fish etui is pretty and practical too.

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With a bit of luck, it'll catch the eye of the collectors.

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Dorchester has its roots in Roman times.

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They built up a town here in AD 43 - that's a long time ago.

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These vintage cars aren't that old

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but I bet they've travelled a few Roman roads in their time.

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This one's a little Austin and this one is a Morris Traveller.

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This brings back lots of wonderful memories for me.

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I had one of these 20 years ago.

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It was my very first car. It was a lovely, creamy-white one.

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It just goes to show what classics are on sale in today's auction.

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While everybody's enjoy a burger and cup of tea,

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I'm going inside to catch up with auctioneer Gary Batt

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to see what he thinks about our classic models.

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I love this little articulated fish. I think he's really cute.

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Now, it belongs to Joy and probably for not much longer.

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I can see this really doing well.

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Mark has put an estimate of £100 to £150 on it.

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Have a look at the tools inside.

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One of them looks like a little spoon. Mark said,

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-"That is for cleaning your ear."

-I think it's this spoon. It isn't coming out easily.

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I don't know where cleaning your ear comes into sewing really.

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No. I think the sharp end is the bit you'd use for needlework.

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The little indentation at the other end is just decorative.

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-Yes, a finial.

-Yeah, a finial.

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It is a really lovely object.

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It's small. It's top quality.

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As you say, it's silver, garnet-set eyes.

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I think the estimate is quite cautious.

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These small sewing accessories are very popular.

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People really love these little objets d'art.

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I would say this, because it's a fish and because it's a desirable shape as well -

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and it's amusing - it would make more than £200, could make £300.

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-Really, as much as that?

-I think so, yes.

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I think Joy will be pleased with the results of selling this.

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30. 30.

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5. 5. 40. 5.

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No, at 40. At the back, in the doorway, £40.

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Well, we can't go wrong, can we? We're just about to flog Lizzie's Clarice Cliff.

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Let's hope we give you a big surprise on this one. Let's hope it does a lot more than the 350.

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-Hmm?

-I hope so.

-Can it though, Mark?

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Can it? Clarice Cliff does do the business.

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It does do the business for us. It is a nice pattern.

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I think this even shows that in a general sale, they've actually catalogued this properly.

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You don't need a lot of fancy description.

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-You've all the facts - Clarice Cliff, Fantasque, melon pattern.

-Yes.

-That's all you need.

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The Clarice Cliff bizarre Fantasque fruit bowl.

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Decorated with the melon pattern here.

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At £200?

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100 to get going.

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100 is bid. In tens I'll take. £100. 10, Clarice Cliff.

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110. 120. 130. 140.

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-Here we go!

-150. 160. 170. 180 standing. 190.

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200. And 20. 240.

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260. 280. 300.

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-Brilliant!

-And 20. And 20.

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Going at £300... I sell.

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-Hammer's gone down. £300.

-Good.

-Better than a tenner.

-Certainly is.

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Right now, we're going to try to grind out a result of £60 to £100 for Audrey's little nutmeg grater.

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-You've upped the reserve, haven't you?

-I have.

-It was £60 to £100.

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You've put £80 on this.

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Well, a thing of beauty is a joy forever and I'd be quite happy to keep it.

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Well, I'm with you on that actually. Treen is so collectible. But it should do the top end.

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We'll find out now - it's going under the hammer. Good luck!

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Lot 31 - a pretty early-Victorian Tunbridge Ware nutmeg grater.

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Nice little bit of kitchenalia.

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What for this? Can I have £50 to start it?

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50 bid. 5. 60. 5.

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70? Any advance on 70?

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Selling at 70. It goes. Done at £70?

0:18:320:18:37

He's put the hammer down but he's put it down on 70

0:18:370:18:40

because nobody was bidding any higher.

0:18:400:18:42

-Well, as I said...

-You know what it means? It didn't sell.

-And I don't really mind.

0:18:420:18:48

240. 260.

0:18:480:18:50

280.

0:18:500:18:52

300. 40? 40.

0:18:520:18:55

Next up, Joy's little articulated fish - the etui -

0:18:550:18:58

which valued at £100 to £150 by Mark Stacey.

0:18:580:19:02

Should be a good catch, according to our auctioneer. We had a chat to him earlier. Oh!

0:19:020:19:07

Ooh! And he said £300 at least for something like that.

0:19:070:19:12

-It's good quality and very collectable.

-Good Lord!

0:19:120:19:16

-That is a surprise.

-It is, isn't it? That would be a good catch if someone got it at 100 to 150 quid.

0:19:160:19:21

Let's hope it isn't the one that got away. He's building it up. Get somebody on a hook and reel it in.

0:19:210:19:26

Lot 283 is this very attractive little white metal -

0:19:280:19:32

probably silver - etui in the form of an articulated fish.

0:19:320:19:37

Start me at £50 to get on with it. 50 is bid. 60 is got.

0:19:370:19:41

70 bid. 80.

0:19:410:19:42

90. 100 seated. And 10.

0:19:420:19:46

120. 130.

0:19:460:19:48

140. 150.

0:19:480:19:50

At £140. Near me at 140. 150.

0:19:500:19:54

160. 170?

0:19:550:19:58

At £160, then?

0:19:580:20:00

We're quite clear at 160. 170 bid?

0:20:000:20:04

180, sir? 190. Fill it up.

0:20:040:20:07

Going at £180.

0:20:070:20:10

-He's sold it. £180. Mark was right.

-Sorry.

-Spot on, really.

-Spot on.

0:20:100:20:15

35.

0:20:150:20:17

360?

0:20:170:20:19

At 360.

0:20:190:20:20

Up for grabs right now, a gorgeous little lattice basket made by Crown Staffordshire.

0:20:200:20:25

And it belongs to you, Joan. Why are you flogging this?

0:20:250:20:28

I bought it myself. I wouldn't sell something that somebody gave me.

0:20:280:20:31

-Right. Susan...?

-Joan's kept it in lovely condition.

-It's perfect.

0:20:310:20:35

It's so delicate. All the flowers - you haven't knocked any off.

0:20:350:20:38

-I'm amazed!

-I had a lovely Belleek one.

0:20:380:20:41

I'm afraid that came to disaster when I gave it to my daughter.

0:20:410:20:44

It's going under the hammer right now. Good luck!

0:20:440:20:47

A very pretty, Crown Staffordshire pierced and floral-encrusted basket.

0:20:470:20:51

Who'll start me with this, please?

0:20:510:20:53

A pretty piece at £50.

