Hartlepool Flog It!


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Hartlepool

The people of Hartlepool are queuing up to have their treasures valued by experts David Barby and Philip Serrell. Presenter Paul Martin explores a very special ship.


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Today we're in Hartlepool on the north-east coast of England.

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It started life as a fishing village on the Yough, a small limestone headland jutting into the North Sea.

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In later years, Hartlepool became a very important port and shipbuilding centre.

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The batteries you can see there were built in the wake of the Napoleonic War to protect the town

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from attack from the sea.

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Fortunately, we live in a time of peace, but we will be going into battle in the auction room

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with some of the very best antiques that our experts have found here.

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Leading the Flog It campaign are David Barby and Philip Serrell.

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-Philip fires the opening salvo.

-How are you doing, June?

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-Very well. How are you?

-Good. It's nice here.

-Absolutely gorgeous.

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-A bit cold.

-Do you live in Hartlepool?

-No.

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I'm from just north of Newcastle.

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-Lots of nice nightlife out there.

-Do I look like I need nightlife?

-Looks like you've had a lot!

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-Sorry!

-I'll let you off. Where has this come from?

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It came from my father-in-law.

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-About 30 years ago there was a village bring and buy sale.

-What did he give for it?

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-He gave 10 shillings. In old money.

-10 bob?

-10 bob, yeah.

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You'd better tell the viewers what 10 bob is. Some won't know.

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It's 50p in today's money.

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-That's right.

-It's worth a lot more today, I think.

-Is it?

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-Yes.

-How do you know that?

-I'm old as well.

-Did you get it valued?

-Yes, we did, actually.

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Oh, help! No pressure here, then(!) Come on.

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The Antiques Roadshow were here about 10 years ago.

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For insurance, they valued it at £800-£900.

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-That's quite a high figure.

-Yes.

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However, a few weeks ago I went to a local auctioneer where I live

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and they said it was worth £30-£40.

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So I can tell you I think this is worth between £30 and £900.

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-I know that!

-It's a really nice thing.

-It is.

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-It's 19th century.

-Is it?

-Yeah. And we've got the clock here.

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It's inscribed. Looks like Barri. I think it's probably French. The auction house will check that.

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And we've got a really lovely barometer with a wheel to change our pointer. Super quality.

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If we just turn the back round, you can just see there what a wonderful movement it is.

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-Should I dust it first?

-No, no. We don't dust our antiquities.

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There's a mystique about finding something that's undiscovered and dusty and murky.

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-There's lots of dirt on that!

-10 bob?

-Yeah, 10 bob.

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-Why do you want to sell it?

-It's just gathering dust in a box. We thought, "Get rid of it."

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And I've lost a lot of weight, so I need some new clothes!

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If you've lost it, I've found it!

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I think, at auction, we'll put a cautious estimate on it of £200-£400. A cautious estimate.

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A fixed reserve of £150 and I think it'll do very well.

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-Really?

-I do.

-That'll get me a few trouser suits!

-On that note, we end!

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Joyce, I don't think there's a programme that goes by, of Flog It,

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that we don't have a piece of Troika. This piece is quite good.

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It's so clean, it's so linear, and I would think this dates probably from

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the sort of mid-1960s, that sort of period. Did you actually acquire it then?

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-Or possibly later?

-Yeah. I bought two of them in 1969.

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-1969, right.

-In St Ives.

-From the shop itself?

-Yeah.

-What was the shop like?

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It wasn't very grand, actually. It was just in a very small building in a lane, in St Ives.

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-Did you go into the potting area and see them working?

-Yes, I can remember seeing a potter working.

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-Goodness me. On the wheel?

-Yes, yes, yeah.

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There was a table with them all on to sell.

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We purchased two of them as gifts to bring home from holiday.

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My word, you were very astute.

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We didn't realise at the time.

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-Looking inside...

-The glaze is really good.

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But right at the bottom there is a very thin little crack in the glaze. Can you see it?

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-Yes.

-That makes me think possibly you might have bought it as a second.

-Right, yes.

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-Did you buy it as a second?

-Yes.

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Because of that glaze fault. Why I like this is because

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it's so in keeping with the St Ives art school. Very clean lines, geometric.

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Almost bordering on Cubism.

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You've got this lovely cylindrical vase with a rough textured finish, which I rather like.

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-It's a very tactile piece.

-Yes.

-I do like these circles all the way round

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in various tones of blue and brown.

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There's a slight indentation here as though it knocked against something and had a little chip,

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which is a shame because this would have realised between £80 and £100.

