Paisley and Plymouth Flog It!


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Paisley and Plymouth

In this specially extended edition of Flog It! presented by Paul Martin, it's north v south in a bid to find the best items to flog at auction.


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Today we're travelling the length and breadth of Britain.

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We'll be in Devon visiting one of England's historic naval cities,

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and travelling nearly 400 miles north to a Scottish town with a fashionable name.

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Later on in the show, I'll find out how these beautiful textiles

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came to be associated with Paisley.

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But first, it's time to Flog It!

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Here, just west of Glasgow, at Paisley Civic Hall, the queue is growing fast.

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They're all waiting to have their antiques valued inside by me and our experts.

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Later, we'll pick the cream of these items and test the valuations by selling them at auction.

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We're in for some real surprises.

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This is exquisite. It's one of the best things I've seen on the show for a long, long time.

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That's not all, later on we'll be in the naval port of Plymouth in Devon,

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where the owner of a painting can't believe her luck after it narrowly escaped the bin.

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-£600 plus.

-Never!

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-Yes!

-Great.

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But first let's start the show north of the border.

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Paisley has a long and distinguished industrial history, particularly in textile making.

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Paisley shawls, with their distinctive teardrop patterns, were made here in their thousands.

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These two mills were built from either side of this waterfall, known

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as the Hammills to harness the power of water for driving the machinery.

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In long, hot Victorian summers, young lads that wanted to prove

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their worth swam in those very dangerous rapids.

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It's known as Tailing The Linn.

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But we've already sorted the men out from the boys here at the Paisley Town Hall.

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-So, there's no need for our two experts to prove themselves today, is there chaps?

-No need at all.

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It's Adam Partridge and Philip Serrell.

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I was very excited about my visit to Paisley and I was hoping to find something Scottish.

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Top of the list was Monart glass and thank you, Bobby, for coming along with your piece of Monart glass.

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Can you tell me how you came to own this?

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-I got it from a lady who was moving house.

-Right.

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She moved house about 50 years ago.

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I've had it ever since.

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I didn't know anything about it until I visited Edinburgh Museum.

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-Right.

-There was a display of Monart glass there.

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And you thought, "I've got one of them."

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They were mostly blues and greens, but there was one like that, half the size of this one.

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I thought that must be worth something.

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I am waiting for you to tell me.

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It is worth something. The blues and greens and purples

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you see quite a lot as well, sometimes with little gold specks in them.

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You see them in bigger and bolder shapes as well.

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If people at home think they might have something similar,

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and think, "That's very much like our vase." There's an extra way to check.

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They are not signed as such. Some of them still have a paper label on. I've sold some with a label on.

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Also, they have this raised circular disc on the bottom, the pontil mark is always raised.

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Do you know why it is called Monart?

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-No, I haven't.

-It was the Moncrieff Glassworks in Perth.

-Yeah.

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There was a Spanish gentleman from Barcelona

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by the name of Salvador Ysart.

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So Ysart and Moncrieff, Moncrieff meets Ysart to make Monart.

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They started in about 1920, 1921 and produced right up until the 1960s, and he had four sons,

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one of them was Paul Ysart, a well-known glassmaker and they were also part of the operation.

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The main father Salvador Ysart was a master glassmaker.

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So you're telling me that's as old as I am.

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I wouldn't know that!

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I wouldn't know at all. I wouldn't like to guess.

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So it's a Scottish, Spanish fusion I suppose.

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-I think it's quite a modern colour.

-I do.

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You know, with this awful trend for minimalism and modern interior.

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I think that would fit in the modern interior very well.

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Why I like it is I was born in the winter time and I like bright colours. I like a lot of colour.

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So, I would think this is gonna be £60 to £100.

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-Yes.

-How does that fit in with your expectations?

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More or less.

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-About what you thought?

-I actually had it valued a few years ago and they said about £50 at auction.

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I think it's a good place to sell it.

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-Yes.

-I know the auctioneer at this saleroom and I know she's quite keen on Monart glass.

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-Oh, good.

-She's probably got a lot of good customers for it.

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Why are you selling it?

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I've got um...a little great-grandson

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-about to be born.

-Oh, right.

-I have promised to get the cot for them.

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Let's hope we get a new world record for a vase of this kind.

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-Thank you ever so much for bringing it along.

-Well, thank you.

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-It's made my day to see something relatively local.

-I'm glad of that.

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-Hello, Stacey, are you all right?

-Very well thank you.

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-Is this yours?

-No.

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-Whose is it?

-My mum's.

-Your mum's.

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What's the story behind this, Stacey?

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It was a wedding present. It was my dad's boss said, "Do want an antique or something modern?"

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They decided on something antique and they got this.

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-You know what this is, don't you?

-I was listening to people talking.

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-You shouldn't listen to other people's conversations.

-You should not indeed, Stacey.

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Wedgwood and majolica, I heard spoken.

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-Majolica.

-Yeah.

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Well, you're absolutely spot-on,

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because we've got the Wedgwood mark just here.

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Majolica, it certainly is.

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What's it currently used for?

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-A fruit bowl.

-A fruit bowl.

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What do you think these are for?

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-I don't know. I don't know.

-Well, that's, I think, sugar.

-Right.

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That's for cream. If you look at the difference between the two, I'll just take them off again.

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If you look at the difference,

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that one has a lip,

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-that one hasn't. That's for cream and that's for sugar.

-Right.

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It's a fruit bowl or occasionally these are

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all moulded with strawberries and they are a strawberry dish.

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They're really quite collectible.

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Dates, I would think, from 1870, 1880.

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-Wow!

-Something like that.

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-So your mum's told you to just come and sell it, yes?

-Mmm.

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-She has no idea what it's worth?

-No.

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If we put an auction estimate of £30 to £50, is that going to be all right?

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-No, I don't think so.

-You don't think so? Why?

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Because Wedgwood maybe, but majolica, no.

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-Shall we put £50 to £80 on it, then?

-No.

-No?

-No.

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If it's worth that, I'll take it home with me.

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What about £100 to £150, then?

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-No, maybe a bit more.

-What about 200 to 300?

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-Maybe, I can cope with that.

-You can cope with that?

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-I can cope with that.

-You're a shrewd judge you.

-Yeah.

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-Stacey, I think that we can put an auction estimate on this of £300 to £500.

-I can cope with that.

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I can cope with that.

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We'll put a fixed reserve of £250.

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OK.

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It wants to be illustrated in the catalogue.

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-Right.

-It's got to be illustrated in the catalogue,

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possibly illustrated in the adverts in the antiques trade papers.

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I think your mum, when she chose something antique rather than

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something new, she was a fairly shrewd cookie, wasn't she?

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-Very much so.

-You are happy with that?

-Very.

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If that makes £400 to £500, what's your mum going to do?

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-Clearly, you'll have your cut, because you brought it.

-I hope so.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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What will your mum spend the money on?

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Probably treat her two daughters and her two son-in-law's

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and her husband for a night out, eh, Mum?

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-That will do it, will it?

-Yeah.

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On that note we'll... Can I come as well?

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Maybe if you're nice.

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Rena, We are all having a brilliant day,

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but my day has just got even better. Look at this.

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You know I love my treen.

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I love my wood. This is exquisite.

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It's one of the best things I've seen on the show for a long, long time.

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It's real quality. Tell me its story, how did you come by it?

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I think it belonged to my grandfather.

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-What did your grandfather do for a living?

-He was a joiner.

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-We had a joiners business at that time.

-So, he loved his wood.

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He loved his craftsmanship.

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-My father was a joiner.

-I bet he was proud of this.

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It's a stationery cabinet of the utmost quality.

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Before I open it up, just look at the way that waterfall front comes down.

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It goes concave and then convex and it's got a snaky, serpentine front.

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Every face of this stationery cabinet has the most wonderful grain on it. Look at that as I turn it.

