Harlow Flog It!


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Today Flog It is in Harlow, a town made to house

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some of the post-war population moving from London.

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Harlow's design was the vision of chief architect and town planner Sir Frederick Gibberd.

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In 1951 he was responsible for this building, The Lawn.

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That is so iconic because it is Britain's first-ever tower block.

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But this isn't where today's action is happening.

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It's here, across town at the Latton Bush Centre.

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We've got a massive turnout here with their antiques.

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Mark Stacey and Charlie Ross are raring to go, so let's get this huge crowd inside.

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-Hello, Anthony.

-Good afternoon.

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Thank you so much for waiting and bringing this lovely coffee set.

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We all know what it is,

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but before we examine it, give us the family history.

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-Well, we know it's been in our family since 1939.

-Right.

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I would think it was a wedding present for our parents.

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They were difficult times and it's not a thing you would buy with war coming on.

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-You've always used it as a coffee set?

-The last time, and I can only remember using it once,

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-I think I drank tea out of these.

-The cups would take tea, but it is a coffee set.

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This is known as the Bonjour set.

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This is definitely a coffee pot in the long oval pattern.

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The teapot is much shorter and circular. I would say it is a little bit earlier than 1939.

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So it was probably second-hand, which often happened generations ago.

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I would have thought it tends to date to mid-1930s.

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The best period for Clarice Cliff is from the end of the 1920s

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up to 1935, 1936.

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After that, the patterns went a little bit...less quality.

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Less dynamic. I'm not absolutely sure of the pattern.

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I'm calling it pomegranate.

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These look like pomegranates. But what we will do is look out for the pattern

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and I'll let the auctioneers know.

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What I like is this lovely, open, triangular handle,

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which is so 1930s.

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I think there will be quite a lot of interest, even though it's not very bright and bold.

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It's complete and, more importantly, perfect, which is the nice thing.

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In terms of value, I would say, if we put it into auction,

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I would keep it slightly on the conservative side so that we tempt people.

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-But I would have thought £500-£800.

-Really?

-How do you feel about that?

-All right.

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-And we'll put a reserve of 500.

-Fine.

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-I suspect it will make the high end on a good day.

-Thank you.

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It's so nice to see a complete set in such good condition.

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Thank you for being patient with us and I'll see you at the auction.

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-Let's hope for a top price.

-Thanks.

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-Right. Henry and Mark here, whose are the candlesticks?

-Mine.

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-He's giving moral support?

-My son.

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-So who's getting the money if we flog them?

-We all are!

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-How many is all?

-Two, four.

-Four of you?

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They'll need to make some money!

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-Where did they come from?

-A friend left them to me.

-And what do you know about them?

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-Nothing. Nothing at all.

-Do you know they're candlesticks?

-Oh, yes!

-Good!

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-What are they made of?

-Silver.

-Correct!

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-Top of the class. Have they got a hallmark?

-Yes.

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I think it's a lion on it.

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The great thing about a bit of silver is you can tell who made it, where it was made and when.

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The lion you were talking about is the lion passant.

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The moment you see the lion, you know they're silver. Next to the lion is an anchor.

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It is an assay mark, so they were made in Birmingham.

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If they had a leopard's head, they were made in London. A crown was Sheffield, et cetera.

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There's a letter N.

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Now the letter N on there tells you that they were made in 1912.

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So they're post-Victorian. Corinthian column candlesticks.

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Probably the most popular design.

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And they are dwarf candlesticks. Sometimes they make 10 or 11-inch ones.

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And these are sort of seven inches. I quite like the squat format.

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-They would clean up beautifully. You haven't cleaned them?

-No.

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A lot of people don't clean silver. If you rub them too much, you rub through the silver.

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B) You'll destroy the decoration.

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C) Worst of all, you can clean off the hallmark.

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-What are they worth?

-A couple of hundred?

-What do you reckon?

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-Two, three hundred?

-You should be doing my job!

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Know what I think they're worth? 200-300!

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-It's not as if they're the rarest things in the world.

-No, no.

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But of all silver objects, candlesticks are the most popular.

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I think 200-300 is spot on.

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-We'll put a reserve of 175 on them. Happy with that?

-Yeah.

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-Thank you for bringing them along. That's 50 quid each. Or will you get most of it?

-I like that!

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Chris and Jean, thank you so much for struggling in on this hot day with a great lump of furniture.

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I'm very proud of you. Give me a bit about your background. You're both involved with a charity.

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That's right. Rainbow Services.

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And it is a charity to fill unmet need of one sort or another, and one of the projects we run

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is to take furniture and donate it to people on low income

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-or on benefits.

-To furnish their bedsits or flats?

-Absolutely.

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This was donated by someone who said, "I'm not sure if it's any good,

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"but if not, please sell it."

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-And this isn't what people want? They want beds and wardrobes?

-That's right.

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Things we get a quick turnover with, to go in a house in Harlow.

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We don't get much call for these desks!

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-Writing desks!

-We need practical things for people.

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They need wardrobes, beds, sofas. We pick up good quality furniture.

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Well, carry on the good work. Let's hope this adds to the kitty.

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-Do you like it? Would you fancy buying it?

-Not in my house, no!

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It wouldn't necessarily go. I can see its charm.

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As a writing desk, it is very usable.

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It's quite small.

