Cheltenham Flog It!


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Cheltenham

Paul Martin and the team are in elegant Georgian Cheltenham. Experts Charles Ross and James Lewis give valuations while Paul visits Snowshill Manor.


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Today we're in a Regency town famous for composers, poets and pop stars.

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Welcome to "Flog It!" from Cheltenham.

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And talking of pop stars, not many of you would know

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that Brian Jones, the guitarist in the Rolling Stones, was born here in Cheltenham and went to school here.

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Brian, with the rest of the Rolling Stones,

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played an early gig in Cheltenham on the 10th of February, 1964.

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And rocking their way along the queue today are our very own heart-throbs. Look at them.

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I can't see them in a rock 'n' roll band, more Eurovision. It's the cheeky boys.

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It's James Lewis and Charlie Ross, who are hoping to find some big hits in the queue.

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-Nul point?

-Oh, did you want me to do it?

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We're in Cheltenham's elegant town hall today and the excitement is building.

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And first at the table is Charlie, who's found something rather intriguing.

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John, I expect you know what you've got.

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-I think it's a snuffbox.

-I think it's a snuffbox too.

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It's an attractive one.

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-Where did it come from?

-Well, it was my grandmother's.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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So my father gave it to me to bring in to see what it's worth.

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Oh, I see! And then sell it regardless?

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-Hopefully.

-Willy-nilly?

-Absolutely.

-If I tell you it's worth £2, still sell it?

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Maybe a little more than that!

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-Do you know what it's made from?

-I presume it's silver and ivory.

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It is silver and ivory, absolutely spot on. It is, as you say, ivory.

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It's interesting that colouring's going, isn't it? On the top there.

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And I've opened it up, and what did you think about the inside?

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-I thought it was wood.

-Wood?

-Yeah, I didn't realise.

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I can see why you thought that. It's got a woody grain to it.

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-Yes, yes.

-But, you see, what's happened is it's become discoloured.

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It is ivory. It's one piece of ivory, and it's ivory top to bottom.

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And the reason it's gone that colour is, of course, because it's been used for snuff.

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Then looking at the inside, inside it appears has been gilded at some stage.

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Why would that be?

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For protection of the silver and also for quality purposes, which is high quality gilding.

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What sort of person would have a snuffbox like this?

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Oh, quite a gentry.

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This is high quality in silver. I mean, a lot of people had snuff,

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but they would have just wooden snuffboxes, metal snuffboxes.

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This is silver.

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And in terms of its date, the hallmark is unclear.

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We can tell, obviously, that it's silver.

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We can tell that it's George III because we've got George III's head on there.

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The date stamp is unclear.

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And I've come up with two possibilities. 1790 or 1810.

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So for purposes of valuation, we'll call it 1800, George III.

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It's really quite a good size.

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It's quite a big, big snuffbox.

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They were more commonly half that size.

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Right.

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-Now, it's got a name on the bottom.

-I have no idea who that is.

-Robert Hillier.

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-No relation.

-Tell me that's your great, great grandfather.

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Sorry, no. I don't think so, anyway.

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What a great shame. That's another comment,

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-another social comment of the standing of the person it belonged to.

-Yes.

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You know, if you were Joe Bloggs and you were a farm labourer,

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you wouldn't have had this wonderfully engraved name on the bottom.

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-It's fabulously done.

-Yes.

-What do you think it's worth?

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I've got no idea. I have no idea.

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-I'll give a wide estimate of £100-£200.

-Right!

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I think it's certainly worth £100.

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-OK.

-I'd like to see it make nearer £200.

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-OK. Right.

-So we'll put it in, and I think we'll put a discretionary reserve on it of £100.

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I think we need to protect it with a reserve.

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This really shouldn't be sold for £50.

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-Absolutely.

-And I don't suppose you've got any use for it?

-My father hasn't, and I haven't.

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-Not a snuff taker?

-Not a snuff taker at all, not even a smoker.

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-So, father's given it to you to bring in today.

-Yes.

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And why does he want to sell it?

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Probably to buy more whisky or wine.

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-Or go and see more horseracing. I don't know.

-Oh, that's... Splendid!

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Bev, Chrissie, when I first saw this earlier on today, I thought, fantastic picture.

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I'm going to be able to do some research into the artist and tell you all about it later.

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But do you know, I found nothing. Absolutely nothing.

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I've searched internets. I've looked through books.

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All the valuers here have tried to find out,

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but the thing is, I just really like it.

