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Stoke-on-Trent

Antiques challenge. The team visits Stoke-on-Trent to value the public's antiques. Presenter Paul Martin takes time out to visit the world-famous Lovell telescope.


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One of the greatest popstars in the world

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was born right here in Stoke-on-Trent in 1974. Who was he?

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ALL: Robbie Williams!

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Yes, but I don't suppose we'll find him here in the crowd today.

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But we do have an enthusiastic bunch that can't wait to get involved with the show.

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In the immortal words of Robbie Williams, "Let Me Entertain You!"

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MUSIC: "Let Me Entertain You" by Robbie Williams

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Robbie might not be here today, but plenty of other people are. Just look at this crowd.

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With experts James Lewis and David Barby on hand, I'm pretty sure

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if there's anything exciting, it's not gonna go unnoticed.

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And it's not long before David spots something special.

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Cyril and Gwen, you're going to Cyprus for a special reason, aren't you?

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-Yes.

-What's that?

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-Our 43rd wedding anniversary.

-43rd wedding anniversary.

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Are you hoping that these will finance that particular holiday?

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-Yes.

-I hope so.

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Well, let's talk about them first of all.

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I like these immensely because they reflect, first of all,

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the pottery industry in the 1920s and '30s in Stoke-on-Trent.

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These date from the 1930s.

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These were decorated and designed by one of the important

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artists during the 1930s and that's Charlotte Rhead.

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She was on par with Clarice Cliff.

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These, in a context, are exceptionally well made.

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When I look at these pots I can actually feel,

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as I pull my hands up, how it's been worked on a wheel.

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You can feel the ribs.

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Charlotte Rhead specialised in these flower productions.

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They remind me very much of a pair of curtains

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at the Granada cinema in Rugby.

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The Granada cinema was from the 1930s

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and these bright, orange-coloured curtains used to close to after the film had finished.

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They had these stylised flowers on them as well.

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They are part and parcel of that art deco period where floor subjects

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or gannet subjects were taken down to basic shapes to great effect.

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I love the flower heads and the leaves.

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-Who owned them originally?

-An aunt of mine.

-Right.

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-So what happened, she died...?

-She died and I inherited them.

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You inherited these. What happened...

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-There's some damage, isn't there, on the edge here?

-Yes.

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-What happened there?

-I don't know, that was before I had them.

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-So she used these for flowers?

-Very much so.

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The pair of them, if they were perfect, would be close on 200.

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-But that little bit of damage there, it's gonna cost somebody to have repaired.

-Yeah.

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So effectively we're just selling one perfect vase.

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-So we're looking in the region of 80 to 120.

-Yeah.

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It won't finance your holiday in Cyprus.

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-No.

-It may be the pocket money.

-Yeah.

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If you're not too extravagant!

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-Super, thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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David, something I really love is sculpture.

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We don't see much of it on Flog It.

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But anything that is inspired by an earlier time,

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in its form, I love. And what we have here

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are a pair of late 19th, mid-to-late 19th century French sculptures,

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-where did they come from?

-They were my mum's aunt's.

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Do you know that they're spelter and not bronze?

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I'd heard the word but I don't know the difference.

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-OK, if we have a look here, we've got a signature...

-Yeah.

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Rancoulet. Rancoulet was a French sculptor, and he would have done the originals in bronze.

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Bronze, of course, is quite expensive to mass-produce, so he'd have made

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a pair, probably bigger than these, in bronze, originally.

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Rancoulet will then have said, "OK, we've made a couple of bronze, we might even make 100 of those,

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"or 1,000, we're going to make 10,000 in spelter."

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And spelter is a zinc alloy, it has an addition of lead to it.

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And it has to have a finish on it to stop it reacting in the atmosphere.

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So, it was either cold-painted, or it was bronzed,

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and in this situation, we have a pair of

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bronzed spelter figures, because they're made to look like bronze.

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Can you see this white flecking?

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-I noticed that when I got them out.

-This is a reaction

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that's coming through from under the bronzed finish,

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where it's reacting with the damp and the atmosphere,

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-and it's oxidising.

-Right.

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So, a pair like this, made in France

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around the time when the originals were made, sought after,

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but not as sought after as bronzes.

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-OK.

-Also have look at the base here.

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A pair of bronzes would have had a fantastic, maybe marble base,

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and the God of antiques, Arthur Negus, always used to say,

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"Beware of a white line."

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If you see a white line on furniture, you know it's just stained.

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Here we see the white line at the base.

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-It's a soft wood, probably pine, that's been ebonised to make it look better than it is.

-OK.

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But the overall impression is still good.

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-I'd love to have these in my home, they're really smart things.

-Right.

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Now, value. Bronzes, we'd be talking £3,000-£5,000 for the pair.

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Spelter, what do you think they're worth?

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I have no idea, they've sat in the cupboard for 14 years.

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14 years, really?!

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-Yeah, at least.

-Gosh.

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-Well, I think we ought to put a figure of £120-£180 on them...

-OK.

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And I think somebody will really love with them.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah!

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-Let's see if they gallop off at auction.

-And why not?

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Rebecca, I'm overwhelmed by this selection of medals. Are they family?

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No, they were my late husband's father's best friend's,

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and he passed them on to my husband, and of course I've got them since.

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So why are you parting, is it because there is no family connection?

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No family connection whatsoever, so I thought I'd bring them along.

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I think they're brilliant. Those are First World War.

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-Yes.

-And they were awarded to Private Bertram Betteridge Hicks.