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With the defect on the outside, it might only realise £40-£60.

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Right.

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Unless there's a collector there who says, "I haven't got that shape, I haven't got that design,"

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And they'll give those extra few pounds. That's the sort of range we're thinking in terms of.

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-Right.

-You're quite happy to part with it?

-Yes.

-All those sentimental memories of St Ives?

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-Swept away!

-The thing is, I don't have modern decor now.

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-Right. Are you more traditional?

-Yes.

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I wouldn't have it on display. And I don't think my family would want it, really.

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-I haven't asked them, but...

-If they object, tell them to come to the auction and bid for it.

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-OK?

-Right.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Dorothy, thank you so much for coming in and bringing me some wood.

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Is it Pandora's box? Is there something frightening in here?

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-You'll have to open it and see.

-There is, isn't there?

-Yes, indeed.

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It's a bit of a horror movie. Here we go.

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Ta-da!

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Look at that! Now that really does put the creeps up you!

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-Just a bit, yes.

-It's a field surgeon's kit.

-Oh, is it?

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Wow. This is definitely early 20th century. I would say this is round about 1910, 1920s.

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It would have been used in WWI.

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-Right.

-Although I'm beginning to think, after looking at it for a few minutes,

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well, I'm hoping it was never used.

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-It's all still very sharp. The tools are very sharp.

-Right.

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And they're very clean. I don't think it's seen a lot of wear.

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-It's not had that wear you'd expect for something from the 1910s, 1920s.

-Right.

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I think this was taken on campaign in WWI, hopefully not used,

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-brought back and put in a cupboard somewhere.

-Yes.

-Forgotten about.

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Until it surfaced with your husband. How did he come across it?

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He got it from a colleague who gave it to him

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because he knew that he would be responsible for this small mortuary.

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-What did he do for a living?

-He was the chief environmental health inspector for Ripon.

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-Would he have used this?

-No. I wouldn't like to think about what they were used for.

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-No.

-Not very nice.

-No, it would give you nightmares!

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-Don't think about it!

-I wouldn't even tell people what I'd brought, in case they were fazed by it!

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-Let's pick up the most obvious one, shall we?

-The most gruesome one.

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This is definitely for amputation, isn't it?

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Oh, dear.

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That is sharp. There's about seven teeth to the inch there. That would rip through anything.

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It's an English maker. It's Allen and Hanbury.

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-It's not the best quality that I've seen or handled.

-No.

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I presume it's all stainless steel so it can be sterilised.

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Yes, and it won't rust.

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Gosh. It does make me feel slightly queasy handling these. Ohh...

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-Not what every house should have!

-But there are a lot of collectors who will be interested in this.

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-What have you done with it for the last few years?

-It was in my husband's office. He passed away.

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It was put in the dining room, but I have grandchildren now.

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-You don't want to let them...

-No. I don't want them to find it.

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-Value - what do you think they're worth?

-I've no idea.

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I would like to put them into the auction with a value of £100-£200.

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-Right.

-Are you happy with that?

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Er, yes, I think so.

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-Can we do that?

-Yes, I would, yes.

-And hopefully we'll get the top end. Shall we flog it?

-Yes, please.

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-You all right, Sheila?

-Yes, thanks.

-This is a bit local.

-Yes, it is.

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-Belonged to my husband.

-You're not from around here?

-No, Wakefield.

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Broad Yorkshire. And proud of it.

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-Your husband was from here?

-Yes. He called himself a Durhamite.

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A Durhamite? I love this to bits.

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As you go round it, it's got views of Sunderland Bridge, it's got the Royal Tweed Bridge at Berwick,

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the bridge at Newcastle. Just wonderful. All these great scenes.

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This is a transfer print.

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What I love - look at that.

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"North-East Coast Industries Exhibition. Newcastle-on-Tyne. 1929."

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So this is an exhibition piece made for that exhibition in 1929.

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It would be made by the Maling's factory, which originated from this part of the world,

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but what you associate with them is much more in the line of lustre wares and thumb-printed designs.

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I have to say, this is so much nicer. It's almost documentary.

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-So your husband loved this. How did he come by it?

-It's been in his family as long as he remembers.

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And he was born in 1920. As long as he can remember, it's been there,

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-but in cupboards, wrapped up.

-Why do people always do that?

-You're frightened of breaking them.

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-Then you don't enjoy them.

-True.

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-This is something he always loved?

-Yes. He wanted to bring it himself,

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-but he died last year.

-Oh, that's sad.

-So I brought it for him.

-I think it'll be sought after.

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A great bit of social history, local social history.