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This would fit into a large Victorian house or a small cottage.

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It's not got a great deal of age. It looks like an 18th-century piece,

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-but in fact it's early 20th century.

-Oh, right?

-Yeah.

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I'd put this around 1930s and it's Dutch.

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-Oh, is it?

-Yes. If you start at the floor,

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it's on lovely flattened ball feet, so typical of the Dutch craftsman.

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It's well-made, handmade.

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It's not machine-made, which is really nice.

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The colour of the oak is very good. If I take one drawer out,

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you can see the whole construction, even the drawer linings, it's all made of oak.

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They've taken pride in it because all the drawer faces are veneered in oak

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and reversed to make a chevron. They didn't need to do that, but it's nice and adds value.

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Those little architectural details make it a little bit more expensive than it would normally be.

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Right. I expect you want to know roughly what it's worth.

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If this was an 18th-century piece, it would be £1,600-£2,000,

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for a continental writing desk.

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But it's early 20th century.

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I think it's got a value of around £200-£300.

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I'd like to see it get to £300, but we need two people. That's all.

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Hopefully, we'll have half a dozen fighting for it! But...

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I think if we put this into auction we've got to put it on with a valuation of £100-£200

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and a reserve at £100. Great.

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It's lovely to know about, to get the history.

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-Hello, Linda.

-Hello, Mark.

-Thank you for being so patient.

-It's OK.

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You've brought in a lovely object that proves size isn't everything.

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-Good.

-This charming little figure. Where did you get it from?

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An antiques fair. I like going round them.

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-I thought it was sweet.

-I love it. Can you remember what you paid?

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-No, can't remember. It wasn't much.

-I've got a feeling that you're a bit of a hoarder.

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You like antiques fairs.

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-My house is like... Steptoe and Son!

-Oh, really?

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-You don't wash in the sink, do you?

-No, I don't!

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Not that far.

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Let's have a little look. I think it's wonderful.

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Quite an interesting potter. Nobody knows who he is. Or she.

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It's very much in the style of the early 20th century, naive school, the London school.

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The main exponent of this was Charles Vyse, who used to be based in Chelsea

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and produced these wonderful figures of cherubs and satyrs and bacchanalian figures

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doing things on the back of snails and with frogs,

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in the most wonderful colours. At that time there were a lot of other small potters around

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who produced similar figures. Your little figure is simply marked underneath, and on the back,

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JSB, dated 1932, and Dulwich.

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So obviously this potter was based in Dulwich.

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I adore it, I love this. It's a little bacchanalian figure. You thought it was a cherub.

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-Yeah, a cherub.

-It's not.

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If you look closely, it's got little horns.

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-Oh, yes.

-And little grapes, vines, which represents a bacchanalian-type subject.

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The god of wine.

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And he's just caught a male pheasant and is grabbing it.

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You look at the pheasant which is desperate to get away,

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but the colours and the quality of the painting... Look at his face.

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-It's so sweet. I love faces.

-He's blushing, with a really wicked look on his face. Actually...

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I'm glad I've not got a tail!

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It's absolutely wonderful. I see why you fell in love with it.

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-Beautiful.

-A lot of people will be interested in it, but we've got to keep the estimate sensible.

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-Maybe £100-£150.

-Yeah, lovely.

-With discretion on the reserve.

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-Let's hope we have a rip-roaring time!

-Wonderful.

-Just like he is.

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Martin, HMS Ganges Association? You must be a naval man.

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-Ex-naval man.

-Ex?

-I joined when I was 15.

-Good time?

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Very tough time. Very strict.

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-Is that where you found the pot?

-No.

-Where's it from?

-When I came out of the navy, I lived in Chelsea.

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-Right.

-And the lady above me said, "Could you clean my windows?" So I said, "Certainly I will."

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-She said, "I'll pay you." I said no.

-A gentleman.

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In 1966, just after the World Cup, she called me up and said, "I'm moving."

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She said, "I'd like you to have that." I used to pick it off the windowsill very carefully,

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-put it on the chest of drawers.

-And you never dropped it.

-No.

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-And?

-It's been in the cupboard ever since!

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-So you don't actually like it?

-No, I...

-No use for it?

-No use for it at all.

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-Know anything about it?

-Nothing.

-Wonderful, isn't it?

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-I will now appear to be wildly knowledgeable about it! I've looked at the bottom!

-You have!

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I think I can tell it was Doulton, Doulton Lambeth. That factory started in the 19th century,

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-making drains.

-Oh, right?

-Pottery drains.

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Then they got a bit more refined and started making jardinieres and all sorts of pots

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-and went on to become the Royal Doulton company.

-Right.

-In about 1920.

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What I think is most interesting is the decoration of it.

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-A lot of Doulton Lambeth wares weren't glazed.

-They weren't?

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No. And this is glazed and, across the middle, looks just like a piece of Wedgwood

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-and yet it's Doulton. As if they were influenced by Wedgwood.

-I'm with you.

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Looking at the bottom, it's stamped 1881.

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-That is 130 years old.

-My God.

-Of moving it backwards and forwards. Not by you for 130 years!

-No!

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In that windowsill.

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And all the rosettes, the glazing, is in perfect condition.

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-And it's got a value.

-Has it?

-Any ideas?

-30 quid?

-You could certainly double that.

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And add a bit more, hopefully. It's certainly £50-£100.