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I really do.

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But we've got the information on the back here.

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HH Sheard, RBA, who exhibited at the Royal Academy.

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It says here,

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"Exhibited and purchased from the Royal Academy in 1920."

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And whenever you have that sort of provenance to a picture,

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you can almost guarantee that there will be a listing somewhere,

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but not for yours! So, is this a family piece?

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No. It was given to my mother.

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-She was the housekeeper in a big house.

-OK.

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And the owner was terminally ill.

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And he said, my mum could pick five things from the house, and she fell in love with that painting.

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She adored that painting, so that was one of the things she chose.

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It's a great lot.

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It's known as Pre-Raphaelite, the Pre-Raphaelite style.

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And this is known in the idealised beauty, the delicacy of the hands.

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There's the shroud, its mystery.

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It's taking its influence from an earlier time.

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The cup itself is a classic Etruscan cup,

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and the surface textures, the attention that's been paid to the detail on there, is really super.

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Look at the colours! You've got white, pink, blue, black...

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All just in the hand. Having said all that, no details on who it is, though.

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So, it's a very difficult thing to value.

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I think that should make around £100, something like that, so...

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auctioneer's favourite, £80-£120.

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-Is that all right for you?

-Yeah, that's fine.

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-We just wanted to know the history.

-I've come up and given you the history of absolutely nothing at all.

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I've failed dismally!

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I wish I could tell you. Have you tried to find things out about it?

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Well, it was just hung up on my mum's wall, and I don't live at home, you know,

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because my sister, Bev, she lived at home with my mum,

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so I didn't really pay much attention to it, I must admit.

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All they said to Mum was that it was worth some money. That's all she was told.

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She didn't know anything else.

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Well, I love it. I really do!

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I've got a good feeling about this, but my friends and family always tell me

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I have no taste in art at all - not a good move for an auctioneer, really.

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Whenever I like a painting, it fails to sell.

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But, hopefully...I haven't put the dampeners on this one.

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-So, you don't like it at all?

-No, no.

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-Do you want it back?

-No.

-No.

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-So what happens if somebody offers you a fiver?

-Oh, no, no, more than a fiver.

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A tenner and it's yours.

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A tenner, fine. If you're happy to let it go...

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Yeah, it's not sentimental at all, so, you know.

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-Fine.

-Somebody else will probably fall in love with that.

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-Fair enough. You know?

-80-120, no reserve.

-Yeah.

-Yep.

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Michael, this is looking a bit like D Day here.

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It certainly is, yeah.

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You collected these over years or...?

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Yes, many years when I was a child.

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-I, you know, bought a few pieces and was given a few pieces.

-Right.

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So you'd have bought these, how long ago? These are early '60s?

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-Yes.

-Yes, yes.

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-40 years or more.

-I was buying the same thing at the same time.

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Unlike you, I haven't still got mine.

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-No.

-And you've even got some in boxes.

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-Yes.

-As you now know, of course, this is the key.

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If you and I had known that back in the '60s, we'd have a lot of value, wouldn't we?

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Yeah.

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How much did they all cost?

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Do you remember what sort of money we were paying in those days?

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A few shillings I suppose, were we?

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Yes, well, it's all ranging probably up to about £1.

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-£1 would have been a pretty good one, wouldn't it?

-Yes.

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So you've got all this collection painstakingly got together over the years. Why sell them now?

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Um, well, it's really just...

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..my son isn't really interested in...

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-Is he not?

-No.

-How old's your son?

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-16.

-So if he was going to be, he would have been by now.

-Yes, yeah.

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He's more into more passive...

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Pastimes. Not a bad thing.

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So they're just in a cupboard, and they'll go off to a collector who can really enjoy them.

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-Well, the last time I unwrapped them was 20 years ago.

-Really?!

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-Yes, it was.

-Good grief.

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And prior to that was 1971 when I moved house with my parents.

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-I wrapped them all in a box.

-Amazing.

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Well done for not throwing them away and giving them to somebody.

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Do you have a value in mind for these?

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Well, I was hoping for perhaps £150, £200 as a job lot.

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Yeah, I think they might make a bit more than that.

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I think that's pretty accurate.

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I think you've got in the four boxed ones here, I think you're off to 100 quid, really.

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I would have thought £200-£300 with an estimate. I don't see why not.

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I think 200-300 as an estimate.

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Perhaps reserve 150 as a bottom line.

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-Yes, yes.

-Wouldn't want to sell for any less than that.