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-Not worth a fortune.

-No, no.

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My guess is that you estimate that at £30-£50 with a £20 reserve on it.

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-Are you happy for us to put it to auction?

-I am, yes.

-Let's do that.

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So far, so good. The place is absolutely jam-packed and we've found some real gems so far.

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We're going over to the auction room to find out if our experts are on the money. They generally are.

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Yes! While we make our way over, here's a rundown of all the items that will go under the hammer.

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The pressure's on to sell June's barometer and clock. Let's hope it'll be a fine day.

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Now something to remind me of home - Joyce's unusual Troika, bought from the factory in 1969.

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Dorothy is afraid her grandchildren might find this field surgeon's kit and want to play with it,

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so she's decided to flog it. And finally a local item - Sheila's Maling tea caddy,

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sure to get local collectors bidding.

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For our sale today, we've travelled to the Boldon Auction Galleries

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and on the rostrum is Giles Hodges.

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110. 120.

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130. Are we all done?

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Something of local interest now from the Maling factory. A blue and white bowl.

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-£30-£50. It's going to be snapped up, surely.

-I hope so.

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-Why do you want to flog it?

-It's been in a drawer so long. It's time somebody else had it.

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Philip saw it and thought, "Yes." We've seen these before.

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-If it doesn't sell here, it won't sell anywhere.

-True!

-Let's hope local interest carries us through.

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-It has a fixed reserve at £20. We're not giving it away.

-No.

-No.

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Good luck. Fingers crossed. This is it.

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120. The Maling octagonal tea caddy. I'm bid 10 to start it.

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Start it at 10. 15. 20.

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25. Middle of the room. At 25. 30 now?

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At £25, are we all done?

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£25.

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-30. Just in time. Front row.

-Got to get your hand up quick.

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£35. Back to the second row. At £35.

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-Hammer's gone down. It's sold.

-Yes.

-£35. That's not bad.

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It's a good price, really. It's just really a simple object, isn't it?

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That's lunch out. Going to treat yourself to lunch?

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-I'm buying something for the caravan.

-Do you go caravan holidaying?

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-At my own caravan, yes.

-Where do you go?

-Redcar. All my sons and grandsons are up there.

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What will you buy for the caravan?

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Oh, I don't know. A gas bottle!

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I've just been joined by Joyce and we're flogging something from Cornwall. You've got one guess.

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-Troika.

-Yes. It has to be, doesn't it? A lovely little vase.

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There's a bit of damage on it, the textured version. £40-£60.

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-That's what David put on it. You had a lovely holiday in Cornwall. Have you been back since?

-Yes, twice.

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-You love St Ives?

-I do, yes.

-It's gorgeous. Will you go back again?

-Yes.

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I like this pot, actually. Unusual design.

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Concentric circles all the way round. Away from straight patterns.

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All right. Coming up right now.

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A Troika cylindrical vase on the pale blue ground.

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And I'm bid 40 straight in.

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At 40. 5. 50.

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5. 60. At 60. 65.

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70. With me at £70. Anybody else in the room?

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At £70, it's a commission bid. All done at 70.

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-Sold.

-Damage did hold it back as it was worth a good 120.

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-That's not bad, is it?

-No. It was 30 shillings.

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I've just been joined by Philip and June, our barometer owner.

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Hopefully we'll turn 50p - or should I say 10 shillings, which is what it was 30-odd years ago -

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into £200-£400, Philip's valuation.

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This is a lovely instrument. I hope the people see the virtue in it and we get the top end. Yeah?

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-Fingers crossed.

-Pressure's on. Temperature's rising. This is it. Going under the hammer now.

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A late 19th-century French gilt brass clock and barometer.

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I'm starting it at £100 in. At 100. 120.

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140. At 140.

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At 140. 160. 180.

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200. At the back of the room at £200.

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-I'll take 10 to help.

-That's mean.

-All done? It's in the middle.

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-It's selling.

-At £200.

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Hammer's gone down. Got it away at the lower end. Probably no-one to bid against him.

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If there was somebody else, it might have been 300 or 400.

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-It's gone.

-That's the main thing.

-Waved goodbye?

-I have. A new wardrobe is coming my way.

-Well done.

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I could do with a new shirt as well.

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Is there a doctor in the house? We're going to find out. We've got a field surgeon's kit coming up.

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-I did the valuation, Dorothy.

-You did.

-£100-£200. I'd like to see it do that 200, plus.

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-We'll keep our fingers crossed.

-Going under the hammer right now.

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20th-century mahogany-cased field surgeon's kit. I'm bid...