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-Right.

-I would want to put a reserve of £50 on it.

-That's fair enough. Absolutely, yeah.

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On a really good day, if somebody likes the way it's glazed,

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it might well trickle on to £100. Thank you very much for bringing it along.

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My pleasure.

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It's now that time in the show where we head off to the sale room,

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and here's what's coming with us.

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This 1930s Clarice Cliff coffee set has languished in the sideboard. Could it be a hidden gem?

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They're small, but are these silver candlesticks beautiful enough to attract an admirer?

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Will the bidders turn out for this Dutch desk? It's all in the aid of charity.

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Because Linda's bacchanalian figure is unusual and fun, it should do very well in the sale room.

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Finally, can this gift for Martin's window-cleaning skills sparkle and shine today?

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All our lots will be going under the hammer here at Reeman Dansie Auctions in Colchester.

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The man on the rostrum is James Grinter.

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This pair of silver candlesticks should light up the saleroom. We're looking for £200-£300.

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They belong to Henry and Mark here. This could be your inheritance!

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-Dad's not passing them on?

-No!

-And you don't want them.

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So, £200-£300. I love the Corinthian columns. Little mini columns.

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-Lovely.

-They'll always sell well.

-Yes. They'll dress any dinner table.

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-You should have had a dinner party before the valuation day!

-Take a bit of cleaning, though.

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-They do.

-Have Flog It in for dinner.

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-Nothing wrong in that!

-No, true.

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Let's find out what the bidders think. This is it.

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Lot 219 is a pair of George V silver candlesticks. A handsome pair of sticks here.

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Start me at 150? 150 to start me?

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140? 140 is bid there. At 140. At 140.

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Do I hear 150? 150. 160.

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170. 170 is bid down here now. At 170.

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180? At £170, I'm going to sell them.

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All done now at 170.

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You've got £170. We had a reserve at 175, so he's used a little bit of discretion.

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-I'm sure he'll make the money up. We didn't light the room up!

-They weren't expensive.

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No. That's auctions for you. They've gone!

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Now it's the Clarice Cliff! It wouldn't be Flog It without Clarice.

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Fingers crossed we get top money today. Now, Mark, you said it was pomegranate at the valuation day.

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-Well, it looks like them.

-I had a chat to James. He thinks it might be passion fruit.

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I'm happy for it to be whatever fruit makes the most money!

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OK! Well, we've got £500-£800 riding on this. Let's hope for Anthony's sake we get the top end.

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Good luck.

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Now the 1930s Clarice Cliff passion fruit pattern coffee set.

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£400 to start me? 400 I have.

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At £400 now. 420. 420.

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440. 460. 480.

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-At 480 in the corner now.

-Come on!

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500 anywhere? At £480.

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It's going to be sold. Are you all done?

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-480.

-480.

-We were just above the reserve.

-Just.

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-That's how these things happen.

-It is. We needed two more people to push that bid.

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-Disappointing slightly.

-But I did say on the day that the pattern isn't the most exuberant.

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If it had been the melons or something a bit more exotic, we might have got a bit more,

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-but there you go.

-Watch out for your patterns.

-Watch out for your fruit!

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Martin saw some wonderful things window cleaning in Chelsea! One was the Doulton jardiniere!

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-What a spot that was! And you've brought your wife, Mary, for moral support.

-Yeah.

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-Do you like the jardiniere?

-It's all right. I'm not...

-No.

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-Not really my thing.

-We'll flog it anyway. We hope for £50-£100 put on by Charlie.

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I want to know more about this window cleaning!

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-I used to live in Flood Street.

-Where Margaret Thatcher lived.

-She lived at the top of the road.

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-I never cleaned her windows.

-Well, a security risk!

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She wouldn't pay me my money!

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Number 100 now is the Doulton Lambeth jardiniere with applied frieze.

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Say for it 50? £50? 40?

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40 I have. 40. At £40.

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Do I have 45? 45. At 45. 50.

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-We're selling it.

-At 50. 55?

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At £50 bid.

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Are you all done?

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-Bang on the lower end. £50. That's OK, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-It's been in the wardrobe!

-I've earned a bit of interest on it!

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Yes!

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Right. My turn to be the expert. Remember that lovely Dutch desk? It's a bit of quality.

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We've got £100-£200 on it. It belongs to Rainbow Services,

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who help furnish houses for underprivileged people.

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-We're not here with Chris today, but we do have Jean. And?

-Jacquie, the director of Rainbow Services.

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-Pleased to meet you. What a lovely charity.

-Wonderful.

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-It's a really good idea. Things we don't need can furnish people's houses.

-Absolutely.

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It's a cracking piece of furniture.

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We're going to turn it into cash. It's not a period piece, or it would be worth a lot more,

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-but hopefully, you never know, we'll get more than £200.

-Lovely.

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-We've got everything crossed.

-Here we go. This is it.

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Number 732 is a 1920s oak desk.

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-£100 to start me? 100?

-Come on.

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£100 I have. At £100.

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Do 110? At £100 bid...

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110. 120. 130.

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-140.

-This is more like it.

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160. At 160 on my right. All done now at 160? All done.

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That wasn't bad, was it? I got very worried for a second!

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We got stuck on £100. In auctions, you need two people on something to push the bid.

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-That's going to Rainbow Services.