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-That's right.

-What a wonderful name!

-Fantastic!

-BB Hicks.

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Don't hear those names now, do you?

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I like the name Betteridge, that's good.

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But what is extraordinary, you've got the Military Medal there, awarded to a private.

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That's fantastic, isn't it?

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Somebody going to buy these at auction will be able to write to a museum, in London,

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and get all the information relating to that particular action,

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and why that gentleman was awarded the Military Medal.

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I'd love to have known that. My husband tried to go into a few things, but he got stumped.

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-The Imperial War Museum will have a complete record.

-Really? How lovely.

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That is a fascinating collection.

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-Absolutely.

-But it's these which are so fascinating.

-Really?

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Now, that little group is separate from this group here.

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Yes, my husband used to like to go to car boot sales...

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-Good for him!

-Junk shops, anything like that.

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Here, we've got standard First World War medals, and miniatures.

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The other medal which I found fascinating was this one.

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I've often wondered about that.

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-It's South African.

-What war was that, then?

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That would be the Boer War.

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-Oh, really?

-You've got the Zulu War, the Boer War.

-Yeah?

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-So that's the medal that would cover the South Africa campaigns.

-Right.

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As a whole, I would reckon that they should realise

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somewhere between £400-£500...

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-Really?

-I think we'll put the reserve at £350.

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That would be lovely, that would be very fine.

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I would hate to see it go below that figure.

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-You think of what people have been through to...

-Absolutely.

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-You've got to think of the sacrifice and the heroism of this particular guy, BB Hicks.

-I know, I know.

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From a military historian's point of view, they will be fascinating,

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-and thank you very much for entrusting them to us.

-Thank you.

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Glade, many people say that late 19th century Britain

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was the height of good taste and good design,

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and what we have here is a classic example

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of late 19th century British jewellery.

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-You're a designer yourself.

-Yes, I am.

-Do you do jewellery or...?

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I do fashion interior design, mainly, yes, soft furnishing.

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Fantastic, brilliant. Well, as a work of design, that's fabulous, isn't it?

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-Yes, beautiful.

-It mixes so many different mediums and styles.

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We're looking at a piece of English jewellery,

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made almost certainly by the Minton porcelain factory,

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-so made fairly locally to where we are today...

-Yes.

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The central panel is in porcelain, and this is signed "Boullemier".

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And the central reserve there, as we would call it,

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is the head of Mercury.

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And it's painted en grisaille, which is made to look like stone, like marble.

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It's interesting cos it has lots of symbolism.

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Mercury was the Roman god of messaging.

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So this was possibly given to somebody as a message of love or something like that.

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-OK, yes.

-Around the border we've got the gilding, then we've got the turquoise jewelling.

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And that is classic Minton porcelain.

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Jewellery, vases, cabinet plates,

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-all around this sort of period.

-How old would it be, this...?

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This would have been made 1880-1890.

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Boullemier was born in 1874.

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And the painter is French?

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I don't know where he was from originally.

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A lot of French came over to work for Minton

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at that time, so he could have been one of them.

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-The mount is very plain, isn't it?

-Yes, but it's got a nice

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little detail on the side, what do you call this?

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Rope twist border, and if you look on the back,

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it's hallmarked as well, nine carat.

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The fact that it's nine carat tells us it's not any earlier than around 1885-1890.

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The earlier golds tended to be of a higher grade.

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-Interesting.

-So, pretty thing.

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It's not the most fashionable of things today, is it?

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I can't imagine you wearing this.

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-I did wear it once.

-A while ago?

-Quite a while ago. Many years ago.

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Today, not so fashionable, but this is the sort of thing

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that a Minton porcelain collector would buy, but also a jewellery collector.

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So it's going to have its appeals.

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Value, I would put an estimate of £100-£150 on it.

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-OK.

-It should make the top end of that.

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-We should protect it at £100.

-Yes, I would like to do that.

-Are you happy with that?

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Yes, I am very happy with it.

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And I'm detecting this is not a Stoke-on-Trent accent, is it?

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No, this is from Brazil.

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-How long have you been in Stoke?

-24 years.

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-Oh, you haven't lost the accent!

-No, I haven't.

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-Still the Brazilian style!

-Completely, yes!

-Fantastic.

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-I think this will do really well.

-Thank you.

-Let's see how it goes.

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Well, how about that lot? You've just seen some cracking items,

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but now it's time to put our experts' valuations to the test.

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It's time for our first visit to the auction room.

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So while we nip up the motorway to Marshalls, here's a quick run-down

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of all the items we're taking with us.

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Gwen and Cyril's vases really are a great example of the art deco style,

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but the chip might just put the buyers off.

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This Minton porcelain brooch might not look that fashionable these days

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but it's a classic and jewellery enthusiasts should be very keen.

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And the collectors are bound to love this selection of medals.

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Let's hope they achieve a heroic figure at today's auction.

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I love these handsome spelter sculptures, and after 14 years

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tucked away in a cupboard, hopefully today they'll find a new home.

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Today's auctioneer is our very own Adam Partridge,

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and he's not all that convinced by the spelter sculptures.

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They're big and they're showy, and they're French, a bit of spelter.

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Yeah, the sound of quality, listen to that, hey?!

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HOLLOW METALLIC CLANG

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They belong to David and they've been in his cupboard for about 14 years.

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He thinks they're too big to display.

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But I mean, that's the beauty of them, because they're in your face,

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and at £120-£180, I think they've got to sell at that.

