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Oldham

Antiques series. Experts Anita Manning and Kate Bliss peruse the possessions of the citizens of Oldham. Paul Martin finds out about the age-old tradition of clog making.


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Each place we visit has a whole host of these,

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but the town we're in today has many blue plaques commemorating some rather unusual firsts.

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Today, Flog It is in Oldham.

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Oldham is the place where Winston Churchill was

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first elected as an MP and up there is the blue plaque to prove it.

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And this plaque marks the place where the very first British chip was cooked.

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Well, we've got no blue plaque to welcome us here today, but hopefully the Queen Elizabeth Hall

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will mark our presence with a massive turnout

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and some marvellous items, so let's go inside and find out.

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Now, I wonder who's going to be first to find a memorable item.

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Our experts giving the valuations are Anita Manning and Kate Bliss.

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And it looks like Anita has beaten Kate to it.

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Kat, I'm always delighted to see a bonny bit of Maling walking through the door.

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Tell me, where did you get it?

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Well, my great auntie left this for me when she died

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and I've brought it here today

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because I'm getting married and I'm saving every penny.

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Oh, right, so if we sell that, that will go to the wedding?

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-It will. It will.

-It could be your auntie's wedding present to you.

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Absolutely.

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That's what I'm hoping for. So we need about ten grand.

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Oh, right!

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Not going to get that.

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But it could be a start.

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Absolutely. Yes.

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-When did it come to you?

-In about 2004.

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I went with my uncle to have a look around her flat

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and I were allowed to choose something

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and at the time I really liked pink and it really stood out for me

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and I chose it because I liked it and then I've had it

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in my mum's house for the past three years and now I've moved out of there

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and it doesn't really go in the...

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Does your fiance like it?

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If I took that to me new place with him, I think I'd be divorced before we married...to be honest.

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-Now, do you know anything about Maling?

-No.

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-To be honest, I don't know anything. I just know I really like it, it's pretty.

-Right.

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Now, Maling was a very popular factory.

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It was in Newcastle and Tyne and it had been there for about 200 years.

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Right.

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Initially they made domestic wares and so on

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and then they started making

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more decorative objects in the 1930s

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and they made very pleasing things like this little dressing-table set.

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-The base of a piece of porcelain or pottery tells us a lot.

-Right.

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And if we look at this little candlestick

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we will see here the mark for Maling.

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Established 1762, so the Maling factory

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has been going for a long, long time.

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-Wow.

-And if you see this motif here, it's called the Maling thumbprint.

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It looks as if someone has made the pattern

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by putting a thumb mark on it.

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-Right.

-So, time to sell it.

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-Yes.

-Now, I would like to put this into auction at £40 to £60.

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-Right.

-Would you be happy for that to make a start...

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-Oh, definitely.

-..on the wedding pot?

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-I'm so excited for that. That sounds fantastic.

-Well, let's put it into auction.

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Estimate 40 to 60

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and we'll put a reserve of, say, £40,

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with a little bit of discretion.

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And we hope there'll be a lot of Maling collectors there on the day.

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-The money will go towards the wedding. When are you getting married?

-2009, in autumn.

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-Well, you've got plenty of time to save up lots and lots and lots and lots of dosh.

-Yes.

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-It'll start the saving off nicely.

-Good. Good.

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Sheila, we've got two items of silver here,

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but they are actually very different.

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-Did they both come from the same place?

-Oh, no.

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-One of them, that's a family piece.

-Right. The spoon?

-Yes.

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The little box I bought myself at an antique fair many years ago.

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Can't remember quite how many.

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Right. OK. And what do you like about it particularly?

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It looks very French.

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It's a nice little design and just a pleasing little object.

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-It is, isn't it?

-Yes.

-It's a sweet little piece. You're exactly right.

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It is French and, if we have a closer look at it,

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it's got the French mark on the bottom here.

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-Yes.

-It's late 19th century in date.

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-Yes.

-And it's rather nice quality.

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It's quite heavy. There's quite a lot of silver in that.

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The thing I've noticed is that on the back we've got engraved -

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I don't know whether you've noticed this -

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-it says Lenoir 14 Rue Royale.

-Which is Paris.

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Which would be Paris. And a very upmarket quartier of Paris.

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So, a nice address. Lenoir would be the retailers, in fact,

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which is rather nice having that engraved on the back. Rue Royale.

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And then on the front, if we turn it over, the decoration is actually

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beautifully cast and we've got a little basket of flowers,

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or a jardiniere, as it's known as,

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and this rather nice almost rope-twist border,

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which is cast into the lid.

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-Yes.

-So, everything really is a sign of good-quality silversmithing.

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So, that's the first piece.

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Let's look at the caddy spoon.

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It's a lovely piece of 18th-century English silver.

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If we turn it over we can see the initials here...

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IT. This is for John Taylor, who was working at that time,

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-who was quite sought after.

-Yes.

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So that would certainly help it in ordinary circumstances.

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-Probably ought to be between £60 and £80. However, unfortunately...

-Yes.

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we have a little bit of damage...

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-Damage?

-..which you have to look quite carefully to spot.

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Can you see, if you look at the front, the handle is

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just slightly skew-whiff there.

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-I can now you mention it.

-Just slightly off-centre,

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and what we have here is a little repair.

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Now, unfortunately, Sheila,

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that's going to bring the price down quite dramatically,

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-because for a collector that is a bit like the kiss of death.

-Yes.

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Instead of being £60 to £80,

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it's probably going to be nearer sort of £15, £20.

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Oh, dear. What a difference.

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So, as a little lot together, because I think the box is

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-very commercial and certainly very pretty, isn't it...

