Swindon Flog It!


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Swindon

Paul Martin and the Flog It team arrive in Swindon to value the public's antiques with help from experts David Barby and Will Axon.


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Transcript


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The auction room's filling up and the air is full of anticipation.

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Going once, going twice - welcome to Flog It!

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I've gone to auctions for years. I still get a thrill

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when I enter the sale room. I love the excitement and the atmosphere

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just as your lot is coming up. You never know which way the hammer is going to fall.

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We've got a great show for you today.

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Believe me, you will not want to miss this,

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but before we get to the auction, we need some antiques to sell.

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We're searching for your antiques and collectables today at the Steam Museum in Swindon.

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Experts David Barby and Will Axon will be helping the crowds on their journey.

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If they're happy with the valuation and want to flog their item,

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then it's off to the auction room in Cirencester, where we'll Flog It!

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Chas, you've bought in today something, bearing in mind

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that we're in the Steam Museum in Swindon, that really, sort of,

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hits the note as far as the locos goes. If I open up this box here,

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-this quite splendid array of... How many did you say there were?

-50.

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-50 silver ingots, sterling silver.

-Sterling silver.

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-Solid sterling silver ingots, which commemorate a wide variety of locomotives.

-Yes.

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How did you come by them?

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Well, my wife had a second-hand dealership and somebody came in and obviously she was interested.

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-What did she pay for them?

-Oh, under £100, I think.

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-So under £100, which is good going considering the value of silver at the moment.

-Yeah.

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-Date-wise, they're from the 1970s.

-They are. Yeah.

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Were these collected over a period of time?

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-50 months. One a month.

-Right. So it was one a month. 50 months.

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-Over four years.

-Exactly. If you miss one, you've got to go back...

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-That's it. Yeah.

-And, we've got here the original receipt.

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£11.25. That was each, which I suppose in the '70s was a decent bit of money, wasn't it?

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-Quite a bit of money, I'd say.

-We've got a bit of literature

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saying that it is the National Railway Museum Collection.

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-That came with it.

-Came with it.

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-So these were produced to commemorate the opening of the museum.

-Yeah.

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We've had a quick look through. There are obviously some, sort of, classics,

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-like the Rocket and the Flying Scotsman.

-Yeah.

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But looking down here, there's one... There it is, the Evening Star.

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That's quite poignant, as that was the last steam loco made.

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-It was, yes. In here.

-In here, in the 1960s.

-It was.

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So, again, bearing in mind where we are, it really sort of hits the right note.

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Now, like I said, with regards to the value, it's tricky because 1970s -

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it's not what most people would call an antique -

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-but, what it's got going for it is that they are solid sterling.

-Yeah.

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Have you got any idea of what sort of figure they should be valued at?

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Have you thought about it, at all?

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Well, scrap price... I mean, probably around £5.

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Is it around £5, £6 an ounce?

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Yes. Cos I think you said they were an ounce each?

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-They're an ounce each. Yep.

-So each ingot is an ounce. We've got 50, so 50 ounces, obviously.

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-Say a fiver for an ounce.

-Yeah.

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-And at scrap value, we're looking at around, sort of, 250.

-Yeah. Yeah.

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But at least then we know it can only go up from there, value-wise.

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-Yeah.

-So what I would suggest was, if we could value these at perhaps £200 to £300. What do you think?

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-That's fine. Yeah.

-You think we'll go for that?

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-Yeah.

-Cos again, people who are viewing the sale

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-will be doing their own maths and working out what it is worth scrap.

-I understand that.

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Well, I'm happy to give these a go at £200 to £300, if you're happy to go with that.

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-Sure.

-And, reserve it at a couple of hundred, do you think?

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-I want to reserve it. Yeah. At least 200.

-Reserve at 200?

-Yeah.

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-OK. Hopefully on the day, we'll get it away for you.

-Brilliant.

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Sheila, when I saw these from a distance,

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I thought, for one moment, they were Moorcroft.

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-Oh.

-And when I got closer I could see they weren't.

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But they're by a company, or produced by a company,

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at the same time as Moorcroft were in production,

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and this idea of having, sort of, foliage and plant forms,

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was prevalent during the earlier part of the 20th century,

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-right through the pottery businesses.

-Oh, lovely.

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So you get a lot of companies like this, which is Hancock and Sons...

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Er...Sampson Hancock and Sons...

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producing wares, trying to catch on to that market.

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So these are not as valuable as Moorcroft.

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-Pity.

-Indeed so. But people hope that the interest will be there,

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and those that couldn't afford Moorcroft could buy these.

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-Right. Yeah.

-What I do like, however, is the shape.

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They have almost like a tulip head at the top there, don't they?

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And they're very nice, bulbous pieces.

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Are these family heirlooms?

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No. They were given to my husband as a gift

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-cos he did somebody a good turn.

-What was that?

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-Decorating or something like that?

-Yes.

-Ah, well done. Well done.

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Why are you selling them?

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-Was it the fact that you saw "Flog It!" was coming to Swindon?

-Right!

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And you thought of these. Have they been on display in the home?

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Oh, yes.

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But I like the contrast of these bright enamelled colours

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against that mottled brown background.

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Well, they look quite jolly against the plain units.

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That's right. If anybody has a sort of minimalistic room, these are going to stand out

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on those low level pieces of furniture, and they'll look super,

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cos I don't think you can be devoid in life of ornaments, can you?

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-No.

-I'm going to lift it up and look at the mark.

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Coronaware.

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Sampson Hancock and Sons.

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Stoke-on-Trent, and they're called Autumn.

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And they're all hand-painted by Molly Hancock, Designer.

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So these have been hand-painted.

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When it says hand-painted,

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what it means is there is a transfer design,

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which is then in-filled with colour.

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So she did the design and then there's numerous workers

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who would then fill in with colour.

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-I see.

-I think they're jolly nice.

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What would you be happy with as regards price?

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SHE LAUGHS You don't know.

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-As much as possible!

-As much as possible.

-Yeah.

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Let me think in terms of a price. If these go up for auction,

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it's nice to have a pair, and I think they will have appeal.

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-Again, for those people who can't afford Moorcroft.

-Ah!

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I would think at auction they should realise somewhere between 80 and 120.