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I don't suppose it sounds that expensive but they're just...

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They belong in a cupboard, for me. Just look at the casting, it's just not there at all.

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And spelter, you know, it's poor man's bronze, a cheap alloy.

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It's a trash metal, isn't it?

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Yes. At the risk of sounding snobby, we don't usually have spelter here!

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Don't you? But surely, looking at those,

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you stand back, and you've got £120-worth of kit there...

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They'll look better on the screen than they do in real life.

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We've got some lovely bronzes upstairs and when you put them

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on the same table with all the others, they look awful.

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Surely, these will sell at £120...?

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I couldn't guarantee it, actually. I couldn't.

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Because people would rather spend £600-£800 plus on a bronze pair

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that are nice than £150 on...

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They're showy, that's all they are.

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They miss the mark for me.

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Will they sell? Couldn't say.

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Glade's gorgeous pendent from the Minton factory with a value of £100-£150, it's very stylish.

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-Thank you.

-Why are you selling this? I know you like it.

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-I do, but I don't wear it.

-You don't wear it.

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-No, it's far too big for me.

-It's just put in the drawer.

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-I just leave it in the drawer, yes.

-I think it's lovely.

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It's going to do well. It's got everything, a little bit of ceramics

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for the porcelain collectors, it's got the jewellery, it's got the look.

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It's got the lot and it's got the look. Good luck, both of you.

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Here we go, it's going under the hammer.

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The hand-painted Minton porcelain pendant, by Antoine Boullemier,

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one of the top painters, a lovely pendent, some interest here,

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I can start with a bid of £110, take 120.

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120, 130, 140... 130 still here...

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140. 150. 150, any more? 150, 160, 170, 180...

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-Brilliant.

-That's good, isn't it?

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190, 200, 210, 220, 230, 240...

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Any more now at £240?

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All done, then, 240...

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-Well done, very good.

-That's better than 150!

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That's a surprise, wasn't it?

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-Yes, it was very good.

-How long had you had that?

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About ten years. Probably longer than that.

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-How much did you pay for it?

-I haven't paid, it was a present.

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-What will you put the money towards?

-I'm going to buy a sewing machine.

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-Are you?

-Another one.

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-You're expanding the business!

-That's right.

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I've been joined by Cyril and Gwen, the two Charlotte Rhead vases.

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Well, £80-£120, David has put on them, a little bit of damage on one.

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At the valuation day, we asked if we got top money for this, what were you going to put the money towards?

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You said a holiday, didn't you, to Cyprus?

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You've been on that holiday, so the pressure's on, we've got to sell.

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We need to get some money back to pay the credit card!

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-But what happened when you were on holiday in Cyprus?

-I broke my ankle.

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Yes, you've come back a bit early, haven't you?

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Oh, dear, how did you do that?

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Slipped on wet marble.

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I bet that was painful, wasn't it?

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It was before she had a drink!

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Was it the beginning or the end of the holiday?

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Halfway through. Five days...

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At least you had a period to enjoy, and a period to reflect!

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We shouldn't be laughing, because that is so painful.

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-It was very painful, yes.

-Are you on the mend now?

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I'm getting there, yes.

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Good luck, both of you, hopefully we can cheer you up and get top money.

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..Charlotte Rhead-designed in the Byzantine pattern.

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One's damaged, therefore start me at £80.

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£80 a pair... Surely, 50, then... 50 bid.

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Take five, at £50, five, 60, five, 70, five, 80...

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Any more, now? 75, any more now?

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-Sold.

-75.

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Just sold them, great bit of studio pottery, great name.

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That's a good investment. Someone's got a bargain there.

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-Yeah, but one's damaged, Paul.

-Yes...

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One's damaged, that is the problem.

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Nevertheless, they're gone.

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They've gone. They're not standing on the wardrobe.

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No, you're gonna treat yourself now.

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A pair of spongy trainers or something!

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£120-£180 we've got riding on this. James, your valuation, had a chat to the auctioneer

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before the sale started, and Adam really did not like them.

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He said they will struggle and he would put them at the lower end,

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hopefully they'll just get away at £120,

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but I think they're a decorator's piece.

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They're big and over the top, too big for your house, weren't they?

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But you can imagine them in a reception area of a hotel on a baronial sideboard.

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And I think you've got the look, and what else can you furnish a reception area with for 120 quid?

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-Nobody's saying they're great quality. They're big and...

-Mixed metal.

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They're decorative, so they've got to be worth that.

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You've tried using them in different parts of the house and they...

0:19:040:19:08

They're just too big to display.

0:19:080:19:10

You've kept them in the cupboard out of harm's way and the condition is very good,

0:19:100:19:14

there's no damage, so hopefully they're gonna sell.

0:19:140:19:17

They're going under the hammer now.

0:19:170:19:19

113, Rancoulet, a pair of large spelter

0:19:190:19:23

figures of warriors on horseback, lot 113, who will start me at 150?

0:19:230:19:28

£100, then?

0:19:280:19:29

-£100, spelter warriors...

-Come on. All sitting on their hands!

0:19:290:19:33

£80 of spelter... £80?

0:19:330:19:37

80 quid at the back, five, 90, 5...

0:19:370:19:40

100, 110, 120, 130... 120 at the back of the room.

0:19:400:19:44

Any more at 120?

0:19:440:19:46

All done now, £120...?

0:19:460:19:50

Adam was right, £120.

0:19:500:19:53

Just got them away, nevertheless they're sold.