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That's craftsmanship. I can tell you why it's also craftsmanship.

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When I open up this lovely stationery cabinet,

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look at that fitted interior. It's got its maker's name, look at that.

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That's been put in there, look, on a little tiny slip of ivory.

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That's a sign of quality. It's got its original log.

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The lock still works. Look at this, because these normally go missing.

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This is to put your stamps in.

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All made of Moroccan leather, which has all been hand-tooled and stamped.

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Four stamps. Look at that. Isn't that lovely?

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I've not seen anything as nice as this for a long, long time.

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Pure quality and the condition is absolutely fantastic.

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-How about the value?

-I don't know.

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What would you think?

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-Whatever it makes, I don't know.

-Whatever it makes.

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I think we should put this into auction

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with a valuation of £200 to £300. A fixed reserve of £200.

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It can't go for any less than £200.

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Oh, well, that's very nice.

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If it doesn't, you're hanging on to it and keeping it.

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-Aye.

-Let the grandchildren have it.

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-But nobody wants it.

-Nobody wants it!

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They will grow into it. As you get older,

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your tastes change and you realise the virtue in things.

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Let's get excited about it.

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-Shall we flog it?

-Of course, yes, flog it.

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Of course, you wouldn't have a programme if I said no!

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-Hi, Mae.

-Hello.

-How are you doing?

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-Fine, thanks.

-You've brought in a lovely little bronze, haven't you?

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-Yes.

-This Egyptian lady.

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-Yes.

-Where did you get her from?

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It's always been in the family.

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-Right. Do you know how it came into the family?

-No idea at all.

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-It's just always been there from when you were a little girl.

-Yeah.

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-Where do you remember it?

-Sitting on the mantelpiece.

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-On the mantelpiece?

-Yes.

-Where does it live in your house?

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-On the mantelpiece.

-As well, OK.

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So you brought her in today to get her identified.

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I know nothing about her, nothing at all.

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-First of all, it's one of these wonderful surprise bronzes.

-Yes.

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-Would you show everybody what happens?

-I'll let you do it.

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Very nice, thank you very much. So we press the button.

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But you need to open it...

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-It needs to open as well.

-The spring's going.

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-Look at that. It doesn't get much better than that, does it?

-No.

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Beautiful. I've sold some of these before.

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-Now, she shouldn't really be painted like that.

-I know.

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My dad liked painting things.

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-So, your dad painted her.

-Yes.

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-Unfortunately, that'll affect the value a little bit because she's not original.

-Yes.

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She's a novelty bronze by a well-known Austrian sculpture called Franz Bergman.

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If we just close her again, just for a minute.

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On the back here,

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you can't really see, because this is a new plate that's put to hold it together.

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You've got the beginning of a signature there

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and the end of the signature there.

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The signature will read Namgreb,

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N-A-M-G-R-E-B, which is Bergman backwards.

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There was his thing, he used to sign them Bergman backwards.

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-I hadn't even seen that.

-There was also a bottle mark that you see on some of them, a foundry mark.

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With this, it's had a bit of adjustment here, shall we say.

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-This base...

-I think my dad put that on.

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Perhaps not the original base, as well.

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It's a very interesting collectible Bergman cold-painted bronze figure.

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-Early 20th century in date, but it has its problems.

-Yes.

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Perfect it's worth £1,000, possibly £1,200, even a touch more.

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But when these things have been modified it does bring it right down.

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-I would suggest an estimate of £300 to £500 on it.

-Yeah.

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-It still is probably more than you thought?

-Oh, yes.

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-What did you think?

-About £100.

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About £100. Well, I think, we're fairly confident with £300 to £500.

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At what price would you rather have it back?

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We need to put a reserve on it? Would you put £250 on it?

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-Mm... Make it £300.

-Make it 300.

-If it doesn't sell,

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-I'll take it home.

-At least you'll know what it is.

-Yes.

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-I can see lots of people liking this, really.

-I can.

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They always have plenty of people after them.

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It's just hard to assess with the amount of changes and the repainting.

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So, if it makes £300, what would you do with that, any ideas? Any plans?

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-Yes.

-Go on tell me.

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-I want to get a trike.

-A trike.

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A motorised trike?

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-Yes.

-Are you into motorbikes?

-Yes.

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-Are you?

-Yes.

-Wow! Excellent.

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You ride a motorbike at the moment?

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-I just go on the back.

-Right.

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-And now you want your own trike?

-Yes.

-Brilliant.

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I might I fall off a two-wheeler now, so I'll get a three-wheeler.

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-So, this lovely exotic, erotic bronze...

-It will go towards it.

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-..will go towards funding you a trike.

-Yes.

-Brilliant.

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So, let's take another look at the items we've picked to go to auction.

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It's nice to see some Scottish heritage.

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A stunning Monart vase, just right for today's retro interiors.

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All we need are strawberries and cream and a summer's day

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to complete Stacey's Wedgwood majolica fruit bowl.

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I love the quality of the walnut veneered stationery cabinet.

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Certainly something to write home about.

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And finally, our saucy Egyptian lady

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is sure to raise some eyebrows when she goes under the hammer.

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Before heading off to the auction in Glasgow, I've taken a short detour

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to find out more about that famous fabric print

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that has put Paisley on the international map.

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In the Swinging Sixties, Paisley enjoyed a psychedelic revival

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and you could find it on just about anything.

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But where did it all start?

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The town of Paisley is synonymous with this distinctive teardrop shape

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that we know today as the paisley pattern.

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But it didn't originate in Scotland at all.

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It actually is an ancient symbol believed to represent the shoot of a date plant.

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The pattern first appeared in Britain on shawls woven in India.

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They were brought back as gifts for wives and daughters

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in the mid-18th century, and they soon became a must-have fashion accessory.

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The long, rectangular shape made an elegant drape for the straight dress of the time.

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But the shawls cost around £70 to £100 each,

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which meant only the most wealthy women could afford them, really,

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so it wasn't long before other weaving centres

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started making their own, more affordable versions.

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Places like Edinburgh, Norwich and Paisley were among them.

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Paisley had been a well-known weaving centre for hundreds of years

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and, in the early 1800s, Paisley weavers

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were among the highest paid workers in Britain,

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because of their high degree of skill.

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They were so good at copying the intricate designs from India

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that production in the town dramatically increased.

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And it's said that they even sent agents from Paisley down to London

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to copy the latest cashmere designs as they arrived by sea.

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And within a short space of time imitations were being sold all over London for around £12.

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In fact, fashionable ladies all over the country

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were visiting their local drapers asking for a selection of paisleys.

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Which is exactly what we've got here on display in this wonderful converted building.

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It is a real gem.

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It is the Anchor Mill. It's part of the collection that has been loaned to us today from the Paisley Museum.

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And Ellen Farmer from the Old Paisley Society has come to tell us more about them.

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Why did they become so popular?

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Probably a silly question, because looking at them, they're so gorgeous, aren't they?

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-I want one.

-Absolutely.

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They're absolutely stunning.

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They were the must-have of their day.

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They were expensive.

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So something that was expensive, even to this day.

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It's got the right label on it.

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-A status symbol.

-Posh would have a couple of them.

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They are massive, aren't they?

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Yes, they were worn to keep you warm when you were wearing a crinoline.

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Crinolines were massive.

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Big, big dresses.

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That's right. And the length of that and the width of it meant you could

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fold it and it would cover your crinoline and keep you warm.

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Do you know what they'd be good for now?

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THEY LAUGH

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Throwing over the sofa on an old Chesterfield and just

0:18:290:18:33

draping it over a sofa and creating the look as a throw.

0:18:330:18:36

I think a lot of designers use that now.

0:18:360:18:38

-And they do look stunning.

-What were the early ones made of?

0:18:380:18:41

Cotton and silk.

0:18:410:18:43

The original cashmere were made from cashmere goats.

