Milton Keynes Flog It!


Milton Keynes

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I only have to say to you roundabouts and concrete cows

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and most of you will know what I'm on about.

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Today, Flog It is in Milton Keynes.

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Mooo!

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It's hotly debated exactly

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how many roundabouts there are here in Milton Keynes.

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Some say there's a mere 300.

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Others say it's closer to 1,000.

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But whatever way you look at it, you have to look around and see there are loads of them!

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As for the concrete cows,

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they were a leaving present to Milton Keynes

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in 1978 from the American artist Liz Leyh.

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For works of art, they've had a rough time.

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A couple have been stolen.

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Pranksters have painted pyjamas on them, and some have had to be rebuilt

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after they were beheaded!

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The Mona Lisa didn't have this sort of trouble!

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All of these good people have been queuing patiently outside the venue,

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the Jurys Inn, in the heart of Milton Keynes.

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They're not here to see modern sculpture.

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They're here to chew the cud with our antiques experts Anita Manning and Kate Bateman.

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It's time to get the doors open and see what they've got to say.

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Everyone, follow me!

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Inside we go.

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Anita's spotted some plates. But I don't think anybody will be eating off these!

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David, Tina, welcome to Flog It.

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I'm so happy that you've brought us along these wonderful big plates.

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Who do they belong to?

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-Me.

-All right. Where did you get them, David?

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I inherited them from a great-aunt.

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She lived in Sweden for 40 to 50 years,

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having taught English to Swedish schoolchildren

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and got the MBE for her services.

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-Ah!

-So these arrived with me about 11 years ago

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in what was a living will.

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I imagine they're Swiss/Italian.

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Could be from the Zizino region of Switzerland

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or northern Italy

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or even a bit further south on the Italian Riviera

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around Portofino, that area.

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-You're very good, David. Are you after my job?

-I like the geography of Europe.

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-Tina, what did you think of them when they arrived?

-I thought they were beautiful.

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I still think that. If we had a high enough ceiling

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and a big enough room to put them in, then we would keep them.

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David, I think you're absolutely right in the geography.

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These are Swiss plates.

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They're from a Swiss factory.

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These would have been the type of items

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that would have been bought by people on their Grand Tour.

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-Oh, gosh.

-They date from the late 1800s to the early 20th century.

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They were made over a reasonable period of time.

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We have these hand-painted scenes in the centre.

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Both different scenes and probably from Switzerland.

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We have these high snow-clad mountains,

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the beautiful lakes

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and we have some little figures in boats.

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They are hand-painted. Not signed.

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They would have been done by artisans rather than artists.

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What I like best about them

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is this wonderful border.

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With these almost asymmetric bands

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of embossed flowers.

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They're big,

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they're bonny,

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they're in good condition.

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They were never fine items. They would be made in large quantities

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as souvenirs.

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-Production-type thing.

-Production-type thing,

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and they still have more quality

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than you would get from production items of today's age.

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So I would like to keep the estimate conservative.

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-OK.

-I would like to put them in

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with an estimate of 150 to 250.

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-That sounds fine.

-I would like to put a firm reserve of 150 on them,

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-with no discretion.

-Right.

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-Now, how do you feel about that?

-OK. They're your plates.

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-That sounds fine.

-Happy?

-Yes.

-Both of you happy?

-Yes!

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-Good. Let's go for 'em. Let's flog it.

-Thank you.

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Next is our new girl, Kate, who's found a glamorous little sparkler.

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So, Sadie and Leah, you've brought in this lovely ring.

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-What can you tell me about it?

-It was my nan's ring.

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I just had it in a jewellery box. My little girl, Leah, used to play in the garden with it.

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In the garden with it? Just to take it out and pretend it's yours?

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Did you ever drop it?

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-Lose it?

-I dropped it and, um...

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-I found it.

-In the garden.

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-We had a tub of flowers.

-Yeah.

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You are a lucky young lady.

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-So you don't know much about it?

-No.

-You inherited it.

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OK. Well, it's a really nice ring. Art Deco.

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Sort of like a dress ring.

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It's got lots of diamonds!

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Very sparkly, as you can see, and a central oval ruby.

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Date-wise it's about 1920s, 1930s.

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-Have you ever had it valued?

-I took it down to my local jeweller's.

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He just gave me a valuation to insure it

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between two and three.

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But he obviously said

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to take it to a proper auctioneer and let them have a look.

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-So he wasn't interested in buying it?

-No.

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Two to three thousand for an insurance valuation is right.

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You'd normally insure it at twice the price

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-that you'd expect to get at a sale.

-Yeah.

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And the problem is not a lot of people

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-are going to be able to wear it.

-That's it.

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-It's not something you'd pop down to the shops with?

-No.

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No. Not when I found out it was... I'd assumed it was a dress ring.

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I didn't assume it was real diamonds.

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It didn't look like that when we first had it.

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He cleaned it all up for me.

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-OK. So quite surprising to see it shining?

-Yes.

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That's why you got to play with it!

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So, if we were to put it into a sale,

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you'd probably expect maybe an estimate of 1,200 to £1,500, something like that.

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A reserve somewhere just below that, so £900 as a reserve.

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-Is that the sort of figure you'd sell it for?

-Yeah,

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because it's just sitting in a box.

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What would you do with the money? This is your inheritance, if they sell it.

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-Don't want to inherit it? Rather get the money?

-Yes.

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-We'll get another car.

-Another car. Fair enough.

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-If you're happy, we'll try and get you a new car. We'll flog it.

-Lovely.

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Cliff, it's great to see a drum on Flog It,

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being an ex-drummer. I have a drum kit at home and still love to play,

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but wasn't fortunate enough to have a Ringo Starr drum!

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-How old were you when you got this?

-About nine.

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-Mid-'60s.

-Mid-'60s. This is definitely '64, '66, somewhere around there.

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Did it inspire you to take up drumming?

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Afraid not. I was never a Beatles fan.

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-Rolling Stones.

-Yes.

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Either one or the other. The Beatles were the good guys

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and the Rolling Stones were the rock'n'roll bad guys, got into trouble.

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The only use it really had was me trying to wear out Ringo's face!

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I'm pleased you didn't cos this is the original skin.

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It's got the Ringo Starr signature with his little face on it,

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as you can see.

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-These skins are very good, almost like professional skins.

-Really?

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This is a standard 14-inch snare drum. Although this is made

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completely out of plastic,

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it is actually modelled on a metal snare drum

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which Ringo would have used. This is made by Selco in this country.

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Ringo would have used a metal-shelled version, in chrome,

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with ten tuning lugs. His drum kit was a Ludwig, an American drum.

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Now, what's missing on this is a set of snares.

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-I noticed that.

-Wires soldered together on a strap.

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There's about 24 of them that run the length of the drum.

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They're held on with string which goes into those two holes.

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If you do that, it tightens them up

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and pulls the snare wires onto the bottom skin

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and makes it sound as if it's a marching drum.

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Military side drums. It goes...

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I wish we had some drum sticks!

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Tell you what, we've got some spoons.

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I don't know what I can do with spoons, but...

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-See?

-Very impressive.

-You can actually get something out of this

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-and I think this is a good starting-off instrument.

-It's a bit more than a toy.

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It's more than a toy. Now, we've sold Beatles guitars on the show.

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I think one achieved around £300 or £400.

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-Have you any idea what this is worth?

-I was hoping 150 to 200, along those lines.

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I could say I think you're bang on!