0:19:530:19:56

-It's a good result, isn't it?

-It's fine.

0:19:560:19:59

-Bit of commission to pay, but there's a bit of spending money.

-That'll go to my mum.

0:19:590:20:03

-Your mum?

-Yeah.

-Bless. What's her name?

-Sylvia.

0:20:030:20:06

Ah, Sylvia, I hope you're watching, and enjoying this moment, he's a good lad, isn't he?

0:20:060:20:11

Right now, it's Rebecca's turn. The miniatures and the medals from World War I and II,

0:20:190:20:24

with a valuation put on by David here,

0:20:240:20:27

a nice, good, punchy £400-£500, we could be in for a big surprise.

0:20:270:20:31

This is the unknown quantity, isn't it, really?

0:20:310:20:33

Absolutely. I hope we're going to get a good price. I look at these not just as medals

0:20:330:20:38

but the very fact that they represent so many young people's lives...

0:20:380:20:42

-Social history.

-Social history, going through the war.

0:20:420:20:45

If anybody does the research, they'll get all the information,

0:20:450:20:49

why they were awarded, and there's one South African medal as well, which I think is good money.

0:20:490:20:54

-It's a big collection, they've come out of the wardrobe.

-They certainly have!

0:20:540:20:58

This is it, good luck!

0:20:580:21:00

A very good medal collection,

0:21:000:21:02

World War I medal group to Private Hicks, a Queen's South African medal,

0:21:020:21:07

some McCormick medals, Private White, a good collection of medals,

0:21:070:21:12

and bidding starts at 360 bid, is it?

0:21:120:21:15

380... Is there 380? 420, 440, 460, 480 still here.

0:21:150:21:21

480, any more now? 520, 540...

0:21:210:21:25

580, 620, 620 in the room, take 40 now... Are you all done at 620?

0:21:250:21:32

Any more? At 620, and we sell...

0:21:320:21:34

640, 660, 640's on line now. £640.

0:21:340:21:39

And we sell away, all done at 640...

0:21:390:21:44

Great! £640!

0:21:440:21:47

-That's fantastic!

-That's a victory.

0:21:470:21:49

What are you gonna put that towards?

0:21:490:21:52

-What are you gonna spend your money on?

-I need a new driveway, it'll go towards that.

0:21:520:21:56

OK, a new gravel drive or tarmac?

0:21:560:21:58

No, gravel. And some garden as well.

0:21:580:22:00

I like the sound as you pull up into the gravel drive.

0:22:000:22:03

-More ecological, isn't it?

-Yes. Thank you very much indeed.

0:22:030:22:06

Thank you.

0:22:060:22:08

This idyllic spot in the countryside has witnessed some extraordinary, unearthly events.

0:22:130:22:18

You see, from here, scientists are busy exploring the outer limits of the universe.

0:22:180:22:24

At the centre of activities here at the Jodrell Bank in Cheshire

0:22:290:22:32

is the famous Lovell Telescope, an engineering marvel.

0:22:320:22:38

Built in 1957 and named after its designer,

0:22:380:22:41

the pioneering radio astronomer Sir Bernard Lovell,

0:22:410:22:45

its bowl, or dish, is an astronomical 250ft in diameter.

0:22:450:22:51

Here in the control room, I've come to find out a bit more about the secrets of the universe and talk to

0:22:510:22:57

-astronomer Professor Ian Morris. Hello.

-Hello, welcome.

0:22:570:23:00

Thank you very much for talking to us.

0:23:000:23:02

-It's a pleasure.

-Look at the view...

-Doesn't it look amazing?

0:23:020:23:06

It's over 50 years old but it's still the third largest radio telescope

0:23:060:23:10

in the world and I don't think any bigger than that will ever be built, so it's great to have it here.

0:23:100:23:15

The Lovell Telescope, it's a radio telescope, what does that mean?

0:23:150:23:19

Instead of picking up light waves, which we all see, we actually pick up

0:23:190:23:23

radio waves, which we can't see, similar to those used by mobile phones and satellite TV.

0:23:230:23:28

So, these waves sort of hit that massive great big dish.

0:23:280:23:32

Do they bounce till they get to that point?

0:23:320:23:34

They bounce just once, straight up to the focus, and that's where we collect them

0:23:340:23:38

and amplify them, bring them down, a big tunnel comes from the telescope

0:23:380:23:41

underneath the ground into our receiver rooms where we analyse them.

0:23:410:23:46

As the telescope can move, it's got motors that drive it round, and at the top of the towers...

0:23:460:23:53

In fact, the actual gears and racks that drive it are second-hand,

0:23:530:23:56

they came from some battleships.

0:23:560:23:58

They were gun turret mountings, so by going up and down and around,

0:23:580:24:01

one way and the other, we can track radio sources across the sky.

0:24:010:24:06

The great thing about radio waves, because they're so long,

0:24:060:24:09

they can travel through dust. We can look at the heart of galaxies

0:24:090:24:12

you could never see with optical telescopes.

0:24:120:24:15

It's a great scientific instruments but just looking at it,

0:24:150:24:18

it's an architectural gem, isn't it?

0:24:180:24:20

It really is. It's a Grade 1 listing building, and there's some thought,

0:24:200:24:24

-before too long, the site here might become a world heritage site.

-Oh, that'll be good.

0:24:240:24:29

It's become an icon of British science and technology.

0:24:290:24:33

It's still doing things that we never even thought could be done when it was first built.

0:24:330:24:38

During the war years, Dr Bernard Lovell had been involved in the development of radar.