-Yes.

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..I think we'd probably be looking between £50 and £70.

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-Would you be happy with that?

-Oh, I think so.

-Good.

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Margaret, it's a great display cabinet. Is this yours?

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It's something my mum inherited, yes.

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Can you remember seeing this as a little girl, full of china?

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Yes, I do. I do. Yes.

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So how long have you had this?

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My brother's had it, but he's moved into a small flat so he's no room.

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So he's given it to you, has he?

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Yes, and I've not really got any room for it either,

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so we thought we'd see if somebody else would like it.

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Now, if I hold that up,

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this is the pediment with a mirror that's been inset.

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It needs little dowels. There's a couple of holes that are missing.

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-Have you got them?

-No, I haven't.

-And the dowels will just sit in

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and stop that from falling over.

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-That's a bit precarious like that so I'm going to drop it down.

-Right.

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Architecturally, you can actually see

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that arch, with the mirror inset, echoes the door.

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You can see that when you stand back. It's made of mahogany,

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-which is a lovely exotic hardwood.

-Yes.

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And it's got some lovely stringing inlay.

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Can you see this... in a chevron pattern?

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-Yes.

-That's been inlaid in ebony with some boxwood

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and there's some satinwood, look, running down there.

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But if you look at that closely, go on, take a close look...

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-that's not inlaid.

-I thought it was painted on.

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-It's a transfer.

-Oh, a transfer. Oh, right.

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Clever, isn't it? It looks quite good.

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-And then it's just heavily varnished over.

-Oh, right.

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This is Sheridan Revival. It's an Edwardian piece of furniture,

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but unfortunately this is sort of late. this is 1920s to '30s,

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where you've got that sort of almost Glasgow school coming in, you know.

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There's fashions coming in of the period

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and this is slightly echoed with this.

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-Any idea of value?

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-I haven't.

-Well, I think if we put it into auction,

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we'll put a value of £100 to £200.

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-Oh, right.

-It's a useful cabinet. It's a good size.

-Yes.

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I think whoever buys this probably won't use it

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-with the pediment on the top...

-Right.

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-It looks nice without it.

-It looks better without it, doesn't it?

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It was made for it, but I think it looks much better without it.

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-But we'll sell it with it on top.

-Give somebody the choice.

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It's pretty. And you've obviously had the memories

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of seeing it full of china...

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-Yes.

-..at Mum's and Gran's.

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I'm sorry in a way that I haven't got room for it.

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So, OK, this is the interesting thing. You're going to sell it,

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but obviously it was left to you and your brother, so who's going to get the money?

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-Are you going to split it?

-Probably. We've not discussed it, actually.

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-Does he know you're flogging it?

-Yes, he does.

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-Hopefully we'll see him at the auction.

-He helped me bring it here.

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-Oh, did he?

-Yes.

-God bless him. Thank you for bringing it in, cos we love seeing furniture on Flog It.

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We don't get enough and I know it's hard for people to carry it in

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but if you make the effort it really does look great, doesn't it?

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It makes the room, and I'm so pleased.

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I love it. It's nice to touch. It's very tactile. I love my wood.

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One to two hundred. Hopefully get the top end.

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-Thank you.

-See you at the auction.

-Thank you very much.

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Linda. John Ditchfield, a Lancashire lad, contemporary glass artist.

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-Are you a fan of his?

-Yes. Most definitely.

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He does very good work.

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Very nice individual pieces but very good quality.

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Pieces of art, really.

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You know, they're all individual

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and some of the designs are really fabulous.

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Do you have many pieces?

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I've got a few. I've got about seven pieces of his.

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I've got a couple of vases and mushrooms and that sort of thing.

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Yeah. And he often has that... a little silver animal

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on top of his paperweights, or the mushrooms.

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The mushrooms I've got, one's got a dragonfly, one's got a frog.

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-And then there's a spider.

-Yeah.

-And they're all silver, those.

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They're very popular pieces of art glass,

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which is of today, of the modern day.

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-Yes.

-And people love collecting it.

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Now, if we look at this one, it has the iridescent finish,

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which we're looking for in a piece of John Ditchfield.

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We have these flowing heart shapes, they're like melting sweeties.

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But I'm looking at it and thinking that it's a wee bit crude.

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It's very crude. There's no way a piece like that

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would get out of the factory now

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and I definitely think it's an experimental piece.

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Well, that's what I think, because of the irregularities.

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-Yeah.

-It adds a wee bit of interest for me

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and I think you thought that when you bought it as well.

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Well, to think that that's perhaps how he started off, with these designs

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with the iridescent, and then to have gone on to what he's doing now.

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-There's quite a massive difference.

-Tell me, where did you buy that?

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I bought it at a summer fair.

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-How much did you pay for it?

-£5.

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Oh, you've got an eye for a bargain.

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-Yes.

-Did the people who were selling it know that it was Ditchfield?

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I don't think they knew who Ditchfield was or anything,

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and when I saw it I thought, "It's so crude, is it Ditchfield?"

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but then, yes, it's got all the tell-tale signs...

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as well as the signature... but it has got all the tell-tale signs.

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So this became part of your collection?

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Yes. I put it in with the other things, but it actually stands out.

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It doesn't actually sort of blend in with the rest of my collection because it's so different.

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And is this the reason that you want to sell it?

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Someone else who perhaps has early pieces would love it

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and it would fit into their collection.

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Well, I think you're absolutely right.

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You know your own collection best.

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It's quite difficult to give an accurate estimate on this vase,

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but I think to put it in at 30 to 50.

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It would be a conservative estimate but it would be an estimate at least

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would give it a chance to go further.