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-Oh, that's lovely!

-That sort of price range.

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And when you break it down that's half,

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that's 40 to £60 each, so that's not a great deal of money, is it...?

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-No.

-..for one particular vase?

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-And how many of these have survived in a pair?

-That's true.

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We'll see what happens, and I'll be there at the auction with you.

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Oh, lovely. Good.

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Pam, thank you for bringing in some furniture. You know it's my passion.

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-I do.

-I love my wood. I like getting my hands all over it and caressing it.

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This is very nice. This is a little adjustable table,

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and it sort of works on the principle of a piano stool,

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and when you stand back and look at the legs, you can see

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it's got that lovely sort of demure sabre leg to it

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that you find on a chair front.

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And I like that little reeded finish

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which you can see on all the legs, running down there.

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Now, that says to me early 1800s, 1810, 1815.

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I think it's absolutely lovely. It's Cuban mahogany

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which is a lovely exotic hardwood brought back from the Americas.

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It's a lovely occasional table to have by the chair, put your glass of wine on it, but it is in fact...

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Some things aren't what they seem.

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-You didn't know this, did you?

-No.

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But if I turn that over...

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..you see there's some ghosting marks there.

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There's a bit of build up of dirt and a bit of wax,

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-and it hasn't quite aged as well as the rest of the piece, has it?

-No.

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That's because it's been hidden by a piece of wood

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which runs from that edge to that edge.

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They stop that table from splitting. Yeah. That was the bracing mechanism

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-to hold a square block of wood right in the middle...

-Uh-huh.

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..which would have allowed the table to swivel on its pedestal base.

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-Now, that was a pedestal table.

-Ah.

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Somebody has lost the base, and they've made use of the top.

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This...

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is a piano stool.

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Now, somebody has taken the padding and the fabric off the top...

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It is a marriage of two pieces of furniture.

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This table top is circa 1800.

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This piano stool is circa 1800, 1810 and they're both made of mahogany,

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and they suit each other well, so I think that's quite resourceful,

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but unfortunately, we haven't got a very unusual piece of furniture

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which has been craftsman made.

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-Not quite what we hoped.

-No. And I thought, "This will be interesting."

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How long have you had it?

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About 20 years now. Maybe 25.

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-And where did it come from, do you know?

-It was my husband's auntie.

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All of this thread...

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that allows this to go up and down by virtue of turning it

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to raise the height or lower it,

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has been hand cut with a chisel.

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And the colour is absolutely to die for.

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And it was a quality table in its day because from that edge to that edge, that's one piece of mahogany.

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That's one broad plank of Cuban mahogany.

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-Yeah.

-Unfortunately, it's split across the grain, and I know why.

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Because those two stretcher pieces...

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that were originally on it, to hold the tripod base on...

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were taken off to make it into this.

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That has broken off since, as there's nothing supporting

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this wide grain, so what's happened is, there's a crude repair...

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done there, with two reverse dovetails

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to hold the piece of wood tight together.

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-Uh-huh.

-So maybe the conversion happened around the early 1900s.

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But both pieces of furniture date back to the early 1800s.

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It's a long time, isn't it?

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Yes. Yeah. Now, value.

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It's not worth a lot,

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but it's a practical piece of furniture, isn't it?

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If you haven't got a lot of money and you want a side table

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and you're just setting up home and you can only afford £60, well, hopefully,

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-you'll be able to buy it for that. I know it's not a lot of money to you...

-No.

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-..but it's better than chucking it away.

-Oh, yeah.

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And I think we should put it in to auction with a value of 60 to £100.

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-Right.

-It's better than nothing, isn't it?

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-It is.

-And there's a little story there, you know?

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-It's a wonderful little story.

-Well, my son told me to throw it away...

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There you go. It's a classic bit of recycling,

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and this little piece of furniture is going to outlive us...

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as long as someone looks after it.

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And I think it's got a bit of style.

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Now, Anthea, I'm rather excited

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when I see these little bits of porcelain in front of me,

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because my interest is in porcelain.

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-Right.

-Particularly the period that this was produced.

-OK.

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I want to know several things from you before I say anything about them.

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Where did you get it from?

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Why do you want to sell it?

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We got it from my husband's uncle.

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-Right.

-He died in 2004.

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I think he may have either collected it or inherited it.

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-We're not quite sure.

-Oh, right.

-And it went all the way

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to Durban in Africa, and it's come all the way back.

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-Because I trace accent.

-That's right!

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-South African accent. And you came back when?

-2005.

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-2005.

-And we settled here then. Yes.

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Right. The second question.

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Why do you want to sell it?

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We don't use it. We're scared to use it.

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It's too beautiful and too delicate, so the thought is we could probably

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do something with the money that we would appreciate more.

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Now, this porcelain service, made by Spode, Josiah Spode,

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came up from London, took over an earthenware company and he was

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-in the retail shop in London, so he knew what the public wanted.

-Right.

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Think in terms of the Regency period.

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-Think in terms of the Brighton Pavilion.

-Yes.

-All the excitement.

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The Japanese, the Chinese styles, Imari patterns. People wanted colour.

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-Right.

-And this is the sort of ware that he was producing.

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What is exciting...

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Spode introduced to the hard paste porcelain, calcinated bone.

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-Right.

-That's burnt bone, ground down, and he added it to this paste.

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-He produced bone china.

-Oh, right.

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-It is a wonderful boat shape, as we can see on this sucriere.

-Beautiful.

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A covered sugar basin.

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That is a lovely example.

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We have the table waste bowl.

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Only two cups and saucers.

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I have two more. But I don't have six. I'm sorry.

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-Will you bring those other...?

-Yes.

-Are they in a similar condition?

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-Exactly. Yes.

-So we have four cups, four saucers. Right.

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And there's actually extra saucers, but I'm sure you don't need those.

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-I'd like any more that you have.

-OK.

-Because the person that buys this

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-might have additional cups in his collection.

-Right. OK.

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-The other thing is this wonderful sort of helmet shaped...

-I know.

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..jug and if you turn it upside down,

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I notice the mark on the bottom, which is Spode with a pattern number.

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-Right. Yes.

-The teapot, I love.

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-But we have a slight accident, do we not?

-Yes.