0:24:430:24:47

He had the idea that sporadic echoes sometimes received by military radars

0:24:470:24:53

might be the result of cosmic rays entering the atmosphere.

0:24:530:24:56

After the war, he wanted to research the subject further,

0:24:560:25:00

but it soon became clear that a very sensitive radio telescope

0:25:000:25:04

would be required and he set about creating one.

0:25:040:25:07

Ten years later, his dream became a reality.

0:25:070:25:11

But in the early days, to some, the telescope resembled a rather large

0:25:130:25:17

white elephant and its future looked uncertain.

0:25:170:25:21

We were very much in debt. It cost a lot more than it should have done

0:25:210:25:25

and it was Sputnik that saved us.

0:25:250:25:27

You might remember in '57, when the Russians launched Sputnik 1.

0:25:270:25:31

The military were keen to know if you could detect these rockets

0:25:310:25:35

because they were designed to carry nuclear bombs, and we were able to track the rocket

0:25:350:25:40

that put Sputnik in orbit as it went over the Lake District.

0:25:400:25:44

The press realised that here in the UK we had something that was unique.

0:25:440:25:48

And so everyone looked after us and the money was found.

0:25:480:25:52

So, in fact for a while, secret until recently,

0:25:520:25:56

this was Britain's early warning radar

0:25:560:25:58

from about 1960 until 1963 and that included the Cuban missile crisis.

0:25:580:26:02

Wow.

0:26:020:26:04

This enabled the telescope to continue its pioneering work

0:26:040:26:07

and we have it to thank for many other scientific firsts.

0:26:070:26:13

It really has had a magnificent time.

0:26:130:26:16

It's made some great discoveries.

0:26:160:26:18

What are its discoveries?

0:26:180:26:20

Very early on, it actually picked up signals from the most distant objects that we knew in the universe.

0:26:200:26:27

The universe actually has a radius of about 14,000 million light years,

0:26:270:26:33

and we picked up objects halfway towards the edge of the universe,

0:26:330:26:37

and these were the most distant objects known at that time.

0:26:370:26:40

-They were called quasars because they looked like stars, they appeared so small.

-OK.

0:26:400:26:45

-It's had a great role in the discovery of pulsars.

-Yeah.

0:26:450:26:49

When a massive star comes to the end of its life, the core collapses down

0:26:490:26:55

under gravity till it's the size of Manchester, 20 kilometres across.

0:26:550:26:59

Now something big going around slowly, if you're making it smaller,

0:26:590:27:02

spins up like an ice skater bringing her arms in.

0:27:020:27:05

And there's an incredibly powerful magnetic field that sends out beams

0:27:050:27:10

of light and radio waves that sweep across the sky.

0:27:100:27:13

Just like a lighthouse.

0:27:130:27:15

Now each time the beam crosses our telescope, there's a little pulse of energy.

0:27:150:27:20

If you apply that pulse to a loudspeaker, you can hear the clicks.

0:27:200:27:23

Listen to the first one...

0:27:230:27:25

-As in pulses.

-Absolutely, that's why they called it.

0:27:250:27:29

Very, very regular... TICKING

0:27:290:27:30

-It's like a metronome.

-Exactly.

0:27:300:27:32

In fact, when these were first picked up,

0:27:320:27:35

they couldn't believe natural phenomena could give rise to them.

0:27:350:27:38

They thought it might be ET phoning home. Jocelyn Bell, who discovered it

0:27:380:27:42

-called it LGM1, Little Green Men 1.

-Gosh.

0:27:420:27:45

We've had some wonderful times with this telescope.

0:27:450:27:48

It's been a wonderful 40-odd years.

0:27:480:27:50

How fascinating was that?

0:27:580:28:00

Now that we've sorted out our quasars from our pulsars,

0:28:000:28:03

I think it's time to beam straight back to the valuation day.

0:28:030:28:07

Lorraine, these two miniature tankards are divine.

0:28:260:28:29

The work involved in these is incredible.

0:28:290:28:32

Have these been in a display cabinet at home?

0:28:320:28:36

No, they're actually in my bedroom just placed on the dressing table.

0:28:360:28:39

That's OK, so you're enjoying them.

0:28:390:28:41

I was really enjoying them.

0:28:410:28:43

Tell me their history, where did you get them?

0:28:430:28:45

I bought them when I was at art college.

0:28:450:28:48

I went past this antique shop and I saw them, and I just thought they were really nice.

0:28:480:28:53

-How long ago?

-Oh...

0:28:530:28:55

-10 years?

-10 years!

-They are stunning, aren't they?

0:28:570:29:02

-They are beautiful.

-They're continental.

0:29:020:29:04

-You know that don't you?

-Yes.

-Austrian or Swiss.

0:29:040:29:07

The enamel work tells me that.

0:29:070:29:09

What attracted you, was it just the art work, these are hand painted?

0:29:090:29:13

-Yes, it was the art work.

-It's typical of looking back in the past.

0:29:130:29:17

It's like the French artist, that Watteau-esque sort of thing.

0:29:170:29:20

-I was trying to think of his name, yes.

-Romantic scenes.

-That's more classical.

0:29:200:29:25

That's very classical and this one's typical 18th century.

0:29:250:29:29

I'd put these about

0:29:290:29:32

1870, 1880.

0:29:320:29:34

There's no hallmarks on the silver.

0:29:340:29:36

They are absolutely stunning, aren't they?

0:29:360:29:39

-And they don't always mark it, anyway, do they?