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-Yes.

-Would you be happy with the vase going in at that price?

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Yes, it would be OK, but I would like to put a reserve on it of 30.

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I wouldn't let it go for less than that.

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-If it doesn't get 30, take it back home again.

-Yes, I will.

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-It'll go back in my collection.

-Thank you very much for bringing it along.

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Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you.

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Well, out of the hundreds of items we've seen here so far, our experts have now selected their first lots.

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And, as regular viewers will know, it's now time to go to the saleroom, and here are the chosen four.

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The sale of Catherine's dressing-table set

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isn't going to pay for her wedding

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but it might make enough money for at least a bouquet or two.

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Sheila's two pieces of silver could make between £50 and £70.

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Fingers crossed the little bit of damage doesn't put the bidders off.

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It's always great to see furniture on the show

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and I really hope Margaret gets a good price for her cabinet.

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And the John Ditchfield vase was a real find at £5.

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I'm sure it will make more than that when it goes under the hammer.

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Here at Calder Valley Auction Rooms, there's just enough time

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before the sale starts to view all the lots that are up for sale

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and all of our items are out on display

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and it looks like they're attracting lots of interest already.

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And today the man doing all the flogging is auctioneer Ian Peace.

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Well, all the money's going towards a wedding, and congratulations.

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Catherine is getting married.

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Pressure's on. £40 to £60 for the dressing-table Malin set.

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-Yes.

-I love Malin.

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Anita, will we get the top end?

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Malin has gone off a little bit.

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The more ordinary wares are not getting as high as they were getting maybe two years ago

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-but this is very pretty.

-It's a bit different.

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And we have four pieces there, so I'm hoping that we'll get the bottom estimate, at least.

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Let's find out. Here we go.

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A four-piece Malin pink-lustre dressing-table set. Opening at £20.

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At 20. Malin. 20 I'm bid.

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-We're in.

-Thank you. £20. £20. And five. 25.

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30. At £30. At £30 now.

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At 30. And five in the room. 35. 35.

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£40 on the phone.

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45.

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-Catches the light beautifully there.

-So it's 45.

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Got you in the room at 45.

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He said no on the phone at 50 so you're still in, £45.

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Have you all done at 45, then?

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Hammer's gone down. £45.

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It was within estimate. We got it right.

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Just didn't get the top end but it's gone and it's money towards the big day.

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Absolutely. Absolutely. I'm pleased. I'm just glad it's gone.

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I didn't want to take it home. I've parted with it now...so I'm happy.

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We've just been joined by Sheila and next up it's the little French box.

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The little tiny silver box, with caddy spoon.

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Family heirloom?

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Yes. The caddy spoon was, but the French silver box I bought

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with the housekeeping money, or what was left of it, about 30 years ago.

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-Oh, bless.

-You sound like my mother. Always spending the housekeeping on silver.

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Let's find out. Here we go.

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Now, lot 653 is the French silver snuff box

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and it's also goes with the silver caddy spoon.

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Open me at £30. £30 I'm bid. Thank you, ma'am.

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30. And five. 35. 40.

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I have 40. And five. 50.

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And five. 60.

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Look at that lady down there. Very keen.

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I have 70 on my right.

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-70. And five.

-Amazing!

-Well, we've sold it now, haven't we?

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85. 85. 90.

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95. £95.

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At £95. 100. And five. 110.

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115. 120.

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And five. 130. And five.

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135. It's been back at £135.

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Are you all done? 135.

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-£135, Sheila.

-Absolutely marvellous.

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Isn't that great? It was quality.

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Thank you for spotting it, Kate.

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Well, I'm just wondering whether the buyer spotted that little repair. I think that's a pretty good price.

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Question is, what are you going to spend all the money on? That's what we want to know.

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I think the most important thing is, I've got my computer in a terrible knot.

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I'm no good at computers so I think I shall have to spend money on getting a man in to see...

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-To sort the computer out.

-To sort the computer out.

0:17:490:17:52

-Well, with all that, it's a good job it made such a good price.

-Yes.

0:17:520:17:55

We've got a value of £100 to £200 on this Edwardian display cabinet and it's worth every single penny.

0:18:040:18:10

I just hope this lot realise it.

0:18:100:18:12

Was Mum's, wasn't it?

0:18:130:18:15

Well, Mum inherited it, yes, off her foster aunt.

0:18:150:18:18

I had a chat to the auctioneer before the sale and he said that he has regular buyers

0:18:180:18:23

in Edwardian shipping furniture, but they haven't turned up.

0:18:230:18:27

I'm just hoping it struggles through and gets that £100 mark,

0:18:270:18:31

-because the last thing you want to do is put it in the car, isn't it?

-Mm.

0:18:310:18:35

If it doesn't sell, I think we have a word with Ian,

0:18:350:18:38

-he could store it and put it in his next sale.

-That'll be fine.

0:18:380:18:41

And hopefully the guys that buy all the shipping furniture will buy that and ship it abroad.

0:18:410:18:47

It'll probably end up in Australia or South Africa...

0:18:470:18:50

and having a good life, yes.

0:18:500:18:51

-Yes. A long way to go.

-Exactly, but long may it live.

0:18:510:18:54

Let's find out if it's going to sell in the room, shall we? Here we go.

0:18:540:18:58

Lot 744 is the mahogany china display cabinet being shown now.

0:18:580:19:03

£100. 80 to start.

0:19:030:19:05

60. £60 start. 60.

0:19:050:19:08

£60 there. 60. And 70.

0:19:080:19:11

At £70. Anybody else now at £70?

0:19:110:19:15

At £70. Are we all done at £70?

