Winchester Flog It!


Winchester

The team travels to Winchester. Charlie Ross and Michael Baggott provide expert valuations, while presenter Paul Martin has a look at the largest tapestry in the UK.


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Transcript


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This magnificent cathedral dominates the oldest capital in England.

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Welcome to Flog It from Winchester.

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In 70AD, the Romans built a fortified city here

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and it's so typically Romanesque

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with its streets in grid fashion and a forum right in the middle.

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Today it's a refined, wealthy city, renowned for its shopping and its works of art.

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So hopefully we can't go far wrong for our valuation day here at the guild hall.

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I can't wait to get this massive queue inside.

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Charlie Ross and Michael Baggett are already hard at work and there are a few surprises in store.

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Sheila and Peter, this is a grotty old album.

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-I hope there's something better inside.

-Yes.

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Unfortunately, my mother accidentally knocked over a candle and burned her bungalow.

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To the ground?!

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Yes, sort of.

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-And I had the task of clearing out what was left. And I found this.

-You found that?

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I'm going to open it up. Postcards - who collected these?

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-My grandmother. My father's mother.

-Are they all written on?

-No.

-They haven't been used at all.

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-Straight into the album.

-Yes.

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I like the fact they're black and white. Good portrait black and white photographs are better than colour.

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I've marked one or two favourites.

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Anna Neagle I remember seeing on the stage in the West End in about 1968.

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-That dates me.

-Yes!

-Pretty. Noel Coward - love Noel Coward.

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Have you seen all these films?

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-No.

-No, no. Bette Davis.

-She was wonderful.

-Yeah.

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-How many are there?

-118.

-118?

-Yes.

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-So what have you been doing with them all?

-They sit in the cupboard.

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-What made you bring them today?

-I've just moved in with Peter this week.

-Have you?

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-This week?!

-Yes.

-Congratulations.

-Thank you.

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-And that came out of one of the boxes.

-Really? You think they might have a bit of value?

-I hope so.

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-Any ideas?

-I haven't a clue.

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I think they're worth about...

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50p a card.

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So you're looking at an album there of value £60-£100, I'd have thought, to a collector.

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I would recommend a reserve of 60, with a bit of auctioneer's discretion.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

-Jolly good.

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Come along to the auction and we'll see who's buying these.

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Clive, I spied you in the queue with a box with just the neck of that poking out and I pounced.

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-It's a wonderful bottle. Are you a bottle collector?

-No.

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Just anything that catches my eye.

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-And where do you look for these?

-Car boot sale.

-The car boot sale again.

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I have gone round a few and never found anything as interesting as this. Was it expensive?

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-They can be quite pricey.

-I paid £3.

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£3. Right, right. Did you have any idea what it was?

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-Yes.

-What do you think it is?

-I think it's an onion bottle.

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What it is is an early wine bottle and they vary in shape and form and designs.

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The very earliest ones are rather rounded with a flatter base.

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They look basically like an onion. So they are the onion bottles.

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-It isn't, unfortunately, as early as some of them are. Any idea of the date?

-18th century,

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but I'm not too sure.

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With this shouldering here and this applied rim,

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it's anywhere from about 1720 up to about 1740,

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1750. And, basically, these things have been dated

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because often they'll have seals on with the date.

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It's amazing they survive. You know quite a bit about them.

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-Any idea of the value of it?

-Em, I'm not too sure, really.

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-I know some with a date can be very expensive.

-Absolutely. Some with a seal are £1,000-£1,500.

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In this case, because it's 18th century and not 17th century,

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and it's a fairly standard type,

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it's more going to be in the region of about £60-£100.

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It's a bottle to start a collection.

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-Still a very good return on £3!

-Yes, very good.

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We'd put a little discretion on the lower estimate, say, a reserve of £45.

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-But it could exceed my expectations if we get two collectors.

-Hope so.

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Liz, you've brought along two of the Cries of London, I think.

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Cherries and we'll come to the other one in a minute. Something's wrong with the caption on the other one.

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-Can you tell me about them?

-They belong to my mother-in-law.

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She was given them by Mr Copeland.

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-By Mr Copeland?

-Indeed.

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Because her father-in-law was coachman to the Copelands.

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How fantastic. When?

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-In the early 1900s.