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Otherwise you could end up selling them individually or just put them in a box for a few more years.

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-They're never going to be worth any less.

-No.

-No. Well, we'll do that.

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-We'll put them in.

-OK.

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-And history tells me that there are ALWAYS Dinky toy buyers.

-Nice to know.

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Moya, Antony, one very simple word - brilliant!

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Love it. One of the best pieces of silver I have ever seen on Flog It.

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I really love this.

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Rarely do you find such an early piece of silver.

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And to find an early piece of silver that has never been touched,

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in such good condition, is wonderful.

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-Mmm.

-Lovely.

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So tell me, you've had it... Well... HAVE you had it for a while?

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Yes, we've had it for over 45 years, and I believe that it came from my grandfather,

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-who was the Lord Mayor of Manchester, as a matter of fact.

-OK!

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-So we've just had it ever since then.

-Have you done any research into it?

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Well, when I got it, I didn't get any information

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with it, but I did look it up and looked up the hallmarks and so on.

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-OK.

-1737, I believe.

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Yeah, 1737.

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And George Boothby.

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Is that the maker? I haven't even looked yet.

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-Yes.

-Wonderful.

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Good clear mark in the lid.

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-Yes, yes, it is.

-Good maker too.

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Yes. And I don't use this for beer or anything.

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It's just in the display cabinet.

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OK, so you thought you'd bring it along and see what it's worth.

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Yes, yes.

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Well, whenever we're looking at 18th century silver, the most important thing...

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Well, there are several important bits of information for you to gather before you come to a value.

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Authenticity, originality, condition and provenance.

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And whenever we're looking at an 18th century tankard, these were often changed to mugs

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by the lid being taken off, and jugs, by a spout being put on the front,

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and this is known as a chair-back thumb piece

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or an Onslow pattern thumb piece,

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-and that would match the fashion of the day, and it would often match the chair backs of the day.

-Mmm, yes.

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Here on the handle we have the triad mark,

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and this would be, I don't know, "Ethel and Samuel Edmunson."

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So the "E" at the top would be the surname,

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and the "E" and the "S" divided by the star would be the first names.

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That's known as a triad mark.

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When we're coming to date a tankard, the late 17th century tankards started with a flat cover,

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and they were quite low and quite wide,

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and as the 18th century progressed, the silver tankards became slightly narrower and taller and more elegant.

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-What is the reason for the pegs inside?

-Ah, right.

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If you have a look in there, you'll see one, two, three, four, five, six.

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Six levels divided by five pegs, and the idea was,

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you would fill that with beer, you would take a swig,

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and if you're doing your neighbour down, you would pass it along,

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and they would have a peg as well. These were known as pegs down the inside.

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Of course, if you took more than one peg, you'd taken your neighbour down a peg or two.

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-Ooh, isn't that nice!

-The origin of that.

-I didn't know.

-That's something different.

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It's a wonderful thing.

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The reason it's a tankard and not a mug, a tankard has a cover and a mug doesn't.

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And the idea for a cover was to stop anybody drugging your drink.

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-Oh!

-So, if you can imagine in the 18th century,

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instead of being worried about date raping, the worry was being press-ganged.

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And all these guys came off ship on to shore. They were short of men to work onboard boats,

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so what they would do, is they would drug your beer

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and you would get a whack over the head, get carted onboard ship,

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and you'd be off... and a seaman, whoever.

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So, why, after having it for 40 years,

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do you bring it along to Flog It and say it's time to go?

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Well, I used to collect English antique silver,

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and children don't seem to want that any more now, so there's no point in keeping it forever.

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So, if the opportunity for selling it comes along, I'll sell it.

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Fantastic!

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Well, I think it's going to do very well.

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There are lots of collectors who would go for it.

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The condition is fantastic.

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It's a lovely-looking thing, and I think we ought to put an estimate of...

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-..£1,500 to £2,500.

-Really?!

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-Yeah.

-Golly!

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-Is that all right?

-Marvellous.

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It's a fantastic object. I would absolutely love that!

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-Very jealous!

-Good.

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Now, are you an avid collector?

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Well, if the answer is yes, then stay tuned to us right now

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because today we're at Snowshill Manor, the creation of one man.

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He was an architect, a craftsman, poet and an avid collector, and his name...Charles Wade.

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Charles' collecting fever started at the age of seven

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when he was sent to live with his grandmother in Great Yarmouth.

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In her drawing room was a Chinese cabinet stuffed full

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of exotic objects that young Charles found endlessly fascinating.