0:19:150:19:18

At 70, I regret we're not in the market at £70.

0:19:180:19:23

Anybody else now at £70?

0:19:230:19:25

Oh, well. I think we leave it here.

0:19:260:19:29

-It's not going back in the car. It's too much of a struggle.

-Another day.

-Another day. Back in this room.

0:19:290:19:34

When the weather's better.

0:19:340:19:36

-I'm so sorry.

-Oh, that's all right.

-I'm so sorry, Margaret.

-It's not your fault.

0:19:360:19:40

Linda, we're going to find out right now. It's that John Ditchfield vase.

0:19:490:19:53

£30 to £50.

0:19:530:19:55

You collect these and you're a bit of an expert on John Ditchfield,

0:19:550:19:59

so why are you selling this one, if you collect them?

0:19:590:20:01

Well, it's an interesting piece and I think that...

0:20:010:20:06

I collect...sort of... a lot of the more modern things.

0:20:060:20:10

I like his old stuff but I think someone who collects

0:20:100:20:13

particularly his old pieces would be quite interested in this.

0:20:130:20:17

-OK.

-Well, although John Ditchfield wares are modern,

0:20:170:20:21

they have become collectable

0:20:210:20:23

and they're coming into the salerooms,

0:20:230:20:25

people like them and they're doing well.

0:20:250:20:28

Is this the new thing?

0:20:280:20:30

-Could this replace Troika and Whitefrairs on Flog It?

-Very well could.

0:20:300:20:34

You heard it here first from our expert, Anita Manning.

0:20:340:20:38

Get out there and get buying it.

0:20:380:20:40

It's all down to you now.

0:20:400:20:42

Well, look, good luck, both of you.

0:20:420:20:44

Let's hope there's a big profit in this.

0:20:440:20:46

Let's go down to the hammer now.

0:20:460:20:49

A John Ditchfield glass vase. Here we are.

0:20:490:20:52

666. What am I bid on this?

0:20:520:20:55

£50, ladies and gentlemen. 50. 40.

0:20:550:20:57

-40. Thank you. £40.

-Yes! Linda, straight in at £40.

0:20:570:21:02

45. 50.

0:21:020:21:04

And five. At 55. 60. At £60 on my right.

0:21:040:21:08

Any advances? 65, sir. £65. 70.

0:21:080:21:11

-Ooh.

-I have £70 here.

0:21:110:21:13

It is the new thing.

0:21:130:21:15

Are we all done? At £70, then.

0:21:150:21:18

In the room at £70.

0:21:180:21:19

First and last time.

0:21:190:21:22

The hammer's gone down, £5 into £70.

0:21:220:21:25

That's very good, isn't it?

0:21:250:21:27

Remember the name. John Ditchfield.

0:21:270:21:29

Go out and buy it.

0:21:290:21:30

-That was wonderful.

-That was excellent.

0:21:300:21:33

Now, as you know, I've got a passion for all things that are made of wood, so I've come to Hebden Bridge,

0:21:390:21:44

which is just down the road from the auction room, to see this block of wood, this lovely bit of beech here,

0:21:440:21:51

turned into something rather unusual, yet, very traditional for this part of the country.

0:21:510:21:56

Any ideas what it is? Well, here's a clue.

0:21:560:21:58

In the late 19th and early 20th century,

0:22:010:22:03

clogs were worn by coal miners and cotton mill workers.

0:22:030:22:07

They were the preferred footwear because they were long-lasting, comfortable and cheap.

0:22:070:22:12

# Hey, babe, take a walk on the wild side

0:22:130:22:18

# Said hey, babe, take a walk on the wild side... #

0:22:180:22:22

I'm here at Walkley Clogs,

0:22:220:22:23

one of the few remaining producers of this traditional footwear.

0:22:230:22:27

Through determination and hard work,

0:22:270:22:29

the craft of clog making is still thriving in this area.

0:22:290:22:33

And the woman responsible for keeping it alive and kicking is Sue Jones.

0:22:330:22:38

-Hi, Sue. Hello.

-Hi.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:22:380:22:40

-Pleased to meet you, too.

-Thanks for letting us film here. It's a proper hive of industry.

0:22:400:22:44

-It is.

-So how many people work here, then?

-Right.

0:22:440:22:48

There's five of us altogether, but we all do various jobs.

0:22:480:22:51

Our clogs, obviously, as you can see, are wood and leather, so we will start off the sole process.

0:22:510:22:57

We have huge planks of wood which we cut up into blocks.

0:22:570:22:59

-Very much like my little one here.

-That's right.

0:22:590:23:02

And then they're turned on profile lathes,

0:23:020:23:06

sanded, waxed and then the leather process which is...

0:23:060:23:09

all the leathers here.

0:23:090:23:11

I do the stitching depending on what styles are wanted.

0:23:110:23:14

And then it goes to the clog maker who nails the uppers onto the finished sole.

0:23:140:23:18

Can we go and have a look at the process?

0:23:180:23:21

I'm going to take my block with me cos I'm a tree lover,

0:23:210:23:24

whether it's living or felled.

0:23:240:23:27

Come this way then and I'll show you the process.

0:23:270:23:30

The wooden soles are the first to be made,

0:23:300:23:34

shaped from a spinning metal template in five minutes flat.

0:23:340:23:38

That's incredibly quick. That's so fast.

0:23:380:23:42

Thank you very much.

0:23:430:23:46

A very valuable member of the team is Arthur.

0:23:490:23:52

He definitely knows a thing or two about clog making.

0:23:520:23:55

-Hiya.

-Hello. Pleased to meet you.

0:23:550:23:58

-Pleased to meet you.