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Pardon the pun!

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If this was in mint condition,

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if it had the stand and original sticks and those snare wires,

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museum condition, you'd be looking for £600 to £700,

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-Cos not many have survived.

-I can imagine.

-They really haven't.

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If we put this into auction, we'd put it in with a value of £200 to £400.

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A fixed reserve at 200.

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-Happy?

-Yes, very. Very happy.

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I think it's fantastic and a Beatles fan will love this,

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especially with Ringo there!

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Jill, welcome to Flog It.

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And it's lovely to have that gorgeous piece of Victorian jewellery here.

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Tell me, where did you get it?

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My grandmother gave it to me when I got engaged in 1974.

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-Did you wear it?

-I've never worn it.

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-Left in a drawer.

-Did it belong to your grandmother?

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I think so, but I don't know anything about it.

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-No pictures of her wearing it?

-No, unfortunately.

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Why haven't you worn it? Is it not to your taste?

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Because I knew it was a mourning locket

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and it's big and dark-coloured.

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Although I knew it was beautifully made.

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-So it's a bit sort of sombre?

-Mmm.

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OK, let's just have a closer look at it.

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The case is not marked for gold.

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Very often when a piece was made specially for someone,

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by a jeweller, if it had been commissioned,

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then they would not have hallmarked it.

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But the touch of it, the colour of it, the weight of it,

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all these things indicate to me that it is gold.

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The front of it

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has this beautiful banded agate oval on it.

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And we have a gold and enamelled starburst here

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and a beautiful pearl.

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So it's a lovely thing.

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It's a quality item.

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I like it very, very much.

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Let's open it

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and have a little look inside.

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-Now, do you know who this...?

-Afraid I don't, no!

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-He's quite a sombre looking chap.

-He is.

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-Could he have been a boyfriend or a fiance?

-I just don't know.

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-You don't know?

-No.

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And we have the hair whorl here,

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which is typical of mourning jewellery.

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When Prince Albert died, Queen Victoria went into mourning.

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And mourning became a fashion.

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-Right.

-I would date it

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from about the 1860s, 1870s.

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Although these aren't popular as things to wear,

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they are collectible. Price-wise,

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I would put an estimate of 120 to 180 on this locket.

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-Would you be happy with that estimate?

-Yes.

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Let's put it to sale, Jill, but we'll put a fixed reserve

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-of £120.

-Yes, that sounds good.

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-Shall we sell it at that?

-Yes, please.

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-I'm hoping it will go much higher.

-Thank you.

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Irene, you've brought in this truncheon.

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What can you tell me about it?

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Just that my mother owned it.

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It used to be her uncle's, many years ago.

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She just kept it and one day said, "It's something you can have."

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-And I thought, "Ooh! Nice!"

-You were thrilled to have it as a gift?

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It was nice.

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When you were younger, you never asked questions what it was about.

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-Now she's long gone, it would be nice to...

-Wish you'd asked.

-Yes.

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-Was someone in the family a policeman?

-Yeah, my mother's uncle.

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-OK. And was that fairly locally?

-Oh, yes.

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-Round Wolverton, which is in Milton Keynes.

-OK.

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It's a late 19th-century policeman's truncheon.

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Have a look here. It's quite nicely decorated.

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All these hand-painted things on the front.

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You've got a crown

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and a VR for Victoria Regis cipher.

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And you've got constable, for a police constable,

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with a turned fruitwood handle and you have a bit of string here,

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but it would have had a leather strap for the wrist strap.

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So quite a highly decorative thing,

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as well as a highly effective thing if you're going to hit someone!

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-Do you like it?

-I think it's nice, but it's in a cupboard in a box.

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OK, so it's quite hard to display.

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Sometimes they have wording on them like where it comes from.

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So you'd have the county or something. This just says constable.

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But you've got the VR cipher, so it's Victorian, pre-1910.

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-Price-wise for auction, do you have any idea what it would go for?

-No.

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-No idea?

-Not at all.

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I would think probably for an auction estimate, you'd put £80 to £120 on it.

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-They are quite collectible.

-Good.

-So you want it to sell?

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What would you say to a reserve of £50?

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-Why not?

-And an estimate of 80 to 120?

-Brilliant.

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In the '60s, Britain was hit by far-reaching cultural changes.

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People tend to think of "Swinging London"...

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the mini skirt, pop music, but at the same time,

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technological advances were having a huge impact on people's working lives.

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While man was walking on the moon,

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here in Milton Keynes a new university like no other was born...

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A university of the air, and some 40 years later, it's now

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Britain's largest university, with over 180,000 students,

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and these old RAF huts is where it all started, back in 1969.

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It now has an extensive campus with 3,776 people working here,

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but less than a quarter of them are students...

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That's because I'm at the home of Britain's first virtual university...

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the Open University.

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The OU was founded on the belief that emerging new communication technology

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could bring high quality, degree-level learning to everyone, without the need to attend

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a traditional university campus, and that would give working people, especially,

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a chance to get a better education without having to give up work.

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The idea of distance learning gained momentum in the early '60s when Harold Wilson,

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the then Prime Minister, appointed Jenny Lee as Minister for the Arts.

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I was a kind of last resort,

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so he comes to me and he says, "For God's sake, get this thing going".

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Jenny Lee passionately believed higher education should be an

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opportunity open to anyone and she successfully triumphed in September 1967

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when a crucial Cabinet decision was made to work out a comprehensive plan for an open university.

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It is designed to provide an opportunity for those who for one reason or another

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have not been able to take advantages of higher education now to do so.

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The scheme was an instant success.

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The OU received 43,000 applications in its first year, and Harold Wilson

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claimed it was the "greatest achievement of his Government".

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In the early years, teaching was done through lectures broadcast on the BBC...

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And we've chosen our scales carefully...

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These programmes were supplemented with correspondence material and study groups.

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The OU's range of courses were also limited to traditional subjects,

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like Maths and Social Science, but over the last 40 years,

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it has diversified into many teaching areas.

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Now it offers both degree and non-degree programmes

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and practical courses like Creative Writing and Nursing.

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I met up with Linda Cramer, who is one of their most recent graduates.

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So how did you find out about the Open University and get involved with it?

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I was working in a hospital environment

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many years ago as a Ward Aid, and a sister on the ward encouraged me

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to become a Healthcare Support Worker...

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-She saw the potential in you?

-She saw, yes.

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I became a Healthcare Support Worker by getting an access course,

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getting A Levels, and then shortly after that

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the Open University provided the opportunity for me to become a Student Nurse.

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You've qualified as a nurse because of the Open University?

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-Yes, because of the Open University.

-That's fantastic.

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How much studying did you have to do a week?

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Hours and hours. Every spare moment, after work or days off, every spare moment.

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-Has this changed your life?

-Oh, yes, indeed, yes, immensely.

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From becoming a Ward Aid to a Healthcare Support Worker to a Student Nurse,

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I can now proudly say that I am a qualified Staff Nurse.

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And has the pay got better?

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I've yet to receive my first month's pay...

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I'm only brand-new qualified, so that's to come.

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-And what do you plan on doing in the future? Will you do another course?

-Yes.

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I now plan to eventually take a degree with the Open University

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and see how I go from there.

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-Fingers crossed!

-Thank you.

-Good for you.

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-Thank you.

-You're a very dedicated person and I'm sure you'll achieve it.

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I hope so. I plan to.

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The success of students like Linda has also been helped by the OU's willingness

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to continually embrace new technologies.