-No.

0:29:390:29:41

-They are absolutely stunning. The condition is very, very good.

-Yeah.

0:29:410:29:45

Are you sure you want to sell these?

0:29:450:29:47

Er...

0:29:470:29:49

I don't really, but, erm...

0:29:490:29:51

I've had so many things disappear all through my life.

0:29:510:29:54

I've travelled quite a lot so I don't know, I hid them. That's terrible.

0:29:540:29:59

-How much did you pay for them?

-I can't remember, not very much.

0:29:590:30:03

Well, I think two collectors could get carried away and pay quite a bit for them.

0:30:030:30:09

I'd be inclined to put these into auction

0:30:090:30:14

-with a value of around about £300-£500.

-OK.

0:30:140:30:18

-Would you let me put them into the sale?

-Erm...yes.

0:30:180:30:23

-With a fixed reserve of £300.

-Yes, OK.

0:30:230:30:27

If they don't get £300, you take them home.

0:30:270:30:29

Yes, which would be quite nice.

0:30:290:30:31

So it's a no-lose situation really, isn't it?

0:30:310:30:34

-Yes.

-If they sell you're happy, we get top money hopefully around the £500 mark.

-Yeah.

0:30:340:30:38

-If they don't, they're going home and you're gonna enjoy them.

-Yes.

0:30:380:30:42

Of all the things that have been brought in today, Sheila,

0:30:510:30:55

this is one that I wish to take home with me.

0:30:550:30:57

-Is that right?

-Absolutely!

0:30:570:31:00

It's in such lovely condition and beautifully polished

0:31:000:31:03

as though you only did it this morning.

0:31:030:31:05

-I bet you did, didn't you?

-Yes!

0:31:050:31:07

-It was brown.

-Was it brown?

0:31:070:31:10

-Not stuck in the attic?

-Yes.

0:31:100:31:12

-Really?

-Yes, till last night.

0:31:120:31:14

So you've never used it?

0:31:140:31:16

Yes, I used to use it, it used to be on a sideboard, but I'd got

0:31:160:31:21

a big place then, and since I've moved, it's been up the loft.

0:31:210:31:25

Right, what do you use it for?

0:31:250:31:27

Nothing really, just decoration.

0:31:270:31:29

-Just decoration?

-Yes.

-It did have a purpose when it was made in 1806.

0:31:290:31:34

It's solid silver and this would have come from a very affluent home.

0:31:340:31:39

-Oh...

-If you read books by Mrs Gaskell...

-Yes.

0:31:390:31:43

North And South, Cranford...

0:31:430:31:46

This fits into that sort of society.

0:31:460:31:48

-Really?

-Yes.

0:31:480:31:49

It really is quite an interesting piece.

0:31:490:31:52

The design, if you look at it,

0:31:520:31:54

it has a classical appearance because it's a pedestal form.

0:31:540:31:57

-Yes, a nice shape.

-It is a nice shape.

-It is.

0:31:570:32:00

And you've got this decoration inside which we call fluting,

0:32:000:32:04

and you've got similar decoration all the way round here.

0:32:040:32:08

-What I love is this swing handle.

-It is nice.

0:32:080:32:12

It is beautiful and either side here you've got this classical leaf,

0:32:120:32:18

an extended acanthus leaf design.

0:32:180:32:20

Yes, it is nice.

0:32:200:32:22

Now, what would it have been used for?

0:32:220:32:24

Well, let's think in terms of a Regency dining table

0:32:240:32:28

and we'd have fresh cut chunks of bread in there.

0:32:280:32:32

-Lovely.

-That would be passed round.

0:32:320:32:34

Or maybe if it was a very posh tea,

0:32:340:32:36

you could have had whacking great slabs of fruit cake.

0:32:360:32:40

-That would be nice.

-To pass round. And it would have been passed round by the servant or the butler.

0:32:400:32:46

-I see.

-So this is the sort of social implications...

-Yes.

0:32:460:32:50

..of this piece. Where did YOU get it from?

0:32:500:32:54

My husband bought it me from an auction.

0:32:540:32:57

I think it was Bingley Hall, I'm not sure. I think it was.

0:32:570:33:01

How much did he pay for it?

0:33:010:33:02

-I don't know. No, he didn't tell me.

-He kept that to himself.

0:33:020:33:05

-Oh, well, I don't suppose you should disclose prices for presents.

-No!

0:33:050:33:10

-The value of it at auction.

-Yeah.

0:33:100:33:13

-Silver, as a whole, is not popular at the moment.

-No.

0:33:130:33:17

Because it has to be polished.

0:33:170:33:19

-That's right.

-I think between £350 and £500.

0:33:190:33:22

-Yes.

-That sort of price range.

0:33:220:33:24

But it's very nice. I hope there's somebody who will

0:33:240:33:27

fall in love with it as much as I have because it's beautiful.

0:33:270:33:31

Thank you very much, indeed.

0:33:310:33:32

Thank you.

0:33:320:33:34

Barry and Janet, of all the things that we were gonna find in Stoke

0:33:420:33:45

-it was gonna be a bit of Beswick, wasn't it?

-Yes.

0:33:450:33:48

One of the most famous factories from here in the Staffordshire area is Beswick.

0:33:480:33:53

This doesn't have a great deal of age to it,

0:33:530:33:55

but it is a fantastic quality piece of porcelain.

0:33:550:33:58

One of the best that Beswick made.

0:33:580:34:00

Is it something you've bought new or had in the family?