-Can you turn it off?

0:23:580:24:01

I've got two more soles for you.

0:24:030:24:05

I see you're sanding down on the belt sander.

0:24:050:24:09

Yeah. That's right.

0:24:090:24:11

-How long have you been working here?

-70 years.

0:24:110:24:14

70 years! How old are you now?

0:24:140:24:16

84. I started at 14.

0:24:160:24:20

-And you're still working here every day.

-Only two days a week now.

0:24:200:24:23

-I can see you're wearing clogs.

-Yes.

-Have you always worn them?

0:24:230:24:28

Yes. I've always worn clogs. Yes.

0:24:280:24:30

They're extremely comfortable. Would you wear anything else nowadays?

0:24:300:24:33

I've never had anything wrong with my feet.

0:24:330:24:35

They always say that clogs are good for your feet and they keep the shape of your feet.

0:24:350:24:39

-Very healthy. They support the arch, don't they?

-That's right.

0:24:390:24:43

So, as a skilled man, once you did your apprenticeship, what was your first week's wage packet?

0:24:430:24:48

Well, it was fourpence ha'penny an hour

0:24:480:24:51

and, for a full week, it was 17/6.

0:24:510:24:55

Was that good money then?

0:24:550:24:57

Yes, it was. Because when I left school, jobs weren't easy to come by

0:24:570:25:03

and I thought myself lucky to get a job really.

0:25:030:25:06

And here you are, still working away.

0:25:060:25:09

-That's right. Yes.

-Keeps you fit, though, doesn't it?

0:25:090:25:12

-I'm going to take this one. The one that you finished sanding.

-Right.

0:25:120:25:17

-Wish me luck.

-Yes. All the best.

-And I'll leave you to it. OK. Bye bye.

0:25:170:25:23

Once the soles are shaped and ready, the next stage is the cutting of the leather uppers.

0:25:230:25:29

Each clog is made of four separate leather parts which then need to be stitched together.

0:25:290:25:35

-You need that bit, as well.

-Thanks, Rose.

-Thank you.

0:25:350:25:39

-Hi, Sue.

-Hi.

-It's good to see the boss getting hands on here.

0:25:460:25:49

Oh, I work very hard, believe me.

0:25:490:25:51

Rose has just given me the uppers.

0:25:510:25:54

-Oh, right. Yeah.

-And I can see you're working on a set there.

0:25:540:25:58

-Yes. These are for you.

-OK.

-Yep.

0:25:580:26:01

I'm enjoying this. I should get a job here really, shouldn't I?

0:26:010:26:03

Won't pay as much as what you're paid now, though!

0:26:030:26:06

-If I pass you these, then you can take them over to Alan for the next step.

-Thanks, Sue.

0:26:060:26:13

Alan, that's looking very good. I've got my uppers with me.

0:26:210:26:25

I know you're working on some now. You've already put the eyelets in.

0:26:250:26:30

-That's correct. I've stretched the upper over the last.

-Yeah.

0:26:300:26:34

And I'm now nailing it on.

0:26:340:26:36

-Can I have a go?

-You certainly can, Paul.

-All right.

0:26:360:26:40

I've got an apron here.

0:26:400:26:43

This one's seen some use.

0:26:430:26:45

And there are your nails.

0:26:460:26:48

Why are you using different nails here to the ones you've used there? Is that purely decoration?

0:26:480:26:53

It is, yeah. Some people specify steel nails all around.

0:26:530:26:57

-This is quite a therapeutic little job, isn't it?

-It is.

0:26:590:27:02

-All done.

-I can see that this is quite a lengthy process, isn't it?

0:27:040:27:08

I mean, that will take me about probably...

0:27:080:27:12

half an hour to go around but I'm sure you can do that a lot quicker.

0:27:120:27:16

That's fantastic. Look. You can actually see what that's like now.

0:27:160:27:19

That's brilliant. I've actually seen the clog evolve.

0:27:190:27:24

I'll pass that back to you.

0:27:240:27:27

-And when you finish that, I think I'm going to buy the pair and take them home and wear them.

-Jolly good.

0:27:270:27:32

# I'm walking, yes, indeed

0:27:320:27:35

# I'm talking, 'bout you and me

0:27:350:27:37

# I'm hoping that you'll come back to me. #

0:27:370:27:40

Well, you could say I'm all booted and suited.

0:27:400:27:44

So it's back to the bags and boxes to join up with our experts at the valuation day.

0:27:440:27:49

Christine, it's great to have you with us cos you've got a special association with the programme.

0:27:590:28:04

Well, I do. I run a fan site for Paul and Flog It on the internet.

0:28:040:28:10

-That's great.

-Members all over the world.

0:28:100:28:12

-Fantastic. And you're an avid collector, aren't you?

-I am.

0:28:120:28:17

These aren't my major collection.

0:28:170:28:19

Right. What's your major collection then?

0:28:190:28:20

-Salt and peppers.

-Right.

-2,000.

0:28:200:28:22

2,000! We'll have to have a look at those next time. But what have we got here?

0:28:220:28:28

We've got some plastic jewellery.

0:28:280:28:30

I love plastic jewellery.

0:28:300:28:32

-Plastic brooches. Mostly, though, I've got bangles and rings.

-Right.

0:28:320:28:36

But these are by a very special lady. Lea Stein.

0:28:360:28:40

That's right. And what do you know about Lea Stein?

0:28:400:28:44

-Only that she was from Paris.

-That's right.

-She's still around.

0:28:440:28:48

Her husband worked in plastics and she experimented, I think magically,

0:28:480:28:54

with the colours and the effects that only plastic can give you.