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straight in at 240.

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240. 250. 260.

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-Carving up the sale room!

-At £260. Anybody else?

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260. 270.

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280. At 280. I'll take a fiver.

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At £280. For the last time. 280.

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-Yes! £280.

-Very good.

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Guess what it's going towards.

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It's a dormer window!

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-I like a window.

-You've got to look out on a good view.

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-Puts the value of the house up.

-Does it? Don't tell the council!

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-No, they'll put the rates up! Ssh!

-You'll put me in another band!

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Hartlepool's Maritime Experience is a superb recreation of an 18th-century sea port,

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evoking the time of Nelson and the Battle of Trafalgar, but this warship has a heart of Indian teak.

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Looking at my globe, I've found India.

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Here's Mumbai, formerly Bombay.

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It was here in 1817, 190 years ago, that the British Royal Navy commissioned an Indian shipbuilder

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to construct a vessel, a frigate, out of teak. It took almost a year to complete the vessel.

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When she was finished, she sailed all around here to a port on the north-east side of Sri Lanka.

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formerly known as Ceylon.

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Here she inherited her name - Trincomalee.

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SEA SHANTY

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For the first 80 years of her life, she was in service with the Royal Navy and saw action

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from the Caribbean to the Falklands, from Vancouver to the South Pacific. When her fighting days were over,

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she returned to England to spend the rest of her life as a training ship.

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During the 1980s, she was in such poor condition there were plans to scuttle her.

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That means sink her at the bottom of the English Channel,

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rather than incur the costs and the time of dismantling her.

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Thankfully, a trust was set up to save her

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and she came to Hartlepool where she's been magnificently restored.

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She's now the oldest ship afloat in the country.

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Bryn, you now manage the ship. Restoration work started in 1990.

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-It must have been daunting. Did you think you'd see it through?

-Oh, yes.

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We needed two things - we needed money but, more importantly, a workforce who could do it.

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Thankfully, over time, both of those materialised. The Heritage Lottery Fund gave us over £5 million.

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The whole thing cost £10.5 million and took 11 years.

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-You need resilience.

-You've got to be determined.

-Absolutely.

-Did you have to strip everything back

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to examine the original teak?

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There were a lot of later softwood additions put onto the ship.

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We had to get rid of all those first and then it was a painstaking task of testing each of the timbers.

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I'm a big, big fan of English oak and in the 19th century that tree built our Royal Navy.

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-It did, yes.

-What are the properties of Indian teak? What are its merits?

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It's a very good timber. It's very hard

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and very resilient in salt water. It's also resilient to wood-boring animals.

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-Impervious to...

-Impervious to pain!

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-Can we go downstairs and examine some of the timbers?

-Of course.

-Below decks, I should say.

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Here we are, below the water level now. You can see something of the structure of the ship.

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-We can see the inner planking here and then the frames, which are rather like our ribs.

-Yes.

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Outside, there is outer planking and then the copper,

0:22:580:23:02

-the copper bottoming of the ship.

-Why was the ship commissioned to be built by an Indian shipwright?

0:23:020:23:09

There was a shortage of usable timber with so many ships being built.

0:23:090:23:15

-Over in India, there was the Bombay dockyard...

-The facilities.

-..the men, and it was a British colony,

0:23:150:23:22

-so it made sense.

-Yes.

0:23:220:23:25

The Trincomalee is a frigate, a fast ship which could hit and run,

0:23:250:23:29

the type of ship sailed by fictional hero Captain Jack Aubrey in the Master And Commander novels.

0:23:290:23:36

-The captain's cabin.

-Yes.

-Luxury.

-It says something about his status.

0:23:360:23:41

If one person has all this space, the other 239 share the rest!

0:23:410:23:46

-Would this have been divided up?

-It would be divided into three areas by screens -

0:23:460:23:52

his entertaining area, a workspace and an overnight with his cot as well.

0:23:520:23:59

I would assume there would be a great deal of competition to become captain.

0:23:590:24:04

Yes, there were lots of these ships. Frigates were very popular.

0:24:040:24:08

But it was more about the status of the captain.

0:24:080:24:13

He had to represent the country, represent government, the Royal Navy and the Admiralty

0:24:130:24:19

in far-flung areas of the world with no instant communication.

0:24:190:24:24

Everybody had to have confidence that the captain would not just be sailing the ship

0:24:240:24:30

and looking after the men, difficult as that may have been,

0:24:300:24:34

but actually being a diplomat on behalf of the country as well.

0:24:340:24:39

And the captain couldn't have wished for a better ship.