0:18:430:18:47

They even tried in Paisley, they brought

0:18:470:18:50

some goats over from Afghanistan to breed, but they made a big mistake.

0:18:500:18:55

They brought a dozen over, but they were all females.

0:18:550:18:57

-So, there was no chance.

-Learned the hard way!

0:18:590:19:01

Yes, so it was mainly cotton and silk.

0:19:010:19:04

How were they made exactly?

0:19:040:19:06

These ones, this early one down here, were made by hand on draw looms.

0:19:060:19:11

The later ones were made on looms but, as you can see, the centre is plain because

0:19:110:19:17

the looms were not technically able to do the whole centre of the shawl,

0:19:170:19:22

it had to be the outside.

0:19:220:19:23

Later on when the Jacquard loom came into being, the whole shawl

0:19:230:19:27

could be filled in and you'd get nice, big patterns on it then.

0:19:270:19:31

I can see the pattern all the way through the shawl now.

0:19:390:19:42

How else have they evolved?

0:19:420:19:45

You are now able to fill in the whole of the shawl,

0:19:450:19:47

because of the Jacquard looms.

0:19:470:19:49

You could start experimenting with other materials, other designs.

0:19:490:19:53

Printed shawls would be lighter. You could wear a paisley shawl in the summer, cos it wasn't too heavy.

0:19:530:19:59

-And a lot cheaper?

-And a lot cheaper. It meant anyone could buy it if they could print it.

0:19:590:20:03

That doesn't do for fashion - that you want anyone to be able to wear it, it must be exclusive.

0:20:030:20:10

They were popular for such a long time, well over 100 years.

0:20:100:20:13

What was their demise? Why did the ladies stop buying them?

0:20:130:20:16

-Bustles.

-Do you know, I never thought of that. The large bustles.

0:20:160:20:20

Cos these would hide the bustle, wouldn't they?

0:20:200:20:22

Absolutely. And if the bustle was in fashion, you wanted the fashionable garment to show.

0:20:220:20:28

So the paisley shawl became unfashionable, because it hid the bustle.

0:20:280:20:33

That pattern is iconic and it is going to be around for many more centuries.

0:20:330:20:38

For ever, I would say, Paul.

0:20:380:20:41

It is just something that never goes completely out of fashion.

0:20:410:20:44

You know what they say about fashion, don't they? It goes around in cycles.

0:20:440:20:47

-And shawls will become very popular.

-Absolutely. Absolutely.

0:20:470:20:52

Ellen, thank you so much for taking time out and talking to us.

0:20:520:20:55

I've learnt lots. And a little tip I can give you,

0:20:550:20:58

which I picked up from Ellen earlier on -

0:20:580:21:00

the most desirable ones for collectors are not the earliest,

0:21:000:21:03

they're the ones with the pattern right through the middle.

0:21:030:21:06

And if you find one of those in a charity shop,

0:21:060:21:08

all I say is, snap it up real quick.

0:21:080:21:12

Absolutely! Absolutely.

0:21:120:21:14

It's D-Day for our items from Paisley.

0:21:210:21:23

We've come to the Great Western Auction Rooms in Glasgow to sell them, but how will they do?

0:21:230:21:29

-Adam found something very local.

-I was hoping to find something Scottish.

0:21:300:21:35

Top of the list was Monart glass.

0:21:350:21:37

Philip picked up this Wedgwood majolica fruit bowl.

0:21:370:21:41

'I found this stationery cabinet to die for.

0:21:410:21:45

'How about this sexy bronze statue?'

0:21:450:21:47

Doesn't get much better than that, does it?

0:21:470:21:50

On the rostrum today is Anita Manning.

0:21:500:21:53

We should have a lot of local interest with this next lot coming up, shouldn't we, Bobby?

0:21:530:21:59

-I hope so.

-The Monart glass.

0:21:590:22:01

It's a vase and it's absolutely lovely.

0:22:010:22:03

Tell us why you love to be called Bobby, cos that's been your nickname for a long, long time.

0:22:030:22:07

Because I was given that nickname many years ago by my brothers

0:22:070:22:13

when I had my hair cut in the old bob style,

0:22:130:22:16

and I looked neither male nor female.

0:22:160:22:19

I was christened Bob, and my brothers took it up as Bobby.

0:22:190:22:23

-Ah!

-So I've been Bobby ever since.

-You suit Bobby, don't you?

0:22:230:22:27

I prefer it, yes.

0:22:270:22:28

OK, let's do our best for you.

0:22:280:22:30

327 is our own Monart glass,

0:22:300:22:34

Scottish glass from Perthshire. Start me at £50.

0:22:340:22:39

50 bid. 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110.

0:22:390:22:46

We're in the right place to sell this.

0:22:460:22:48

£120. Any advance on 120?

0:22:480:22:52

All done at 120. 120.

0:22:520:22:55

Yes. £120.

0:22:550:22:58

That's going to go a long way to buying her mattress, isn't it?

0:22:580:23:02

Well, it does, because I've actually priced one at £100.

0:23:020:23:06

Bobby's done her homework.

0:23:060:23:08

THEY LAUGH

0:23:080:23:10

Bobby wasn't born yesterday!

0:23:100:23:12

You know, I'm so pleased you brought in that stationery cabinet.

0:23:180:23:22

That made my day at the valuation, it really did.

0:23:220:23:25

Gosh, it's so tactile.

0:23:250:23:26

It looks fantastic over there.

0:23:260:23:28

It's got a good maker's name.

0:23:280:23:31

And the condition is superb. I think it's got everything going for it.

0:23:310:23:34

It's even a good size as well.

0:23:340:23:36

A lot of stationery cabinets, we've seen them on the show before

0:23:360:23:40

and they're quite big and bulky, and sort of take up the table top if you put them down.

0:23:400:23:44

This is cute. Oh, it's tidy, all right, isn't it?

0:23:440:23:48

Lot 452 is this superb quality

0:23:480:23:53

walnut veneered stationery box by Parkins & Gotto of London.

0:23:530:23:59

Start me at 100. 100 bid, sir.

0:23:590:24:02

Any advance on £100?

0:24:020:24:05

110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160,

0:24:050:24:11

170, 180, 190, 200, 210, 220.

0:24:110:24:18

£220.

0:24:180:24:21

£220. 230?

0:24:210:24:25

Fresh bidder at 230. It's a lovely box.

0:24:250:24:28

230. Any advance on £230? Any advance?

0:24:280:24:34

All done at 230. 230.

0:24:340:24:37

Sold it. Wasn't bad, was it? Nearly mid-estimate.

0:24:370:24:40

Very good. 200 was the estimate?

0:24:400:24:43

Yeah, two to three.

0:24:430:24:45

So we've gone a bit over. That was a lovely little thing.

0:24:450:24:48

I so much enjoyed talking about that and touching it and holding it.

0:24:480:24:53

-It had a real personality, didn't it?

-It did.

0:24:530:24:56

You're going to miss that, aren't you?

0:24:560:24:57

Not really. It's a different era.

0:24:570:25:00

I'm living in this era.

0:25:000:25:03

I like living in the past, personally.

0:25:030:25:05

I wish I could all the time.

0:25:050:25:07

That's too much in the past.

0:25:070:25:09

Thanks so much for coming in and talking to us, and for bringing such a wonderful item in.

0:25:090:25:14

-And enjoy spending the money.

-Yes. I will.

0:25:140:25:17

Next up, the majolica Wedgwood fruit bowl. It's real quality.

0:25:230:25:27

£300 to £500. It belongs to Stacey or, should I say, your mum.

0:25:270:25:32

-And your mum's given you permission to flog this.

-Aye, she has.

0:25:320:25:36

-Don't you want to inherit it?

-No.

0:25:360:25:39

-Don't you like it?