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And this is it.

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The very cabinet that Charles' grandmother would open

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just one day a week on a Sunday so the contents could be examined and, of course, held

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because that's what it's all about, and that's what inspired the young lad to start collecting curios.

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But, obviously, on a much vaster scale here at Snowshill.

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He started by spending his pocket money on the odd thing.

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And of course, with an ever-increasing budget, the collecting just never stopped!

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House manager Jennifer Rowley is going to show me around the rest of this extraordinary collection.

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-Oh, how lovely! Look at that! A collage of musical instruments.

-Yes, they're lovely, aren't they?

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Beautiful. What's that one shaped like a serpent?

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It is. It's called a serpent, actually, yes.

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We've got some lovely Irish harps here.

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'What a wonderful display!

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'But there's so much to see here, we better move on...

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'..to something rather unexpected!'

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Oh, my gosh. Look at this!

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I'm surrounded by Japanese samurai.

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Where did Charles buy all of this from?

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Well, the majority of items in the collection were actually bought in this country,

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and this includes the samurai armour.

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He found some of the suits in a plumber's shop in Cheltenham when he went to buy a washer.

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Some came from Cheshire, and some were found in a dusty heap in a cellar off the Charing Cross Road.

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And they were arranged to give the impression of warriors meeting

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in the gloom with all their weapons and banners.

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Well, I've certainly been transformed to the Orient, that's for sure!

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And now for something completely different.

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You can see why this area is called 100 Wheels.

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Once used as a granary, it now houses Charles' enormous collection of bicycles,

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and I wonder how many he tried out.

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Hmm. They all look a bit uncomfortable to me!

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Oh, this is a lovely little room. It's full of children's toys.

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It reminds me of a nursery. Are some of them Charles'?

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Yes, a lot of the toys here did belong to Mr Wade, in particular the pantechnicon here

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which was used to transport furniture between the two dolls' houses,

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so it was played with by Mr Wade and his sisters.

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-What a lovely story!

-Yes.

-I like that, the Noah's Ark.

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Yes, it's great, isn't it?

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But unfortunately, you have to be very careful because if you knock one animal, they all go down.

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-A domino effect?

-Yes, definitely. And we've got

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the lovely Georgian-style doll's house over here which belonged to Mr Wade's grandmother.

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The room is called "Seventh Heaven." Why is that?

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Well, Mr Wade thought that Seventh Heaven was something that could only be attained before schoolmasters

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and schools took away the greatest of treasures, which was imagination.

0:19:310:19:35

-Ah!

-Hence the name.

-They don't make toys like this any more.

0:19:350:19:38

No, they don't. They don't. A real shame, I think.

0:19:380:19:41

Charles Wade decided that the manor was the best place to show off

0:19:440:19:47

his vast collection of more than 22,000 items.

0:19:470:19:52

So he created a home for himself in the priest's house,

0:19:520:19:55

a modest cottage in the garden just a few yards away from the manor.

0:19:550:19:59

As you can see, it's cosy, isn't it?

0:20:020:20:06

Proper bachelor's pad. It's so masculine.

0:20:060:20:09

There's nothing feminine about this place at all or indeed the manor.

0:20:090:20:13

And this chair is where Charles would have sat on many an evening

0:20:130:20:17

by the fire, keeping warm and listening

0:20:170:20:20

to great classics on the wireless such as Much-Binding-In-The-Marsh.

0:20:200:20:25

And, as you can see, the collecting certainly spilled over from the manor house into here.

0:20:250:20:29

Every room was candlelit. There was no electricity in the village at the time,

0:20:290:20:33

and I think, to add a little bit of comfort and domesticity to the place,

0:20:330:20:37

this little wooden cat certainly did the trick.

0:20:370:20:40

But life was about to change for Charles forever.

0:20:400:20:45

One day, a visitor to Snowshill got lost, looking for the gardens.

0:20:450:20:50

One evening in 1946, a young woman lost her way,

0:20:510:20:56

knocked on the door of the priest's house and was invited in.

0:20:560:21:00

For the solitary collector, aged 63, romance had arrived!

0:21:000:21:04

That very same year, Charles and Mary married,

0:21:060:21:09

and they later moved abroad to a more sunny climate - St Kitts.

0:21:090:21:14

Although Charles was living overseas, he still maintained

0:21:140:21:17

a lively interest in the manor and, of course, its contents.