-Fantastic.

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Are you all done?

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I love this next item! That little bacchanalian figure. It belongs to Linda.

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-Not for much longer, Mark.

-No.

-You'd love to buy this.

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If he was allowed, he'd buy that.

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-It's so Charles Vyse.

-Yes.

-And it's so small.

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Puts a smile on your face and that's worth investing in. Let's hope this lot invest.

0:23:300:23:37

-Good luck!

-Unusual 1930s Dulwich pottery bacchanalian figure.

0:23:370:23:43

I have two commissions with me. I start at £140.

0:23:430:23:47

-140 straight in.

-Straight in.

0:23:470:23:50

Do I hear 150? 150.

0:23:500:23:52

160. With me at 160. 170.

0:23:520:23:56

180. At 180, still with me. On the book at £180.

0:23:560:24:00

Are you all done? 190. 190 in the corner. I'm out.

0:24:000:24:05

At 190 in the corner. All done?

0:24:050:24:08

-Hammer's gone down. £190.

-Amazing. Well done!

0:24:080:24:13

That has got to be a good result. It's put a big grin on your face.

0:24:130:24:18

-I'll have to go and find something else.

-What's on your shopping list?

0:24:180:24:23

-Something here today.

-What have you spotted?

0:24:230:24:27

That china lady over there. The thing that everybody hates!

0:24:290:24:34

Late Victorian. She's a big girl!

0:24:340:24:36

-Good luck!

-After me!

0:24:360:24:39

Welcome to painter's paradise.

0:24:460:24:48

We're in the garden of Paycocke's House.

0:24:480:24:51

just outside of Coggeshall in Essex.

0:24:510:24:53

Now if this scene looks familiar to some of you,

0:24:530:24:55

that's because it's the choice spot

0:24:550:24:58

for many amateur artists.

0:24:580:24:59

They love to capture the very essence of this beautiful place.

0:24:590:25:02

But behind that romantic facade,

0:25:020:25:05

I know it's hard to believe

0:25:050:25:06

but there was once a bustling factory

0:25:060:25:08

and a rather glitzy showroom

0:25:080:25:10

for one of the wealthiest businesses in the area.

0:25:100:25:13

When this house was built in 1509, at the time of Henry VIII,

0:25:150:25:18

the village of Coggeshall

0:25:180:25:20

was one of East Anglia's principal clothing-making centres.

0:25:200:25:24

Although from a family of butchers,

0:25:240:25:26

its owner, Thomas Paycocke,

0:25:260:25:27

wanted to lead the field in wool and cloth.

0:25:270:25:30

He needed a prime location for his new venture

0:25:300:25:33

to attract passing trade

0:25:330:25:35

so where better than right on the edge of the M1?

0:25:350:25:38

The Roman M1, that is, otherwise known as Stane Street,

0:25:380:25:42

which ran from Colchester to St Albans.

0:25:420:25:45

It would have thronged with pedestrians

0:25:450:25:47

and horse-borne traffic.

0:25:470:25:48

BOLT CLATTERS

0:25:520:25:53

Thomas constructed Paycocke's as a nest for himself

0:25:530:25:56

and his new wife, Margaret.

0:25:560:25:58

This room is beautifully adorned with

0:25:580:26:01

the most wonderful ornamentation.

0:26:010:26:03

Thomas would have displayed all his goods here,

0:26:030:26:05

all his cloth and tapestries,

0:26:050:26:07

to be marvelled at.

0:26:070:26:09

How do we know that? Well, unlike the rest of the house,

0:26:090:26:12

the walls here are devoid of any panelling.

0:26:120:26:16

This is quite austere and flat

0:26:160:26:17

but it was Thomas' canvas to display

0:26:170:26:20

his wonderful tapestries.

0:26:200:26:21

To advertise his trade further,

0:26:250:26:27

he used this exquisite linenfold panelling

0:26:270:26:29

on the walls and doors, inside and out.

0:26:290:26:31

I'm going to meet Orlando Visotsky,

0:26:380:26:40

who's the custodian of this rather wonderful building

0:26:400:26:43

and find out a bit more about its history.

0:26:430:26:47

-Hi, Orlando.

-Hello.

0:26:470:26:48

What a great job you've got. Smashing place, isn't it?

0:26:480:26:51

Tell me a bit about how the house was constructed.

0:26:510:26:53

The house has evolved over the centuries.

0:26:530:26:56

The Paycockes were already living in a house on this site,

0:26:560:26:59

of which this is the only part that still remains.

0:26:590:27:02

-That dates back to...

-Dates back to 1420.

0:27:020:27:04

As they got richer and richer,

0:27:040:27:06

they decided they need a flashy front elevation

0:27:060:27:10

on the street.

0:27:100:27:11

-They added!

-That's right.

0:27:110:27:13

Was the house very different to any other house in the road?

0:27:130:27:16

Oh, gosh. Very much so.

0:27:160:27:18

Paycocke would have done a lot of trading

0:27:180:27:21

with Flanders and France, the Lowlands.

0:27:210:27:24

He brought back some architectural ideas to use on this house.

0:27:240:27:27

-So he was a real visionary?

-Very much so.

0:27:270:27:29

This house makes use of something radical called storeys,

0:27:290:27:34

which were unknown for a chap like Paycocke at that time.