-It's fine,

0:25:390:25:41

but I don't have anywhere to display fruit, which is what my mum uses it for.

0:25:410:25:45

Ah. OK. I'd love to see this get the top end of this, but that's down to our expert, Philip.

0:25:450:25:50

Will we get that £500? Three to five on this.

0:25:500:25:55

I'd be really disappointed if it didn't do well. It's a lovely thing.

0:25:550:26:00

This majolica stuff, it's gone up a little bit over the last 18 months or so, but it's such a lovely thing.

0:26:000:26:07

The Americans were really hot on this. They loved it.

0:26:070:26:10

-If it does well, I've got an invite to dinner riding on it.

-Have you?

0:26:100:26:13

-I'm hoping it does well.

-If he starts being nice to me,

0:26:130:26:16

-he might get an invite.

-Has he been trouble?

-Yes.

0:26:160:26:19

She's been awful.

0:26:190:26:21

He's caused a domestic.

0:26:210:26:23

-We don't want to cause you any more "domestics", do we?

-No.

0:26:250:26:28

Right, it's going under the hammer right now. Here we go, Stacey.

0:26:280:26:32

Lot 439.

0:26:320:26:34

A 19th century Wedgwood majolica strawberry set

0:26:340:26:38

with the basket and sugar and cream.

0:26:380:26:41

Will you start me at £200? 200 bid.

0:26:410:26:45

200 bid. Any advance on 200?

0:26:450:26:49

210, 220, 230, 240, 250, 260.

0:26:490:26:53

£260.

0:26:530:26:56

Any advance on 260 on the majolica? Any advance on 260?

0:26:560:27:02

All done at 260. 260.

0:27:020:27:05

Yes, she's put the hammer down and she's sold it at 260.

0:27:050:27:09

So, we had a reserve of 250.

0:27:090:27:11

Cheekily tucked in there, Philip.

0:27:110:27:13

But that's still disappointing, isn't it? Mm?

0:27:130:27:16

A wee bit. At least, we'll get a night out!

0:27:160:27:19

-You'll get a night out!

-You might get a night out,

0:27:190:27:23

if you're nice to me.

0:27:230:27:26

She's a lovely girl.

0:27:260:27:27

-Enjoy your night out.

-Thank you. Thank you.

0:27:270:27:29

It's absolutely stunning.

0:27:340:27:36

It has created a laugh, we've all had fun with this.

0:27:360:27:39

-Good novelty item.

-We had a value put on at £300 to £500.

0:27:390:27:43

Which was very sensible considering the damage, but since the valuation day,

0:27:430:27:48

-I know you have upped the reserve a bit.

-Just a wee bit.

0:27:480:27:52

What is the new reserve?

0:27:520:27:54

-400.

-Right.

0:27:540:27:56

And we've got a new valuation of 400 to 600.

0:27:560:28:00

I bet it's caused a good old laugh in the house, hasn't it?

0:28:000:28:03

Yes. Everybody in the family's always handled it.

0:28:030:28:07

-Yeah. You can see all the rub marks.

-Yes, Paul, that's right.

0:28:070:28:11

But I do know all the money is going towards a trike.

0:28:110:28:17

-For you?

-Yes.

0:28:170:28:18

-Really?

-Mm-hm.

-Are you into biking?

-Yes.

0:28:180:28:21

Do you have a bike at the moment?

0:28:210:28:23

No. My partner has, but I don't.

0:28:230:28:25

-I can only sit on the back of it.

-OK.

0:28:250:28:28

And if I was on two wheels on my own, I'd fall off.

0:28:280:28:33

That's exciting, isn't it? Good for you.

0:28:330:28:35

See you out on the road one day on your trike.

0:28:350:28:38

-I'll wave.

-OK.

0:28:380:28:40

It's an Egyptian mummy, ladies and gentlemen.

0:28:400:28:43

It's a wonderful piece, ladies and gentlemen, Franz Bergman.

0:28:430:28:47

Start me at 400.

0:28:470:28:48

£200 then? 200. 200 bid.

0:28:480:28:52

-We're in.

-200 bid.

0:28:520:28:54

-It's low, but we're in.

-Any advance on 200?

0:28:540:28:58

-There's someone on the phone.

-260,

0:28:580:29:00

280, 300, 320, 340, 360, 380, 400.

0:29:000:29:08

-Coming out the woodwork now, aren't they?

-420, 440, 460, 480.

0:29:080:29:13

500. 520, 540, 560, 580, 600.

0:29:130:29:20

620. £620 on the floor.

0:29:200:29:24

-That's all right, isn't it?

-It's good.

-Any advance on 620?

0:29:240:29:27

All done at 620. 620.

0:29:270:29:30

-Yes! I'm pleased, very pleased.

-So am I.

0:29:300:29:34

That's a lot of money towards a bike, isn't it?

0:29:340:29:36

-Or the leathers, maybe.

-I've got my leathers!

0:29:360:29:38

You've got your leathers, have you?

0:29:380:29:40

That's the last of our lots from Scotland.

0:29:400:29:43

What a great final result for Mae, who walks away with £620.

0:29:430:29:49

But can we do any better down in Plymouth?

0:29:490:29:51

This seafaring city sits on the beautiful Devon coast,

0:29:530:29:56

famous for its beaches and holiday resorts.

0:29:560:29:59

Later, I'll be taking the strangest trip of my life.

0:30:010:30:04

But first, our experts, David Barby and Jethro Mars have already started advising all these people

0:30:040:30:12

at the Civic Hall in Plymouth on whether their items are worth taking to auction.

0:30:120:30:16

Pat, you were the one responsible for bringing this into your home. How did that happen?

0:30:160:30:20

A few years ago, a gentleman moved into our area with no family.

0:30:200:30:26

And I became friendly with him through our dogs.

0:30:260:30:31

He became ill a couple of years ago.

0:30:310:30:34

He asked if I would nurse him as a carer

0:30:340:30:38

and that I did, until he passed.

0:30:380:30:43

-This was bequeathed to myself.

-These were his father's?

0:30:430:30:47

They were, yes.

0:30:470:30:49

It is Frederick Ablewhite.

0:30:490:30:52

Dick, you have been researching these items. What have you found out?

0:30:520:30:56

I have traced them back onto the ST Paul Jackson.

0:30:560:30:59

Which is a sailing ship.

0:30:590:31:00

And I found that he had been all around Australia with the Paul Jackson.

0:31:000:31:05

He has been with P and O, right since he started.

0:31:050:31:08

To get the Apprentice's Certificate...

0:31:080:31:11

That's what you've got here? This is ordinary apprentice's indenture.

0:31:110:31:15

Had to pay 100 guineas.

0:31:150:31:17

-So at the end of his term, he had to pay?

-Yes.

0:31:170:31:19

-£105?

-£105, yeah.

-That was a lot of money.

0:31:190:31:24

It certainly was, yes.

0:31:240:31:26

You've got all this documentation and then you have this wonderful midshipman's dirk that he had.

0:31:260:31:32

And this is the piece

0:31:320:31:35

you've really brought along today. Now, the dirk - it's not the sword, we mustn't call it a sword -

0:31:350:31:41

its a dress dirk and it would have been worn on formal occasions, the blade inside the

0:31:410:31:47

sheath of the scabbard here, beautiful condition, this leather scabbard, wonderful condition.

0:31:470:31:52

The blade, we've got one or two little rust spots but nothing too much of a problem.

0:31:520:31:56

This wire bound sharkskin handle, again in lovely condition and the leather outer case as well.

0:31:560:32:04

So often, it's all tatty and falling apart.

0:32:040:32:06

And here's the gentleman himself - Midshipman Ablewhite.

0:32:060:32:10

When do you think that photo might have been taken?

0:32:100:32:13

I should imagine about 1920-1923.

0:32:130:32:17

And we've also got, I don't know if this is his cap badge.

0:32:180:32:21

-I believe it is, yes.