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And the accident has occurred on this particular section here

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and it's broken all the way through and then glued together.

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And I think it's because as the teapot was tipped,

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-they didn't hold the finial and the lid just went off.

-Must have.

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Now, this decoration, I think done by Daniels, is exquisite.

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The gilding is superb.

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They were the leaders of porcelain production

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at the beginning of the 19th century.

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The date of this... 1810, 1815.

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Now, let's think in terms of price.

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I think we're looking at about

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325 up to about 380.

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-OK.

-If it does more, I shall be absolutely deliriously happy for you.

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But I think we've got to, sort of, keep our parameters sensible.

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I only hope, at the auction, there are going to be collectors

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with the same enthusiasm as myself,

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to start bidding on this. And I shall look forward to seeing you.

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-Thanks so much.

-I'll be there to hold your hand!

-Good!

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Well, we found some wonderful items and now it's time for our first trip to the auction room.

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Let's find out what lots we've got.

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Anthea's Spode tea set has some damage,

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which I really hope doesn't put the collectors off.

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David loved this pair of decorative vases.

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I think they're an acquired taste,

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so let's see what happens in the auction.

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Pam was tempted to throw away this table,

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and I'm so glad she didn't, cos I love it,

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and I hope somebody else will too.

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And lastly, there's Chas's collection

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of silver ingot locomotives.

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Let's hope they build up a head of steam among the bidders.

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Today's auction is at the Cotswold Auction Company in Cirencester.

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And in the hot seat is auctioneer Elizabeth Pool.

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I'm going to find out what she thinks of our Spode tea set.

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Who fancies a cup of tea in style?

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Look at that. Doesn't it say it all?

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-Mm. Quality.

-Spode. Bone china.

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-And it just looks divine.

-Mm.

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It belongs to Anthea.

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I don't know why she's selling it.

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I wouldn't sell this if I had it in the house.

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We've got a fixed reserve on this of £325,

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and David's hoping it might make nearly 400, sort of, £380.

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As you know, there's damage on the lid, but, my word,

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it is early 19th century but it's got such good classical form.

0:16:420:16:47

-It's absolutely gorgeous.

-Beautiful shapes.

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Beautiful painting. Gold still very lustrous. Good condition.

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And it is classic Spode, but today's market isn't wonderful, is it?

0:16:540:16:58

No, and I tell you what, also.

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They're very very fussy, the purists that will buy into bone china.

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-They've got to have perfect things.

-Yep.

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-That's the problem, there is a lot of damage. There's more than this, as you know.

-Yeah.

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But the lid has been, sort of,

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crudely put back together.

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At least it's done, sort of, with loving care and it's not

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a professional restoration, so you can see it's damaged.

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-You can.

-That'll hold it back, won't it?

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It will. It will make a difference and I think two to five years ago, it would have easily made,

0:17:250:17:30

you know, what David was expecting, but I hope we'll get there,

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-but we might be pushing it.

-This one's going to be quite interesting, isn't it?

-It is.

0:17:340:17:39

I don't know. Something tells me it just might fly.

0:17:390:17:41

Let's hope you're right.

0:17:410:17:43

Anthea, it's now time for tea.

0:17:480:17:50

No, don't go and put the kettle on.

0:17:500:17:52

It's that Spode bone china tea service.

0:17:520:17:54

It's real classical quality but with a bit of damage to the lid.

0:17:540:17:58

Had a chat to the auctioneer earlier,

0:17:580:18:00

and I think she agreed with your valuation but she said it'll get

0:18:000:18:04

the lower end because of the damage,

0:18:040:18:06

and they're not selling so well at the moment.

0:18:060:18:08

I hope there's a collector out there, like me, who adores that period of porcelain.

0:18:080:18:13

Or a dealer that will pick this up, split the lot and resell it.

0:18:130:18:16

That's what we want. We're going to find out what it's going to do now.

0:18:160:18:20

Spode china tea service. Very elegant and very prettily painted.

0:18:200:18:25

Lots of interest. Start me at 200.

0:18:250:18:27

£200. 220.

0:18:270:18:29

240. At 240. At 240.

0:18:290:18:31

Are we all finished, then?

0:18:310:18:35

-At 240...

-No.

-No.

0:18:350:18:37

Not a chance. Absolutely no chance.

0:18:370:18:40

240 in the room.

0:18:400:18:41

-Nobody, nobody was here.

-That's fine.

0:18:410:18:43

-Well, I think you did the right thing.

-Yeah.

0:18:430:18:45

We do love it so we'll hang on a bit.

0:18:450:18:47

Why don't you have a go at using it every now and then?

0:18:470:18:50

-No!

-Oh, I would.

0:18:500:18:52

-No!

-I would!

-Use it visually, to look at. Yeah.

0:18:520:18:56

Sheila's two hand-painted vases, we've got 80 to £120 on these.

0:18:590:19:03

The money's going towards a holiday. Where are you going to go?

0:19:030:19:06

-Don't know yet.

-You don't know yet. Haven't made your mind up!

0:19:060:19:10

-This is a reasonable estimate. I'd like to see the top end, though.

-So would I.

0:19:100:19:14

They're an exciting design but the background is not everyone's favourite, that dark brown.

0:19:140:19:19

-Yes.

-If you're think of the 1920 houses,

0:19:190:19:21

-1930 houses, dark furniture, dark reproduction furniture...

-Sits well.

-Sits well. Yeah.

0:19:210:19:26

Hancock and Sons Coronaware vases.

0:19:260:19:29

Start me at 50. At 50, who's going on? Five.

0:19:290:19:32

60. Five.

0:19:320:19:34

They're worth a lot more. Hand decorated by Molly Hancock.

0:19:340:19:37

-Is there any advance? Five. 75 with the lady...

-We've sold them.

-75.

0:19:370:19:42

75, then. Going at 75. All done.

0:19:420:19:46

-Yes.

-75.

-Yes.

-Just in. Just in at £75.

0:19:460:19:50

-You were happy with that, weren't you?

-No.

-THEY LAUGH

0:19:500:19:54

Oh, dear. You did up the reserve £10, didn't you? I know that.

0:19:540:19:59

But, you know, fixed reserve at 70. We got them away at 75.