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Open University coursework is now sent out through DVDs and CDs

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and downloaded from the Internet as podcasts, so it's all very up to the minute.

0:19:520:19:57

These new computer-based tools have consigned the once-popular,

0:19:570:20:00

late-night TV lectures to the past,

0:20:000:20:03

but the Open University hasn't abandoned television altogether.

0:20:030:20:06

It's now gone into partnership

0:20:060:20:09

with the BBC on some of its landmark educational programmes,

0:20:090:20:13

like the Fossil Detectives...

0:20:130:20:15

Lenny's Britain...

0:20:220:20:24

and Coast.

0:20:240:20:26

The OU's ability to harness new communication technologies has

0:20:270:20:31

allowed it to reach out to people from all over the world and now,

0:20:310:20:34

in its 40th year, it continues to look to the future.

0:20:340:20:40

Since its opening, the Open University has given

0:20:400:20:43

hundreds of thousands of people the chance to access an education...

0:20:430:20:47

something they probably wouldn't have had, and quite interestingly,

0:20:470:20:51

the amount of students that have enrolled recently under the age of 25 has dramatically increased.

0:20:510:20:56

It's probably due to the fact that

0:20:560:20:58

a course here costs less than a third of a conventional

0:20:580:21:01

university, so it's a great way of avoiding those student debts.

0:21:010:21:05

Let's refresh our memories, with a look at the first batch of items

0:21:100:21:14

on their way to the auction.

0:21:140:21:16

David's hand-painted plates originally came from Switzerland.

0:21:160:21:20

They've got to sell today - they're too heavy to carry home!

0:21:200:21:24

Even Leah agrees that Kate's exquisite Art Deco diamond ring

0:21:240:21:27

is much better off in a sale room than in the garden!

0:21:270:21:31

Beatles memorabilia sells well,

0:21:330:21:35

so no reason for me to bang on any more

0:21:350:21:38

about the value of the Ringo Starr drum.

0:21:380:21:42

And the Victorian mourning locket may not be the height of fashion,

0:21:420:21:47

but it's quality - and you know what I always say about quality.

0:21:470:21:51

And the decorative Victorian policeman's truncheon

0:21:510:21:54

is so beautiful, the bidders are bound to find it arresting!

0:21:540:21:58

Today's sale comes from the heart of Woburn

0:21:580:22:01

and today's venue is the Old Town Hall.

0:22:010:22:03

For years, this has been owned by Flog It favourite Charlie Ross.

0:22:030:22:07

It's been taken over recently by Jasper Marsh, also an auctioneer,

0:22:070:22:10

but he's using Charlie's talents today on the rostrum.

0:22:100:22:13

Let's go inside.

0:22:130:22:14

We've seen plenty of these on the show, a Victorian police truncheon.

0:22:240:22:28

They make cracking money if dated and in great condition.

0:22:280:22:31

This one's condition is superb. We've got £80 to £120 on it.

0:22:310:22:34

It belongs to Irene here, possibly for not much longer.

0:22:340:22:38

-Who have you brought along?

-My husband, Ed.

-Hi.

0:22:380:22:41

Cracking, cracking item. How did you come across this?

0:22:410:22:44

It was my mother's uncle's.

0:22:440:22:47

I wonder if someone was in the police force in the family?

0:22:470:22:51

-I wish I knew.

-Let's hope you're right, Kate.

0:22:510:22:55

The condition, as you say, is great.

0:22:550:22:57

So it should sell pretty well.

0:22:570:22:59

You're right, if it had been dated, or a warrant number on it.

0:22:590:23:04

-Or name of a place.

-Name of a place.

0:23:040:23:06

You could attribute it to a local police station.

0:23:060:23:09

-Wow, you're looking at £400 to £500.

-And upwards.

0:23:090:23:14

Lot 577 is a Victorian constable's truncheon.

0:23:140:23:18

Impressed maker's mark, Parker.

0:23:180:23:21

In fantastic condition. £50, I'm bid. Five.

0:23:230:23:26

60. Five. 70.

0:23:260:23:29

Five. 80.

0:23:290:23:30

Five. Your bid. 85 on my left. 90. Five.

0:23:300:23:34

100. And ten.

0:23:340:23:36

120?

0:23:360:23:38

120. 130?

0:23:380:23:39

120. Your bid in the back, standing.

0:23:410:23:44

£120. Selling.

0:23:440:23:46

At one hundred... 30.

0:23:460:23:49

40. 150? 140 in the back, then.

0:23:490:23:52

At £140!

0:23:520:23:56

-That was like a game of table tennis!

-That's really good.

0:23:570:24:00

-Really nice.

-What are you going to put the money towards?

-A holiday.

0:24:000:24:05

-Well, we're going to Norfolk.

-We like Norfolk.

-Right.

0:24:050:24:08

-We take the pets with us!

-What have you got?

-A border collie and a dog.

0:24:080:24:13

-A cat, sorry!

-A collie and a cat. "Border collie and a dog"!

-Sorry!

0:24:130:24:18

Can't take me anywhere!

0:24:180:24:20

-Congratulations.

-Thank you.

-Well done.

0:24:200:24:24

You know those moments when I say credit to our experts, they were spot on?

0:24:290:24:33

Well, it could go horribly wrong now for us.

0:24:330:24:36

We've got Cliff and the Ringo Starr snare drum.

0:24:360:24:39

A lovely bit of retro 1960s plastic.

0:24:390:24:42

But unfortunately, the auctioneer didn't agree with my valuation.

0:24:420:24:46

He didn't know what planet I was on

0:24:460:24:49

and he's too young to understand The Beatles.

0:24:490:24:52

I'm just hoping the room's full of Beatles fans. Spot any?

0:24:520:24:56

There's a lot of bald heads!

0:24:560:24:58

The circle Newbeat snare drum.

0:24:590:25:03

Circa 1964.

0:25:040:25:06

A Beatles promotional drum. There it is.

0:25:060:25:10

Ringo Starr.

0:25:120:25:13

And I'm bid £110. 120, anywhere? At 110.

0:25:130:25:18

And 20.

0:25:180:25:20

130. And 40.

0:25:200:25:22

150 and 60. No.

0:25:220:25:24

£150 now.

0:25:240:25:26

160. It's not your bid.

0:25:260:25:28

At 150. All done?

0:25:280:25:29

At 150.

0:25:290:25:32

Any more bids? All done?

0:25:320:25:34

At £150. One more?

0:25:340:25:37

Come on, one more.

0:25:370:25:39

Can't be done, I'm afraid, ladies and gentlemen. We move on.

0:25:390:25:42

We got it to 150 in the room. Put it in a specialist music sale.

0:25:420:25:46

There were no other instruments here.

0:25:460:25:49

-Just a few old violins.

-I'll take your advice.

0:25:490:25:52

-Smashing.

-Thank you. I'm really sorry it didn't sell.

0:25:520:25:56

Next up, two beautiful hand-painted plates.

0:25:590:26:02

They're quite large, from the 1800s, and belong to Tina and David.

0:26:020:26:06

Great to see you. You look absolutely fabulous!

0:26:060:26:08

-They've been in the family. They were your aunt's...

-Great-aunt's.

-Lots of memories?

0:26:080:26:13

-Yes.

-Originally, Anita, we had a valuation of 150 to £200.

0:26:130:26:18

Fixed reserve at 150.

0:26:180:26:21

We decided that at the valuation day.