-And you've got the standard service medal.

0:32:210:32:26

So, really, as a lot, it's all self-supporting.

0:32:260:32:30

It tells us about the man, gives us his life history,

0:32:300:32:32

so collectors of this sort of thing are going to be really interested.

0:32:320:32:37

You don't want to keep it and carry on

0:32:370:32:39

-the interest yourself?

-No.

0:32:390:32:42

We would love it to go to somebody who's interested.

0:32:420:32:46

I'm not an expert on this sort of militaria, but I've spoken to a colleague and we feel

0:32:460:32:53

this is probably going to be worth, as a group,

0:32:530:32:57

perhaps £250 - £300.

0:32:570:33:01

-It's a little bit less than you were hoping, isn't it?

-I saw a piece

0:33:010:33:05

in not as good condition advertised on the internet

0:33:050:33:09

for quite a bit more,

0:33:090:33:12

-and it did sell.

-It did?

-Yes.

0:33:120:33:14

At the end of the day, what we've got to do is have confidence in the auctioneer.

0:33:140:33:18

If we say we don't want to put a reserve at less than £250,

0:33:180:33:23

of course if they feel they could put more on it, then they will do.

0:33:230:33:26

-If we put the reserve at £250, you'd be happy with that?

-Yes.

0:33:260:33:30

Let's hope we can find someone who would perhaps pay up to that £300.

0:33:300:33:34

-Yes.

-Yeah, let's.

-Thank you.

0:33:340:33:36

-Can I call you Babs?

-Of course you can.

0:33:400:33:42

Well, Babs, I was hoping something was going to come

0:33:420:33:45

into the room today that we could relate to Plymouth

0:33:450:33:48

and this is one of those objects that I wanted.

0:33:480:33:55

This shows Plymouth and its association with the Navy.

0:33:550:33:58

This painting by an artist called Frank Watson-Woods, a local artist

0:33:580:34:05

who painted naval vessels.

0:34:050:34:07

Anything to do with the Navy.

0:34:070:34:10

Here we have HMS Revenge sailing out of Plymouth.

0:34:100:34:16

It's such an evocative picture, particularly with this setting sun in the background.

0:34:160:34:22

How did this come into your possession?

0:34:220:34:24

It was left to my mother's house and when my mother died my sister had it

0:34:240:34:29

and then I said to her, "don't get rid of it, I would like it".

0:34:290:34:34

And that's how I got it.

0:34:340:34:36

What was she going to do with it?

0:34:360:34:38

Put it in the dustbin, I'm afraid.

0:34:380:34:40

I can't believe it.

0:34:400:34:42

Well, she doesn't have no interest in pictures like that.

0:34:420:34:46

And I was really enthralled with it.

0:34:460:34:49

I think it's lovely.

0:34:490:34:51

It's so evocative of a time past.

0:34:510:34:54

Although the artist died in 1958, I think that's the date he died,

0:34:540:34:59

this one is a much earlier period.

0:34:590:35:02

So we are probably looking at '30s, '40s, that sort of date.

0:35:020:35:05

-Oh, I see.

-But it is a beautifully well executed watercolour.

0:35:050:35:10

Watercolour, is it?

0:35:100:35:12

Now why are you selling it?

0:35:120:35:14

Well...I've got nobody else to leave it to.

0:35:140:35:18

And my daughter is going to put it in a bin bag

0:35:180:35:22

-and get rid of it.

-Really?

0:35:220:35:24

So, rather than do that, I thought I would bring it along to Flog It!

0:35:240:35:30

Babs, it's a story I hear so often where youngsters do not want anything from the past.

0:35:300:35:36

-No.

-They reject anything that is old.

0:35:360:35:40

-That's right.

-This, I think, is a lovely, lovely picture.

0:35:400:35:44

It may well be that the new owner, if it sells at auction...

0:35:440:35:48

-If it sells.

-Will want to put it into a more modern mount.

0:35:480:35:52

Instead of having this gold, they'll have a white mount put all the way around it.

0:35:520:35:57

-I see.

-And in possibly

0:35:570:35:58

a simple frame.

0:35:580:36:01

So you get the image of that watercolour

0:36:010:36:04

and also at that time they could re-back it with acid-free tissue.

0:36:040:36:08

-Oh, I see.

-But this one is good because there's no blemish on it at all, there's no foxing.

0:36:080:36:12

It is a very, very attractive watercolour in excellent condition.

0:36:120:36:17

And because it's Plymouth, it's going to find a market.

0:36:170:36:21

Now let's talk about price. How much do you think it's worth?

0:36:210:36:24

-Well, I only thought it was worth £20.

-I'll give it you now!

0:36:240:36:29

-I wouldn't sell it for £20 because I do hang it, it has been hung in the hallway.

-Are you still married?

0:36:290:36:36

I'm still married, yes.

0:36:360:36:38

How long have you been married?

0:36:380:36:40

-56 years.

-56 years! That's an incredible length of time.

0:36:400:36:45

To the same man?

0:36:450:36:46

To the same man.

0:36:460:36:48

And I've loved him ever since.

0:36:480:36:50

And he's in agreement about you selling this?

0:36:500:36:52

Well yes, he said, "It's yours. If you want to get rid of it, get rid of it. I'm not worried.

0:36:520:36:59

"If you want to sell it, get rid of it."

0:36:590:37:02

-I think it's going to do much more than your £20.

-Do you?

0:37:020:37:05

I'd like to put £100 in front of it, say £120-200, although it has been

0:37:050:37:11

recorded as selling between £200-400.

0:37:110:37:14

So we might have a nice surprise at auction.

0:37:140:37:17

Let's keep our feet on the ground.

0:37:170:37:20

-Yes.

-And put a reserve in the region of about £100.

-Oh lovely. Lovely.

0:37:200:37:25

And hopefully we shall find somebody prepared to pay over £200.

0:37:250:37:28

Maureen, I've seen these little fellas before.

0:37:340:37:38

-So have I.

-I did a valuation on one not so long ago.

-Yes.

0:37:380:37:40

And the poor little owl, he had no eyes. Is that the programme you saw?

0:37:400:37:44

Yes. I watch it every afternoon.

0:37:440:37:46

-A big, big Flog It! fan.

-Very big.

0:37:460:37:49

Well, you know that little owl, he was sterling silver, but with no eyes, he sold for over £300.

0:37:490:37:55

Just £300 I think it was, yes.

0:37:550:37:58

-So, how long have you had this little owl?

-About three months.

0:37:580:38:02

Did you buy it purely because you saw it on Flog It!?

0:38:020:38:05

-I bought it because I liked it.

-And then you saw Flog It!?

-I saw Flog It!

0:38:050:38:09

Prior to that I had seen it in my little book at home.

0:38:090:38:12

And how much did you pay for this?

0:38:120:38:13

-50p.

-50p! Well I think you've turned a profit if you want to sell this.

0:38:130:38:17

-Which means you might be tempted to flog it?

-Well, possibly.

0:38:170:38:21

Well, let's pick him up and have a look, shall we?

0:38:210:38:23

He is beautifully chased. He is silver.

0:38:230:38:26

As you can see by the piercings there, it is a pepper pot.

0:38:260:38:30

Now it's got a bayonet fitting. You twist it and pull it.

0:38:300:38:33

Very much like putting in a lamp.

0:38:330:38:36

-Yes.

-I've inspected both parts.

0:38:360:38:40

-There are no hallmarks.

-No.

0:38:400:38:42

There were on the other one you sold.

0:38:420:38:44

They were on the other one. Yeah, he was an English one.

0:38:440:38:46

This is silver but it's continental silver.

0:38:460:38:49

And I believe this was made in Germany.

0:38:490:38:51

-A lot of them were made in Germany. Circa 1900.

-Getting on a bit then!

0:38:510:38:55

He's getting on a bit but he's in very good condition, isn't he?