0:34:000:34:03

My late wife used to work for Beswick and she had a 10% discount.

0:34:030:34:08

-Right.

-So we went into the shop and I saw that and I said I'd love that. I would love it.

0:34:080:34:14

Money was tight then, and I paid for it and thought, "It's a good investment."

0:34:140:34:21

-I think it is a good investment.

-Do you remember what you paid for it?

-£95.

0:34:210:34:25

-95, yes. When was that?

-1989.

0:34:250:34:28

'89, OK. This model was produced between 1987 and 1989.

0:34:280:34:33

It was a series of connoisseur ranges

0:34:330:34:37

and this one didn't sell as well as some of the others.

0:34:370:34:40

It's more unusual than a lot,

0:34:400:34:43

-but the quality of paintwork is fantastic.

-Yeah.

0:34:430:34:46

The designer was a chap called Graham Tongue and he became head of design in 1973.

0:34:460:34:52

He loved these very fine, very well detailed models.

0:34:520:34:55

This is a classic example of it.

0:34:550:34:57

Just look at the way the face is painted on there.

0:34:570:35:00

The eyes in the white background, dark pupils

0:35:000:35:03

and a little white dot in the centre.

0:35:030:35:06

Beautifully painted. Better than a lot of the major factories

0:35:060:35:10

that we associate with good painting today.

0:35:100:35:13

So, OK... Well, we've all known about Beswick.

0:35:130:35:16

We've had it here so many times, but not often a connoisseur model,

0:35:160:35:20

not often a piece that is relatively modern.

0:35:200:35:24

So what do you think it's worth?

0:35:240:35:26

A couple of hundred?

0:35:260:35:28

I think if it made a couple of hundred it wouldn't be enough.

0:35:280:35:31

I would hope it would make somewhere between £300 and £500.

0:35:310:35:35

Mmm, that's all right.

0:35:350:35:37

Not bad for a £95 investment.

0:35:370:35:40

Hasn't done as well as houses, but not many things have doubled in that sort of time!

0:35:400:35:44

Trebled even. So I think you've done very well.

0:35:440:35:47

To buy modern at £95 and within 20 years,

0:35:470:35:51

it's worth three times as much, I think is really well done.

0:35:510:35:55

So you loved it when you first saw it.

0:35:550:35:57

-Yes.

-I presume you still love it today.

0:35:570:35:59

-I still love it.

-Why is it here?

0:35:590:36:02

Well we do a lot of travelling in our motorhome and I think

0:36:020:36:07

the price of this will fill the tank a few times and we're going abroad.

0:36:070:36:11

I hope so... It depends where you fill the tank!

0:36:110:36:13

-We want to go to Denmark and see my daughter.

-Oh, really?

0:36:130:36:17

I don't know whether it'll get you enough fuel to get you to Denmark, but I hope it will!

0:36:170:36:22

David didn't want to let this solid silver basket go but Sheila

0:36:280:36:31

wrestled it out of his hands and is hoping to get a good price for it.

0:36:310:36:35

I instantly fell for these stunning miniature tankards and with such

0:36:350:36:39

romantic scenes, someone is bound to fall in love with them today.

0:36:390:36:44

Barry was hoping this Beswick figure would make a good investment.

0:36:440:36:47

It still may only be a few years old,

0:36:470:36:49

but let's see if it'll end up with a good return on it.

0:36:490:36:52

Next up we've got the solid silver basket with a London hallmark, 1806.

0:36:590:37:03

It belongs to Sheila and we've got £350-£500 on this.

0:37:030:37:06

-There's a lot of silver, David.

-It's a beautiful piece.

0:37:060:37:09

I had a chat to Adam just before the sale.

0:37:090:37:12

He pointed out that the foot may be slightly wrong

0:37:120:37:15

and it might be an addition, I don't know.

0:37:150:37:18

I don't know my silver really.

0:37:180:37:20

Fingers crossed. he says it'll still sell because the weight's there.

0:37:200:37:23

The whole thing hangs together beautifully, so well balanced.

0:37:230:37:27

-Yes.

-It's a lovely piece.

0:37:270:37:29

I wish I was allowed to bid. We can't buy anything.

0:37:290:37:32

-But that is one of the pieces I would love to own.

-I know.

-And use, and use...

0:37:320:37:36

I saw him walking about with it.

0:37:360:37:38

That was a handbag!

0:37:380:37:40

Oh, Sheila... Let's hope we get that £500.

0:37:430:37:47

-Here we go, Sheila.

-479, what a lovely George III silver basket.

0:37:470:37:52

Good weight there of 39 ounces, London 1806.

0:37:520:37:57

No maker's mark but I'm bid...

0:37:570:37:59

well, I've got four bids.

0:37:590:38:01

Shall we just cut to the chase and say we've got 460. Is there 480?

0:38:010:38:06

460 bid, is there 480 now? At 460, conflicting bids start us at 460.

0:38:060:38:12

If you're all done, we'll sell it. At £460 short and sweet, at 460.

0:38:120:38:17

Yes, blink and you'll miss that one, £460.

0:38:170:38:21

Well done, David. Good valuation.

0:38:210:38:23

Marvellous, thank you very much, David.

0:38:230:38:25

-What are you putting it towards?

-Something for my new home.

0:38:250:38:28

-What are you gonna buy?

-Well, we used to go to the antique sales

0:38:280:38:31

-and we used to buy cranberry glass.

-Oh, that's great,

0:38:310:38:34

-putting money back into the trade.