0:20:530:20:55

£50 is bid. I'll take £60 if I can.

0:20:550:20:58

Any advance on 50? 50. 50. 60?

0:20:580:21:01

Thank you, madam. 60. Any advance on 60? 70, you will, at the back. 80.

0:21:010:21:05

At 70. 80. 80 bid. 90?

0:21:050:21:09

£80 now. 90, anyone like?

0:21:090:21:11

90? Going then, at £80, all done.

0:21:110:21:15

He didn't sell it.

0:21:170:21:18

-That's fine.

-Is that OK?

-Absolutely.

0:21:180:21:21

It reached £80 in the room.

0:21:210:21:23

-Absolutely.

-You'd rather take it home.

-Yes.

0:21:230:21:25

I don't blame you - a bit of quality.

0:21:260:21:28

Here's something to digest - the Art Nouveau biscuit barrel brought by Keith.

0:21:340:21:38

We've got a reserve of £80. A valuation of 80 to 120.

0:21:380:21:41

-You've altered the reserve, haven't you?

-I have.

-What is it down to now?

0:21:410:21:45

-I've dropped it down to 50.

-Are you worried?

0:21:450:21:48

I was worried it might not sell.

0:21:480:21:50

You don't want to take it home. He doesn't want it any more.

0:21:500:21:53

Oh, crumbs! Why is that?

0:21:530:21:55

My wife hates it!

0:21:550:21:57

-I quite like it.

-You've got to keep her pleased, haven't you?

-I have indeed, yes.

0:21:570:22:01

You've done some research on this. What have you found out?

0:22:010:22:04

It was designed by a German by the name of Friedrich Adler.

0:22:040:22:08

It was produced in 1903.

0:22:080:22:11

-Sadly, Friedrich Adler was killed in Auschwitz...

-Mm-hm.

0:22:110:22:15

..because he was a member of the Jewish faith.

0:22:150:22:18

That's about it, really.

0:22:180:22:20

-Keith's becoming an expert, Mark.

-He is, isn't he?

-Mark's worried now.

0:22:200:22:24

Displayed here is this pewter,

0:22:240:22:27

Art Nouveau biscuit barrel and cover.

0:22:270:22:30

Good pewter lot, typical of its period.

0:22:300:22:33

Can you start me off with this lot at £30?

0:22:330:22:35

£30 to start. 30 is bid.

0:22:350:22:37

35 I'll take, if you will.

0:22:370:22:39

At £35. 40 anywhere now, then?

0:22:390:22:42

At £35. And 40, if you will. 40. 40.

0:22:420:22:46

5. 50.

0:22:460:22:48

At £50. Any advance on 50?

0:22:480:22:50

Going at £50 near me.

0:22:500:22:52

Well, it's gone for 50 quid.

0:22:530:22:55

-It's a good job you did that.

-Yes.

0:22:550:22:58

He got the valuation right, Mark.

0:22:580:23:00

Well...

0:23:000:23:02

15. 20, anywhere now then? £15. 20.

0:23:030:23:08

Thomas Hardy is one of the all-time greats of British literature

0:23:080:23:11

with books like Tess of D'Urbervilles and Far From The Madding Crowd to his name.

0:23:110:23:15

And he's always been one of my favourites.

0:23:150:23:18

So, while I'm here, I'm going to find out a little bit more about him

0:23:180:23:21

and the local countryside which inspired him to write so much.

0:23:210:23:25

Hardy was born in this cottage, just outside Dorchester, in 1840.

0:23:400:23:45

He lived here and grew up here with his family of stonemasons and builders.

0:23:450:23:49

In his novels, he liked to describe real settings as the scenes for the plots.

0:23:490:23:54

In Under The Greenwood Tree, published in 1872, the cottage was described like this.

0:23:540:24:02

-WOMAN:

-"It was a long, low cottage with a hipped roof of thatch.

0:24:020:24:05

"Having dormer windows breaking up into the eaves.

0:24:050:24:08

"A chimney standing in the middle of the ridge and another at each end.

0:24:080:24:11

"The window shutters were not yet closed and the fire

0:24:110:24:14

"and the candlelight within, radiated forth upon the thick bushes."

0:24:140:24:19

After leaving school, Hardy became an apprentice to an architect

0:24:190:24:22

and spent five years working and living in London

0:24:220:24:25

but his real passion was writing.

0:24:250:24:27

So, he returned to Dorset to try to get his books published.

0:24:270:24:31

Towns, villages and buildings throughout the county are all recognisable from Hardy's novels.

0:24:310:24:36

In the Mayor Of Casterbridge, Casterbridge is a thinly disguised Dorchester.

0:24:360:24:41

The story centres around Michael Henchard, who sells his wife and his daughter when he gets drunk.

0:24:410:24:46

18 years later, they return to the town to find out

0:24:460:24:49

that he's become the mayor

0:24:490:24:51

and he's presiding over dinner here in the King's Arms.

0:24:510:24:54

"A spacious bow window projected into the street over the main portico

0:24:560:25:00

"and from the open sashes came the babble of voices,

0:25:000:25:03

"the jingle of glasses and the drawing of corks."

0:25:030:25:06

And this appears as the mayor's house.

0:25:080:25:10

Michael Henchard decides to make up for his past bad behaviour by courting and remarrying his wife.

0:25:100:25:15

He brought her and their daughter to live here.

0:25:150:25:18

If you want to know what happens in the end, you'll have to read the book.

0:25:180:25:22

I've come to Dorset County Museum

0:25:270:25:30

to see some of Hardy's treasured possessions

0:25:300:25:33

and talk to museum director Judy Lindsay.

0:25:330:25:35

Hardy didn't come from a very wealthy background, did he?

0:25:350:25:38

No, he didn't. He was born to a labouring family in the village of Bockhampton.

0:25:380:25:43

Although he describes his cottage as seven bedroomed and rambling, it was still very much a labourer's cottage.

0:25:430:25:49

When did he start to write novels?

0:25:490:25:51

Thomas Hardy published his first novel in 1871.

0:25:510:25:54

He had written one previously - The Poor Man And The Lady - but had failed to find a publisher for that.

0:25:540:26:00

His first novel was Desperate Remedies.

0:26:000:26:02

He followed that up, however, with a much more popular novel -

0:26:020:26:05

and the one which really brought him public acclaim - Under The Greenwood Tree.

0:26:050:26:09

Looking around, I notice musical instruments. We've a cello there and violins. There's one.

0:26:090:26:14

Did he actually play the violin?