-In the early 1900s. Yes.

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Then the family actually farmed on the estate in Cornwall.

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That's when Mr Copeland gave the figures to my mother-in-law.

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Sounds like it would be around 1920.

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One of them has got the inscription... There we are.

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"Spode. Copeland's China, England."

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And here, as we were saying, "Cries of London after Francis Wheatley",

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who was an 18th-century artist. Royal Academy. He did a series of paintings

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from which people have done a lot of coloured engravings.

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Copeland and Doulton and others have made figures of the series.

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Ripe strawberries, cherries, all sorts of things.

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I always thought it was, "Milk-o! Milk-o!"

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This one says, "Milk below!"

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I think there's something wrong there. I've never seen one of these with "Milk below!"

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Why you'd be tipping milk out of a window I do not know.

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I think whoever modelled that just overheard, "Milk...something or other,"

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-and put, "Milk below!"

-Right.

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I think that's a wrong caption, which makes it quite charming. You don't like them?

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-My mother-in-law is afraid that she might break them.

-Is she?

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-She's happy for them to be sold.

-She does know you brought them?

-Yes.

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I phoned her, just to make sure!

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You've had her blessing. Did she say, "Oh, sell them if they're worth X, Y or Z"?

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-Yes, she did. £50.

-£50. I think they're worth that each.

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-She will be pleased.

-You can tell her that.

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I think they are worth £110, £120 the pair,

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into three figures.

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These are pretty collectable and I do like the inscription.

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OK, super. Thank you very much.

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-Whose collection is this? What are your names?

-Claire.

-Rob.

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-Whose are they?

-They were my granddad's.

-You've inherited them?

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He sadly passed away last year. They used to be all on display in the flat that they lived in.

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-Lots of dusting!

-Yes. I think my nan was not happy with the dusting,

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-so she was thinking about tipping them down the sink!

-I see little bottles of Guinness.

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They're worth £20-£30 each.

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But the value here is in the bottles of single malt.

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Single malt is expensive anyway.

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There's quite a few of those.

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The rest you'll struggle to get 30p or 40p for.

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Nevertheless, it's a fantastic collection.

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-Have you thought about what you'll do with it?

-No, we haven't.

-Drink it!

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-Has anyone got any glasses?

-We considered it while we were waiting.

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-Granddad was a big fan.

-He liked a tipple for "medicinal purposes".

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-I don't blame you. Thanks for coming in.

-Thank you.

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Nicky, it's fair to say that my eyes popped out of my head

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when you opened your little box in the queue

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and I saw this magnificent watch. What can you tell me?

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I know practically nothing about it. It belonged to my grandmother and probably her parents.

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-I know nothing about it.

-It's been in the family.

-Yes.

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-Has it ever been worn or used?

-No.

-What I'll do, to get a better look at the watch first,

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is if I take it off here...

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We've got this beautiful gold case set with half-pearls

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all the way round the bezel on blue and white enamel. Quite fantastic.

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-And look at the back of it!

-That's what I love.

-That's stunning.

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It's an English watch, but a very French and Swiss technique,

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which they developed in about 1750, 1765, of engine turning.

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You get a piece of metal, you turn it in a jig and it gets a rather fine and intricate pattern.

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Then you flood it over with clear enamel, in this case blue. And you see all the working underneath.

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The real joy of it... should be...

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when we get it open. There we go. That's the cover open.

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There should be another snib here. There we go.

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-And we've got the movement. Ever seen it?

-No. Never dared.

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Look at the craftsmanship.

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Beautifully pierced. Hopefully, we'll have a maker's name on it.

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Right. Well, they're not watchmakers, but it's a good name.

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It's Rundell and Bridge, goldsmiths to George IV.

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They actually provided most of the regalia for his coronation.

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They provided all the diamonds for his crown and their heyday was

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around...1810 to about 1820, 1825.

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And it's fantastic. The fact that it is Rundell and Bridge, not Rundell, Bridge and Rundell,

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dates it to about 1810, 1815.

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The only disappointing feature is no full set of hallmarks.

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I tried to look for the hallmarks. I thought it might be on this.

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Well, we've got a little lion passant, which you've got here on the bezel and on the back.

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-This is, I'm happy to say, 18 carat.

-Oh! Sounds all right.