0:21:170:21:20

After a brief visit in 1956 to the house, by then in the hands of the National Trust,

0:21:200:21:26

Charles sadly, and peacefully, passed away, and he's buried right next to his mother

0:21:260:21:31

and his sisters here in a local churchyard.

0:21:310:21:34

There was an impressive turnout at our valuation day in the splendid Cheltenham Town Hall.

0:21:400:21:45

Let's hope the buyers are equally impressed with what we're taking with us to auction.

0:21:450:21:50

I wonder if they'll sniff out the quality of John's rather special George III snuffbox.

0:21:520:21:57

James loved Bev and Chrissie's painting.

0:22:000:22:02

What a pity that the artist is as much of a mystery as the woman he painted.

0:22:020:22:07

Out of the mothballs and into the auction room for Michael's fantastic collection of boys' toys.

0:22:080:22:14

I hope the damage doesn't affect the price.

0:22:140:22:17

And finally, Antony and Moya's wonderful tankard.

0:22:180:22:22

What a find, James!

0:22:220:22:24

We've certainly found some cracking items and we've all had time to reflect on their values.

0:22:280:22:33

But now it's the time to put them to the test.

0:22:330:22:36

For our sale today, we're in Cirencester at the Cotswold Auction Company.

0:22:360:22:40

Right now, we're just about to flog a complete army.

0:22:470:22:50

-Well, it's your army, isn't it, Michael?

-It is.

-The Dinky toy army.

0:22:500:22:53

A massive collection that you've collected from the '60s. I think Charlie's right on the money here.

0:22:530:22:58

It's about right. I had all these as a child.

0:22:580:23:01

My mother gave them all away.

0:23:010:23:03

I never kept the boxes.

0:23:030:23:05

I was naughty, really bad. Lots of memories here.

0:23:050:23:08

Most definitely, yes, yeah.

0:23:080:23:10

Again collected as a small child and into my early teens.

0:23:100:23:13

Then they went into a box and they've been there ever since.

0:23:130:23:16

At least you had the sense to keep them in a box. I didn't.

0:23:160:23:19

-No.

-Good luck, both of you.

0:23:190:23:20

-It's going under the hammer now.

-265.

0:23:200:23:25

Quantity Dinky toys.

0:23:250:23:27

Start me at 100. At 110.

0:23:270:23:29

120. 130. 140. 150. 160. At 170.

0:23:290:23:36

180, 190, 200, 210.

0:23:360:23:39

220. At 220 right at the back.

0:23:390:23:42

At 220, any advance? At 220, then.

0:23:420:23:46

For the last time at 220.

0:23:460:23:48

Yes, 220!

0:23:480:23:50

-Not bad.

-That'll do.

-That'll do, won't it?

-Yeah.

0:23:500:23:52

We won the battle there.

0:23:520:23:55

Something for you fine art lovers.

0:24:040:24:06

It's an oil painting in the Pre-Raphaelite style, and it belongs to Bev and Chrissie.

0:24:060:24:11

We don't have Chrissie, but we've got Bev. So where's Chrissie today?

0:24:110:24:15

One of her children is not very well, so she had to stay at home.

0:24:150:24:18

Looking after them. Oh! I hope they get well soon, OK?

0:24:180:24:20

And I hope we get the top end of James' estimate, don't you?

0:24:200:24:23

-Yes. Definitely.

-We've got 80-120 on this.

0:24:230:24:25

It's a pre-Raphaelite style. It looks the part.

0:24:250:24:27

It does. It really looks the part.

0:24:270:24:29

I couldn't find ANY trace at all about the artist,

0:24:290:24:32

and, at the auction room here, they haven't been able to find out anything,

0:24:320:24:35

and I've put the feelers about for the last few weeks

0:24:350:24:38

and I still haven't been able to find out anything about the artist either. So...

0:24:380:24:42

OK. It's going under the hammer.

0:24:420:24:44

Ready, Bev? This is it.

0:24:440:24:46

Our pre-Raphaelite lady.

0:24:460:24:49

We'll start the bidding at 50. 5. 60. 5. 70. 5. 80. 5.

0:24:490:24:54

At 85 now. 90. 5. 100. 105.

0:24:540:24:59

At 105... All done. Going at 105.

0:24:590:25:03

That's a sold sound!

0:25:040:25:05

That's a big booming sold sound.

0:25:050:25:07

£105.

0:25:070:25:09

Good estimate. Good estimate. Spot on!