0:26:210:26:23

Since then, David's done some research.

0:26:230:26:27

He's put the reserve up. It's not 150 any more, it's now 250.

0:26:270:26:32

These plates may well do 250 or more.

0:26:320:26:37

A low estimate doesn't jeopardise the price.

0:26:370:26:42

-It's more of a "come and buy me".

-It encourages the bidding.

0:26:420:26:46

Where did you do your research? How did you come by the price?

0:26:460:26:50

Some of these plates, a lot smaller, are selling for 1,500 US dollars.

0:26:500:26:55

-They're for sale at 1,500 dollars.

-Whether they get that.

-Not selling at.

0:26:550:27:02

You have to be really very careful.

0:27:020:27:04

You think you can do the research on the internet, but it is limited for the private person.

0:27:040:27:10

It's going under the hammer. Good luck!

0:27:100:27:13

A pair of Swiss earthenware chargers,

0:27:130:27:15

each centrally decorated with figures in boats

0:27:150:27:18

on a lake with mountains beyond.

0:27:180:27:20

Within a broad band of floral panels.

0:27:200:27:23

The reverse each signed "Toon".

0:27:230:27:28

And I'm bid

0:27:280:27:29

220 to clear commissions.

0:27:290:27:35

220.

0:27:350:27:36

240, now? 220.

0:27:360:27:38

240.

0:27:380:27:40

240 here. 250.

0:27:400:27:42

260. 260.

0:27:420:27:44

-Well done.

-It's on my right, now. Selling at 260.

0:27:440:27:47

270 elsewhere?

0:27:470:27:49

£260 to my right. All finished

0:27:490:27:52

at £260. Done and selling

0:27:520:27:56

at 260.

0:27:560:27:59

260.

0:27:590:28:00

260. Just over reserve. Well done.

0:28:000:28:04

Sadie and Leah, we've been waiting for this for a long time.

0:28:080:28:11

Is it exciting? Not only a day off school, but a day in an auction room.

0:28:110:28:15

-Have you been in one before?

-No.

0:28:150:28:17

You can't see a lot at your height, but it's all going on at that end.

0:28:170:28:22

Charlie Ross is on the rostrum, selling all our lots.

0:28:220:28:25

Hopefully, this little ruby ring - we've got a value of 1,200.

0:28:250:28:29

-Yes, just over 1,000.

-Just over £1,000 is coming hopefully your way.

0:28:290:28:35

Ruby and diamond ring

0:28:350:28:38

in an Art Deco mount.

0:28:380:28:39

Beautiful lot.

0:28:390:28:41

Bid 650, 700. 50.

0:28:410:28:44

At 750. 800 now.

0:28:440:28:47

At 800. I'll take 20 if it helps you.

0:28:470:28:50

Bid's at 800. And 20 now? Say now.

0:28:500:28:53

At £800.

0:28:530:28:54

You're all out seated at 800. And 20 is it, now?

0:28:540:28:58

At £800. Any more bid?

0:28:580:29:01

All done at £800.

0:29:010:29:03

No more? At 800 it is.

0:29:030:29:06

Can't be sold, ladies and gentlemen, at £800.

0:29:070:29:10

We had a fixed reserve of 900 and I'm pleased you protected it with that.

0:29:100:29:15

-You don't want to give it away.

-No. I don't think the jewellery dealers were here.

0:29:150:29:20

It's a stand-alone piece in the room. There's no other diamonds or gems here.

0:29:200:29:25

-OK, we'll take it home, Leah.

-It's got to go home!

0:29:250:29:28

-I'm so sorry!

-That's OK. Thank you, anyway.

0:29:280:29:31

The good news is that, after the auction,

0:29:310:29:34

Sadie accepted a private offer of £750.

0:29:340:29:39

So she'll be able to buy that much-needed car after all.

0:29:390:29:42

Let's hope this isn't a sad moment. It's a Victorian mourning locket.

0:29:480:29:52

It's Jill's and has been in the family a while.

0:29:520:29:54

But you've decided to sell this now

0:29:540:29:57

because you want to put the money towards a new addition.

0:29:570:30:00

We've just had our first grandchild, called Isobel.

0:30:000:30:04

It's easier to sell it, because this was a special present to you.

0:30:040:30:09

When we got engaged, my grandmother gave me this, 33 years ago.

0:30:090:30:12

A long time. It's hard to sell things people give you as presents.

0:30:120:30:16

But in this case, selling it because of a new addition to the family,

0:30:160:30:22

I think is wonderful.

0:30:220:30:23

It's such a lovely thing and it's in perfect condition.

0:30:230:30:26

You haven't worn it. It's been in a drawer.

0:30:260:30:30

I think if you don't like it, it's the time to sell it.

0:30:300:30:34

I think it might be to today's tastes. It's a big chunky piece.

0:30:340:30:39

It's of beautiful quality.

0:30:390:30:41

Does that mean we'll get the top end of the estimate?

0:30:410:30:44

I don't know, Paul. We'll have to wait and see.

0:30:440:30:47

What are you looking for secretly?

0:30:470:30:49

120? 50?

0:30:490:30:52

150 would be very nice.

0:30:520:30:54

But the market will determine.

0:30:540:30:57

Fingers crossed.

0:30:570:30:58

A gold, pearl and enamel pendant,

0:30:580:31:01

circa 1880. Late Victorian pendant.

0:31:010:31:04

I can start that at 85. 90. Five.

0:31:050:31:08

110. 120. 130.

0:31:080:31:11

140. 150.

0:31:110:31:13

-160. 170.

-This is good.

-180.

0:31:130:31:16

190.

0:31:160:31:18

200. And 20.

0:31:180:31:19

240. 260.

0:31:190:31:21

280. 300.

0:31:230:31:26

320. 340.

0:31:270:31:30

-360.

-A lot of money!

-380.

0:31:300:31:32

Are you taking instructions? 380.

0:31:350:31:37

400? No.

0:31:370:31:39

380. You're out on the stairs. 380 in the middle of the room.

0:31:390:31:42

At £380. All done?

0:31:420:31:45

Selling at £380.

0:31:450:31:48

-Yes!

-Excellent!

-Now, quality...

0:31:480:31:51

-..always sells.

-Quality. Condition.

0:31:510:31:54

And I was right. I thought that it might be to today's tastes.

0:31:540:32:00

-And also...

-A big chunky piece.

0:32:000:32:02

-And also a "Come and buy me..."

-Well.

0:32:020:32:05

-"Come and buy me" valuation!

-I can be a bit like that.

0:32:050:32:08

-Excellent!

-Canny lass!

0:32:080:32:10

-I'm really pleased.

-You've got to be pleased with that! Wow!

0:32:100:32:14

I'm feeling hot over that one!

0:32:140:32:16

-Lovely.

-That's going to be put towards the christening funds.

0:32:160:32:21

-Definitely.

-A bank account.

-Lovely nest egg, yes.

0:32:210:32:24

Fantastic. Thanks for coming in.

0:32:240:32:26

-Well done. That was marvellous!

-Thank you!

0:32:260:32:29

Roald Dahl, what a legend!

0:32:340:32:37

Is there anybody

0:32:370:32:38

who has grown up over the last 50 years

0:32:380:32:41

who can imagine their childhood without the BFG...

0:32:410:32:45

James and the Giant Peach...

0:32:450:32:47

..or Matilda?

0:32:500:32:51

These are just some of his classic and much-loved children's stories.