0:28:540:28:58

I think you're absolutely right and it was quite a special partnership

0:28:580:29:03

because Lea Stein was born in 1931 in Paris,

0:29:030:29:06

and it was in the '60s through to the '80s really that she developed jewellery design

0:29:060:29:13

and her husband with the knowledge of plastics and the industry helped her with the practicalities of it.

0:29:130:29:20

And, in fact, when she was working from the '60s to the '80s, she was very little known outside Paris

0:29:200:29:26

and it's only recently that she's gained, really, international recognition as a jewellery designer.

0:29:260:29:31

And she developed, as I'm sure you know, bangles and bracelets and...

0:29:310:29:35

-I have a bangle.

-You have a bangle.

0:29:350:29:37

But it was the pins, the brooches that she's best known for

0:29:370:29:41

and, as I'm sure you know, lots of different designs -

0:29:410:29:46

-animals, insects, portraits. I think she did an Elvis Presley lookalike.

-Yes. There's a sort of...

0:29:460:29:53

That's right. Yes.

0:29:530:29:55

I have a bowler hat with the walking stick and a swallow.

0:29:550:29:58

Why do you want to sell these two, in particular?

0:29:580:30:02

I'd like to... they are the most common one.

0:30:020:30:04

I'd like to replace them with something less common.

0:30:040:30:07

-Right. So what will you be looking out for?

-A ladybird.

0:30:070:30:11

That is unusual.

0:30:110:30:12

So, what about value?

0:30:120:30:14

You probably know just as well as I do. Where did you get these from?

0:30:140:30:18

I bought them from a flea market. I paid around 40 for that one.

0:30:180:30:24

And £12 for that one.

0:30:240:30:26

Right. That was a very good buy.

0:30:260:30:28

Well, I think retail, the fairly common design as I say, the cat, is probably going to be 40, £45.

0:30:280:30:36

At auction, we've got to bring it slightly down and I would say

0:30:360:30:40

-these ought to be anywhere between 20 and £40 each at auction.

-Yes.

0:30:400:30:45

So, if you're happy with that, we'll put them in with that estimate

0:30:450:30:50

and hope that we've got a real collector there like yourself who's prepared to give a good price.

0:30:500:30:55

-I'd like that.

-It's always nice to see good costume jewellery

0:30:550:31:00

because it's a market that's ever growing. And she's a great name.

0:31:000:31:04

She is.

0:31:040:31:07

-Maria, does this wee chap have a name?

-It doesn't, no.

0:31:160:31:20

Tell me, where did you get him?

0:31:200:31:23

It's a piece that was bought for my husband when he was born.

0:31:230:31:26

It was given by a family friend. He was born in 1969

0:31:260:31:31

and I believe that these started to be made in the '60s.

0:31:310:31:36

So you've had to take on the dog...

0:31:360:31:39

when you took on your husband.

0:31:390:31:41

-I did. Yeah.

-Do you like this one?

-I don't. I'm not fond of it at all.

0:31:410:31:46

-Well, Maria, plenty of people will be fond of it.

-Yeah.

0:31:460:31:50

Now, this dog was produced by Beswick,

0:31:500:31:55

commissioned by Dulux, the paint makers,

0:31:550:31:59

-and if we turn our dog round, we can see the Beswick back stamp here.

-Yeah.

0:31:590:32:04

-Beswick were very good at animals.

-Yeah.

0:32:040:32:07

We have a very good factor there. We have a very good factory there.

0:32:070:32:12

-The second factor is he's an advertising figure.

-Yeah.

0:32:120:32:16

Dulux commissioned Beswick to design and produce this dog

0:32:160:32:22

and he would have sat in the shop window to advertise the paint.

0:32:220:32:28

Who could resist a wee face like that?

0:32:280:32:31

So you're appealing to the Beswick collectors and you're also appealing

0:32:310:32:36

-to those people who collect advertising items.

-Right. OK.

0:32:360:32:40

So, quite a nice item here.

0:32:400:32:42

I would estimate him in the region of £200-£300.

0:32:420:32:48

Gosh, yes...

0:32:480:32:52

By the way, have you consulted your husband?

0:32:520:32:56

He does know I'm here today!

0:32:560:32:58

He knows you're here. And is he quite happy that this goes to auction?

0:32:580:33:04

-He's happy for him to be sold. Yeah.

-OK.

0:33:040:33:06

And will you share in the takings?

0:33:060:33:10

Yeah, in some way I will. We're hoping if we are able to sell him

0:33:100:33:15

that the proceeds might go towards a piece of original art work for the house.

0:33:150:33:20

-You might see something at the auction.

-We might do.

-Yep.

0:33:200:33:23

Well, I think the dog will do well.

0:33:230:33:27

We'll put a reserve of £200 on him. Estimate of £200-£300.

0:33:270:33:32

-I'm sure he'll do very well and you'll be very pleased.

-Thank you.

0:33:320:33:37

-Meg, hello.

-Hello.

-Hi. And you've brought your friend, Ann, along.

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:33:430:33:49

-Have you come for moral support?

-I have. Yes.

0:33:490:33:52

Some very colourful pottery here. Where did this come from?

0:33:520:33:55

They belonged to a great aunt of mine who was also my godmother

0:33:550:34:00

and they'd just been passed through the family since the 1930s.

0:34:000:34:04

Do you know what factory they are?

0:34:040:34:06

-Clarice Cliff.

-They are Clarice Cliff.

0:34:060:34:08

But, it's not perhaps immediately obvious that they're Clarice Cliff.

0:34:080:34:13

One of the things I like about them is the pattern. It's quite an unusual pattern for Clarice Cliff.