0:24:390:24:44

She's here thanks to the skills found in Hartlepool to save her

0:24:440:24:48

and to the Indian shipwrights who built her so well.

0:24:480:24:53

The ship's figurehead is believed to be a representation of Bombay's master shipbuilder, Jamsetjee Wadia.

0:24:530:24:59

Who'd have thought 190 years ago when someone carved those bright eyes over Bombay harbour,

0:24:590:25:05

they'd find themselves cheerfully looking out over a beautifully regenerated Hartlepool harbour?

0:25:050:25:11

That's just amazing. Now it's time to return to the valuation day

0:25:110:25:16

and find out what our experts are staring at.

0:25:160:25:20

-Sue, you've never worn this brooch.

-No. Never.

0:25:300:25:34

-Ever?

-Never, ever.

-Where did it come from?

-It was amongst some jewellery left to me by my mother.

0:25:340:25:40

That was just in a box with other bits and pieces.

0:25:400:25:44

-Where did she get it from?

-That I don't really know.

0:25:440:25:48

She had uncles who travelled abroad.

0:25:480:25:52

Right. Do you know if anybody went to Italy?

0:25:520:25:56

-I think possibly yes.

-We're talking probably mid to late 19th century.

0:25:560:26:02

-Right.

-This is when that particular cameo dates from.

-Right.

0:26:020:26:07

If I said this is a second-rate cameo, I don't infer that it's not good quality.

0:26:070:26:13

It is, but a first-rate cameo would be an agate stone,

0:26:130:26:17

a layered agate stone carved through to reveal the colour underneath.

0:26:170:26:22

That's the true cameo. In the 19th century, they discovered the same effect with a layered shell.

0:26:220:26:30

So these cameos are layered shells, where they cut through the surface to reveal that toffee colour.

0:26:300:26:38

Right.

0:26:380:26:39

Very skilled operation, perfected in Florence. This is typical of the Italian school.

0:26:390:26:46

The subject matter itself is possibly a follower of Dionysus.

0:26:460:26:51

Here we have a female or male figure holding this swathe of grapes.

0:26:510:26:57

We call that fruiting vine.

0:26:570:27:00

Draped over the shoulder and onto the skirt we have a lionskin. Can you see that?

0:27:000:27:06

-There are the claws there.

-Oh, yes.

-And there's the lion mask.

0:27:060:27:12

-And followers of Dionysus often adopted that dress.

-Right.

0:27:120:27:17

The other one might have been acquired to put in a gold mount and it never happened.

0:27:170:27:24

This one in a silver mount, this wired decoration,

0:27:240:27:28

is typical of the mid-Victorian period, sort of 1860, that sort of period.

0:27:280:27:34

Just think of the costume at the time. Folds and folds of garments,

0:27:340:27:39

-lace shawls...

-Yes.

0:27:390:27:42

-All gathered at the centre of the bosom, so they had to have a whacking great spike.

-Yes.

0:27:420:27:49

-That spike is steel.

-Right.

-Which unfortunately is rusted.

0:27:490:27:53

That has to be attended to. But quite an interesting piece of jewellery.

0:27:530:27:59

-Would you never wear this?

-No, never.

0:27:590:28:02

-And do you have daughters?

-Yes.

-What about them?

-No.

0:28:020:28:07

-Too old-fashioned?

-Yes.

-Right.

0:28:070:28:10

Price. I think it's going to go for the region of 80-100.

0:28:100:28:14

I think the auction house will say, "Let's put a reserve round about 65." Would that be acceptable?

0:28:140:28:21

-Yes.

-If it makes over 100, I'll be delighted. With the two together, we could achieve that.

0:28:210:28:28

-That would be fine.

-Sure?

-Yes.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:28:280:28:33

-Vicky, you all right?

-Yes, thanks.

-So you've brought this little beauty along.

-I did.

0:28:400:28:46

-Is it yours?

-No, my brother's.

-Does he know you're here?

-He does.

0:28:460:28:51

He came with me, but had to leave.

0:28:510:28:54

-Where's he gone to?

-A christening.

-Did you not get an invite?

-No.

0:28:540:28:59

-Where did he get it from?

-He bought it at an auction, he said,

0:28:590:29:03

-with another two pictures.

-Another two?

-Just small ones.

-What did he give for that?

-£20.

0:29:030:29:10

-When was that?

-Maybe last year. I'm not sure.

0:29:100:29:15

Well...

0:29:150:29:16

-It's a watercolour by Fred Miller.

-Right.

0:29:160:29:20

It's a rural scene. Any idea where?