0:32:540:32:59

And this big blue building here couldn't be anything else but the Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre.

0:33:030:33:08

Amanda Concay runs the Roald Dahl foundation

0:33:080:33:11

which is also based here. That's her office by the sign on the first floor.

0:33:110:33:15

She can remember him reading her bedtime stories.

0:33:150:33:19

Sounds absolutely fascinating, so let's have a chat with her.

0:33:190:33:23

Let's hear Amanda tell us her story about Roald Dahl.

0:33:240:33:28

I grew up in the village we are now, in Great Missenden,

0:33:290:33:33

and this is where Roald Dahl lived and spent most of his adult years

0:33:330:33:39

and where he wrote all his children's books.

0:33:390:33:41

As a child, our families were friends.

0:33:410:33:44

I was in the same class as his second child, Tessa.

0:33:440:33:47

Roald did the morning lift to school, my mother did the evening.

0:33:470:33:51

We certainly stayed in each other's houses, had sleep-overs,

0:33:510:33:54

so our lives were pretty interlinked.

0:33:540:33:56

Was he good fun to be with?

0:33:560:33:59

Yes, he was very imposing.

0:33:590:34:01

He was very tall, six foot five,

0:34:010:34:03

so he seemed a giant when you were a child and I think he hoped he was the Big Friendly Giant.

0:34:030:34:08

Do you have any fond memories of him?

0:34:080:34:11

He always wanted to take that bit of childhood fun a bit further.

0:34:110:34:16

So midnight walks are something that children talk about, and fantasise about,

0:34:160:34:21

but generally they don't happen.

0:34:210:34:23

But he would get us up in our pyjamas and say, "We're going for a walk."

0:34:230:34:28

And he would take us down the road to this tunnel

0:34:280:34:31

and he would tell a story under there.

0:34:310:34:34

It could be about anything,

0:34:340:34:36

the stars, witches, foxes, anything.

0:34:360:34:39

So that was just completely magical and different.

0:34:390:34:43

When Amanda started working at the foundation,

0:34:430:34:46

she had no idea what a huge and lasting success

0:34:460:34:49

Dahl's children's books would turn out to be.

0:34:490:34:52

Roald was the first one where there were signing sessions,

0:34:520:34:57

where there were author visits,

0:34:570:35:00

and boy, did the kids like to meet him!

0:35:000:35:03

You're not frightened of me, are you?

0:35:030:35:05

They're all sort of funny and nice.

0:35:060:35:08

Better than the other people's books.

0:35:080:35:11

The amazing thing is, for example,

0:35:110:35:14

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is Penguin Books' best-selling book of all time.

0:35:140:35:19

You're in publishing yourself,

0:35:190:35:22

so can you sum up why he was such a successful writer?

0:35:220:35:26

It is hard to say what makes somebody take off in this way,

0:35:260:35:29

to become part of the popular culture.

0:35:290:35:32

There's nothing old-fashioned about Roald Dahl. He's contemporary.

0:35:320:35:36

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory was written over 40 years ago,

0:35:360:35:40

but it still feels very contemporary.

0:35:400:35:43

They're nearly all moral tales, in one way or another.

0:35:430:35:47

Um, and the child is generally the hero.

0:35:470:35:53

At least the good children win and the bad children get their come-uppance.

0:35:530:35:58

Talking of Charlie again, what happens to the horrible children?

0:35:580:36:02

They all end up going down the chute.

0:36:020:36:05

The Oompa-Loompas get rid of them.

0:36:050:36:07

But we know Charlie is a good boy.

0:36:070:36:10

Nasty things happen but out of those, people either get punished

0:36:100:36:14

-or good people get rewarded.

-Yes.

0:36:140:36:17

So out of the dark comes good.

0:36:170:36:19

It's hard to think of Roald Dahl without thinking of his long-term working partnership

0:36:200:36:25

with illustrator Quentin Blake.

0:36:250:36:27

I think The Enormous Crocodile just shows how well

0:36:270:36:30

the combination of the two talents worked.

0:36:300:36:35

-Children can identify with that.

-Here is a crocodile that eats children.

0:36:350:36:40

But he has huge teeth.

0:36:400:36:42

But somehow, they're funny. There's something amazing about the combination.

0:36:420:36:48

In this book, Revolting Rhymes, for example,

0:36:480:36:50

here's a great thing when the prince chops off Cinderella's sister's head.

0:36:500:36:55

"What's all the racket?", Cindy cried. "Mind your own biz", the prince replied.

0:36:550:37:01

Poor Cindy's heart was torn to shreds.

0:37:010:37:04

"My prince", she thought.

0:37:040:37:06

"He chops off heads."

0:37:060:37:09

-That is so funny.

-This is a great example, isn't it?

0:37:090:37:12

-Look at her face.

-Yes, her face. It's not ghoulish, it's just funny.

0:37:120:37:17

I can have lots of people killed

0:37:170:37:20

but they won't be killed in a conventional way.

0:37:200:37:23

You can't have them shot

0:37:230:37:25

or chopped up or anything like that. It's just straight.

0:37:250:37:30

I'm quite prepared to have them killed in the most grizzly possible way,

0:37:300:37:35

like having little boys from Eton pulled out of the windows

0:37:350:37:40

and eaten by giants.

0:37:400:37:42

Bones crunched up and everything.

0:37:420:37:44

Or a child falling into a chocolate-making machine

0:37:440:37:50

and coming out as fudge.

0:37:500:37:51

That's fine, as long as there is a whopping great laugh at the same time.

0:37:510:37:57

He always said it's got to be fun. The books have to be funny.

0:37:570:38:01

And that came to him naturally.

0:38:010:38:03

He had the whizz-popping giant

0:38:030:38:07

in George's Marvellous Medicine

0:38:070:38:10

where he describes the granny as having a mouth like a dog's bottom.

0:38:100:38:16

-That's very creative!

-You only have to say that,

0:38:160:38:18

you only have to say it and you laugh, but no-one else would write it. But he did.

0:38:180:38:23

I understand he said, or he disliked anyway,

0:38:230:38:27

beards, museums and speeches.

0:38:270:38:31

What would he have made of the museum downstairs?

0:38:310:38:34

One has to remember he would have been 92 had he been alive now.

0:38:340:38:38

He said those things when museums were quite stuffy places.

0:38:380:38:43

The great thing is, we've been able to create the museum and story centre

0:38:430:38:48

at a time when museums can be really good fun.

0:38:480:38:51

They can be very interactive. I think you'll find when you see the museum

0:38:510:38:56

that it really lives up to him and his books

0:38:560:38:59

and it's a great fun place.

0:38:590:39:01

So that's exactly what I did

0:39:010:39:04

and Amanda was right. The children were having a scrumdiddlyumptious time.

0:39:040:39:08

But the final word should be left to the great man himself

0:39:080:39:12

who'd have been very at home in the museum.

0:39:120:39:14

'Most adults have forgotten how children are thinking.

0:39:160:39:21

'And I certainly see myself totally on the side of children.'

0:39:210:39:27

Back at the valuations, Anita has found some playful Clarice Cliff.

0:39:360:39:40

Clare, Clarice Cliff was one of the leading ceramicists of the 20th century.

0:39:410:39:48

People either love or hate her work.

0:39:480:39:54

-What do you think of it?

-These, I think, are hideous, really.

0:39:540:39:59

That's a word that my father described them as, "hideous".

0:39:590:40:03

Indeed. Tell me, where did you get them from?