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If we close that up, the only flaw with this is the lack of the minute hand!

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Not terribly useful like that, but otherwise in lovely condition.

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This, because it had the rigours of wear, is base metal,

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which is gilded. But all of this work again is in gold.

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Beautiful blue engine-turned enamel. I think this little fob here is original to it.

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-We've got the blue and the white.

-And that's the key?

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Yes. And in period with 1810, 1820. Cast gilt scrolls and roses.

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Really super thing. Right, any idea of what it's worth?

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No, I'm here for you to tell me. I've always just admired it.

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I think it's a stunning watch. If I were a watch collector and I saw that at an auction,

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I'd want to own it. So I think, for the purpose of the auction, we'll put...

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£600-£800 on it.

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A fixed reserve of £600.

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And hopefully, if two people get behind it, we'll do very much more.

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-If you're happy with that...

-A few telephone bids!

-From London and New York!

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I watch your programme practically every day.

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-That would be thrilling.

-We'll pop it into auction and see how it goes.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Well, I'm escaping the crowds and going to see what cultural treasures the city has to offer.

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You've got to keep your eyes open here. Winchester has a refreshingly modern outlook.

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The civic powers are really tuned in to contemporary art.

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Amongst the city's old buildings, there's plenty of visual surprises.

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For instance, you may not expect to see something as modern and contemporary as this

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situated right by the city's 11th-century cathedral.

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Or this bronze statue which is situated underneath a canopy of green foliage

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on a very busy high street.

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These two works of art are nearly 100 years apart.

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The statue behind me on this side of King Alfred was put up in 1901.

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On this side, that sundial was commissioned to mark the new millennium.

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So it's no surprise, really, to find out that the local county council

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have commissioned the largest embroidery to go on public display in the UK

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and it's being made in Winchester by internationally-renowned textile artist Alice Kettle.

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Alice, this is such a vast explosion of colour. I can't grasp the scale.

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-What size is it?

-It's 16.5 metres by 3 metres.

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Possibly the largest machine embroidery in the world, but that's arguable!

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-It's very big.

-I think it is.

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When it's on the wall, you can stand back and appreciate it. Has it got a title yet?

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-We're inviting the public to make suggestions.

-Good idea!

-So we might discover a title for it.

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-So where did the inspiration come from?

-It's about Winchester.

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It's going to be located in the new discovery centre, the library.

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So I've tried to reflect aspects of Winchester.

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You've taken inspiration from Winchester itself - buildings, sculptures...

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-I looked at the Winchester Bible, a remarkable treasure.

-12th century.

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-It's in the cathedral.

-The colours remind me of the illuminations.

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The vivid blues, ultramarine, gold.

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-Exactly.

-You've captured those hues.

-That's exactly what it refers to,

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although I've used the colours as a sweep across.

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Can you explain a little about the technique you use?

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It's machine embroidery. Normally I use one machine. I'm using seven different types!

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The easiest way to describe it is if you've got a fixed pencil

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and you move the paper underneath to do a drawing.

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I'm doing the same with a sewing machine. I've got a needle and I've removed the foot.

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I can move the fabric in any direction.

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I've got four helpers. I've trained them, so they've had to learn my technique and interpret it.

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I've also go a computerised sewing machine, which is very different.

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It sews out independently.

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Has it gone the way you wanted it or has it led you in some places?

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It's very much led me because of the scale and the technical challenges along the way.

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-You've had to adapt?

-Completely. It's testing things out as I do the making process.

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I wanted the whole thing to be very glowing and lustrous.

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-It's got metallic thread throughout.

-Lots of golds.

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-Yes, yes.

-How do you work on such a vast scale?

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-Do you work from smaller drawings and size them up?

-As it's a public commission, I had to do a design.

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-I did a small watercolour painting.

-Did that go to a committee?

-Yes.

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Although they were very positive and they had no changes that they wanted to make.

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To have a commission on this scale in textiles is truly remarkable.

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-So I'm very proud and very lucky.

-Well, good luck with this.

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-Thank you.

-I'll come and see it when it's in the new building.

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-Then I can really appreciate it.

-Thank you.

-Thank YOU.

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The people of Winchester turned out in droves for our valuation day

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but now we're off to auction with all our treasures.