0:29:200:29:23

-He told me it was Cotswold Downs.

-On the Cotswolds in the Midlands?

0:29:230:29:28

-It may be there.

-I didn't know.

-It may be there.

0:29:280:29:33

It's a lovely watercolour on paper of quite a rustic, charming view.

0:29:330:29:39

We can see here we've got this horse and cart and the church and village.

0:29:390:29:44

If you look at the size of the gate compared to the horse and cart and the steeple,

0:29:440:29:51

it loses a bit in perspective.

0:29:510:29:53

-The other thing it's got real problems with is its condition.

-Yes.

0:29:530:29:59

Now watercolour clouds have a habit of fading.

0:29:590:30:04

-Right.

-And if you look here,

0:30:040:30:07

these once cotton wool white clouds

0:30:070:30:11

have now gone a bit yellow and grey.

0:30:110:30:15

That could be nicotine, it could be hung in sunlight.

0:30:150:30:20

-There isn't really anything you can do to restore that.

-Right.

0:30:200:30:24

-The other problem is you've got these damp spots here.

-Brown dots.

-Yeah.

0:30:240:30:30

It's almost like foxing. You can get rid of those

0:30:300:30:36

and some of the staining in the sky, but it's always a problem.

0:30:360:30:40

Now there was a Fred Miller watercolour last year of a harbour scene

0:30:400:30:46

-that made £400, but it was slightly bigger and in better condition.

-Yes.

0:30:460:30:53

And people always think antiques go like that all the time.

0:30:530:30:57

They don't. There are peaks and troughs. When I started,

0:30:570:31:03

copper kettles were £90, warming pans were £100.

0:31:030:31:07

Now they're £10 or £15 a go.

0:31:070:31:10

This sort of 19th-century Victorian genre picture, landscape picture,

0:31:100:31:16

I won't say they've had their day, but the market's dipped a bit.

0:31:160:31:20

So whilst there's a record of one making £400,

0:31:200:31:25

-I think a sensible auction estimate for this is £50-£80.

-Yes.

0:31:250:31:29

And we'll give the auctioneers a £50 reserve with 10% discretion.

0:31:290:31:34

-You've got the whip hand. Your brother's not here.

-That's right.

0:31:340:31:39

-You know he paid 20 quid for it. What do you reckon? Get it sold?

-Yes, definitely.

0:31:390:31:45

Hope I'm right!

0:31:450:31:48

Keith, regardless of rumours, this is the oldest piece - not me -

0:31:570:32:02

in the room today.

0:32:020:32:05

This is a fascinating little bit of pottery. It must have a wonderful history. Where does it come from?

0:32:050:32:12

It's from my mother's side. She lived on a farm.

0:32:120:32:17

I take it it was my grandmother's or my great-grandmother's. I'm not sure how far back it goes.

0:32:170:32:23

Right. I would have thought great-great-great-great-grandmother.

0:32:230:32:28

This little piece of pot dates from round about 1740, 1760.

0:32:280:32:34

It's a lovely piece of pottery that we know as Delft.

0:32:340:32:39

You think of Delft and you think of Holland, the Low Countries.

0:32:390:32:44

-This is where it originated.

-Yeah?

0:32:440:32:47

The potters came over to England from the 17th century onwards.

0:32:470:32:52

This little piece was made to imitate Chinese imports into the country,

0:32:520:32:59

which were very valuable. Chinese imports were actually porcelain.

0:32:590:33:05

This is why it's decorated in blue and white, looking like Chinese porcelain from a distance.

0:33:050:33:11

But it was made in London by a Delft potter producing wares like this.

0:33:110:33:17

I like it because it's easy to handle.

0:33:170:33:22

It's got interesting elements of decoration, particularly these lions' heads at the side there.

0:33:220:33:28

All this chipping round the edge, you expect that.

0:33:280:33:33

This is a biscuit pottery covered with a white slip

0:33:330:33:37

-and then it's coated in a tin glaze.

-I see.

0:33:370:33:41

It does have the tendency to chip, so don't worry about that.

0:33:410:33:45

It's got a whacking great crack all the way down the side, which does affect its value,

0:33:450:33:51

-but otherwise it's in lovely condition.

-There's no markings

0:33:510:33:56

so I didn't know what it was. A chalice or a cup...

0:33:560:33:59

Chalice is a good idea, but it's got a hole going through to this enclosed pedestal.

0:33:590:34:05

If that had been left enclosed, it would have broken open in the firing.

0:34:050:34:11

That's why you have the hole. Makes it difficult to contain liquid.