0:26:140:26:16

He started to play the violin, aged only eight.

0:26:160:26:19

He played with the Stinsford Band which was a church band.

0:26:190:26:23

It was very much a family tradition to do that.

0:26:230:26:25

His father, grandfather and uncle all played in the string band.

0:26:250:26:29

-This was his violin.

-May I hold this?

0:26:290:26:32

-Yes, you may.

-Wow, Hardy's violin! You really couldn't put a value on something like that.

0:26:320:26:38

In antiques, we talk about provenance and its history, which adds to the value.

0:26:380:26:42

-I don't think it gets much better than this, does it?

-No.

0:26:420:26:45

We're very lucky in that all of the items

0:26:450:26:48

-in our Thomas Hardy collection come with excellent provenance.

-Yeah.

0:26:480:26:52

Tell me a little bit about the pens.

0:26:520:26:54

Thomas Hardy was self-conscious enough to label some of the pens that he wrote with

0:26:540:26:59

so that we would know which pens he used to write which novels and poems.

0:26:590:27:03

So, this one is labelled "Jude".

0:27:030:27:05

I can see - he's scratched it into the bone handle.

0:27:050:27:09

It was also used to write some poetry.

0:27:090:27:11

This one is labelled "Tess", as in Tess Of The D'Urbervilles.

0:27:110:27:14

And this one is "The Dynasts" - which was his epic poem about the Napoleonic Wars.

0:27:140:27:20

Wow, thoughtful chap, passing on his legacy there and then, really.

0:27:200:27:24

Very much so.

0:27:240:27:25

-You mentioned his manuscripts. Can we have a look at them?

-Of course.

0:27:250:27:29

-You'll have to put your white gloves on to do that. I'll move the violin.

-Thank you.

-Just to there.

0:27:290:27:34

So, this is the manuscript of the Mayor Of Casterbridge.

0:27:340:27:38

And this is a bound copy of the original manuscript.

0:27:380:27:42

-So, it's extremely precious.

-Wow!

0:27:420:27:44

One of the things I think is particularly lovely is that inside the cover,

0:27:440:27:49

it says "Presented by Thomas Hardy", distinctively in his own signature.

0:27:490:27:53

There's also a note here saying, "Hand it on to the museum."

0:27:530:27:57

Gosh, how exciting! Can you turn the page, please?

0:27:570:28:00

Yes.

0:28:000:28:02

When you research Thomas Hardy,

0:28:040:28:06

you become so familiar with the handwriting -

0:28:060:28:09

it's absolutely distinctive.

0:28:090:28:10

Yeah. Was he happily married? Did he have children?

0:28:100:28:14

Thomas Hardy married twice.

0:28:140:28:15

His first wife was Emma Lavinia Gifford.

0:28:150:28:17

He met her in Cornwall when working on a church restoration project when he was still an architect.

0:28:170:28:23

She died and he married Florence Dugdale in 1914.

0:28:230:28:26

Unfortunately, there were no children from either marriage.

0:28:260:28:29

-Thomas Hardy died without issue.

-Was he buried in Dorset?

0:28:290:28:33

Sort of. Partly.

0:28:330:28:35

When Thomas Hardy died, his family were very keen that he would be buried here.

0:28:350:28:39

His heart was actually taken from his body and interred with his first wife, Emma,

0:28:390:28:44

at the church in Stinsford which is very close to Bockhampton where Hardy grew up.

0:28:440:28:49

The rest of his body was cremated and the ashes were interred in Westminster Abbey in Poets' Corner,

0:28:490:28:55

which is particularly fitting because many people see Thomas Hardy as a novelist.

0:28:550:29:00

Those who know his work better are aware that Thomas Hardy saw himself first and foremost as a poet.

0:29:000:29:05

Phew, what a complicated ending!

0:29:050:29:07

Indeed. A bit like one of his novels.

0:29:070:29:10

-Thank you very much.

-That's a pleasure.

0:29:100:29:13

It's time to start a brand new chapter and join our experts back at the valuation day.

0:29:130:29:17

-Hello, Benita.

-Hello.

-I must say, that's a lovely name.

0:29:260:29:29

-Thank you very much.

-There must be a bit of Spanish in there somewhere.

-Ooh, maybe.

-I think so.

0:29:290:29:34

-You've two interesting pottery figures in to show us.

-Yes.

0:29:340:29:37

Before we have a look at them, I know there's a nice family story to this.

0:29:370:29:41

-Will you share that with me, please?

-Yes.

0:29:410:29:43

My uncle, many years ago, used to work at Carter's Pottery.

0:29:430:29:48

He used to bring home the odd ornament for my auntie.

0:29:480:29:52

When my uncle died, my auntie said to me,

0:29:520:29:54

"I think you ought to have these figurines, you know."

0:29:540:29:58

I just kept them in the box in the attic.

0:29:580:30:01

-That's where they've been, right up until recently.

-Why is that?

0:30:010:30:05

Why have they been kept in a box?

0:30:050:30:06

I think mainly because there's not a lot of colour to them.

0:30:060:30:10

-You like things that are more decorative.

-Yes.

0:30:100:30:13

Of course, part of the reason why they're this colour is because,

0:30:130:30:16

when they were made in the '20s and '30s,

0:30:160:30:20

there was a particular vogue for the sort of matt finish in one colour.

0:30:200:30:25

The Carter factory specialised in this type of figures.

0:30:250:30:30

What else have you found out about the figures in your own research?

0:30:300:30:34

Well, we did look through catalogues

0:30:340:30:37

and we've tried very hard to pin them down.

0:30:370:30:40

We've got nowhere with them.

0:30:400:30:42

We can't trace them anywhere.

0:30:420:30:43

-They seem to be unrecorded figures.

-I think so.

0:30:430:30:46

As your late uncle worked for the factory,

0:30:460:30:50

they might have been some prototypes or something like that,

0:30:500:30:54

which would be very interesting.

0:30:540:30:56

-I think we've got to mention, of course, now that the Carter Stabler Adams factory...

-Yes.

0:30:560:31:00

..became the Poole factory, which everybody knows.

0:31:000:31:03

And these are marked, in actual fact, underneath, Poole, England.

0:31:030:31:08

But they are very typical of that 1920s, 1930s period. Again, even the figures are very typical.

0:31:080:31:14

You've got a flower seller and a sort of busker really,

0:31:140:31:18

playing his accordion with a little dog here, holding the hat out as the begging bowl,

0:31:180:31:24

which are rather charming and sweet really.