0:19:590:20:03

-Well, that's fine. I don't mind.

-You don't mind, do you?

0:20:030:20:06

Well, it's my turn to be the expert. Remember Pam's little occasional table?

0:20:100:20:15

-The piano stool which had been adapted?

-Yep.

0:20:150:20:18

-It's a lovely bit of kit and it's quite useful. Now, it came out of your spare bedroom.

-It did.

0:20:180:20:22

If it doesn't sell today, where will it go?

0:20:220:20:25

Back up in the spare bedroom!

0:20:250:20:26

£60, you can't go wrong. Bit of discretion.

0:20:260:20:30

Go and tell them that.

0:20:300:20:32

I will! OK! It's about to go under the hammer. Let's keep our fingers crossed.

0:20:320:20:36

Mahogany swivel top coffee table.

0:20:360:20:40

Very pretty piece. There we go.

0:20:400:20:41

Start me at...£30 to start.

0:20:410:20:43

£30 somewhere, put it in. 30. I'm bid at 30.

0:20:430:20:46

At 30. Five.

0:20:460:20:47

At 35 now. We're all done, then, at 35.

0:20:470:20:50

-Oh, come on.

-35 doesn't seem a lot.

0:20:500:20:52

Are we all finished, then, at 35?

0:20:520:20:54

40. 45 anywhere? At £40, are we all done?

0:20:540:20:59

-Not sold.

-£60. That's a giveaway price.

0:20:590:21:02

I'm so pleased that's going back in your spare bedroom.

0:21:020:21:05

Yeah. It can go back. Go back where it's been for the last 30 years!

0:21:050:21:08

Well, it's better than buying a bit of MDF for 35 quid.

0:21:080:21:11

-Yeah. Yeah.

-Yeah. Look after it.

0:21:110:21:13

-I will. I'll give it a bit extra polish.

-Exactly. Touch it.

0:21:130:21:16

It's got some energy. It makes you feel good.

0:21:160:21:18

This is interesting. 50 silver ingots just about to go under the hammer.

0:21:210:21:25

They belong to Chas. He can't be with us right now.

0:21:250:21:28

He's at work in Manchester, but we do have Donna, his wife.

0:21:280:21:31

200 to £300. What do you think?

0:21:310:21:34

On the day...who knows?

0:21:340:21:36

-You don't know.

-Anything's possible.

-we're going to find out now.

0:21:360:21:39

We put 200 to 300 on them cos we thought they're worth 200 quid scrap,

0:21:390:21:43

so, you know, they should make that money.

0:21:430:21:45

They're an ounce a go. 50 of them. Fingers crossed.

0:21:450:21:49

Silver ingot collection. 50 in the box.

0:21:490:21:51

In a fitted case. Start me at £100. £100 bid.

0:21:510:21:54

Thank you. 110. 120.

0:21:540:21:56

30. 40. 150. 160.

0:21:560:21:59

170. 180. 190. 200.

0:21:590:22:01

-210. 220.

-They've sold.

-They've sold.

-230. 240.

0:22:010:22:04

250. 260. 280.

0:22:040:22:08

-280.

-At 290. At 290.

0:22:080:22:12

Selling at 290. Gentleman's bid.

0:22:120:22:14

Last time at 290.

0:22:140:22:16

Yes! £290! That's brilliant, isn't it? You were feeling so nervous!

0:22:160:22:20

You got me worried there.

0:22:200:22:22

-And me!

-But good job the scrap value is worth £200.

0:22:220:22:24

Hopefully they won't be scrapped.

0:22:240:22:26

-Hopefully someone will keep them as a part of a collection.

-They were pretty.

0:22:260:22:30

Now I reckon I've been to hundreds of antique auctions in my life.

0:22:360:22:40

I know how they work, but today I'm doing something completely different.

0:22:400:22:44

I'm going behind the scenes at a livestock auction

0:22:440:22:47

to find out what it's like to be a buyer, a seller and an auctioneer.

0:22:470:22:52

Cirencester Livestock Market has been going since 2005

0:22:570:23:02

and has twice-weekly sales and most breeds of farm animals.

0:23:020:23:06

I'm going to learn how it all works from one of the auctioneers, John Pullen.

0:23:060:23:11

-What are these cattle?

-These are continental cross cattle.

-Yeah.

0:23:110:23:16

-They would be beef breeds. These will go into the food chain.

-These are for slaughter?

-Yes.

0:23:160:23:21

Someone's just put dobs of grease on their back. What's that for?

0:23:210:23:24

We put lot numbers on the back, as you do in the antiques world.

0:23:240:23:28

Keep the lots numbered! Couldn't do that with antiques!

0:23:280:23:32

Every beast has a lot number on its back which must match up with a passport.

0:23:320:23:36

These are very important in our industry.

0:23:360:23:39

You can't move cattle without one of these?

0:23:390:23:41

Cannot move or sell without this. This tells us where the beast has come from, where it was born

0:23:410:23:46

-and where it's going, ultimately.

-You still haven't told me your estimate!

0:23:460:23:50

I would expect this beast to make...

0:23:500:23:52

I guess she's a good beast, so she's going to be, hopefully, 750 to £800.

0:23:520:23:57

-Will you get that today, do you think?

-I'd like to hope so.

0:23:570:24:00

I hope you do, as well!

0:24:000:24:02

-What are your commission charges?

-We work on a percentage,

0:24:020:24:05

but we're probably going to earn about 15 to £17 for selling that beast today.

0:24:050:24:12

-That's not a lot, is it?

-No.

-I mean, in my world,

0:24:120:24:14

in the antiques world, most auction houses are charging 17 to 20% commission to the buyer.

0:24:140:24:20

-Yes...

-And also to the seller.

-Yes.

0:24:200:24:23

-They're earning 40%.

-We're in the wrong trade.

0:24:230:24:26

-You are!

-In the wrong trade.

-You are, aren't you?

-We're working on 2, 2.5%.

0:24:260:24:30

-And no buyer's premium.

-Gosh!

0:24:300:24:33

I've got to say, looking around, I mean, the auction's not far off starting.

0:24:340:24:38

I can't see a lot of bidders.

0:24:380:24:41

How many people do you expect turning up?