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Charlie uncovered these glamorous postcards of movie stars, but will they shine at the auction?

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Michael's nose led him to this 18th-century wine bottle, which Clive found at a car boot sale.

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I think it will make a healthy profit.

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Fingers crossed, Liz's two spode fetch a good price, as they belong to her 92-year-old mother-in-law.

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And Nicky's beautiful enamelled watch is a unique time piece.

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I think this will be the one to watch at auction.

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Today we're the guests of Andrew Smith and Son just outside Winchester.

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Before the auction starts, one item has caught Andrew's eye.

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It belongs to Nicky. Michael did the valuation.

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He's put £600-£800 on this watch,

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but look what you get with it.

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-And I like the enamel work.

-And the pearl around the edge.

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-We've been getting a lot of interest in this.

-Have you?

-This one will quite exceed expectations

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-by quite a big amount.

-Can you let us in on a little inside knowledge?

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Auctioneers have the knowledge before the sales start, Andrew.

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We haven't had enough interest to categorically say, but we think well in excess of £1,000.

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Well in excess of £1,000. I can't wait to see this go under the hammer. Don't go away.

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-Andrew's going to weave his magic with the aid of...who's this?

-This is Ted.

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Ted, the new porter! Good luck. I can't wait to see this one fly.

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Sharing the rostrum with Andrew today is Nick Jarrett.

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First some film memorabilia from Peter and Sheila.

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Some big stars there. We've got a valuation from Charlie of £60-£100.

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-Reserve 60.

-Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Clark Gable.

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-Let's hope we get that top end!

-I've got to treat him for his birthday!

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-Is it his birthday?

-Soon.

-75.

-He doesn't look it.

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-4 o'clock in the morning I start work and I finish at 4 in the afternoon.

-What do you do?

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I work on the roads, doing lining and things.

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-Still at the age of 75?

-Yes.

-Crikey.

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-We both work.

-Six days a week.

-Keeps you fit, doesn't it?

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And he makes waistcoats.

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Well, good luck, everybody. It's going under the hammer now.

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The album of portrait cards of film stars. Good names in there.

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To clear bids, I'll start you here at £80.

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-Goodie!

-Mid-estimate. Straight in.

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85? It's with me at 80.

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Anybody else? £80. I'll sell it for that.

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Done at 80?

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-Blink and you'd miss that one! £80, straight in.

-Brilliant.

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-You're going to party with that!

-Not half!

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I love this next lot. It's not a lot of money, but it's a bargain from a car boot sale.

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-And it was found by Clive. How much?

-£3.

-£3 for this 18th-century wine bottle.

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If this had a date on it, we'd be looking at £600.

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Nevertheless, £60-£80 is a good bargain.

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What a buy! A bottle that's been around for nearly 300 years for £60.

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Well, good luck. This is it.

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This is the 18th-century dark green glass bottle in onion form.

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We have a commission bid and a number of telephones.

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Good grief! What have I done?

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So, starting at £50. Is there 5 in the room?

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At £50. Is there 5?

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55. 60. And 5.

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Commission bid 65. Is there 70? 70. And 5.

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80. And 5.

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90? At £85 in the centre. Is there 90?

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And 90. And 5.

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100. 100. And 10.

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-120.

-This is more like it. It's a nice sculptural piece.

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160. 170.

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-180. 190.

-"Come and buy me!"

-It was!

-200. 220. 240.

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260? £240 and selling.

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260? 260.

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-Another bidder. They love it!

-320.

0:23:070:23:10

340. 360. 380.

0:23:100:23:13

-400?

-Oh, Clive, you're going to be over the moon with this!

0:23:130:23:18

He's shaking!

0:23:180:23:20

At £380, then. Is there any more?

0:23:200:23:22

At £380.

0:23:220:23:24

At £380 for the last time.

0:23:240:23:28

-Something for the purists and the academics.

-When's your next car boot sale?

-Sunday.

-Right!

0:23:290:23:35

That's not bad, is it? £3 turned into £380.

0:23:350:23:39

I'm rich!

0:23:390:23:41

We've got two beautiful Spode figures belonging to Liz.

0:23:440:23:49

Why aren't you keeping these in the family? It's where they belong.

0:23:490:23:54

-Well, they were tucked away in a cupboard

-Forgotten about.