0:31:240:31:26

There needs to be a little more research.

0:31:260:31:29

We've agreed, I think, to put them in at £600 to £800

0:31:290:31:32

and ask the auction house to do some more research.

0:31:320:31:35

We're selling them, of course, in Dorchester which is local to Poole.

0:31:350:31:40

-Very local.

-So, you'll attract the local market.

0:31:400:31:42

If they illustrate them in the catalogue and mention them on the internet,

0:31:420:31:46

-you're then going to pull in that wider collecting field as well.

-Yes.

0:31:460:31:50

I think they're charming. I like them because they're simple.

0:31:500:31:53

If you look at a lot of Poole from the '20s and '30s, it's very much like this.

0:31:530:31:57

You have leaping stag bookends that are all matt finish in one colour.

0:31:570:32:03

Even those now fetch 300 or 400 a pair.

0:32:030:32:06

So, if these are a prototype,

0:32:060:32:09

we could be looking at a very exciting find indeed.

0:32:090:32:12

-You could make Flog It! history for Poole.

-Wouldn't that be lovely!

-It would be lovely, wouldn't it?

-Yes.

0:32:120:32:17

Val and Geoff, I see you've brought along your glasses.

0:32:220:32:25

Do you have a collection of them?

0:32:250:32:27

I have several - about 20 or 30 of them in actual fact - not a great collection.

0:32:270:32:32

-Do you have them on display?

-Yes, most of them are.

0:32:320:32:35

They're not exactly on display but they're certainly on show, one way or another.

0:32:350:32:40

These are stuck in a cupboard, doing nothing because they don't fit in with the decor of the place.

0:32:400:32:45

-So, you've been collecting them from a number of years?

-Yes, about 30.

0:32:450:32:49

1970s.

0:32:490:32:51

-Ah!

-It's quite a long time.

0:32:510:32:53

Why did you start collecting glasses, particularly?

0:32:530:32:57

I went to an antiques fair one day and decided to buy one and that was it.

0:32:570:33:01

-That was the first one I'd ever bought. That little one there.

-This one?

-Yes.

0:33:010:33:05

Yes. Well, this is nice, isn't it?

0:33:050:33:07

It looks, datewise about 1740 with the plain stem here.

0:33:070:33:12

The air twist would be about 1750s, 1760

0:33:120:33:17

and the cotton twist slightly later, maybe up to 1770.

0:33:170:33:21

It's quite nice. You've got the sort of run of them.

0:33:210:33:24

These two are the ogee bowls - the shape of the bowl here.

0:33:240:33:28

And this is a trumpet bowl, which is fairly self-explanatory.

0:33:280:33:33

And you'd probably drink maybe cordial out of the smaller ones

0:33:330:33:37

and then ale out of the trumpet one here,

0:33:370:33:39

which, of course, was a strong drink and not like the pint glasses we get today.

0:33:390:33:44

Have you any idea of value?

0:33:440:33:47

Not really, no.

0:33:470:33:49

It's a long time since I bought any glasses

0:33:490:33:52

so we hadn't any cause for finding what the value is at all,

0:33:520:33:55

-in actual fact.

-OK.

0:33:550:33:57

If we could put a reserve, as a lot of the three, at 220,

0:33:570:34:02

and then they can have an estimate of 220 - 250.

0:34:020:34:06

I think it might encourage more people in.

0:34:060:34:08

I'd hope it would make well towards the top end.

0:34:080:34:11

If we put too high a reserve, it may put people off - if you're happy about that.

0:34:110:34:16

It sounds all right to me in actual fact. I'll be guided by you.

0:34:160:34:20

OK, that's great. We'll give them a go and I'm sure they'll do well.

0:34:200:34:24

Mary, you've brought a very interesting pair of bracelets in to show us.

0:34:290:34:34

Where did they come from?

0:34:340:34:36

They're actually my daughter's.

0:34:360:34:37

Her dad gave her... He moved house.

0:34:370:34:40

They were in a box and he just said, "Oh, jewellery - a daughter."

0:34:400:34:45

See if you want them for anything.

0:34:450:34:47

So, they came home and they got stuck in a cupboard - that was it.

0:34:470:34:51

When she left home - she married and left home - they got left with me.

0:34:510:34:55

She wasn't really interested in them.

0:34:550:34:58

You don't know where he got them from. Are they family pieces?

0:34:580:35:01

No. I think he found them when he moved house or moved into a house or something like that.

0:35:010:35:06

They just appeared magically from somewhere.

0:35:060:35:09

They're quite an interesting pair of bracelets. They're 19th century.

0:35:090:35:14

If we just have a look at this one... They're a pair.

0:35:140:35:18

We've got a cameo in the centre which would have been carved in Italy, maybe around the Naples area.

0:35:180:35:24

On this particular cameo, we've got Cupid and Psyche -

0:35:240:35:28

well-known classical figures.

0:35:280:35:31

Then, they're set in this sort of gilt metal bracelet with enamelled panels, which is probably Swiss.

0:35:310:35:38

-Right.

-Which of course, Italy and Switzerland, they share borders, etc,

0:35:380:35:42

and Europe was always trading with each other.

0:35:420:35:46

So it's actually quite a nice thing.

0:35:460:35:48

Made probably in the mid-19th century, 1850 onwards, that sort of period.

0:35:480:35:53

-And the other one is very similar indeed with a different carved cameo in there.

-Yeah.

0:35:530:35:58

Your daughter's never worn them?

0:35:580:36:00

Oh no. No. I mean...they...

0:36:000:36:03

I just rung her and said about them and she said, "Oh, mum, just do it."

0:36:030:36:08

-Get something I can wear.

-Yeah.

0:36:080:36:11

There would be a commercial aspect to them.

0:36:110:36:14

People collect this sort of jewellery.

0:36:140:36:16

They're not terribly practical to wear. In those days, they didn't have wristwatches.

0:36:160:36:21

So you could wear bracelets on both wrists.

0:36:210:36:25

I would have thought, if we are putting them into auction,

0:36:250:36:29

we'd be looking maybe at an estimate of £150 to £200 for the pair,

0:36:290:36:33

with a reserve of 150 with 10% discretion.

0:36:330:36:37

-Would your daughter go for that?

-She'd love that.

-Wonderful.

0:36:370:36:40

-You'll be happy to put them in?

-Yes, she's happy with that.

-Fantastic! You'll come to the auction?

-I will.

0:36:400:36:46

-Let's see who we can attract.

-Lovely.

-Thanks.

-Smashing. Thank you.