0:24:410:24:43

We don't unfortunately get the numbers you get randomly turning up to your antiques.

0:24:430:24:48

On average, what do you expect?

0:24:480:24:50

-Probably five or six bidders on the sheep.

-Is that all?

0:24:500:24:53

-And five or six bidders on the cattle.

-And that's it?

-And that's it.

0:24:530:24:57

-Crikey.

-We've got our work cut out.

-You have!

0:24:570:24:59

-So you've got to make them fight amongst each other.

-We do regularly.

0:24:590:25:03

Which is difficult as they all know each other!

0:25:030:25:05

RINGS BELL

0:25:090:25:12

It's typical. All the bidders turned up in the nick of time.

0:25:120:25:15

I think they were in the cafe all along. That is so typical of auction rooms.

0:25:150:25:19

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.

0:25:190:25:21

Welcome to Cirencester. My pleasure to say they're cheaper than normal.

0:25:210:25:25

Green lines are farm assured. Blue lines, non-farm assured. Red market today.

0:25:250:25:29

On we go, gentlemen, 42 kilos, then.

0:25:290:25:31

HE TAKES BIDS VERY RAPIDLY

0:25:310:25:34

So quick, I can't even see the bidding going on.

0:25:390:25:42

AUCTIONEER CONTINUES TO TAKE BIDS VERY RAPIDLY

0:25:420:25:45

He's just sold that pen off. What does that work out per kilo, per sheep and also, per pen?

0:25:480:25:54

-Well, about 130 pence a kilo for those lambs in there.

-Yeah.

0:25:540:25:59

They come to £64 per head.

0:25:590:26:01

There was ten in the pen so we've made £640 from that pen of sheep.

0:26:010:26:04

OK. £64 per sheep. That's not bad.

0:26:040:26:06

I've got mixed feelings, because I'm a vegetarian and I don't eat meat,

0:26:060:26:11

but looking at these animals, they have been cared for and loved by the farmers,

0:26:110:26:16

and the farmer needs to earn a living and he needs top money.

0:26:160:26:19

-Peter, these are yours, aren't they?

-Yes.

-What are they?

0:26:230:26:26

-They're the Belgian Blues.

-They're beautiful.

0:26:260:26:29

And they're about 25 months old.

0:26:290:26:31

-How many of those have you got?

-In total, we have 550 in two counties.

0:26:310:26:36

They're such an affectionate animal, the Belgian Blue.

0:26:360:26:39

And that's why I choose them now to farm, because they're slower in energy.

0:26:390:26:44

Whereas the Limousins are a very high energy animal, and I can't run fast enough to keep up with them!

0:26:440:26:50

-BELL RINGS

-More bells. It's now the sale of the beef cattle

0:26:590:27:04

-so they'll be coming in a minute. Is it Chris on the rostrum?

-It is.

-Chris is coming back on the rostrum.

0:27:040:27:09

HE TAKES BIDS VERY RAPIDLY

0:27:090:27:12

Do you know, I can't understand him at all!

0:27:140:27:17

HE TAKES BIDS VERY RAPIDLY, THEN INHALES DEEPLY

0:27:170:27:21

On we go, gentlemen, we move on...

0:27:210:27:24

Cor, that was big!

0:27:240:27:26

510 kilos, gentlemen. 510 kilos coming in.

0:27:260:27:31

Angus bullock...

0:27:310:27:32

How many sales a year do you have?

0:27:320:27:35

-We're in here twice a week.

-Twice a week.

-Every week. Two sales a week.

0:27:350:27:39

Bar Christmas week. Every other week of the year.

0:27:390:27:42

And is it just sheep and cattle, or do you do pigs?

0:27:420:27:45

-We do sheep, cattle, pigs. and goats in here.

-Yeah.

0:27:450:27:48

-What's your favourite bit of the job?

-The selling.

-The sale.

0:27:480:27:51

The adrenalin of a sale. It's a real buzz and we all enjoy that.

0:27:510:27:56

Well, the auction's coming to an end and that was an experience, but right now,

0:28:070:28:12

I'm looking forward to getting back to the antiques world.

0:28:120:28:15

Back at the valuation day, Will's found a piece of railway memorabilia that's really close to home.

0:28:200:28:26

-Wendy?

-Yes.

0:28:260:28:28

What an interesting group of railway memorabilia you've brought in today.

0:28:280:28:33

The Swindon Works of the Great Western Railway, which is where we are today.

0:28:330:28:38

-That's right.

-Now, I've had a look in here and if I open this up,

0:28:380:28:42

we've got this wonderful map of the Great Western Railway Swindon Works.

0:28:420:28:46

What can you tell me about this? How have you come by it?

0:28:460:28:49

Well, it was my father's. He worked in the railway from the age of 16.

0:28:490:28:54

-When he came back from the War, he went back into the Western.

-He retired here, did he?

0:28:540:28:58

-More or less. Yeah.

-He worked his whole life here, where we are now.

0:28:580:29:02

-Yep.

-Looking at this map, we've deduced where we are.

0:29:020:29:05

That's St Mark's Church on the other side of the railway, so we're here.

0:29:050:29:09

-Yeah.

-B. Looking at the key...

0:29:090:29:12

the Erectors, Boilermakers, Painters and Tender Shop, which is where we're sitting now.

0:29:120:29:17

-Where my dad worked. He was a boilermaker.

-A boilermaker?

-Yeah.

0:29:170:29:21

-We could be sitting...

-Where he worked.

-Where he worked. What a lovely story.

0:29:210:29:25

Moving on to the other items you've brought along today, we've got here

0:29:250:29:31

a commemorative plaque for the King George V engine.

0:29:310:29:34

-It says here, "478 of a limited edition of 1,000."

-Yep.

0:29:340:29:39

Now, I suppose this locomotive, the King George V, is here in the Steam Museum, is it?

0:29:390:29:44

Yes. We passed it on our way in.

0:29:440:29:46

How interesting. So that's another plaque.

0:29:460:29:49

-This time limited to 3,000.

-Yeah.

0:29:490:29:51

And this one is to commemorate

0:29:510:29:53

the 150th anniversary of the railway works.

0:29:530:29:56

-That's right. Yeah.

-And again, a certificate of training.