0:34:130:34:21

If we turn the bowl over, we can see her signature, just as it should be, on the bottom.

0:34:210:34:26

Clarice Cliff. And the word Bizarre. Do you know what that relates to?

0:34:260:34:31

I just know a lot of Clarice Cliff pieces have the Bizarre on but I don't know the significance, really.

0:34:310:34:36

Well, it's actually the name given to a range of her work.

0:34:360:34:39

One of the earliest ranges in fact - it was launched in 1928 - which usually used very bright colours.

0:34:390:34:46

Some colours really quite outrageous, which is what makes this quite unusual.

0:34:460:34:51

And the thing that really strikes me about it is this beautiful powder blue colour.

0:34:510:34:56

It's called blue cafe au lait, the ground here that we see, which really makes it striking,

0:34:560:35:02

combined particularly, I think, with the pink.

0:35:020:35:05

It's known as Japan pattern.

0:35:050:35:08

That's what it's called, particularly on the plates, you can see a pagoda here.

0:35:080:35:13

Obviously, very Japanese and this tree, also, has a Japanese look about it.

0:35:130:35:19

It's set in landscape and the way she's composed the landscape also has a Japanese feel about it.

0:35:190:35:25

So, it's quite interesting.

0:35:250:35:28

So, Meg, what about value?

0:35:280:35:30

-Any ideas?

-Not really.

0:35:300:35:31

No, because it is an unusual pattern and I haven't seen it before.

0:35:310:35:36

OK. What about you, Ann?

0:35:360:35:37

Have you done any secret research?

0:35:370:35:39

Well, I thought they were worth a bit more.

0:35:390:35:41

As Meg said, they're unusual, so I was looking at 250 for that and about 100 for the two plates.

0:35:410:35:48

-OK. Right. You're optimistic, aren't you?

-I am, aren't I?

0:35:480:35:51

She needs a new bathroom, you know.

0:35:510:35:54

Well, I'm going to be a little bit conservative.

0:35:540:35:57

It's a great pattern and I mean, the shape is nice as well

0:35:570:36:00

but it's the pattern that's really going to pull collectors.

0:36:000:36:03

-But plates, we've only got two.

-Yeah.

0:36:030:36:05

They probably would have been a set of six or larger.

0:36:050:36:08

-So it would have been part of a much larger dinner service and we've only got a small section here.

-Right.

0:36:080:36:12

So that does affect the value quite a bit.

0:36:120:36:15

So I'm going to say, conservatively, £100-200 at auction.

0:36:150:36:19

-I certainly would hope you'll get the upper end of that but that will get buyers interested.

-Yeah.

0:36:190:36:26

-But I really hope we reach the 200 or even more.

-Right.

-I think it's super. I love that powder blue.

0:36:260:36:33

Yes. It is nice. Yes. Yeah.

0:36:330:36:34

Two cat brooches could be the perfect thing for any feline loving bidder.

0:36:400:36:44

I'm keeping my fingers crossed for Christine.

0:36:440:36:47

I hope Maria sells the Beswick dog so she can get the art work she really wants.

0:36:470:36:52

And finally, Clarice Cliff is an old Flog It favourite.

0:36:520:36:55

I hope this piece does as well as the others have in the past.

0:36:550:36:58

Calling all cat lovers, we have two Lea Stein little cat brooches, which Kate fell in love with.

0:37:030:37:08

You don't like them, so I guess you're not an animal lover, are you?

0:37:080:37:12

-Oh, I am.

-Oh, are you. Dogs?

0:37:120:37:14

-Dogs and not cats.

-I do like cats.

0:37:140:37:17

But not cat brooches.

0:37:170:37:19

-OK.

-I don't want to walk round with one on my chest.

-No.

0:37:190:37:21

They're a bit big, aren't they? They look like they belong to the '70s.

0:37:210:37:26

-I think you have to wear them with the right thing.

-Colourful gear.

0:37:260:37:30

One of them's very bright.

0:37:300:37:33

Nevertheless, they're just about to go under the hammer.

0:37:330:37:38

Let's hope it's purrfect.

0:37:380:37:40

And the next lot. Lot 536.

0:37:400:37:43

The Lea Stein Paris plastic brooches in the form of cats. Rather pretty.

0:37:430:37:47

What am I bid on these? Lot 536.

0:37:470:37:49

£50. 40. 20 to open. £20.

0:37:490:37:52

-20 I'm bid. Thank you.

-We're in.

-£20.

0:37:520:37:54

-And five. 30.

-Oh, yes.

0:37:540:37:57

There's interest here, Kate.

0:37:570:37:59

And five. 40 sir. 40.

0:37:590:38:01

And five. 50.

0:38:010:38:03

And 50. And five.

0:38:030:38:05

-Oh.

-I have 55 in the second row.

0:38:050:38:08

£55. Are we all finished?

0:38:080:38:10

At £55 then, first and last time.

0:38:100:38:13

Yes. Great result, there.

0:38:130:38:15

Definitely cat lovers.

0:38:150:38:18

£55, less a bit of commission.

0:38:180:38:20

-That's good.

-That's very good.

-That'll buy me a bug.

0:38:200:38:24

Back to the markets to buy a brooch, or something like that.

0:38:240:38:28

-Good for you.

-That lady buyer looked very determined down there.

0:38:280:38:31

-I don't think she was going to give up.

-Good.

0:38:310:38:34

-Well, I'm coming shopping with you next time to the flea market.

-Yes.

0:38:340:38:39

How much is that doggie in the window?

0:38:460:38:48

Or should I say at Calder Valley? Well, we're going to find out.