0:36:460:36:50

You two look alike. Are you sisters?

0:36:500:36:52

Yes.

0:36:520:36:54

And this is a bit of a wow factor, isn't it?

0:36:540:36:57

-Yes.

-So, how did you come by it?

0:36:570:36:59

I was left it nine years ago.

0:36:590:37:01

-Oh, right!

-By a friend of mine.

0:37:010:37:04

She'd bought it on her way back from Tanganyika

0:37:040:37:07

and she'd bought it on a boat from one of the sultans of Zanzibar to bring home to give to her father.

0:37:070:37:13

Oh, wow! That's a nice story, isn't it?

0:37:130:37:16

I'm not sure 100%, whether it's ivory or bone - the inlay.

0:37:160:37:19

It doesn't sort of make a huge amount of difference but it's been very nicely done, hasn't it?

0:37:190:37:24

The sort of circle in the middle here and all the foliage and leaves all around it.

0:37:240:37:29

-And the decoration continues all round the box, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:37:290:37:34

You've got a little bit of inlay missing here.

0:37:340:37:37

And then, round the box, you've got brass bindings, just to protect all the corners.

0:37:370:37:42

-That's kind of done its job, hasn't it?

-Yes.

0:37:420:37:44

I'd have said it was a sort of 19th-century box, maybe 1890s, something like that.

0:37:440:37:50

It's kind of got that feel.

0:37:500:37:52

If we open it up...

0:37:520:37:54

it's very nice inside here, isn't it?

0:37:560:37:59

You've got the pin pieces here, the red silk there and the mirror in the middle.

0:37:590:38:04

And all the little sections - the little lift out tray here.

0:38:040:38:09

And this roll-top. That's unusual, isn't it?

0:38:090:38:12

-Yes, that rolls back to...

-Oh, right!

0:38:120:38:15

That's clever - a secret drawer.

0:38:150:38:17

-That's nice.

-What do you think the box was used for?

0:38:170:38:22

I thought it was a workbox because you've got here, pins and things like that.

0:38:220:38:26

But that could have been hat pins because you've the mirror there and sections you could put jewellery in.

0:38:260:38:31

It's similar to a workbox, jewellery box and all the compartments.

0:38:310:38:35

So most probably jewellery.

0:38:350:38:37

So, is it something you display at home?

0:38:370:38:41

Yes, I've had sewing things in it.

0:38:410:38:43

-So, you keep it as a workbox?

-Yes.

0:38:430:38:46

Had you considered what it might be worth?

0:38:460:38:49

No, sorry. No idea.

0:38:490:38:52

I think we could put it in with an estimate of, sort of,

0:38:520:38:57

-120, 150, something like that.

-Really?

0:38:570:39:00

As much as that?

0:39:000:39:02

-Would you be happy?

-Yeah.

0:39:020:39:04

-OK. So, shall we give it a whirl for you?

-Yes, please.

0:39:040:39:07

Originally, there were two towns here - Weymouth on that side on the water and Melcom Regis on this.

0:39:260:39:31

You can imagine, can't you, plenty of disputes going on over trading at the time

0:39:310:39:35

until Queen Elizabeth stepped in and granted a charter amalgamating the towns in 1571.

0:39:350:39:41

But, I'm not going quite that far today.

0:39:530:39:56

I'm only going across the other side.

0:39:560:39:58

Believe it or not, a ferry has operated on these waters since the 16th century.

0:39:580:40:03

Originally, the ferry boats were pulled across by ropes.

0:40:030:40:06

Today, I've got Bob who's going to row me across.

0:40:060:40:09

I'm also going to have a chat to Derek, who knows all about the port

0:40:090:40:13

because he's worked on the waters all his life.

0:40:130:40:15

So, when did you start working in the port?

0:40:150:40:19

I've been involved for the last 45 years.

0:40:190:40:22

My first job here, I worked for a local contractor - Joe Basso.

0:40:220:40:27

I did that for a few years and then I came and I worked for the Lifeboat Institution.

0:40:270:40:31

I completed 35 years in 2002.

0:40:310:40:34

-That's a long service, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:40:340:40:36

-So, what was the harbour like back then? It wasn't like this.

-Bustling. This is quiet now.

0:40:360:40:41

There was always one or two

0:40:410:40:43

what they call fruit boats come in, tomato boats, every day.

0:40:430:40:47

-All sorts of cargo.

-All sorts of cargo. There was timber and all sorts of cargo.

0:40:470:40:52

It's a rich man's playground now, isn't it?

0:40:520:40:54

It's more of a yachting type harbour.

0:40:540:40:57

-You've been in the lifeboat service...

-That's correct.

-..and you're a brave man.

0:40:570:41:01

I know that Bob who's rowing us to the lifeboat was one of your crewmen, wasn't he?

0:41:010:41:05

Tell us some of the rescues you got involved in.

0:41:050:41:08

One - I suppose the highlight of my career and, I'm sure, Bob's -

0:41:080:41:12

was when we rescued five from a catamaran called Sunbeam Tracer.

0:41:120:41:17

on the night of the hurricane in October 16th 1987.

0:41:170:41:22

Um, I was very privileged then to have a medal involved

0:41:220:41:28

and it was presented by Princess Alexander in London.

0:41:280:41:34

Well, you're both very, very brave men and you did get a medal and we've got it here. Look at this.

0:41:340:41:39

Take a look at that.

0:41:390:41:42

-You must be very proud of this.

-I'm very proud of that.

0:41:420:41:44

Well, Bob and Derek, you're both heroes.

0:41:440:41:46

This medal is a fantastic tribute - something for your kids to be proud of for the rest of their lives -

0:41:460:41:51

nautical memorabilia to inherit. Talking of maritime memorabilia

0:41:510:41:55

there's a shop just on the other side of the harbour. Let's go there and find out a bit more.

0:41:550:42:00

INSTRUMENTAL SEA SHANTY PLAYS

0:42:000:42:03

Well, here we are! It doesn't get much better than this, does it?

0:42:170:42:21

You'd think this was a ship's cabin but no - I'm in a nautical antiques centre. It really is chock-a-block.

0:42:210:42:27

It's full of nautical memorabilia!

0:42:270:42:29

There are different areas of collecting within nautical memorabilia -

0:42:290:42:33

you've one for the academic, you've got one for the decorator.

0:42:330:42:36

For the academic - cannonballs. It's obvious really, isn't it?

0:42:360:42:40

These date back to the 18th century. Five pounds in weight.