0:38:550:38:58

I haven't tried cleaning it at all.

0:38:580:39:00

And I don't blame you, don't clean it.

0:39:000:39:02

Look at the plumage, look at the feathers.

0:39:020:39:04

It's lovely, isn't it? Each individual little feather.

0:39:040:39:07

That's all chased by hand.

0:39:070:39:08

I think it's gorgeous, I really do.

0:39:080:39:12

But unfortunately, there are no hallmarks which will slightly devalue it.

0:39:120:39:16

But it's got to do I would say it around about in between £160-260.

0:39:160:39:22

Not far short.

0:39:220:39:24

-No, not bad for 50p.

-And not bad for 50 pence either, yeah.

0:39:240:39:28

Let's put him into auction with a valuation of £160-260.

0:39:280:39:34

-We'll put a reserve of £160.

-That's fine.

0:39:340:39:37

Which means the auction it could use a little bit of discretion, 10%.

0:39:370:39:40

-OK.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:39:400:39:42

Jenny, these are in appalling condition, where have they been?

0:39:490:39:52

Well actually I rescued them from a skip.

0:39:520:39:55

-A skip?

-A skip. A house clearance.

0:39:550:39:56

But you were astute enough to say, don't throw those away.

0:39:560:40:00

-No, I quite like them actually.

-I think they're very good.

0:40:000:40:03

There's always something very poignant about postcard albums.

0:40:030:40:06

-Because you don't know the person that collected these.

-No.

0:40:060:40:09

And obviously they meant so much, to preserve pictures like this one.

0:40:090:40:14

The HMS Hood. Well that was blown up in the First World War.

0:40:140:40:17

These are a complete cavalcade of history at the beginning of the 20th century.

0:40:170:40:23

Then you have got the more humorous ones here, particularly Donald McGill and Mabel Lucie Atwell.

0:40:230:40:28

These are great names for postcard collectors.

0:40:280:40:31

-Really?

-And you've got the place names as well like Clevedon.

0:40:310:40:34

Oh and look at this one here, here we have Felix here.

0:40:340:40:37

"I am surprised at you, Felix."

0:40:370:40:39

There's another pussycat. And you've got other album here.

0:40:390:40:42

Oh, these are quite good.

0:40:440:40:46

They have been embellished with silk ribbons.

0:40:460:40:48

And even with little glass eyes.

0:40:480:40:52

-I've never seen that before.

-No, nor have I.

0:40:520:40:54

-And those in their own right are collector's items.

-Are they?

0:40:540:40:58

Yeah. These albums are full of collector's items.

0:40:580:41:01

-There's a huge cacophony of subjects here which are going to appeal.

-Really? That's good.

0:41:010:41:07

I think these will surprise you. How much do you think they're worth?

0:41:070:41:10

-I've got no idea, really. No idea.

-How long ago did you acquire them?

0:41:100:41:14

-10, 11 years.

-10, 11 years ago.

0:41:140:41:17

I think if someone's going to throw them away then, OK, 11 years ago...

0:41:170:41:20

-Because it's more recent that the postcard market has come to the fore.

-Right.

0:41:200:41:24

But even then they'd have had some value.

0:41:240:41:26

And you are also including this cigarette cards album, are you not?

0:41:260:41:30

-Yes.

-These are quite good from a collector's point of view and I'll tell you why.

0:41:300:41:35

Because these cards are all loose.

0:41:350:41:39

They're not glued down. In very good condition.

0:41:390:41:42

-Yes.

-But they are complete sets, aren't they.

-Yeah, they are.

0:41:420:41:45

They are mainly by Players and Wills.

0:41:450:41:49

But you've got one interesting set here by Hignett's Cigarettes,

0:41:490:41:53

which show various national greetings. "Bonjour", "Salaam",

0:41:530:41:58

and other...

0:41:580:42:00

Oh, these are quite nice. The colours are beautiful.

0:42:020:42:04

So these are interesting cards.

0:42:040:42:07

-I reckon these albums could be worth something in the region of about £120 up to £200.

-Really? Gosh.

0:42:070:42:15

That will certainly boost it up to the £200 mark. What do you think?

0:42:150:42:18

-That's great, yeah.

-Well I think there's going to be loads

0:42:180:42:21

of collectors out there fighting to get their hands on these albums.

0:42:210:42:24

They're really, really good. Thanks for bringing them along.

0:42:240:42:28

Thanks for looking at them.

0:42:280:42:30

So let's have a reminder of all the items we found here in Plymouth.

0:42:320:42:36

Pat and Richard brought in this collection of naval memorabilia after caring for the owner.

0:42:360:42:41

Jenny inherited these albums from a friend who wanted to get rid of them.

0:42:420:42:46

I think the bidders will see money in these pages.

0:42:460:42:50

Maureen paid just 50p for this silver owl pepper pot

0:42:500:42:54

and I think it's worth at least £160.

0:42:540:42:58

And Babs rescued this painting by Frank Watson Woods after her sister wanted to throw it out.

0:42:580:43:04

While these items go off to auction, I've come down to Bigbury-on-Sea

0:43:050:43:09

on the Devon coast to see a real piece of history.

0:43:090:43:13

The trouble is, getting there is not going to be easy.

0:43:130:43:17

Now what makes this so unique is Burgh Island behind me.

0:43:170:43:21

It's 200 metres out to sea and at high tide it is completely

0:43:210:43:24

cut off, adding mystery and romance to its very splendid art deco hotel.

0:43:240:43:31

Munitions millionaire, Archie Nettlefold started to build what is now the hotel in 1929.

0:43:400:43:47

The current owners, Tony Orchard and Deborah Clark just completed a £2 million refit.

0:43:470:43:52

It's an absolutely staggering achievement. It is superb in design.

0:43:520:43:57

And I think it's the best time to visit now since the 1920s or '30s.

0:43:570:44:01

So you come through two sets of double art deco doors. Now that is an architectural delight in itself.

0:44:090:44:15

But look at this, look what it brings you to, the original staircase.

0:44:150:44:19

It's absolutely magnificent.

0:44:190:44:21

It pulls you along, it sweeps you along with these lovely scrolling waves and leads you

0:44:210:44:26

into this, the ballroom. How about that?

0:44:260:44:30

As soon as you walk into this room it lifts your spirits, it puts a big smile on your face.

0:44:300:44:35

But like everything else in the hotel, it is on the bijou scale.

0:44:350:44:39

But nonetheless, that is magnificent.

0:44:390:44:42

It's easy to imagine the scene in the 1920s and '30s.

0:44:420:44:47

The decadent dinner dances with the beautiful people of the day

0:44:470:44:51

letting their hair down and getting involved in rather risque goings-on.

0:44:510:44:54

Uncle Archie Nettlefold was a great bon vivre.

0:44:540:44:58

He got involved with silent film production in the 1920s and was known for his wild parties.

0:44:580:45:04

He had the sense of great fun, salvaging the rear end of HMS

0:45:040:45:08

Ganges, the last wooden flagship, and using it as a cocktail bar.

0:45:080:45:13

Which leads you into the original dining room.

0:45:130:45:17

Just take a look at this.

0:45:170:45:20

It absolutely oozes nostalgia.

0:45:200:45:22

Could you imagine dining here in the evening?

0:45:220:45:25

Oh, gosh!

0:45:250:45:27

This I love, the original Nettlefold's sign.

0:45:270:45:30

Take a look at these radiators.

0:45:300:45:33

They run the length of this wall, heavy-duty cast-iron, Art Deco style.

0:45:330:45:38

They are virtually like classical columns

0:45:380:45:41

but they've got these little jazzy Art Deco hats on at the top there.

0:45:410:45:44

This is an original photograph of what the dining room used to look like in its early days.

0:45:440:45:51

The hotel is now a mixture of the original furniture and fittings which have been restored.