0:34:110:34:16

It may have had a decorative cover and could have been put on display.

0:34:160:34:21

My mother had a chest of drawers and a thing above it, a cabinet,

0:34:210:34:26

with all the different things enclosed. On display. Never used, but on display.

0:34:260:34:33

I think your mother was canny and knew it had some age and may possibly have some value.

0:34:330:34:39

-What do you think it's worth?

-Nothing!

0:34:390:34:43

-Right. Well, I hope somebody... who is very keen on Delft ware...

-Yeah?

0:34:430:34:49

..and early pottery is going to be at that auction.

0:34:490:34:54

I'm going to put a conservative 80-120.

0:34:540:34:59

I'd like to see it do 200, if not more,

0:34:590:35:03

but I have reservations about that crack, but it is an early, unusual piece

0:35:030:35:09

-of English Delft.

-I had reservations about the chips, but you explained it's one of those things.

0:35:090:35:15

I've never seen a piece of Delft, early Delft, without those teeth marks all round it!

0:35:150:35:22

-Keith, thank you for making my day.

-A pleasure.

0:35:220:35:25

We've had a great time in Hartlepool and certainly found lots of things for the bidders.

0:35:250:35:31

Sue found the cameos in her mother's things. They're out of fashion, but great quality.

0:35:310:35:37

Vicky's brother bought the watercolour for less than £20. Philip hopes it will double that.

0:35:370:35:44

The condition of Keith's piece of Delft won't worry the collectors.

0:35:440:35:48

He was surprised at David's valuation, but let's see what auctioneer Giles Hodges thinks

0:35:480:35:55

and how high bidders might go.

0:35:550:35:58

One of my favourite lots. I like my period things.

0:36:000:36:05

Late 18th century, a bit of blue and white.

0:36:050:36:09

Delft as well, as you know. David's put a valuation of £80-£120 on it.

0:36:090:36:15

If I could buy it for that, I'd be so happy.

0:36:150:36:20

I think it's worth twice as much.

0:36:200:36:23

I think you're bang on. With the pre-sale interest we've had prior to the auction,

0:36:230:36:29

we should hit double the estimate quite comfortably.

0:36:290:36:33

It's something for the connoisseur because you've got to be a real purist to like this.

0:36:330:36:39

It looks tatty, it's chipped, but it doesn't matter - it's Delft.

0:36:390:36:43

-Delft collectors don't really mind that.

-We've got chips and a crack,

0:36:430:36:49

but for the purist, no problem.

0:36:490:36:51

-And it stands so well.

-Lovely.

-Would you like to own it?

-Yes.

0:36:510:36:57

If you go on a picnic, you probably carry a few plastic knives and forks with you, but look at this.

0:37:030:37:09

In the good old days, they did things properly. I wouldn't fancy carrying that.

0:37:090:37:15

At the end of the day, when the picnic's over, the butler had to polish it all!

0:37:150:37:22

Susan's cameo brooches - one large, one small - are being sold as a joint lot.

0:37:280:37:34

And she's pinning her hopes on £80-£100, which is what David Barby valued them at.

0:37:340:37:40

I know brooches aren't fashionable at the moment, but surely they're worth a little more than that.

0:37:400:37:47

-Well, they're not the best quality. The best quality is agate.

-Yes.

0:37:470:37:52

Today they'd be worn on a little black dress or cocktail dress.

0:37:520:37:57

-It makes a statement, Paul.

-It does. Is anyone wearing a little black dress here?

0:37:570:38:03

I can't see anyone! Good luck, Susan. This is it.

0:38:030:38:07

Italian cameo of a classical female and a smaller unframed.

0:38:070:38:11

I'm bid 50. At £50.

0:38:110:38:15

5. 60. 5.

0:38:150:38:17

-At £65.

-Come on, come on.

-70 now?

0:38:170:38:20

-£65 to my left.

-Come on.

-£65.

0:38:200:38:24

-Make no mistake. At £65.

-Yes.

0:38:240:38:28

Sold! Hammer's gone down. £65 - right on the reserve.

0:38:280:38:32

-Phew!

-Great.

-Happy with that?

-I'm very happy with that, yes.

0:38:320:38:37

Now we've got some fine art - a watercolour by Fred Miller and it belongs to Vicky.

0:38:450:38:51

We've got a valuation around £50, £60, £70 with a reserve at £40.

0:38:510:38:55

-A bit of discretion on it. There is a bit of foxing.

-It's badly foxed, isn't it?

0:38:550:39:02

-It needs some love.

-It does need some TLC.