0:42:400:42:43

These would be shot from a cannon and shot into he broadside of another man-of-war

0:42:430:42:48

putting a hole in its hull.

0:42:480:42:50

But those holes could be plugged quite easily.

0:42:500:42:53

If one hit you on the head, well, you wouldn't know anything about it, would you?

0:42:530:42:57

In order to do more damage you used something like this.

0:42:570:43:00

This is called a bar shot.

0:43:000:43:02

This would be fired from the cannon. If this hit the ship on a broadside as it was turning in the air

0:43:020:43:08

it would make a whacking great big hole which you couldn't plug.

0:43:080:43:12

It would also get caught in the rigging which would slow the vessel down.

0:43:120:43:16

And, lastly, I wonder if you've seen one of these?

0:43:160:43:19

It's another cannonball - it's called chain shot.

0:43:190:43:23

What happens is, as that leaves the cannon, it splits in half...

0:43:230:43:26

opens up and swings around in the air at hundreds of miles an hour

0:43:260:43:32

and actually gets caught in some of the ship's rigging, or rips the sails apart.

0:43:320:43:36

That will slow the vessel down.

0:43:360:43:38

You could then come alongside and board it and, hopefully, capture it.

0:43:380:43:42

Something like that would set you back about £200 to £300.

0:43:420:43:47

A standard cannonball from the 18th century, like that,

0:43:470:43:50

£50 to £60. There's quite a lot of those about.

0:43:500:43:54

And one of these? Well, they're a little bit rarer.

0:43:540:43:57

That's probably £100 to £200 but that's something for the academic.

0:43:570:44:01

They look great on a table top. My advice is to go down the decorator's route

0:44:010:44:06

because then it's practical, it cheers you up

0:44:060:44:08

and you can create a nautical theme at home.

0:44:080:44:11

If I was doing a bathroom the first thing I'd go for would be a ship's pulleys - the block and tackle.

0:44:110:44:16

You can pick them up for around about £50.

0:44:160:44:19

This one's of elm and dates form the 18th century. The pulley's inside.

0:44:190:44:22

The rigging would pass through there.

0:44:220:44:25

They're made of Lignum vitae a hard wood from South America - incredibly oily so it self-lubricates,

0:44:250:44:31

so these blocks and tackles will never jam up which is quite essential if you're at sea.

0:44:310:44:36

Well, that's a good starting point. For the walls you need a ship's bulkhead clock,

0:44:360:44:41

maybe some models and maybe a little bit more decoration, so let's have a look.

0:44:410:44:46

INSTRUMENTAL SEA SHANTY PLAYS

0:44:460:44:49

OK, that's the shelving and the deck sorted out in the bathroom. Now for the walls,

0:44:530:44:57

and the most obvious thing to do is decorate them with ships' flags, or fishing nets,

0:44:570:45:01

or even lobster pots and fishnet floats like these. We see a lot of these around.

0:45:010:45:06

There's port and starboard lights, or there's some converted gimbal lights.

0:45:060:45:10

These are designed for when the ship rocks and rolls around at sea.

0:45:100:45:14

The light actually stays still. Here's a good example. Look.

0:45:140:45:18

And that'll set you back around £50. The ones that are converted to electricity? About £80.

0:45:180:45:24

But for my wall I'd go for a clock.

0:45:240:45:27

A bulkhead clock like this...

0:45:270:45:29

There's a little range here in brass. They start from around £100

0:45:290:45:33

to £200. But this one here is rather a specialist clock.

0:45:330:45:38

It's made by Astral Smith and it was supplied to the Royal Navy in the Second World War.

0:45:380:45:42

It's an eight-day wind-up clock and it's made of brass - extremely good quality.

0:45:420:45:47

But the brass has been painted, as supplied to the Royal Navy, in its original black enamel paint.

0:45:470:45:53

This would be to dull it down

0:45:530:45:55

so it wouldn't shimmer away at night or day to attract the enemy.

0:45:550:45:58

You wouldn't want to do that, would you?

0:45:580:46:01

If you look really closely at the dial,

0:46:010:46:03

something very interesting is going on here.

0:46:030:46:06

The little dial in the centre is for the hours.

0:46:060:46:10

The outer ring, well, that's got the minutes on it

0:46:100:46:12

cos midshipmen would have to keep a handwritten log of all the ship's engine movements.

0:46:120:46:17

At every vital point and turn, it would be logged to the exact minute.

0:46:170:46:22

So he would look up as he was charting and he could see it from a distance. That's very, very handy.

0:46:220:46:27

One of these, if you can find one, will set you back about £300.

0:46:270:46:31

And, to top the look off, how about a couple of pond yachts or some ships' models.

0:46:310:46:36

We've got a few here. This one is quite cute.

0:46:360:46:40

This one starts at around about £35 or, you could go upmarket,

0:46:400:46:44

for some lovely pond yachts in full sail, or a dinghy like this one.

0:46:440:46:49

That will give you a look for 200 quid. Do you know, I could spend hours in here.

0:46:490:46:54

Right now, I've got to weigh anchor and cast-off and head straight back to the auction room.

0:46:540:46:59

But, before we do that, let's have a quick recap of all the items that are going to go under the hammer.

0:46:590:47:05

Anita's uncle brought these home from the factory.

0:47:050:47:08

Mark hopes they're rare and not run of the mill.

0:47:080:47:11

Beryl and Geoff's glasses didn't go with their collection -

0:47:110:47:15

are they the toast of the sale room?

0:47:150:47:17

Is Mary's daughter in the money?

0:47:170:47:18

Will Cupid's arrow finds its mark with these cameo bracelets?

0:47:180:47:23

And there's a touch of the exotic about this little inlaid wooden box

0:47:230:47:27

which Susan is confident can do really well.

0:47:270:47:31

Gary, something you should be familiar with - Poole Pottery - maybe not these figures.

0:47:440:47:48

These were brought in by Benita.

0:47:480:47:50

Mark Stacey, our expert, got extremely excited on the day.

0:47:500:47:54

Two wonderful figures and he's put £600 to £800 on them.

0:47:540:47:58

We don't know much about them, but are they rare?

0:47:580:48:00

Well, that's a fundamental question which, equally, we're not entirely sure about, to be entirely honest.

0:48:000:48:06

We sell a lot of Poole Pottery in here because we're not far away from Poole.

0:48:060:48:10

We get a lot of standard Poole.

0:48:100:48:12

We ourselves have never seen objects similar to this.