0:38:480:38:53

I love this little Dulux dog. He's quality. He's brilliant.

0:38:530:38:59

His condition is wonderful.

0:38:590:39:02

His coat is glossy. His nose is wet.

0:39:020:39:07

He should get a first.

0:39:070:39:10

-Best of breed. Here we go. Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:39:100:39:13

Lot 523. Large Beswick advertising model of an old English sheepdog.

0:39:130:39:16

This was issued 1964 to 1972.

0:39:160:39:20

£100 I have. £100. I have £100.

0:39:200:39:24

I have 100. 120. 140. 160.

0:39:240:39:27

180. At £180.

0:39:270:39:30

At £180. Any further advance on 180?

0:39:300:39:33

At 180. At £200. £200.

0:39:330:39:35

-There's another bid coming here.

-At £200. 210 if you like. 210.

0:39:350:39:39

Well, done. 210. At £210. We're in the market and selling at £210.

0:39:390:39:43

Any further advances. At £210 then.

0:39:430:39:46

It's gone. £210 the hammer went down.

0:39:480:39:51

I was expecting 300 plus.

0:39:510:39:54

But you're happy cos you're not a dog lover, are you?

0:39:540:39:57

And you didn't like that little Dulux dog.

0:39:570:40:00

-Cat lover, you see.

-Yeah.

0:40:000:40:02

OK. £210 less a bit for commission.

0:40:020:40:04

What's that going to go towards?

0:40:040:40:06

Hopefully, a piece of art work for the house that we've just moved into.

0:40:060:40:10

Oh, brilliant.

0:40:100:40:12

Contemporary or sort of fancy?

0:40:120:40:14

More contemporary I think, yeah.

0:40:140:40:15

There's plenty for sale here.

0:40:150:40:17

Yeah. I'll keep looking.

0:40:170:40:20

Meg's Clarice Cliff is just about to go under the hammer

0:40:270:40:31

and I've been joined by Ann and Kate, our lovely expert here.

0:40:310:40:35

So, you two, best friends...

0:40:350:40:37

guess for how long?

0:40:370:40:39

-I know it's quite a long time. How long is it?

-Near on 40 years.

0:40:390:40:42

40 odd years. Did you meet at school then?

0:40:420:40:45

No. Meg's from Northern Ireland.

0:40:450:40:47

I'm from County Wexford.

0:40:470:40:49

We're involved with the Irish community in Manchester, so we met really through that.

0:40:490:40:53

-Friends.

-And you've been best friends ever since, for 40 years. That's a cracking long time.

0:40:530:40:59

Well, you like Clarice Cliff but you don't mind flogging this.

0:40:590:41:03

-They're just taking up room at the moment.

-Ann, do you like this?

0:41:030:41:06

Not really but I can see, you know, the value in it because the design is different.

0:41:060:41:11

There's not a lot of that design around. So fingers crossed.

0:41:110:41:14

Let's see what this lot think right now, shall we? It's going under the hammer. Here we go.

0:41:140:41:20

Right. The Clarice Cliff salad bowl and two matching octagonal plates.

0:41:200:41:23

What am I bid for this lot, ladies and gentlemen? 100, shall we say 180?

0:41:230:41:28

Open me at £50. £50.

0:41:280:41:29

50 I'm bid. I have 50. At 60.

0:41:290:41:31

At 70. At 80. £80. At £80. 90 bid.

0:41:310:41:36

£90.

0:41:360:41:38

I've £90. 100. 100.

0:41:380:41:40

At 100 on my right. Anybody else?

0:41:400:41:42

110 there. 110. 120. 130. 140.

0:41:420:41:46

-This is more like it.

-I was a bit worried there for a moment.

0:41:460:41:50

-Yeah. Mid estimate now.

-150.

0:41:500:41:52

160.

0:41:520:41:55

170. 180.

0:41:550:41:57

Clarice Cliff never lets us down, does it?

0:41:570:42:00

-210? Yeah.

-210. 220.

0:42:000:42:05

-Keep going, Meg.

-230. 240.

0:42:050:42:07

-250. Yeah.

-250. 260.

0:42:070:42:11

That phone bidder's pretty determined.

0:42:110:42:14

290. 300.

0:42:140:42:16

310? Yeah.

0:42:160:42:18

-And ten. 320.

-Yeah.

-330.

0:42:180:42:23

-Oh, don't they love Clarice Cliff?

-Don't they.

0:42:230:42:25

360. At £360, are we all done at £360 then, on the phone?

0:42:250:42:32

-Brilliant.

-That is a good result.

0:42:320:42:35

That's a great result.

0:42:350:42:36

-You two girls are going to have a jolly afternoon, aren't you?

-Yes.

0:42:360:42:41

-You're set up for one now.

-We are.

0:42:410:42:43

What's £360 going towards, less a bit of commission?

0:42:430:42:46

Well, I've recently had a new granddaughter, so hopefully, a lot will go on her.

0:42:460:42:53

Treat yourself to lunch out as well.

0:42:530:42:55

-We might.

-You might. I'm sure you two will.

0:42:550:42:59

-Trouble.

-No doubt.

0:42:590:43:01

Well, the auction's over and what a super day we've had here in West Yorkshire.

0:43:110:43:16

The highlight of the day had to be Meg and Ann going home with £360 to spend on themselves.

0:43:160:43:23

Clarice Cliff, well, it never lets us down, does it? It always does the job.

0:43:230:43:27

I hope you've enjoyed today's show, so until next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:270:43:32

For more information about Flog It, including how the programme was made,

0:43:340:43:38

made, visit the website at bbc.co.uk/lifestyle

0:43:380:43:42