0:27:340:27:39

But it's really stood the test of its time.

0:27:390:27:41

It's got a wonderful feel this house.

0:27:410:27:43

-Beautiful.

-That's right.

0:27:430:27:44

It does feel very very homely.

0:27:440:27:47

Sometimes you walk into stately homes

0:27:470:27:49

and you feel distant from it.

0:27:490:27:52

-There's a connection here.

-That's right.

0:27:520:27:55

Thomas Paycocke is an ordinary man.

0:27:550:27:58

He's one of us.

0:27:580:27:59

Thomas was a self-made man

0:27:590:28:01

who wanted to give something back.

0:28:010:28:03

When he died, he bequeathed much of his great wealth

0:28:030:28:06

to his workers.

0:28:060:28:07

In the 16th century this was most unusual.

0:28:070:28:10

Then, it was customary for rich people

0:28:100:28:13

to leave all of their wealth to the Church.

0:28:130:28:15

What of Paycocke's today?

0:28:180:28:20

The woollen trade is no longer here and the workers have gone.

0:28:220:28:25

In the last century, it's become more of a peaceful, tranquil haven.

0:28:250:28:30

Today, as we've seen, the house has become a shrine

0:28:300:28:33

to East Anglia's woollen industry

0:28:330:28:34

and to one visionary entrepreneur

0:28:340:28:37

and the workers and tradesmen that have served with him.

0:28:370:28:40

Back to the valuation day in Harlow, there's, well, magic in the air.

0:28:520:28:57

-Hello, Michael. Hello, Sarah.

-Hi.

-Hi.

-We know what's inside the box,

0:28:570:29:02

but give us a bit of the history first.

0:29:020:29:05

I've had this for about 34 years.

0:29:050:29:09

I used to do table-top magic shows and my aunt in Aberdeen bought it in an auction.

0:29:090:29:15

-I think she paid £20 for it.

-Gosh!

0:29:150:29:18

-34 years ago, you must have been quite young.

-Thank you very much.

0:29:180:29:23

I was about 14 at the time.

0:29:230:29:26

-Have you continued that?

-It fell by the wayside when I was about 20.

0:29:260:29:31

-Sarah, where has it been for the last 20 years?

-In various lofts.

0:29:310:29:36

-You haven't magicked it out of the loft until today?

-No.

0:29:360:29:41

Let's have a look at it. It's in a nice, leather fitted case.

0:29:410:29:45

Oh, it's in nice condition, isn't it?

0:29:450:29:48

Not a lot of damage at all. Normally, you get the odd bit of scuffing.

0:29:480:29:54

I'm always tempted to go like that because a lot of them are opera top hats

0:29:540:30:01

where you fold them and you flick them and they open when you want to wear them, but this isn't like that.

0:30:010:30:08

We've got a nice London maker, Christys' of London,

0:30:080:30:12

and then the Edinburgh retailer.

0:30:120:30:14

Then we've got a nice mark, "Imperial Quality", as well.

0:30:140:30:18

Back when these were popular, in the late Victorian, Edwardian period, heads were a lot smaller.

0:30:180:30:26

Most of the time, they sit on the top of your head, but this is quite a good size. It's too big for me.

0:30:260:30:33

I think it's quite a good size.

0:30:330:30:36

-It's been in various lofts. Your aunt bought it for 20 quid. What is it worth today?

-I don't know.

0:30:360:30:44

We've sold them before on the show. They're not very rare items.

0:30:440:30:48

It's nice that it's got the fitted box, but we must be realistic.

0:30:480:30:53

I'm going to say that auctioneer's cliche. I think it is probably worth £80 to £100.

0:30:530:30:59

-OK.

-And hopefully on the day, we'll get 100, maybe even 120.

0:30:590:31:04

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah.

-So we'll put a reserve of £80 on it.

-OK.

0:31:040:31:10

Thanks for coming in. I look forward to meeting you both at the auction.

0:31:100:31:15

-Let's hope we pull a magic price out of the hat on the day.

-Excellent.

0:31:150:31:20

-Roger and Brenda, I think this is more Roger than Brenda.

-You're right!

-It's my collection.

0:31:250:31:31

-Tell me about it.

-They're autographs I collected when I was at school,

0:31:310:31:37

-writing to people, watching games, mostly late '40s and '50s.

-Yeah.

0:31:370:31:43

Cricket, golf, tennis, anything.

0:31:430:31:45

-Do you play golf?

-I used to. As a child I was given a putter instead of a rattle.

0:31:450:31:51

So I had an eye for a ball. Anything with a ball I could do.

0:31:510:31:56

If there was no ball, I couldn't!

0:31:560:31:59

I'm going to have a quick peep. I recognise the first one!

0:31:590:32:04

The Brylcreem boy! That's Denis Compton, isn't it?

0:32:040:32:08

He was a bit of a wastrel. He would appear at midnight in his bow tie and go straight to a match,

0:32:080:32:15

borrow somebody else's kit, score 100 and go to another party.

0:32:150:32:19

-He didn't always appear at midnight.

-Really?

-When he was told to be in by 11,

0:32:190:32:25

he thought it meant 11am and so he'd be out all night and then turn up for the match.

0:32:250:32:31

-He was a one with the girls.

-Oh, yes. He was the first sort of glamour sportsman.

-Great fun.