0:29:560:30:00

And this relates to your father.

0:30:000:30:02

Yes. He started when he was 16,

0:30:020:30:05

-and, erm... Which was 1936, I think he started. Yeah.

-It says here 1936.

0:30:050:30:11

-"He bears good character, good ability as a workman..."

-Yeah!

0:30:110:30:14

-"..And has conducted himself in a satisfactory manner."

-That's right.

0:30:140:30:18

-It's like a school report!

-Yeah, yeah.

0:30:180:30:20

Now it comes to the point where I have to sort of suggest a value.

0:30:200:30:24

-Have you any idea what these pieces are worth?

-No. Not at all.

0:30:240:30:27

-No.

-I didn't really think they'd be worth...

0:30:270:30:29

I would suggest perhaps putting a nice wide estimate on them of 50 to £100.

0:30:290:30:34

-Yeah.

-It's going to be hard to pin it down to more than that, I expect.

0:30:340:30:38

Now, was this something that you wanted to include?

0:30:380:30:41

I don't think so, it's more sentimental to me, cos my dad's name's on it.

0:30:410:30:45

-Let's take that out of the equation.

-OK.

0:30:450:30:48

How would you feel if I suggested no reserve? Would you be happy with that?

0:30:480:30:51

-Yes. I think so. Yeah.

-That's what I like. Yes. Well done, Wendy.

0:30:510:30:55

We like to live on the edge! Let it make what it makes.

0:30:550:30:58

-Yes.

-So, we're agreed. 50 to £100 is an estimate.

0:30:580:31:01

No reserve. You're keeping the Certificate Of Employment.

0:31:010:31:05

-And we'll offer the rest as a lot.

-OK.

0:31:050:31:07

Well, Diane, this is absolutely devastating.

0:31:110:31:16

It's one of the most exciting things that's been brought in today.

0:31:160:31:19

-Right.

-Do you know what it is?

0:31:190:31:22

Well, we've always thought it was a visitor's card case.

0:31:220:31:25

That's perfectly correct. Have you seen one like this before?

0:31:250:31:28

-Not so much decoration on it.

-This is beautiful.

0:31:280:31:33

It's not just bright cut, so you get the shiny elements in the decoration,

0:31:330:31:38

but it's also raised work, as well.

0:31:380:31:40

When you look at all these flower heads and scrolls,

0:31:400:31:43

it's all raised. Possibly cast originally then chased away,

0:31:430:31:49

so you've got all this lovely open work here on a matt ground.

0:31:490:31:53

But what is such a feature

0:31:530:31:55

is the decoration in the centre panel here, which is of a house.

0:31:550:31:59

Do you know what the house is?

0:31:590:32:01

No. No. We would like to know.

0:32:010:32:04

That house is important, and the one on the other side's important,

0:32:040:32:07

-because it commemorates two major writers of the day.

-Oh.

0:32:070:32:13

This one is Abbotsford.

0:32:130:32:15

-And where's that?

-Who lived at Abbotsford? Sir Walter Scott.

0:32:150:32:19

-Ah.

-On the other side...

0:32:190:32:23

we have Newstead Abbey.

0:32:230:32:26

Who lived at Newstead Abbey?

0:32:260:32:28

-Byron, the poet.

-Oh.

0:32:280:32:31

So this commemorates

0:32:310:32:33

-two major literary figures of the early 19th century.

-Oh.

0:32:330:32:38

Now, when I say early 19th century, this little box dates from 1836.

0:32:380:32:45

-1836?

-1836.

-Gosh!

0:32:450:32:49

-Earlier than we thought.

-Yes.

0:32:490:32:51

This was made in Birmingham by a company called Taylor and Perry.

0:32:510:32:57

Right.

0:32:570:32:58

-It's lovely. Now, does this belong to you?

-No. It's my father's.

0:32:580:33:03

So your father's instructed you to sell this on his behalf?

0:33:030:33:06

-Yes.

-If the price is right.

0:33:060:33:09

-If the price is right.

-OK.

0:33:090:33:11

How much do you think it's worth yourself?

0:33:110:33:14

Erm... Well, he did think, round about 200 to 300.

0:33:140:33:19

200 to 300. Well, I think he's got a sensible head on his shoulders.

0:33:190:33:23

-Where he is now that you've had to come along?

-He's actually on a half world cruise.

0:33:230:33:27

Oh! Doesn't really need the money, does he?

0:33:270:33:30

Oh, he's working though, on it.

0:33:300:33:32

-What does he do?

-He's a dance host for Saga.

0:33:320:33:35

-Really?

-Yes.

-What a fascinating way to see the world, isn't it?

0:33:350:33:38

Yes. So, he left last week from Southampton to Sydney...

0:33:380:33:43

Oh, that's brilliant. Oh, that's brilliant, isn't it?

0:33:430:33:46

I reckon that if it goes up for auction

0:33:460:33:48

we should get something in the region of about 400, £600.

0:33:480:33:52

-Excellent.

-That sort of price range.

0:33:520:33:54

But the factors are the decoration and the subject matter.

0:33:540:34:00

-Right.

-So that's Newstead Abbey and Abbotsford.

0:34:000:34:02

-Locally made, Birmingham.

-Right.

0:34:020:34:04

So you've got all the ingredients and the condition is so important,

0:34:040:34:08

-and that is in perfect condition.

-Yeah.

0:34:080:34:10

It is a collector's piece, and I've seen wonderful collections

0:34:100:34:13

of card cases, but not as beautiful as this,

0:34:130:34:17

so I think it'll make the top end of the price.

0:34:170:34:20

-Excellent.

-Thank you for bringing it along.

0:34:200:34:22

Maureen, I really love this piece you've brought in today.

0:34:260:34:30

-Thank you.

-A piece of what I would call Art Nouveau.

0:34:300:34:32

What can you tell me about it? How did you come by it?

0:34:320:34:35

I bought it at a local flea market about seven years ago.

0:34:350:34:39

-So some time ago now.

-Some time ago.

0:34:390:34:41

-Yeah.

-Can you tell me what you paid for it?

0:34:410:34:43

-No more than £2 or £3, I wouldn't think.

-No more than £2 or £3.

-No.

0:34:430:34:47

-I think you've got yourself a good deal there.