0:45:510:45:56

A few authentic purchases and some fun modern touches which all have the Art Deco feel.

0:45:560:46:02

The whole thing gets better and better. I'm now in the Palm Court.

0:46:020:46:06

It's a wonderful place to relax. Have a drink.

0:46:060:46:10

Look at these stunning panoramic views. That's the Devon coastline all out there.

0:46:100:46:14

That's something to soak up, especially sitting underneath

0:46:140:46:17

this domed, stained-glass window and it's fashioned like a peacock with all the feathers moving outwards.

0:46:170:46:24

It really does take you back to the 1930s.

0:46:240:46:27

The only thing that's missing, of course, is a cocktail

0:46:270:46:30

but lucky enough for me we have Burgh Island's barman here, Gary...

0:46:300:46:35

How do you do? To help me out.

0:46:350:46:37

-Pleased to meet you, Paul.

-What can I have?

0:46:370:46:39

-We've got Singapore Sling.

-Yes.

0:46:390:46:43

-Mermaid's Kiss.

-Sounds very exotic.

0:46:430:46:45

What about a classic Burgh Island Martini?

0:46:450:46:48

I'm gonna have that because it would be rude not to, Burgh Island Martini, yes please.

0:46:480:46:52

Just the job.

0:46:520:46:54

There's a lot of gin there.

0:47:090:47:10

-Thank you, Gary.

-There you go.

0:47:200:47:23

-It looks great.

-Fantastic.

0:47:230:47:26

That's strong, that's neat alcohol.

0:47:310:47:33

Tell me about Archie Nettlefold's original guests.

0:47:330:47:37

The kind of place it is, it always attracted characters, theatricals, dramatic types.

0:47:370:47:43

So there was a certain element which, even to this day, you still get that certain type of person.

0:47:430:47:49

-They want to escape?

-They want to escape.

0:47:490:47:51

They have a really lovely, mild mannered existence in London so they

0:47:510:47:56

want to come down here and basically let their hair down and basically get up to all sorts of mischief.

0:47:560:48:02

What sort of guests are we talking about?

0:48:020:48:04

There's been countless.

0:48:040:48:06

You know you are talking about George Formby in the '30s,

0:48:060:48:10

Noel Coward came for three days and stayed for three weeks.

0:48:100:48:15

-Can you imagine?

-Yes. Because he loved it so much!

0:48:150:48:18

Amy Johnson came to open Plymouth airport in 1932.

0:48:180:48:21

-Oh yes, the pilot.

-In 1932.

0:48:210:48:23

And, of course, Agatha Christie came, she used to come down here with Max, her second husband.

0:48:230:48:28

Has it changed much today? Who do get coming along now?

0:48:280:48:32

It's still entertainment, actors and these days, pop stars.

0:48:320:48:36

-In a way it hasn't changed much at all.

-Long may it live on.

0:48:360:48:40

-Thank you very much.

-Pleasure.

0:48:400:48:41

Carry on the tradition and I'm going to check out Agatha Christie's hut.

0:48:410:48:45

She loved the place so much that she wrote two of her novels on Burgh Island.

0:48:460:48:50

Here we are, Agatha Christie's original writing hut.

0:48:500:48:54

Look at that, touch wood, some of the original boards

0:48:540:48:56

and what a view! Just look at that for inspiration.

0:48:560:49:01

Gosh, I feel creative already.

0:49:010:49:04

Let's have a look inside.

0:49:040:49:05

Once you get inside, it has changed a little.

0:49:050:49:09

Obviously it has been kitted out superbly in true Art Deco style.

0:49:090:49:14

I must read you something from Agatha Christie's novel,

0:49:140:49:16

And Then There Were None, which was actually written in this very room.

0:49:160:49:21

Listen to this passage.

0:49:210:49:23

"There was something magical about an island.

0:49:230:49:25

"The mere words suggest fantasy.

0:49:250:49:27

"You lost touch with the world, an island was a world of its own.

0:49:270:49:32

"A world perhaps from which you may never return."

0:49:320:49:36

We had some great successes earlier in the programme but can we

0:49:420:49:45

do any better here at Eldred's, our Plymouth auction house?

0:49:450:49:50

Jethro has chosen naval memorabilia while my vote goes to this lovely silver owl pepper pot.

0:49:500:49:57

I think he's gorgeous. I really do.

0:49:570:50:00

David favoured the cigarette and postcard albums

0:50:000:50:03

and what could be better than to see an item that is really local?

0:50:030:50:07

Auctioneer, Anthony Eldred is in charge of the selling here

0:50:070:50:10

in Plymouth and I think we're going to be in for some real surprises.

0:50:100:50:15

It's the naval dirk with all the memorabilia, belongs to Pat and Richard here.

0:50:150:50:19

Why are you flogging this?

0:50:190:50:21

Well, it's much better to go somewhere where it can be appreciated.

0:50:210:50:26

Yes, and what a great place Plymouth is for selling naval memorabilia.

0:50:260:50:30

-That's why you've come down from Norfolk, haven't you?

-We have, yes.

0:50:300:50:33

That is absolutely sensible, isn't it?

0:50:330:50:36

It gives us a good chance of a few days' holiday.

0:50:360:50:39

-Let's hope we can send you home exceptionally happy with a great price.

-We hope so.

0:50:390:50:43

Lot 87, which is a dirk, naval dirk memorabilia and medals,

0:50:430:50:49

all relating to Frederick Ablewhite.

0:50:490:50:54

-Several bids on this, I'm bid £260 to start.

-We're away.

0:50:540:50:59

260? At £260... 70 if you want it.

0:50:590:51:02

-At 260, 270. 80...

-Come on, come on.

0:51:020:51:05

290, 300?

0:51:050:51:07

At £300 then.

0:51:070:51:09

At 300, any more in the room at 300?

0:51:090:51:11

-Come on, a bit more please.

-Any more in the room at 300? At £300 then.

0:51:110:51:15

Are you all done at 300?

0:51:150:51:17

Short and sharp, wasn't it? With 300 quid we're sending you home happy.

0:51:190:51:23

-Yes.

-Yes.

-What are you gonna put that towards?

0:51:230:51:26

We're gonna have a bid on a little Victorian glass lamp over there.

0:51:260:51:31

Oh, are you? That one down there? Well, good luck on that.

0:51:310:51:35

-Catch up with you later.

-Thank you very much.

0:51:350:51:37

Well it's my turn to be the expert now

0:51:420:51:44

and we are gonna have a hoot with this next lot, aren't we, Maureen?

0:51:440:51:47

-Hopefully.

-Hopefully, yes, it's that little silver owl.

0:51:470:51:51

£160 to £250, he's a continental bird.

0:51:510:51:54

We had a chat to the auctioneer earlier.

0:51:540:51:56

He said, "Yes, Paul, it's quality, it is gonna sell,"

0:51:560:52:00

but he thinks the lower end.

0:52:000:52:02

I'm still sticking my neck out for the top end cos, as you know,

0:52:020:52:05

we've had some good results on these little birds before, haven't we?

0:52:050:52:08

Now, have you changed your mind, do you want to keep him?

0:52:080:52:11

I'd like to, but no.

0:52:110:52:13

-You want the money?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:52:130:52:16

OK, let's flog it, shall we. This is it.

0:52:160:52:18

The continental silver owl pepper pot.

0:52:180:52:21

There he is and £100, I'll start at £100.

0:52:210:52:24

10 if you want it, at 100, 10 anywhere? At £100 only then.

0:52:240:52:28

Are you all done at 100, 10, 20 130, 140, 150... Bidding?

0:52:280:52:35

At 150 then in the centre here.

0:52:350:52:37

At £150, take 5 if you like.

0:52:370:52:39

All done at £150 then?

0:52:390:52:42

-He's sold it.

-That's all right.

-£150.