0:40:030:40:06

They were given to my grandparents as a wedding gift.

0:40:060:40:10

I think that was in 1936.

0:40:100:40:12

Then my mum's always had them on the shelf in the kitchen.

0:40:120:40:16

That's where I remember seeing them.

0:40:160:40:18

Then Mum and Dad brought them over this time last year

0:40:180:40:21

and said, "Get rid of them. See what you can do with them."

0:40:210:40:25

Well, if we turn them up and look at the back stamp,

0:40:250:40:28

we see the magic name, Clarice Cliff.

0:40:280:40:31

Now, Clarice made a wide range of goods

0:40:310:40:37

and some of them are more collectible than others.

0:40:370:40:40

We have some very rare patterns that go into the four figures

0:40:400:40:46

and are highly sought-after.

0:40:460:40:48

Now, these are not the top-of-the-range Clarice Cliff.

0:40:480:40:52

They're from the series "My Garden" series.

0:40:520:40:57

So-called because you have this wonderful handle,

0:40:570:41:01

which is a band of flowers.

0:41:010:41:05

A fairly common, a fairly ordinary pattern,

0:41:050:41:09

it was very popular in its day.

0:41:090:41:12

They were made in the 1930s.

0:41:120:41:15

Because they were popular, they made a large amount of them.

0:41:150:41:19

So they weren't rare, and in today's market, that brings the price down.

0:41:190:41:24

-I would estimate them between £100 and £150.

-OK.

0:41:240:41:31

About £50 each. Now, they might go a little higher

0:41:310:41:36

than the bottom estimate,

0:41:360:41:38

but you're not going to go to £200, £250.

0:41:380:41:41

I would love it to happen!

0:41:410:41:43

I think my dad would, also!

0:41:430:41:45

-So would you be happy to sell them?

-That would be good.

0:41:450:41:48

We'll put a reserve of £100 to protect them

0:41:480:41:52

and we'll hope they'll be very well fancied on the day.

0:41:520:41:56

-I hope so.

-Clare, shall we flog them?

-Go for it!

-Let's go for it!

0:41:560:42:01

So, Steve, you've brought in this bizarre, rather large, animal.

0:42:070:42:12

It's an elephant and a tiger. What do you think about it?

0:42:120:42:16

Um, I like it. It's just gathering dust, really.

0:42:160:42:20

I've had it in the loft. I inherited it from my gran,

0:42:200:42:23

but I've got nowhere to display it.

0:42:230:42:25

And if the little 'un knocks it off, it would be quite upsetting.

0:42:250:42:29

Ah, you've got a young child that might break it into pieces.

0:42:290:42:33

-Does your wife like it?

-Yeah, she likes elephants.

0:42:330:42:37

She'll be sad to see it go, but if it gets broken, she'll be even more gutted.

0:42:370:42:42

Do you know anything about it? The maker, or...?

0:42:420:42:45

It's got on the bottom it's a Beswick. I've nothing else to go on.

0:42:450:42:48

I know it's from my gran's cos I've seen it since I was young.

0:42:480:42:52

Yes, Beswick is the mark, an English maker.

0:42:520:42:54

It's fairly modern, 20th century.

0:42:540:42:56

But they make quite a lot of these animal models - cows, sheep and things.

0:42:560:43:01

They also do a series of wild animals, of which this is one.

0:43:010:43:04

They do this model in various sizes, a small, medium and large, and this is the large.

0:43:040:43:09

You've got a big bull elephant being attacked by a tiger.

0:43:090:43:13

So quite a violent theme to go on your mantelpiece!

0:43:130:43:17

It's really nicely modelled.

0:43:170:43:20

You can see the detail in the hide of the elephant, the face on the tiger.

0:43:200:43:24

Also, Beswick bits always get broken off.

0:43:240:43:27

So whenever I see one, I think, "It'll have a break on the trunk

0:43:270:43:31

"or the tusks always come off.

0:43:310:43:33

"You get chips on the legs or the ears."

0:43:330:43:35

But this is remarkably good condition,

0:43:350:43:38

considering it's been kept in the loft!

0:43:380:43:40

-It didn't cost you anything.

-No.

-Any idea as to value?

0:43:400:43:44

I've got no idea. As far as I'm concerned, it's more sentimental.

0:43:440:43:49

There are lots of Beswick collectors out there.

0:43:490:43:52

But it means nothing to them in terms of sentiment.

0:43:520:43:55

It's, "Is it one of a number that were produced and how rare is it?"

0:43:550:43:59

But the condition's great. For an auction value, you'd put £150 to £250 on it.

0:43:590:44:05

-Better than I thought.

-More than you thought?

0:44:050:44:07

-So for that kind of price, you'd be happy to sell it?

-Yes.

0:44:070:44:10

The estimate for the catalogue is 150 to 250.

0:44:100:44:14

I would suggest a lower reserve of £100.

0:44:140:44:17

But you can make that discretionary so the auctioneer has a chance to sell it.

0:44:170:44:21

-OK with that?

-Yeah.

0:44:210:44:22

Gladys, when I saw you in the queue I knew you were a woman of taste...

0:44:310:44:38

-Did you?

-..and style!

0:44:380:44:41

And I wasn't surprised when you brought out this piece of Poole Pottery.

0:44:410:44:47

I think that it is absolutely wonderful.

0:44:470:44:51

Tell me, where did you get it?

0:44:510:44:54

I bought in 1960 or just turned down at Poole Pottery,

0:44:540:45:00

the pottery itself.

0:45:000:45:03

I've always been interested in ceramics and pottery because

0:45:030:45:08

in the late '30s I worked with Henry Moore but that was on sculptures.

0:45:080:45:12

-So you have an artistic background?

-Absolutely!

0:45:120:45:16

Apparently it was detected from the age of ten that there was artistic talent in me,

0:45:160:45:22

and my art mistress at school pushed me.

0:45:220:45:24

I went into the LCC in London

0:45:240:45:29

and won a scholarship for five years to go to Chelsea

0:45:290:45:33

and that's how I was under Henry Moore and there was also Barbara Hepworth there

0:45:330:45:38

-and John Piper and Graham Sutherland.

-Wow!

0:45:380:45:42

I just heard all these artists' names mentioned, how wonderful,

0:45:420:45:46

-and you've worked with them?

-I worked with them.

0:45:460:45:48

Barbara Hepworth didn't really like me - she was jealous...

0:45:480:45:51

because Henry Moore, he was older than me,

0:45:510:45:54

and I was very, very young and I worked in a room on my own with him.

0:45:540:45:59

-Did he fancy you?

-He did, he did!

0:45:590:46:03

Only Anita could ask that question!

0:46:030:46:05

And I'll answer it truthfully.

0:46:050:46:07

Yes, he did have a soft spot for me, I don't know why...

0:46:070:46:10

Because, Gladys, you are still a good-looking bird!

0:46:100:46:14

You're both a couple of stunners, aren't you? And here's another bonnie wee lass as well!

0:46:140:46:19

I've always been interested in art. I love it.

0:46:220:46:27

I mean, I just love this plate.

0:46:270:46:29

Why do you want to get rid of it?

0:46:290:46:33

Because I've gone more modern.

0:46:330:46:36

You see, when I bought that at the beginning of the '60s,

0:46:360:46:38

it was very modern.

0:46:380:46:40

You see, there's an interesting point here.

0:46:400:46:43

-You bought it in the '60s because it was bang up-to-date.

-That's right.