0:48:120:48:16

We've been able to do some research but haven't been able to get an absolutely finite answer

0:48:160:48:21

so, they are a bit speculative which really is what makes them quite interesting.

0:48:210:48:25

-We think they're probably quite early from the production of the Poole factory.

-What - sort of 1910?

0:48:250:48:31

1910, 1915, 1920 and possibly designed by Phoebe Stabler,

0:48:310:48:36

who was one of the founders of the Poole Pottery with Carter, Stabler and Adams.

0:48:360:48:41

They've come from a mould. There must be more about.

0:48:410:48:44

-They're not that finite, are they?

-No, they aren't.

0:48:440:48:47

It depends, I suppose, how popular that production was.

0:48:470:48:50

The ones we have seen were similar to this but with a coloured glaze to them.

0:48:500:48:55

These are plain - not quite as desirable.

0:48:550:48:58

I like them. They're quite naive. Will they do the £600 to £800 mark?

0:48:580:49:02

Well, if it was me, I think we'd be more likely to get near 400,

0:49:020:49:05

but you never know, you're not entirely sure.

0:49:050:49:07

You wouldn't fall of the rostrum if they made 600.

0:49:070:49:10

A typical, cautious auctioneer. You've to go on the rostrum. I hope they get the top end.

0:49:100:49:15

I'd like to see it. It's a case of suck it and see. Let's let the bidders decide.

0:49:150:49:19

20. 5. 5. 20.

0:49:200:49:23

5. That's it.

0:49:230:49:25

£600 to £800 riding on this one. They belong to Benita, hopefully for not much longer.

0:49:250:49:30

It's the two Poole figures. They've got the look but have they got the price right? We had a chat.

0:49:300:49:35

I'll bring Mark in on this - our expert.

0:49:350:49:37

-We had a chat to the auctioneer before the sale.

-Right.

0:49:370:49:40

He said he's not come across anything like it before.

0:49:400:49:44

He's seen them glazed in colour but not left plain like that.

0:49:440:49:48

-He would have been cautious and put a sort of maybe £300 to £400 on them.

-Right.

0:49:480:49:55

He's playing the market here. He's going to let that bidder decide.

0:49:550:49:59

It's what auctions are about. It's where tension creeps in.

0:49:590:50:02

-I think we'll see some today.

-There might be.

-Mr Stacey.

0:50:020:50:05

-There's a bit of tension here, I can tell you.

-There is.

0:50:050:50:08

Now, we're on to lot 252,

0:50:080:50:10

these unusual Poole Pottery white glazed figures.

0:50:100:50:13

And who will start me with this lot? We've got £200 to start me.

0:50:130:50:17

I'll take 220 in the room. At £200.

0:50:170:50:20

220, anyone?

0:50:200:50:22

At 200. And 20.

0:50:220:50:24

240.

0:50:240:50:26

260.

0:50:260:50:28

280.

0:50:280:50:30

300. At £300. Any advance on 300?

0:50:300:50:33

20, anyone like?

0:50:330:50:35

320 on the telephone. 340.

0:50:350:50:39

360. 380.

0:50:390:50:41

400? 400. And 20. 440?

0:50:410:50:46

At £420. 440, anyone like?

0:50:480:50:51

440. All done? I sell.

0:50:510:50:53

GAVEL THUDS

0:50:530:50:55

The hammer's gone down at 440, which means he didn't sell them, did he?

0:50:550:50:59

-He didn't sell.

-You've a reserve of 600.

0:50:590:51:01

Yes.

0:51:010:51:04

Well, I'm surprised. I'm very surprised.

0:51:040:51:07

They're 1924 and as far as we know, there's no others like it.

0:51:070:51:13

You can't do comparables, can you?

0:51:130:51:15

I think also, maybe what you should do, as we say before, Paul, for something as specialist as them,

0:51:150:51:22

is really find an auctioneer's that have a specialist decorative arts sale and get a little bit...

0:51:220:51:27

-dig a bit deeper in the provenance of it.

-Yes.

0:51:270:51:31

Well, that's a disappointment for Benita. Let's hope Beryl and Geoff's glasses will do better.

0:51:310:51:36

Something for the purist here, these really are. I love them.

0:51:360:51:39

The oldest thing in the sale.

0:51:390:51:41

I think they're priced to sell. We've got 220 to 250.

0:51:410:51:44

They should do more than that.

0:51:440:51:46

I'm hoping they do a lot more than that. 100 quid a glass, at least.

0:51:460:51:49

That's what I'm hoping for. Can we get that sort of money for them?

0:51:490:51:53

I hope so. They're worth that.

0:51:530:51:55

They're worth the top end of the estimate.

0:51:550:51:57

What's concerned me a little bit is there's not much glass of that kind in the sale.

0:51:570:52:01

-But buyers will find it - they'll always find quality.

-Let's hope.

0:52:010:52:05

-Hopefully.

-Let's hope they find them. Good luck. This is it.

0:52:050:52:08

An interesting lot.

0:52:080:52:10

English 18th-century wine glasses.

0:52:100:52:13

Three of these. Who will start me with these - at £100 for the three?

0:52:130:52:17

£100 for the three. 100 is bid.

0:52:170:52:20

And 10 I'll take. 100.

0:52:200:52:22

And 10, thank you, sir. 110 at the back. 110. 120 now, then?

0:52:220:52:26

110. 120. 120.

0:52:260:52:29

130. 140. 150.

0:52:290:52:32

160. 170.

0:52:320:52:34

180. 190.

0:52:340:52:36

200. In tens, I'll take.

0:52:360:52:39

210, sir? At £200. 210.

0:52:390:52:43

220. 220. Any advance on 220?

0:52:430:52:46

230, well done, sir. 240.

0:52:460:52:48

250. It's not my money.

0:52:480:52:52

250?

0:52:520:52:53

-Oh, come on.

-At £240, the bid's against you, sir. Are you sure?

0:52:550:52:58

If you're sure. At £240.

0:52:580:53:01

I'm selling. Out and clear, I sell.

0:53:010:53:04

That's not bad - that's top end of your estimate, actually.

0:53:040:53:07

-Happy with that?

-Ooh, yes.

-Yeah?

0:53:070:53:09

-Yes.

-What's that money going towards?

0:53:090:53:11

More glasses? Yeah, more glasses.

0:53:110:53:15

180. 190.

0:53:150:53:17

200.

0:53:170:53:19

And 20. Going round the room.

0:53:190:53:21

No, at 40 at the back.

0:53:210:53:22

We've got two lovely, 19th-century early ones - bracelets going under the hammer.