-Good.

0:34:470:34:50

You're obviously aware of the maker of this piece.

0:34:500:34:53

-Yes.

-You've had a look over it.

0:34:530:34:55

-You pointed out to me it is marked as we both know, WMF.

-Yes. Yeah.

0:34:550:35:00

Wurttemberg Metalwork Factory in Austria. Art Nouveau period.

0:35:000:35:06

We're all aware of the Metro signs in Paris.

0:35:060:35:09

-That very, sort of, organic curve...

-Flowing.

0:35:090:35:12

Exactly. That sort of organic shape.

0:35:120:35:15

Well, this, from Austria, also had the influence

0:35:150:35:18

of the German Art Nouveau, which actually was a bit more angular,

0:35:180:35:22

-a bit more sort of Modernist in its design.

-Yeah.

0:35:220:35:25

WMF took more of their influence from the French style.

0:35:250:35:30

This flowing, organic moulding.

0:35:300:35:34

-These flower heads here.

-Yep.

0:35:340:35:36

Did no-one else see this shining out at them at the flea market?

0:35:360:35:39

It wasn't shining when I bought it. It was black.

0:35:390:35:42

And it was in with a load of other metal pieces, all black, but I was just attracted to the shape of it.

0:35:420:35:47

Is it something that fits in with your scheme?

0:35:470:35:50

I think it's lovely.

0:35:500:35:51

What's brought you to the decision to bring it along today?

0:35:510:35:54

-I've had it for seven years and well, why not change it into a piece of jewellery?

-Oh.

0:35:540:35:59

Then I can wear it instead of looking at it.

0:35:590:36:01

-I was admiring your brooch earlier.

-So, yeah.

0:36:010:36:04

It's going to be a piece of what I would call commercial Art Nouveau.

0:36:040:36:09

-Yeah.

-It's something that was produced in large numbers.

0:36:090:36:14

-You say you only paid £2 or £3 for it.

-Yeah.

0:36:140:36:18

I would translate that into an auction estimate today

0:36:180:36:20

of perhaps 40 to £60.

0:36:200:36:22

Maybe straddle that £50 mark. What do you think?

0:36:220:36:25

That's brilliant. That's great.

0:36:250:36:27

So, if we go for the auction, 40 to £60, shall we reserve it?

0:36:270:36:31

Or do you think it's just going to find its level in the sale?

0:36:310:36:34

I would say it will find its own level.

0:36:340:36:37

-We like that.

-Paying just £2 to £3, I don't think...

-Exactly.

0:36:370:36:40

-It's not like you're in to lose a lot, is it?

-No, no.

0:36:400:36:42

I'm confident that 40 to 60 is the right level to pitch it at.

0:36:420:36:45

-That's fine.

-So if you're happy with that.

-Yeah.

-No reserve.

0:36:450:36:48

-No.

-Live dangerously.

-Yeah.

-And we'll see you on the day

0:36:480:36:51

and hopefully we can get it away for you.

0:36:510:36:53

Well, that's it for our valuations today, so let's have one last look at what's going off to auction.

0:36:550:37:00

Wendy's Great Western Railway memorabilia belonged to her father.

0:37:000:37:04

They're of great local interest, but will they steam ahead?

0:37:040:37:08

Maureen's only paid a couple of pounds

0:37:080:37:10

for the silver plated Art Nouveau tray at a flea market.

0:37:100:37:13

I think she should see a good return on her investment.

0:37:130:37:17

And last up is a silver card case.

0:37:170:37:18

Diane's father has gone on a cruise and told her to Flog It!

0:37:180:37:23

Let's hope it sails away at auction.

0:37:230:37:25

But first, let's see what auctioneer Elizabeth Pool thinks of the card case.

0:37:250:37:29

This is absolutely divine. It's got quality written all over it.

0:37:290:37:34

It belongs to Diane. It is her father's.

0:37:340:37:36

He can't be with us at the auction.

0:37:360:37:38

We've got 400 to £600 on this with a fixed reserve of 350.

0:37:380:37:43

Very good. Very realistic, I think.

0:37:430:37:46

These are very popular at the moment.

0:37:460:37:48

The last one I saw had an engraved castle on it,

0:37:480:37:51

which this has a relief decorated...

0:37:510:37:54

-It's embossed.

-Embossed. Yeah.

0:37:540:37:56

And I think that makes it more desirable.

0:37:560:37:59

-Has there been much interest?

-Definitely. Lots.

0:37:590:38:01

Right. So, what would you like to see it do?

0:38:010:38:04

-I would like to see it...

-A lot more!

-Yes. 1,000!

0:38:040:38:07

BOTH LAUGH

0:38:070:38:09

Whatever you do, don't go away.

0:38:090:38:10

Watch this one go under the hammer.

0:38:100:38:12

Right. Now, it's Wendy's turn to run the gauntlet of the auctioneer

0:38:160:38:19

and this was a classic item we found at the Works in Swindon.

0:38:190:38:22

Great Western Railway memorabilia.

0:38:220:38:24

-And it was your father's.

-Yes.

0:38:240:38:26

He worked in the room where we had the valuations.

0:38:260:38:29

-He did. Yes.

-You can't get any more local, can you, Will?

0:38:290:38:32

I thought it really set the day off, didn't it?

0:38:320:38:35

Could we get £100 plus?

0:38:350:38:37

We got 50 to 100. No reserve.

0:38:370:38:40

-No reserve.

-You want this to go.

0:38:400:38:42

Well, yes, cos my children don't want it.

0:38:420:38:44

-Did he twist your arm?

-Not really.

0:38:440:38:47

-No.

-Suggested it, perhaps, rather than twist.

0:38:470:38:50

-No. It's fine.

-The sale room told us they wanted GWR memorabilia.

0:38:500:38:53

It sells well, according to the auctioneers, so, you know,

0:38:530:38:57

I've gone with the information that they gave us, and fingers crossed.

0:38:570:39:00

OK. Let's see if we're on the right tracks. It's going under the hammer now.

0:39:000:39:04

-OK.

-Rather nice collection of GWR memorabilia.

0:39:040:39:08

Limited edition plaques.

0:39:080:39:10

Start me off, £20 to start. Must be some people interested here.