0:46:430:46:47

And if we look at the pattern and the colours of this plate...

0:46:470:46:50

-It was the colour that attracted me...

-Yeah.

0:46:500:46:52

-These things are typical of what the Poole Pottery was putting out...

-Absolutely...

0:46:520:46:57

In the '60s. They were so '60s...

0:46:570:47:00

-they were modern, abstract...

-Absolutely were.

0:47:000:47:02

They were hip, the thing that people

0:47:020:47:06

of style and taste, like yourself, would buy.

0:47:060:47:10

Now, Gladys, I've chosen this item

0:47:100:47:12

because I really like it, I really love it, as you have.

0:47:120:47:15

Well, I loved it, yes.

0:47:150:47:17

But I'm afraid I'm going to have to estimate fairly low

0:47:170:47:20

because there is some damage and restoration on the edge here...

0:47:200:47:24

-That's true.

-So we're having to ca' a wee bit canny.

0:47:240:47:28

Now, I'm going to put an estimate of £20 to £30 on it, with a reserve of £20.

0:47:280:47:35

Would you be happy to sell it at that?

0:47:350:47:39

Yes, I would, although to be honest,

0:47:390:47:42

-I thought it might have gone a little bit higher.

-Yeah.

0:47:420:47:45

Let somebody buy it and let them have the pleasure that I've had with it.

0:47:450:47:50

But I'll tell you something,

0:47:500:47:53

for your performance we should be adding a series of zeros after that!

0:47:530:47:59

So, Jan, you've bought this mysterious box here. What's inside? Let's have a look.

0:48:070:48:12

-Ah! Scent bottle.

-Yes.

-What can you tell me about it?

0:48:120:48:16

Well, I bought it from an antiques fair, about five or six years ago,

0:48:160:48:22

and I was looking to buy some powder compacts, which is what I used to collect at the time,

0:48:220:48:28

and I walked past a stand and I just saw it and thought I've got to have it, just loved it.

0:48:280:48:34

-An impulse buy?

-Absolutely an impulse buy, yes.

-It's lovely.

0:48:340:48:37

I mean, do you know anything about age or...?

0:48:370:48:39

I think it's Victorian.

0:48:390:48:41

I spoke to the person who sold it to me and

0:48:410:48:45

-she thought it was about 1886.

-OK.

0:48:450:48:49

She would've got that from the hallmark,

0:48:490:48:51

it's clearly marked up and that's great from my point of view as

0:48:510:48:54

it tells me the maker who made it, and tells you the year...1886.

0:48:540:48:59

What's nice about it is this maker - SM,

0:48:590:49:02

is quite a well-known maker...

0:49:020:49:04

-Sampson Morden.

-OK.

0:49:040:49:05

He's one of the better late Victorian makers of scent bottles,

0:49:050:49:09

and this is a really nice example.

0:49:090:49:11

Over-wood body, it's an overlay, so it's a glass body

0:49:110:49:14

and then over-painted with glass and then refined. Right.

0:49:140:49:18

You've got a silver gilt, so silver covering gold-plate mount.

0:49:180:49:22

It's a really lovely thing. Why are you selling it?

0:49:220:49:25

Well, I've done my compact collecting now and I'm now collecting '50s things,

0:49:250:49:32

and I'm decorating a room at home and I want to buy a '50s lamp,

0:49:320:49:35

one of these tall lamps, and so I need to get some money, basically.

0:49:350:49:40

So, a one-in, one-out policy? You can't buy something till you get rid of this?

0:49:400:49:44

-Absolutely.

-So it's here to sell?

-Yes.

0:49:440:49:46

For auction, I'd probably put an estimate of £300 to £400 on it.

0:49:460:49:52

-OK.

-Is that the sort of price you'd be happy to sell it for?

0:49:520:49:55

Yes, yes, I think so. That sounds fine.

0:49:550:49:57

What you would do is put a reserve on it to make sure it doesn't sell for too little that you'd be

0:49:570:50:02

gutted on a very quiet sale day. What's the least you'd take for it?

0:50:020:50:07

Um...I wouldn't want to sell it for sort of less than £250.

0:50:070:50:12

OK. Well, that's below the low estimate, so what you could do

0:50:120:50:15

-is put a reserve at £250 and make that a firm reserve.

-OK.

0:50:150:50:18

And then the estimate in the catalogue would be £300 to £400.

0:50:180:50:21

It's got a really good chance of selling at that. If we can get you enough money for a lamp,

0:50:210:50:26

-that would be a good result.

-That would be brilliant.

0:50:260:50:30

Time to have a final look at what is on the way to the sale room.

0:50:300:50:34

Luckily, not everyone shares Clare's low opinion of Clarice Cliff!

0:50:340:50:37

I'm sure these jugs will soothe a new owner.

0:50:370:50:40

The Beswick collectors will love the condition of Steve's elephant and tiger.

0:50:420:50:47

Anita loved Gladys' stylish pottery plate.

0:50:470:50:50

It may have been made in the '60s

0:50:500:50:52

but it's the height of fashion right now.

0:50:520:50:54

Janeane brought her Victorian scent bottle from an antiques fair,

0:50:560:51:00

which is slightly the wrong way round of doing it,

0:51:000:51:02

but it's in great condition so it should do well.

0:51:020:51:05

First up, those Clarice Cliff jugs.

0:51:090:51:11

Clare, good to see you again. You've brought the kids here?

0:51:110:51:15

I've got Joshua. He's four. And Rachel, who's 16 months.

0:51:150:51:19

Wow! First time on TV. Lovely. The jugs, do you...

0:51:190:51:22

-No. Hideous.

-Do you like them?

0:51:220:51:25

I like Clarice Cliff. I think it's very cheering.

0:51:250:51:29

-Yes.

-It's lovely in a kitchen.

0:51:290:51:31

Hopefully, we'll get around £100 to £150.

0:51:310:51:33

-You're flogging their inheritance!

-Not really!

0:51:330:51:37

No? What does Rachel think, I wonder? Hey, Rachel?

0:51:370:51:40

Oh, she's bidding. You just bought something!

0:51:420:51:45

A pair of 1930s Clarice Cliff jugs

0:51:450:51:49

of cylindrical tapering form,

0:51:490:51:51

each decorated with streaked orange and grey glaze

0:51:510:51:54

with moulded floral loop handle.

0:51:540:51:58

Bid 65 to clear commission. 70 I'll take.

0:51:580:52:02

At 65 for the pair. 75. 80.

0:52:020:52:05

Five. 90.

0:52:050:52:07

90 bid. Five now?

0:52:070:52:08

At 90. And five. 100.

0:52:080:52:11

100 elsewhere? Bid's at 95. May I say 100, sir?

0:52:120:52:17

95 is the bid, then. At 95.

0:52:170:52:20

All finished at 95? 100 now?

0:52:200:52:23

At 95, then.

0:52:230:52:25

I'm afraid, ladies and gentlemen, we are one bid away. Not sold.

0:52:250:52:29

I just don't believe that. One bid.

0:52:290:52:32

We just needed a little prayer there. Rachel,

0:52:320:52:35

one bid away. So close!

0:52:350:52:38

-So close.

-But Mum and Dad set the reserve.

-They did, yes.

0:52:380:52:42

We've seen plenty of Beswick on the show before, but nothing like this.

0:52:470:52:51

A tiger on the back of an elephant. It belongs to Steve, not for much longer.

0:52:510:52:56

It's in good company. Have you seen the amount of Beswick in the room?