-Mother always knew they were there,

0:23:540:24:00

but she's afraid that at 93 she might chip them.

0:24:000:24:04

We have no room for them and my daughters don't want them,

0:24:040:24:09

so somebody else should enjoy them.

0:24:090:24:12

-The old story. The next generation don't want them. No point in leaving them up in the loft.

-No.

0:24:120:24:19

They've got to go and they're going right now.

0:24:190:24:23

Two Spode figures here. "Milk below!" and "Cherries!"

0:24:230:24:27

Start me at 120? £100, then?

0:24:270:24:30

£100? £80 to get it going? £80?

0:24:300:24:34

Thank you. And 5. 85.

0:24:340:24:37

-90. And 5. 100.

-We're in!

-And 5. 110.

0:24:370:24:43

115. 120?

0:24:430:24:44

£115 and selling. At £115. Any more?

0:24:440:24:49

All done at £115?

0:24:490:24:51

-For the last time.

-Yes!

0:24:510:24:54

-£115. The hammer's gone down. That's excellent.

-It is.

0:24:540:24:58

-You've got to get down to Cornwall now to treat Mum.

-That's it.

0:24:580:25:04

Time is up for Nicky's gold pocket watch. It is a real gem.

0:25:070:25:12

Nicky, we're looking at £600-£800. Who have you brought along?

0:25:120:25:17

-My husband Mark. We've been married 52 years.

-52 years! Hello. Pleased to meet you.

0:25:170:25:23

-And they can't be separated.

-No.

-It's a great moment for you both.

0:25:230:25:28

Such quality. It's not just the watch, but it's the seals, the fob, everything that goes with it.

0:25:280:25:34

My eyes popped out of my head! It's a fantastic, top quality item that I wish we saw more of!

0:25:340:25:40

We mused over this with the auctioneer earlier on.

0:25:400:25:44

He seems to think it could do your top end plus a little bit more.

0:25:440:25:49

-We could be looking at £1,000.

-Four figures.

-Four figures.

0:25:490:25:53

Four figures! Tell me, why are you selling this?

0:25:530:25:58

It's your inheritance. It's been in the family a long time.

0:25:580:26:03

I'm keeping it quiet from the others.

0:26:030:26:05

It's time to say goodbye to it. It's going under the hammer now. Good luck.

0:26:070:26:12

This is the lever escapement watch and we have two telephones.

0:26:120:26:18

Telephone bids! Two!

0:26:180:26:21

I'm going to start the bidding at £900.

0:26:210:26:25

-Is there 50 in the room? At £900.

-It will go on now.

-Michael, you were right.

0:26:250:26:31

950. 1,000. And 50.

0:26:310:26:34

-They love it.

-1,100. And 50.

0:26:350:26:38

1,200. And 50.

0:26:390:26:41

1,300. And 50.

0:26:420:26:44

1,400. And 50.

0:26:460:26:49

1,500. And 50?

0:26:500:26:53

-At £1,500.

-Another "Come and buy me".

-1,600.

0:26:550:27:00

1,700. 1,800.

0:27:000:27:03

1,900. 2,000. 2,100.

0:27:030:27:07

Commission bids out. 2,100 in the room. Is there 2,200?

0:27:070:27:11

At £2,100 and selling. Is there 2,200?

0:27:110:27:15

At £2,100, then. For the last time.

0:27:150:27:19

-That's a sold sound!

-Wow.

-£2,100, Nicky.

0:27:190:27:25

I told you my eyes popped out of my head. They're rarely wrong.

0:27:250:27:30

-Wow! What will you put it towards?

-I was going to spend it in Sicily. We go there at the end of June.

0:27:300:27:37

-But I don't know.

-Put it in the bank.

-That's it!

0:27:370:27:42

-Gosh.

-It can earn some money.

0:27:420:27:45

It's all over for our owners. The auction has just finished

0:27:500:27:55

and they are paying for their lots.

0:27:550:27:58

We've had a cracking day here just outside Winchester.

0:27:580:28:02

We've had some big smiles as well, and some big surprises.

0:28:020:28:06

I hope you've enjoyed the show. Join me next time for plenty more.

0:28:060:28:10

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2007

0:28:220:28:26

Email us at [email protected]

0:28:260:28:30

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