-It'll buy some tins of paint.

0:52:440:52:48

Just got it away. He was right, actually, wasn't he?

0:52:480:52:50

-Yes.

-He got the lower end.

0:52:500:52:52

-It wasn't English, was it?

-No, no.

0:52:520:52:54

That's gonna buy the paint though.

0:52:540:52:56

-Oh yes.

-Cos you're halfway through some DIY.

0:52:560:52:58

-I've got quite a bit of painting to do, yes.

-So have I, at home as well.

0:52:580:53:02

-It's a chore, isn't it?

-It is.

0:53:020:53:04

It's only until you finish all the prep and the rubbing down that you

0:53:040:53:08

actually put the colour on and you think, "Oh, it was all worth it."

0:53:080:53:11

And when you get to the end you've got to start again.

0:53:110:53:13

-Jenny, are you nervous?

-Yes.

0:53:180:53:20

-Is this your first auction?

-It is.

0:53:200:53:22

Fingers crossed, let's hope it's a lucky day for you.

0:53:220:53:25

We've got three albums, two of postcards, one of cigarette cards.

0:53:250:53:29

-That's right.

-Anthony, the auctioneer, has decided to split them

0:53:290:53:32

-into three separate lots as he feels they'll sell better that way.

-Right.

0:53:320:53:36

So each lot now has a new estimate.

0:53:360:53:39

This is the first lot going under the hammer right now.

0:53:390:53:41

Lot 142, a little collection of postcards there.

0:53:410:53:46

Lot 142, several bids... I'm bid...

0:53:460:53:50

Two bids. I'm bid exactly £120.

0:53:500:53:52

-Oh, fantastic.

-Brilliant.

0:53:520:53:53

130, 5, 140, 5?

0:53:530:53:56

At 145 now. At 150...

0:53:560:53:59

Jenny, we're gonna make lots of money, lots of money.

0:53:590:54:01

-Yeah.

-180, 190, 200...

0:54:010:54:03

Oh! 210, 220, 230...

0:54:030:54:07

Oh, they've spotted something!

0:54:070:54:08

260, 270?

0:54:080:54:11

At 270 now.

0:54:110:54:13

-280?

-It's incredible.

-Oh, my goodness.

-290. 300...

0:54:130:54:16

At £300 on my right.

0:54:160:54:19

-What a wonderful rescue.

-Are you quite sure, everybody, at £300?

0:54:190:54:22

That is superb.

0:54:240:54:26

Right, one down, next one, this is it.

0:54:260:54:29

Several bids again, I'm bid £70.

0:54:290:54:32

Oh wow! This is incredible.

0:54:320:54:35

..75, 80, 5, 90, 5...

0:54:350:54:39

At the back of the room now, at £95.

0:54:390:54:42

-100...

-We've just got 100.

-£100 again on the right.

0:54:420:54:44

-110, 120, 130, 140, 150...

-Wow!

0:54:440:54:50

-160, 170...

-It pays to be green!

0:54:500:54:53

At the very back at £170.

0:54:530:54:56

Are you all done, then, at 170?

0:54:560:54:58

-Fantastic, phones are going off all around me here.

-Oh my gosh.

0:55:010:55:04

Two down and one more to go. This is it.

0:55:040:55:06

..20 I'm bid, 5...

0:55:060:55:08

30, 5, 40, 5, 50, 5, £55 there by the door then.

0:55:080:55:14

At £55. Quite sure at 55?

0:55:140:55:17

-What was that total?

-£525!

-525 quid.

0:55:200:55:24

-That's great.

-What are you gonna do with that?

0:55:240:55:26

-I really don't know yet. I really don't know. I can't believe it.

-Stunners there.

0:55:260:55:31

There must have been a couple that the collectors really wanted.

0:55:310:55:35

Good for you for spotting them.

0:55:350:55:36

I've been looking forward to this, the water colour Frank Watson Wood's lot and lots of local interest.

0:55:410:55:46

I've been joined by Barbara and David, our expert.

0:55:460:55:49

You've got a lovely smile on your face, Barbara, haven't you?

0:55:490:55:53

You've been looking forward to it.

0:55:530:55:54

We're gonna make that smile even bigger later on.

0:55:540:55:57

You know we had a valuation?

0:55:570:55:58

We all saw David put the valuation 120 to 200 on this.

0:55:580:56:01

Had a chat to the auctioneer, Anthony, just before the sale

0:56:010:56:04

started and he said there's been lots of interest

0:56:040:56:08

-and he thinks it's going to go for £600 plus.

-Never!

0:56:080:56:14

Yes.

0:56:140:56:16

Great!

0:56:160:56:18

Fingers crossed.

0:56:180:56:19

-And you had it valued for £20.

-Yes.

0:56:190:56:22

-Six years ago.

-Yes.

0:56:220:56:24

-Barbara, oh, you're looking forward to this now, aren't you?

-I am.

0:56:240:56:29

-This is it.

-Next is Lot 5, which is the Frank Watson Wood, HMS Revenge,

0:56:290:56:35

a lot of commission bids for this.

0:56:350:56:37

I'm bid £450 to start the bids.

0:56:370:56:40

-£450?

-500, 50...

-50?

0:56:400:56:43

£550, 600 and 50.

0:56:430:56:47

-Never.

-700 and 50.

-Never.

0:56:470:56:50

Never, a proper job, isn't it?

0:56:500:56:52

-800 and 50.

-Great!

0:56:520:56:54

At £850, against you all.

0:56:540:56:56

900 and 50. Are you finished in the room at 950.

0:56:560:57:01

-1,000.

-Fantastic!

0:57:010:57:03

At 1,100, still against you all.

0:57:030:57:05

-1,200, 1,300...

-They love it.

0:57:050:57:08

1,400, 1,500...

0:57:080:57:11

At 1,500.

0:57:130:57:14

Still against you all in the room at 1,500.

0:57:140:57:18

-Oh, great.

-I'm holding you up.

0:57:180:57:20

At £1,500 then, it's on the book, against you all at 1,500...

0:57:200:57:24

That is a sold sound, £1,500.

0:57:240:57:28

-Great!

-What do you think?

0:57:280:57:30

-You're trembling.

-Thrilled to bits.

0:57:300:57:33

Barbara, where do you live?

0:57:330:57:36

-Plymouth.

-Born and bred.

-Yes.

0:57:360:57:38

A local lass then, proper job.

0:57:380:57:40

They say that in Cornwall. That's across the Tamar.

0:57:400:57:43

-That's true.

-What are you gonna put

0:57:430:57:45

£1,500 towards?

0:57:450:57:48

Well, I'm gonna share some of it with my grandchildren.

0:57:480:57:51

-How many have you got?

-Two.

-OK.

0:57:510:57:53

Then I'm gonna take my daughter away for a weekend.

0:57:530:57:57

I didn't think it would even reach 600 to be honest.

0:57:570:58:01

-You'd have been happy with David's 200, wouldn't you?

-Yes.

0:58:010:58:04

Well sadly we've come to the end of our show and the end of our journey north and south of the border.

0:58:060:58:11

We've seen some wonderful local items like that Monart vase in

0:58:110:58:15

Scotland but it's that painting illustrating Plymouth's naval heritage that will stay in my mind.

0:58:150:58:22

It's great to be back in the west country and I can't wait to come down to Plymouth again.

0:58:220:58:26

Remember, if you've got any antiques and collectibles you want to sell

0:58:260:58:30

then we want to know, so until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:58:300:58:33

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:330:58:36

E-mail [email protected]

0:58:360:58:38

In this specially extended edition of Flog It! presented by Paul Martin, it's north v south in a bid to find the best items to flog at auction.

The people of Paisley near Glasgow hope a Monart vase and a saucy bronze will raise the temperature in the sale room while bargain hunters in Plymouth are counting on some naval memorabilia to bring home a profit for them.