0:52:560:53:00

-There's a lot.

-I'd say there's about 300 lots there.

-Yeah.

0:53:000:53:04

So the collectors are going to be here. I think they'll snap yours up.

0:53:040:53:08

-Do you think it'll get top end?

-It'd be nice if it did.

0:53:080:53:11

It's unusual, not the normal thing people go for.

0:53:110:53:14

But I think so, yeah.

0:53:140:53:16

I had a chat with the new owner of the sale room, Jasper.

0:53:160:53:19

He kinda liked it. He said he wouldn't give it house room

0:53:190:53:22

but it will do mid-estimate. So we're pretty safe.

0:53:220:53:25

Lot 65 is a Beswick elephant and tiger.

0:53:250:53:29

Large group. 50 bid. Five. 60. Five.

0:53:290:53:32

70. Five.

0:53:320:53:34

No? At 70. Five now. 75 in two places. 80.

0:53:340:53:37

80. 90, may I say? 90.

0:53:370:53:40

Your bid at 90.

0:53:400:53:42

Make no mistake, I'm selling at 90 in the front row.

0:53:420:53:46

Anybody make it 100? And 100 I'm bid.

0:53:460:53:48

And ten, sir? Pipped at the post. 110.

0:53:480:53:51

120? No? 110 your bid.

0:53:510:53:53

Front row. All done at £110.

0:53:530:53:56

Yes. Nice work, Charlie Ross.

0:53:560:53:59

-£110, Steven.

-Not bad.

0:53:590:54:01

-Good, isn't it?

-Yep.

-Better than something collecting dust

0:54:010:54:04

and breaking in a few weeks' time.

0:54:040:54:07

Who's getting the money?

0:54:070:54:08

Um, I dunno, really.

0:54:080:54:10

Take the girlfriend out for a meal, I suppose.

0:54:100:54:13

-Treat her. Something special.

-She'll hold you to that! It's on camera!

0:54:130:54:17

Right, got to sort myself out. I'm surrounded by very stylish women.

0:54:210:54:25

I've got Anita and Gladys next to me.

0:54:250:54:28

Behave yourself!

0:54:290:54:31

And we've got some Poole Pottery going under the hammer.

0:54:310:54:34

£20 to £30 is not a lot of money.

0:54:340:54:36

I'm going to give it to my good friend, Mike, to give to his

0:54:360:54:40

-well-known charity.

-And what's that?

0:54:400:54:44

Well, he does a lot for Willen Hospice, Milton Keynes.

0:54:440:54:48

OK. Nice local charity.

0:54:480:54:50

Gladys is a star!

0:54:500:54:54

She was wonderful.

0:54:540:54:56

And it's not a big, pricey thing and there is a wee bit of damage

0:54:560:55:00

which you repaired yourself?

0:55:000:55:02

I did myself, yes.

0:55:020:55:03

I didn't make a bad job of it, did I?

0:55:030:55:06

Gladys was irresistible!

0:55:060:55:09

-Well, she is now, isn't she?

-Oh, thank you!

0:55:090:55:11

Fingers crossed. Let's raise as much money as possible, OK?

0:55:110:55:15

-It's going under the hammer.

-It's for charity.

0:55:150:55:17

A Poole Pottery charger, decorated with spheres and swept bands of

0:55:170:55:22

orange, caramel and black on a mottled ground.

0:55:220:55:26

£30. £20. I'm bid £20.

0:55:260:55:30

Ooh, we're in.

0:55:300:55:31

-Yes!

-Chap down the front is buying it!

0:55:310:55:34

For nothing. Try 22.

0:55:340:55:36

£20, one only bid on my left.

0:55:360:55:38

22 anybody? Last chance at... Is that a bid?

0:55:380:55:43

£22, 24, sir. 26 now. 28, £30...

0:55:430:55:49

-Ooh, nice work, Charlie Ross!

-28 on the left here.

0:55:490:55:52

At 28, all done?

0:55:520:55:54

Aah, well done!

0:55:540:55:56

-Oh, good!

-£28! Good result!

0:55:560:55:58

Spot on estimate, as well!

0:55:580:56:00

Well, all the money is going to charity.

0:56:000:56:02

That's right and I'll add...

0:56:020:56:04

I'll double it up for him.

0:56:040:56:06

We've got some real quality for you right now. I know Kate fell in love with this.

0:56:160:56:21

It belongs to Jan, possibly for not much longer.

0:56:210:56:23

Gorgeous little scent bottle in immaculate condition.

0:56:230:56:26

-Who are you with? Who is this?

-This is my sister, Carol.

-Hi, Carol.

-Hi.

0:56:260:56:30

So, do you both jointly own this? Was this something from the family?

0:56:300:56:33

-No, it's mine. I actually bought it.

-Oh, did you?

0:56:330:56:35

About seven or eight years ago, yes.

0:56:350:56:37

Right, and how much did you pay for it? Can we ask?

0:56:370:56:40

Just over £700...top end. I know!

0:56:400:56:42

-Ooh, dear!

-But that was retail, so that was a fair price.

0:56:420:56:46

-Yes, it was.

-We're looking for £300 to £400 here, aren't we?

0:56:460:56:49

-I hope it will do better... I love it.

-OK.

0:56:490:56:51

-Could it do seven?

-On a good day. It's a good day in the saleroom.

0:56:510:56:55

If two people really want this, you don't know what's going to happen! This'll be exciting!

0:56:550:56:59

The Victorian smoked glass scent bottle.

0:56:590:57:04

Enamel decorated.

0:57:040:57:05

Bearing hallmarks for 1886.

0:57:060:57:09

And I'm bid £340...

0:57:090:57:13

-OK, well, it's sold.

-Yes.

0:57:130:57:15

360 I will take. At 340, 360 now.

0:57:150:57:19

At 340, the bid's with me.

0:57:190:57:23

350, 360, 380?

0:57:230:57:26

380, 400...

0:57:260:57:30

420, 440...

0:57:300:57:31

This is more like it, isn't it?

0:57:310:57:35

440, still with me. 440 commission bid. At 440.

0:57:350:57:41

460, 480...

0:57:410:57:43

-I'm liking this!

-This is nice.

0:57:430:57:45

At 480 then. The bid's here with me at £480.

0:57:450:57:50

-All done.

-Excellent, brilliant.

0:57:500:57:53

The hammer's gone down really sharp, then, at £480.

0:57:530:57:55

That's nice. I'm pleased with that.

0:57:550:57:56

-So will you reinvest the money back in the antiques trade?

-Yes.

0:57:560:58:00

I need to buy a 1950s lamp for one of my rooms at home

0:58:000:58:03

-or if I I can't find one, a coffee table...

-OK.

-..something like that.

-That's half the fun, isn't it?

0:58:030:58:08

Just going to the antique centres and the auction rooms and simply have fun days out shopping,

0:58:080:58:14

-because you can learn so much.

-Absolutely.

-Well, good luck.

-Thank you very much.

0:58:140:58:18

We've had a great time at Woburn. Until next time, cheerio!

0:58:230:58:26

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:58:510:58:54

Paul Martin and experts Anita Manning and Kate Bateman are in the sixties new town Milton Keynes. During the day they unearth some real treasures - a dazzling art deco ring and a mourning locket which get the bidders buzzing in the sale room later.

Paul also drops in on a local museum celebrating the life and work of famous children's writer Roald Dahl and talks to a group of very excited youngsters.


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