0:39:020:39:06

You got this for £20 and the money is going to an exceptionally good cause. We've got to sell it.

0:39:060:39:12

-Tell us where it's going.

-The Great North Air Ambulance.

0:39:120:39:17

-A great cause.

-Yes.

-Get these helicopters up and save some lives.

0:39:170:39:21

Going under the hammer right now.

0:39:210:39:24

Landscape at harvest time by Fred Miller.

0:39:240:39:29

A watercolour. 30, straight in, on commission.

0:39:290:39:33

-Straight in at 30, Vicky.

-At £40.

0:39:330:39:36

45. 50. At £50, are you all done?

0:39:360:39:40

-£50. And we're away at 50.

-Yes! The hammer's gone down.

0:39:400:39:45

-It's got me out of trouble with the air ambulance.

-Lovely.

0:39:450:39:49

-Why did you choose that charity?

-We were going to do a walk at work for the air ambulance.

0:39:490:39:55

So this'll go to it as well.

0:39:550:39:58

-Good for you. Thanks so much for coming.

-Thank you.

-Thanks.

0:39:580:40:02

Coming up now, my favourite lot of the sale. I'd love to own this.

0:40:090:40:13

A little blue and white Delft cup with a value of £80-£120.

0:40:130:40:17

It belongs to Keith, but not for much longer.

0:40:170:40:22

I had a chat to Giles about it before the sale started.

0:40:220:40:27

The damage won't put people off. I think it could do... David! I think it could do £200-£300.

0:40:270:40:33

-Somewhere in that sort of figure.

-I couldn't believe that.

-It was very difficult to choose -

0:40:330:40:40

-either the chamber pot or this(!)

-My wife thought that one, the chamber pot from Maling.

0:40:400:40:47

-Yes, local interest.

-The blue pot was all chipped.

-But you expect chips on Delft.

0:40:470:40:54

-Are you a local?

-North of Newcastle.

-What do you do?

-I'm a security guard, but I was a sunshine miner.

0:40:540:41:02

-A sunshine miner! How long for?

-27 years.

0:41:020:41:07

-So that means on the surface.

-Instead of down a shaft.

0:41:070:41:12

-That's a lovely description.

-Catching the rays!

0:41:120:41:16

-When did you finish that?

-2005, made redundant. I was on the sick for about a year.

0:41:160:41:22

-So the money will come in handy.

-Yeah.

-Well, wait no longer. It's going under the hammer now.

0:41:220:41:28

-The London Delft...

-Say goodbye!

-We've got a couple of phone bids.

0:41:280:41:34

I'm starting it at £250.

0:41:340:41:38

-Yes!

-250. 260. 270.

0:41:380:41:42

-280. 290.

-It was a "come and buy me".

0:41:420:41:46

320. 340.

0:41:460:41:48

360.

0:41:480:41:51

380. 400. 410.

0:41:510:41:55

On the phone. Anybody else? 420.

0:41:550:41:58

430. 440.

0:42:000:42:02

-450.

-450!

0:42:020:42:05

460.

0:42:050:42:06

460. Caroline's phone.

0:42:080:42:10

At £460. For the last time at 460.

0:42:100:42:15

Yes! No surprise to me.

0:42:150:42:18

Fantastic! The purists were here.

0:42:180:42:20

They absolutely adored it. Hot competition.

0:42:200:42:25

-That's a lot of money.

-I thought 150 was a lot.

-Keith would have been happy with 80 quid!

0:42:250:42:31

-It's very difficult to judge the market. That could well have been a London buyer.

-Yes.

0:42:310:42:37

-What will you put the money towards?

-We haven't had a holiday for two years with us being both bad,

0:42:370:42:44

-so we'll go for a holiday.

-Where?

-Majorca again.

0:42:440:42:49

-Good for you.

-Enjoy it.

0:42:490:42:51

What a day we've had here.

0:42:590:43:02

Giles is still on the rostrum, but it's all over for our owners.

0:43:020:43:07

Credit to our experts - they're on the money today. Everyone's gone home happy.

0:43:070:43:13

All the lucky bidders here are queuing up. We hope you enjoyed the show.

0:43:130:43:18

Until the next time, cheerio.

0:43:180:43:21

For more information about Flog It, including how the programme was made, visit the website at bbc.co.uk

0:43:210:43:28

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2007

0:43:350:43:39

Email us at [email protected]

0:43:400:43:42

The people of Hartlepool are queuing up to have their treasures valued by experts David Barby and Philip Serrell. Presenter Paul Martin goes aboard Trincomalee, a very special ship moored in the new harbour.