0:32:310:32:37

You've got all sorts of teams here.

0:32:370:32:40

-Henry Cooper. First man to knock down Muhammad Ali.

-He was.

0:32:410:32:46

And we go from Henry Cooper to Margaret Lockwood!

0:32:460:32:50

-How bizarre can you get?

-Another glamorous figure.

-Fascinating.

0:32:500:32:55

-Stanley Holloway.

-Who played the original Doolittle in My Fair Lady, didn't he?

0:32:550:33:02

About the first thing I saw in the West End.

0:33:020:33:05

Sadly, although this is without doubt my favourite item,

0:33:050:33:09

-it's of interest to somebody probably in the £30-£50 range.

-Right, OK. These things are worth...

0:33:090:33:17

-The great thing is for it to go to someone who loves it.

-Exactly.

0:33:170:33:21

-So I'm going to suggest that we sell it without reserve.

-OK.

0:33:210:33:26

If they catalogue it properly, and put as many names in as possible,

0:33:260:33:33

-so it appeals to as many different people as possible, it helps.

-Some may not be worth keeping.

0:33:330:33:39

This letter from Sandy McPherson of the BBC, not worth a great deal.

0:33:390:33:44

-I've probably now lost my job!

-But to the connoisseur!

0:33:440:33:49

-We'll put it in and see how we go.

-You must keep your job.

-Thank you.

0:33:490:33:54

-John, you've brought a complete history of a man's record in the army.

-Looks like it.

0:34:040:34:11

-Who was he?

-He was my grandfather on my mum's side.

0:34:110:34:15

He fought in the Second World War.

0:34:150:34:18

He was a rifleman in the Scottish Cameronians, in the First Battalion.

0:34:180:34:23

-There he is.

-Yeah.

-Weren't they smart in their kilts?

-He was.

-Wonderfully smart.

0:34:230:34:29

-Did he get through the war?

-Yeah, he died when I was about seven.

0:34:290:34:34

He must have seen a huge amount.

0:34:340:34:37

-He travelled a bit as well?

-He certainly did, yeah.

0:34:370:34:42

What I really love is that he's written here, chronologically, everything he's done with the army.

0:34:420:34:49

So he was in the beginning of the war. In 1939, he was in Calcutta, then he was in France.

0:34:490:34:56

And then subsequently sent to Africa and then Italy, Palestine, Lebanon,

0:34:560:35:02

and finished the war in Egypt.

0:35:020:35:04

-That's right.

-Just that tells you all about the war,

0:35:040:35:09

how the war moved, and that guy saw it all.

0:35:090:35:13

-Yeah.

-Not many of them would have been able to do that.

0:35:130:35:17

-Moving on through here, we've got some very early aeroplanes here, some biplanes...

-That's right.

0:35:170:35:24

..which he caught in flight. There's a wonderful page of recreation.

0:35:240:35:30

And there's a game of polo going on here.

0:35:300:35:33

Keeping fit - look at that for a bit of gymnastics! Extraordinary.

0:35:330:35:38

We haven't got time to go through all these pages,

0:35:380:35:43

but this, I think, is my favourite page.

0:35:430:35:47

-There's a wonderful picture of Gandhi.

-Yeah, that's Gandhi.

0:35:470:35:52

He looks very thoughtful, a man of principles.

0:35:520:35:56

-Now, why are you going to sell it? Your children aren't interested in this?

-Not really, no.

0:35:560:36:02

If you're not keeping them and your children won't use them, what better than to put them into auction?

0:36:020:36:10

If somebody is going to pay money for this,

0:36:100:36:12

-they are not going to throw it away.

-It's going to be looked after.

0:36:120:36:17

The medals are worth £30 to £50, £40 to £60.

0:36:170:36:22

The album must be worth £100 of anybody's money, £150, I think.

0:36:220:36:27

-That's fine.

-So, 150 to 250, with a reserve of £150. Happy with that?

-That's great.

-Jolly good.

0:36:270:36:35

Thank you very much for bringing it along. This is a real history lesson in one album.

0:36:350:36:41

It certainly is. Thank you very much.

0:36:410:36:44

-Hi, Chris.

-Hi.

-As soon as I saw you holding this, I thought, "I've got to film this."

0:36:490:36:56

It's a wacky, bizarre item. Where on earth did you get it from?

0:36:560:37:01

I inherited this from my grandfather

0:37:010:37:03

via my aunt who has sadly passed away

0:37:030:37:07

and it's resting itself in my house,

0:37:070:37:10

trying to avoid damage from the assorted kids and pets that we have.

0:37:100:37:15

I'm just interested in finding out about it and if it's worth anything.

0:37:150:37:20

A lot of people will be interested in it. I think it's Austrian.

0:37:200:37:25

And late 19th century, so any time between 1880 and 1900. And she's made of pottery.

0:37:250:37:32

These were produced in large numbers, normally figures.

0:37:320:37:36

Or busts. I've never quite seen one so elegant as this.

0:37:360:37:41

Have you always known it like this or has it had other pieces with it?

0:37:410:37:46

-There was a stool.

-A little china stool?

-Yeah.

0:37:460:37:50

But that, I believe, got broken. And it's been sitting on a wooden chair that my grandad made.

0:37:500:37:57

-Originally, these would have been made in pairs.

-I did wonder if it was staring at somebody else?