0:53:220:53:27

£150 to £200 is our estimate. They belong to Mary.

0:53:270:53:30

In fact, they belong to your daughter, don't they?

0:53:300:53:33

-They do.

-So she should be here flogging them.

0:53:330:53:35

She only came back from Cyprus yesterday on holiday

0:53:350:53:39

and so I've got to let her know what happens at the end of this.

0:53:390:53:43

Will it get it? Will it get the top end?

0:53:430:53:45

I don't know whether it's more of a specialist thing.

0:53:450:53:48

-Yes.

-Fingers crossed.

-What did you think of the valuation? Were you happy?

-Very. Shocked.

0:53:480:53:53

Very shocked. Well, happy, yes.

0:53:530:53:55

They were just in a box of old jewellery.

0:53:550:53:57

It's nice to get the pair of them.

0:53:570:54:00

Early 19th century, they would have had one on each wrist because they didn't have wristwatches.

0:54:000:54:05

Gilt metal and probably Swiss. The quality's very good.

0:54:050:54:08

The cameos are Italian of course.

0:54:080:54:10

-But they're nice, I like them.

-Unusual.

-Let's find out what the bidders of Dorset think.

0:54:100:54:15

-Great.

-It's going under the hammer.

0:54:150:54:17

Very attractive,

0:54:170:54:18

19th-century cameo, enamel and gilt metal bracelets - a pair of these.

0:54:180:54:25

OK, who will start me with this lot? £100 if you will, to get on.

0:54:250:54:29

£100 is bid, thank you. And 10.

0:54:290:54:32

120 at the back.

0:54:320:54:34

130 seated. 140.

0:54:340:54:36

150. 160.

0:54:360:54:38

-170. 180. 190.

-Getting there.

0:54:380:54:43

200. And 20. 240?

0:54:430:54:46

At £220. And with me at 220.

0:54:460:54:49

Any advance on 220?

0:54:490:54:51

-Come on, tease them!

-£220 then. 230.

0:54:510:54:54

240.

0:54:540:54:56

250. 260.

0:54:560:54:58

270 on the side.

0:54:580:55:00

At £260, sticking to it.

0:55:000:55:03

At £260, I'm selling now, all clear and done.

0:55:030:55:06

Yes. £260. We'll take that and you'll take that as well.

0:55:070:55:12

Brilliant.

0:55:120:55:13

I think your daughter will. Does that goes to her or a bit to you?

0:55:130:55:17

Well, we'll hand it over but we'll look pitiful, sort of thing.

0:55:170:55:21

What a great result! Sisters Sally and June are up next, hoping to sell their 19th-century inlaid box.

0:55:210:55:29

I wouldn't be parting with this

0:55:290:55:31

but at £120 to £150 I reckon this is going to go because it's quality. I love it.

0:55:310:55:37

Why are you flogging it - because it's yours, isn't it?

0:55:370:55:40

Yes, it is. Well, I don't want it and my children don't want it. So...

0:55:400:55:44

What about you, come on?

0:55:440:55:46

-No, I don't really want it. It's hers.

-It's hers, is it?

-Hers to sell.

0:55:460:55:50

-Let's see if we can get top money for it, shall we?

-I hope so.

0:55:500:55:53

It's a lovely box - a bit of a wow factor, isn't it?

0:55:530:55:56

The condition's good. There is a bit of inlay missing but it's unusual.

0:55:560:56:00

It's got the touch, it's got the rub and it's got the age, so that's quite nice.

0:56:000:56:04

-It's going under the hammer...

-Fingers crossed.

-..now.

0:56:040:56:07

This Anglo-Indian inlaid bone or ivory dressing box.

0:56:070:56:12

Very smart thing.

0:56:120:56:14

OK, who'll start me off with this lot? At £100 to start it.

0:56:140:56:17

100 is bid. 110, anyone say?

0:56:170:56:20

100. 10. 120. 130.

0:56:200:56:23

140. 150.

0:56:230:56:26

At £140 then. 150, anyone? 150.

0:56:260:56:29

160. 170.

0:56:290:56:31

180. 190.

0:56:310:56:33

200. And 20?

0:56:330:56:36

At £200. And 20, anyone say?

0:56:360:56:39

-200.

-It's worth every penny.

0:56:390:56:41

220 commission. 240.

0:56:410:56:43

260. 280.

0:56:430:56:46

300. And 20.

0:56:460:56:49

340. 360. 380. 400.

0:56:490:56:54

At £380 commission. At 380.

0:56:540:56:56

400, anyone say? 400. And 20.

0:56:560:57:00

440. 460.

0:57:000:57:02

Against you at the back. 460 on the book.

0:57:020:57:05

Commission bid on the book, against the room? I sell, all done.

0:57:050:57:08

GAVEL BANGS

0:57:080:57:11

Fantastic! £460.

0:57:110:57:14

-Amazing.

-Well...

0:57:150:57:17

you didn't think you'd get that, did you? Hmm?

0:57:170:57:20

-No.

-What a lovely moment!

0:57:200:57:23

What's going through your mind? I mean about the money. What would you do with that?

0:57:230:57:27

Well, we're going to have a weekend away - me and my sister and our husbands.

0:57:270:57:31

-Where are you thinking of going?

-We're going away in a caravan just for a nice, restful weekend.

0:57:310:57:37

-Ah! Do you ever squabble, you two, at all because you spend so much time together?

-No.

-Not at all?

0:57:370:57:42

We're like a couple of book ends.

0:57:420:57:44

Well, enjoy it, won't you?

0:57:450:57:47

-It's a lot of money. That's a good surprise.

-Yeah.

-Thank you.

0:57:470:57:50

260. 280.

0:57:500:57:53

300. 20.

0:57:530:57:56

Well, the auction's still going on behind me but it's definitely all over for our owners.

0:57:560:58:02

All I can say, from Duke's in Dorchester, it's been a mixed bag.

0:58:020:58:06

What did sell sold extremely well and what didn't,

0:58:060:58:10

it wasn't all bad because our owners wanted to take their items home.

0:58:100:58:14

The star of today's show had to be Sally and June's colonial box, selling for a staggering £460.

0:58:140:58:20

I hope you've enjoyed the show. See you next time on Flog It!

0:58:200:58:24

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd - 2005.

0:58:390:58:42

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:420:58:45

Experts Susan Orringe and Mark Stacey dig up some gems for the sale in Weymouth. Presenter Paul Martin gets inspiration from Thomas Hardy and hands out some decorating tips on a nautical theme.