0:25:090:25:11

Next up, the Georgian snuffbox with the ivory top belonging to John,

0:25:170:25:20

who is on his way to the dentist, aren't you?

0:25:200:25:23

-Thank you, yes, very kind.

-Going to have a couple of crowns put in.

-I needed that!

0:25:230:25:27

-Well, you need the money to pay for it.

-I do.

0:25:270:25:29

I'm looking at £100-£200 for the snuffbox. I hope we get the top end.

0:25:290:25:32

-It's quality.

-It's a nice thing, and I would have thought a very collectable thing.

0:25:320:25:37

-Fingers crossed.

-Yeah.

0:25:370:25:39

Well, we're going to find out right now. This is it.

0:25:390:25:42

414 is the Georgian silver oval snuffbox.

0:25:420:25:46

-Let's start the bidding at 100. At 100. At 110. 120.

-Ooh!

0:25:460:25:50

That's good. We've sold it.

0:25:500:25:53

At 130, at 140.

0:25:530:25:55

140. 150? 160. 170. 180. 190...

0:25:550:26:00

-Oh, God, John!

-210, commission bid.

0:26:000:26:04

220. At 220 in the room now. 240.

0:26:040:26:07

260. 280.

0:26:070:26:09

At 280? 300.

0:26:090:26:12

Serious case of undervaluation.

0:26:120:26:14

300...

0:26:140:26:16

At 300, then. We're all done at £300.

0:26:160:26:19

Wow, they loved it, £300!

0:26:190:26:22

The hammer has gone down.

0:26:220:26:23

That will make going to the dentist a little less painful.

0:26:230:26:26

Thank you. Yes, it will.

0:26:260:26:28

The annoying thing about the dentist is you've got to pay to have all of that pain done.

0:26:280:26:32

-That's the annoying thing about it! It really is!

-Hurts so much...

0:26:320:26:36

And then you've got to pay for it.

0:26:360:26:38

-At that price, they're going to be platinum teeth, aren't they? Diamond studded.

-Ooh, how awful!

0:26:380:26:44

Right. Next up, the moment I've been waiting for.

0:26:480:26:50

It's that wonderful silver tankard.

0:26:500:26:52

The pegged tankard belonging to Antony and Moya.

0:26:520:26:56

They've gone back home to the Philippines.

0:26:560:26:59

James is with us, who put the value on at £1,500 to £2,000.

0:26:590:27:02

-But we've got daughters...

-Tara.

0:27:020:27:04

-And?

-Karen.

-With us. Two beautiful daughters.

0:27:040:27:07

Now, this is really your family inheritance, isn't it?

0:27:070:27:10

We're flogging it. Anyway, it's going under the hammer right now.

0:27:100:27:13

Lot 426 is the interesting and lovely 18th century silver tankard

0:27:130:27:18

showing here. Thank you very much.

0:27:180:27:21

At £1,000 I have. At 1,000.

0:27:210:27:24

And 50. 1,100. And 50. 1,150. 1,200.

0:27:240:27:29

1,250 on the phone? 1,250. 1,300.

0:27:290:27:33

-1,350. 1,400.

-Come on!

0:27:330:27:37

1,450. 1,500 on the phone.

0:27:370:27:39

At 1,500 on the phone. All done?

0:27:390:27:41

I'm selling on the phone, £1,500.

0:27:410:27:44

-Was that 15?

-It's gone.

0:27:440:27:46

It's gone, £1,500 on the phone. You're happy, aren't you?

0:27:460:27:49

-You didn't like it.

-Yes, I'm happy.

0:27:490:27:51

-I think I'll be happier.

-Yeah.

0:27:510:27:53

-Will Mum and Dad be happy?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

0:27:530:27:55

Well, as you can see, the sale is still going on behind me down on the auction room floor.

0:28:010:28:06

It's been a hectic and very busy day.

0:28:060:28:08

We've had our ups and downs, but on the whole, everybody's gone home happy,

0:28:080:28:12

and I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:28:120:28:14

So, from Cirencester until the next time, it's cheerio!

0:28:140:28:18

For more information about Flog It, including how the programme was made,

0:28:240:28:29

visit the website at bbc.co.uk/lifestyle

0:28:290:28:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:28:330:28:36

E-mail [email protected]

0:28:360:28:38

Paul Martin and the team are in elegant Georgian Cheltenham. Experts Charles Ross and James Lewis value the local antiques while Paul visits nearby Snowshill Manor, where he discovers a most extraordinary collection of artefacts.