0:37:570:38:04

There would've been a gentleman with her.

0:38:040:38:07

It's just so ridiculously camp.

0:38:070:38:10

You've got a wonderful plumed hat. The quality is very good. Lovely, delicate expressions on her face.

0:38:100:38:17

And she's holding this wonderful, oversized fan. It's a fantastically outrageous item really.

0:38:170:38:24

Chris, we come now to the crucial point of how much is she worth.

0:38:240:38:30

If we were putting it into auction, we've got to bear in mind some minor damage, the odd chip here and there.

0:38:300:38:37

But with something as complicated and as old as this, you have to expect that.

0:38:370:38:43

I would suggest £300 to £400. Would you be happy with that?

0:38:430:38:47

-Yeah, that's fine.

-And we'll put a reserve of 300 with 10% discretion on that.

-That's fine.

0:38:470:38:54

On the day, it might be a surprise and fly away.

0:38:540:38:58

-Hopefully, not off the shelf until they've paid for it!

-Yeah.

0:38:580:39:02

-Thank you for bringing such a memorable item in.

-Thank you very much for giving me the information.

0:39:020:39:09

Can the auctioneer magic up some interest in this top hat, complete with fitted box?

0:39:150:39:21

I'm sure Roger's autograph book will excite great interest amongst the sports collectors.

0:39:210:39:27

These wartime photos and medals are a picture book of social history,

0:39:270:39:32

but can it win a place in someone's heart?

0:39:320:39:36

And can this lady turn enough heads to win a suitor?

0:39:360:39:40

Auctioneer James Grinter thinks she's got potential.

0:39:400:39:44

I don't know what to say. Mass-produced Victoriana. Massive, great big pottery figure.

0:39:460:39:52

This belongs to Chris. It was his grandfather's.

0:39:520:39:56

And I think it's time to go. We've got £300 to £400 on her.

0:39:560:40:01

-You get a lot for your money.

-It's the largest figure I've ever seen.

0:40:010:40:06

-And me.

-In 27 years, I haven't seen another one like it.

0:40:060:40:11

-It was one of a pair originally.

-There'd be a gentleman.

-A dandy.

-Courting her.

-Exactly.

0:40:110:40:17

-Where would you have displayed it?

-I don't know.

-Perhaps on top of a Victorian upright piano?

0:40:170:40:23

-One either side.

-Or a purpose-made piece of furniture.

0:40:230:40:27

A small chair or little settee made for the two of them to sit together.

0:40:270:40:33

-It's quite fascinating.

-It is.

0:40:330:40:35

The condition is absolutely remarkable. It's perfect.

0:40:350:40:39

It's High Victorian taste, but I think it will appeal to people.

0:40:390:40:45

It's a very decorative thing.

0:40:450:40:47

Not necessarily in fashion today, but I still think it'll do quite well.

0:40:470:40:52

-I'm glad it's the lady. A single gentleman won't sell so well.

-True.

0:40:520:40:58

-£300 to £400?

-It stands a chance.

0:40:580:41:01

-How much more?

-I've never seen one before, so it's difficult to gauge.

0:41:010:41:07

-So we could get more.

-Yes.

-A lot more.

0:41:070:41:11

Brenda and Roger, hello. Your autograph book is up for grabs. Hopefully, we have eager bidders.

0:41:160:41:22

-Hopefully.

-From the 1940s and '50s.

-Yes, my schooldays, really.

0:41:220:41:27

-When I started collecting.

-Who's your biggest hero in the book?

-Well, I would say Denis Compton.

0:41:270:41:34

-Charlie, you've put £30-£40.

-There's no Bradman or WG Grace.

0:41:340:41:39

-That's where the big money is.

-These won't have serious value for another 50, 60 years.

0:41:390:41:46

We'll be gone then. Somebody else will see Denis Compton and think, "Finest cricketer ever!"

0:41:460:41:52

They'll be back up for sale!

0:41:520:41:55

But you've got to be right here to buy them. This is it.

0:41:550:41:59

The school of art sketchbook.

0:41:590:42:02

-£160 I'm bid.

-What?!

0:42:020:42:05

-I beg your pardon?

-160!

0:42:050:42:09

At £160. Are you all done?

0:42:090:42:13

Yes! £160. Straight in, straight out.

0:42:130:42:17

A great effort. More than I'd expected, but what I'd hoped.

0:42:170:42:22

There was one name, probably, that somebody really wanted.

0:42:220:42:26

Cricket's supposed to be my specialist subject!

0:42:260:42:30

-Sarah, Michael, good to see you again. Can you do any magic tricks?

-I'm not prepared, sorry.

0:42:360:42:42

Hopefully, your last one will be turning this top hat, valued at £20 35 years ago,

0:42:420:42:48

into £100 right now in the next couple of minutes.

0:42:480:42:52

-We've got a value of £80 to £100.

-It's in good condition.

-It is.

0:42:520:42:58

It's in a nice leather box and top hat size is important.

0:42:580:43:02

-A lot of them are very small.

-They don't fit your head.

0:43:020:43:06

This one does fit, so hopefully we'll be able to get £80 to £100.

0:43:060:43:11

Before that, Michael has one last little magic trick.

0:43:110:43:15

Yeah!

0:43:210:43:23

Hang on.

0:43:240:43:26

-No, there's nothing there.