0:39:100:39:14

-Yes.

-Thank you, at 20. Five.

0:39:140:39:17

30, is it, sir? 30. Five.

0:39:170:39:19

-At 35. 35. Lady's bid, and selling.

-It's going.

0:39:190:39:24

-£35.

-It's OK. Not bad.

0:39:240:39:27

-Is that OK?

-Yeah. That's fine.

-Will's feeling guilty.

0:39:270:39:30

I can feel it. I can feel heat rising from Will's head!

0:39:300:39:33

-Well, I think it's worth more than that.

-It's fine.

0:39:330:39:36

-It's OK.

-You know, we took a chance.

0:39:360:39:38

-Yeah. It's fine.

-No reserve.

0:39:380:39:40

Maybe you'll come and buy next time, rather than sell.

0:39:400:39:43

It's obviously a good place to come and buy!

0:39:430:39:46

This has got to sell, hasn't it, at 40 to £60? Maureen's lovely tray.

0:39:490:39:54

A bit of WMF. Great maker's name. You said to me earlier

0:39:540:39:58

-the money's going towards more costume jewellery?

-Yes.

0:39:580:40:02

I see what you're wearing. Our expert, Will, put the valuation on 40 to 60.

0:40:020:40:06

-What are you wearing?

-I thought it went with the shirt.

0:40:060:40:09

I thought I'd borrow one. Rather nice.

0:40:090:40:11

-I could get used to this.

-Look at this.

0:40:110:40:13

-I had a hard choice.

-I bet you did!

0:40:130:40:16

I think the green would suit me,

0:40:160:40:18

-but 40 to £60 should get you another nice piece, shouldn't it?

-Yes.

0:40:180:40:22

That's all we want here today.

0:40:220:40:23

-That's right.

-Fingers crossed, Will.

-Yeah. Again, no reserve.

0:40:230:40:27

-I think I twisted your arm.

-Yeah.

-Well, I don't think we're going to need a reserve.

0:40:270:40:31

Every auctioneer's dream. No reserve!

0:40:310:40:34

If it's here to sell, it's here to sell. WMF, good name. Collected.

0:40:340:40:39

Good condition.

0:40:390:40:40

One step up would have been to have perhaps a female figure on it.

0:40:400:40:43

They tend to make lots of money, but easily accommodated, and, I think, commercial.

0:40:430:40:48

OK. Just tell us what WMF means, Will, cos I can't pronounce it.

0:40:480:40:52

-HE CLEARS HIS THROAT

-OK...!

0:40:520:40:55

273 is a stylised WMF silver plated oval tray.

0:40:550:41:00

Very nice. Very decorative. 20 to start me off.

0:41:000:41:02

20. Bid at 20. I have 25.

0:41:020:41:06

30. At 30. At 35. At 35. 40.

0:41:060:41:09

At £40. Any advance, then, at £40, on my right?

0:41:090:41:13

Are you all done?

0:41:130:41:15

-We'll settle for that. You wanted 40.

-That's fine.

0:41:150:41:18

-Thank you.

-That'll get you a nice piece.

0:41:180:41:20

-I'll get two for that!

-Excellent!

0:41:200:41:22

Well, you know, no reserve, but it made its money.

0:41:220:41:24

-We needed a bit of competition in the room.

-Yeah.

-One buyer got it.

-OK.

0:41:240:41:28

Diane, David, good luck.

0:41:310:41:33

I know you've been waiting a long time for this one and so have we.

0:41:330:41:36

It's that wonderful silver card case. 400 to £600. Beautiful work.

0:41:360:41:42

Lovely embossed work. We were musing over it.

0:41:420:41:45

The auctioneer and myself were just poring over it.

0:41:450:41:47

It's absolutely divine. I hope we get that top end.

0:41:470:41:51

It's the best thing in the sale!

0:41:510:41:53

-It's unbelievably good.

-Yeah.

-It really is good.

0:41:530:41:56

What will you do with the money?

0:41:560:41:58

-Well, it's my dad's.

-OK. So what's the money going to?

0:41:580:42:00

To him, but I hope he'll give me a commission!

0:42:000:42:03

Yeah. Let's hope we get that top end.

0:42:030:42:05

I'd like to see the 600.

0:42:050:42:06

Victorian silver castle top card case. Very lovely piece here.

0:42:060:42:11

Beautifully decorated. 300 to start.

0:42:110:42:14

£300. Bid at 300. At 300 near me.

0:42:140:42:17

320. 350. 380.

0:42:170:42:20

-400. At 400 near me.

-Diane, we're selling.

0:42:200:42:24

420. 450. 480.

0:42:240:42:26

500. 520. 550.

0:42:260:42:29

-At 550.

-Come on!

-At 550, now, are we all done?

0:42:290:42:33

At 550 near me, then.

0:42:330:42:35

-I feel greedy. Come on...!

-At 550...

0:42:350:42:39

£550, Diane!

0:42:390:42:42

-Excellent.

-You've got to be happy.

0:42:420:42:44

-David's very happy.

-I'm delighted.

0:42:440:42:46

-Dad's going to be over the moon, isn't he?

-Yeah, when he gets back.

0:42:460:42:49

-He's on a cruise at the moment.

-Is he?

-Yeah.

-On his way to Australia.

0:42:490:42:53

Sounds like he doesn't need the money!

0:42:530:42:55

THEY LAUGH

0:42:550:42:57

How about that? What an exciting show,

0:43:010:43:04

and a few surprises, but for all the wrong reasons.

0:43:040:43:06

It certainly was a mixed day, but that's auctions for you.

0:43:060:43:09

You can never predict the result. That's where the fun is.

0:43:090:43:12

I hope you've enjoyed watching the show, so from Cirencester,

0:43:120:43:15

until next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:150:43:17

For more information about "Flog It!" including how the programme was made,

0:43:170:43:21

visit the website at bbc.co.uk/lifestyle

0:43:210:43:24

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:310:43:34

Email subtitling@bbc.co.uk

0:43:340:43:37

Paul Martin and the Flog It team arrive in Swindon to value the public's antiques with help from experts David Barby and Will Axon. Paul Martin leaves the world of antiques behind when he takes a trip to a livestock auction.