-You know that already.

0:43:260:43:30

No.415 is the Edwardian, black, silk top hat by Scott. Original box.

0:43:300:43:36

£60 to start me? 60 I have down here. At 60.

0:43:360:43:40

65. 70. 75.

0:43:400:43:43

-80. 85...

-We're getting there.

-We are.

0:43:430:43:47

100. £100.

0:43:470:43:49

Down here at £100. Are you all done?

0:43:490:43:52

We did it. We got that magical £100. Well done.

0:43:520:43:56

There's a bit of commission to pay, but it's a nice meal out.

0:43:560:44:01

Lots of memories for you have gone.

0:44:010:44:03

-Yes, but I've had a good time with it.

-Has he still got the cape at home and the wand?

0:44:030:44:10

-He's got the wand.

-I like the wand.

-Yeah.

0:44:100:44:13

This next lot is a cracking item. Not a lot of monetary value, but there's a lot of history here.

0:44:200:44:27

It belongs to John. And all this social history is the contents

0:44:270:44:31

-of your grandfather's campaign throughout the Second World War.

-That's right.

0:44:310:44:37

-Have you got other things that he left you?

-There are photographs that I'm definitely keeping.

0:44:370:44:44

No.504 is a group of five Second World War medals.

0:44:440:44:48

And the photograph album. £100 to start me?

0:44:480:44:51

-Fingers crossed.

-£100 I'm bid.

0:44:510:44:54

At £100. 110? At £100.

0:44:540:44:57

-110 anywhere? At £100. Any advance?

-There's no bidding.

0:44:570:45:01

Are you all done...?

0:45:010:45:04

-Grandad's looking down, giving you a bit of a ticking off.

-Yeah.

0:45:040:45:09

-John, please hang on to them.

-Definitely.

0:45:090:45:12

Next, that wonderful Austrian pottery figure. She's big, blousy and beautiful.

0:45:220:45:28

She's late Victorian and very rare.

0:45:280:45:30

We talked to the auctioneer about it. We don't have the owner Chris.

0:45:300:45:35

-But we do have his son Robert. Hello. Is Dad on holiday?

-Yeah, but I don't really know where he is.

0:45:350:45:42

-And you don't care.

-No, party time!

-Which means it's party time!

0:45:420:45:47

Yeah, why not?

0:45:470:45:49

-Seriously, if we do really well on this, you will get on the phone to Dad and let him know.

-Sure.

0:45:490:45:56

We're looking for £400-plus. James agreed with your valuation.

0:45:560:46:01

It's lovely. It's very televisual.

0:46:010:46:04

-And as you say, she's blousy, a lot there for £300 to £400.

-Yeah.

0:46:040:46:10

-I think this lot will agree with your valuation. We've got the nod of approval.

-And a wink!

0:46:100:46:16

Good luck, everybody.

0:46:160:46:19

No.63 is the very large, 19th century German ceramic figure of a lady.

0:46:190:46:24

Very unusual. I have two commissions and I start the bidding at £280.

0:46:240:46:29

300 with Ian. At £300. 320.

0:46:290:46:32

340. 360. 380.

0:46:320:46:35

400. 420. 440.

0:46:350:46:38

At 440. The lady's bid now at 440.

0:46:380:46:41

-We're happy with that.

-460.

0:46:410:46:44

480. 500. 520.

0:46:440:46:46

-540.

-This is great!

0:46:460:46:48

560. 580. 600.

0:46:480:46:51

620. 640.

0:46:510:46:53

-660.

-Gosh!

-680. 700.

0:46:530:46:57

-720. 740. 760.

-That's unbelievable!

-780.

0:46:570:47:01

800. 820. 840. 860.

0:47:010:47:04

-880. 900.

-We might get £1,000!

0:47:040:47:07

920. 940. 960.

0:47:070:47:09

980. 1,000. 1,100.

0:47:090:47:12

-1,100?!

-1,200. 1,300...

0:47:120:47:15

-What have we missed, Mark?

-I don't know!

0:47:150:47:18

1,500. At £1,500.

0:47:180:47:21

On my right now at £1,500...

0:47:210:47:24

Are you all done...?

0:47:240:47:26

-£1,500!

-I do believe they're going to be extremely happy with that!

0:47:260:47:31

They've got to be happy with that. I'm tingling all over!

0:47:310:47:35

What do you think of her? You've seen her around the house.

0:47:350:47:40

-I really don't like her.

-But you like the £1,500.

-I like the 1,500 quid!

0:47:400:47:45

You should phone Dad. That'll make his holiday!

0:47:450:47:48

-He'll probably stay away for another two weeks, so it's more partying!

-Definitely.

0:47:480:47:55

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

-I'm amazed.

-That's incredible.

0:47:550:47:59

I thought 300 to 400 was a little on the conservative side, but it is best to tease the bidders in.

0:47:590:48:07

-But 1,500, you can't beat it!

-What a fine lady! She had a fine figure and she achieved a fine figure.

0:48:070:48:13

We've had great fun here, so until the next time, there's plenty more surprises to come on Flog It!

0:48:130:48:20

Charlie Ross and Mark Stacey value heirlooms to sell at auction in Harlow. Down the road in Coggeshall, Paul Martin takes a look at Paycocke's, an extraordinary example of Tudor architecture.


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