-Yes.

-Good.

0:38:340:38:37

Because everyone says, we're going on holiday or something.

0:38:370:38:40

-Yes.

-Reinvest in the trade, visit the antique shops.

0:38:400:38:43

-Yes.

-And the antique arcades.

-Yes.

0:38:430:38:45

-And the auction rooms.

-Hopefully.

0:38:450:38:47

-Good hunting.

-Thank you very much.

0:38:470:38:49

Janet and Barry, good luck, it sounds like we're swapping

0:38:570:39:01

horsepower for diesel power, aren't we? The mobile home...

0:39:010:39:04

We've got a Beswick horse to go under the hammer.

0:39:040:39:07

£300-£500 is put on this.

0:39:070:39:09

They've never let us down before these Beswick horses.

0:39:090:39:12

-They're hot to trot.

-This one's rare.

0:39:120:39:14

Oh...will it do more than £500?

0:39:140:39:17

I don't want to say. I don't know.

0:39:170:39:19

-Oh, is this a tease?

-No.

-No.

0:39:190:39:21

Why do you say that? I don't know.

0:39:210:39:23

Cad!

0:39:230:39:26

-Right, we're gonna find out anyway, aren't we?

-Of course.

0:39:260:39:29

-This is it.

-OK, 412, is the Beswick model, Blues And Royals.

0:39:290:39:33

Lot 412 from the connoisseur series. Lot 412. Start me at £300, please.

0:39:330:39:38

Two then, two bid... I'll take ten.

0:39:380:39:41

210, 220, 230,

0:39:410:39:43

240, 250,

0:39:430:39:47

260, 270, 280, 290,

0:39:470:39:51

300 now.

0:39:510:39:53

300, 320,

0:39:530:39:55

340, 360, 380...go on!

0:39:550:40:01

400...

0:40:010:40:04

It's two full tanks.

0:40:040:40:06

380 on this phone, is there 400 now?

0:40:060:40:08

£380 on Ian's phone, any further now, any advance on £380?

0:40:080:40:11

If you're all done at 380...

0:40:110:40:15

That's it, mid estimate.

0:40:150:40:17

Jolly good show. That was very good, wasn't it?

0:40:170:40:20

A couple of full tanks, then?

0:40:200:40:22

-Yes.

-You're gonna fill it full of gas and just...

0:40:220:40:25

-To Europe.

-To Europe, oh, wonderful.

0:40:250:40:28

What a trip.

0:40:280:40:30

-Have fun, won't you?

-We shall.

0:40:300:40:32

Next up, two miniature tankards belonging to Lorraine.

0:40:380:40:40

We've put £300 to £500 on. They were a must-have for you when you were at art college?

0:40:400:40:45

-Yes.

-You said, "I want them!"

0:40:450:40:48

And I'm just hoping there's a lot of people thinking exactly like you did.

0:40:480:40:51

But I know if they don't sell...

0:40:510:40:54

-No, I don't mind.

-You want to take them home?

0:40:540:40:56

-Yes. I do like them.

-Do you regret now bringing them in?

0:40:560:40:59

A little bit. A little bit.

0:40:590:41:01

You haven't had sleepless nights thinking about this?

0:41:010:41:04

No, probably only about one.

0:41:040:41:05

-Oh, good luck, good luck...

-Thank you.

0:41:070:41:09

Let's hope it makes lots of money so it doesn't bother you at all.

0:41:090:41:13

-Here we go.

-446, lovely little pair of continental majolica,

0:41:130:41:16

coloured, enamelled, silver miniature tankards.

0:41:160:41:19

-He likes them.

-Yeah.

0:41:190:41:21

Aren't they sweet? Where are they? There.

0:41:210:41:24

Lot 446, and who'll start me at £300 for these? 300... two then. Two bid.

0:41:240:41:30

-Oh dear.

-At £200, 10...

0:41:300:41:32

210 bid. 220 now. At 210.

0:41:320:41:36

220, 230, 240...

0:41:360:41:39

250, 260,

0:41:390:41:41

-270, 280, 290, 300, 320...

-Sold.

0:41:410:41:50

Mmm. Yeah, but now we want that 500.

0:41:500:41:53

380, 400, 420,

0:41:530:41:57

440, 460,

0:41:570:42:00

480, 500,

0:42:000:42:03

520, 540,

0:42:030:42:07

560, 580, 600?

0:42:070:42:10

580 on the phone.

0:42:100:42:12

It's still good. Wow!

0:42:120:42:16

640... 660.

0:42:160:42:20

680.

0:42:200:42:22

-660 on this phone.

-Wow!

0:42:220:42:25

660 on this phone.

0:42:250:42:27

At 660, anymore now? At 660, if you're all done, we'll sell.

0:42:270:42:32

That's really good.

0:42:320:42:34

-That's great, isn't it?

-Really, really good.

0:42:340:42:36

-Top end and a little bit more.

-I don't regret it now.

0:42:360:42:39

-Not quite as much.

-You can't regret that, can you?

0:42:390:42:42

-Money's gonna come in handy?

-Yes.

0:42:420:42:44

What are you planning on doing?

0:42:440:42:47

-I would love to buy a house in Morocco.

-Would you?

-Yes.

0:42:470:42:51

Why are you drawn to Morocco? The colours, the...

0:42:510:42:53

I'm studying French at Keele University and it's warm out there,

0:42:530:42:59

but I love the architecture, the buildings and fairs are absolutely beautiful.

0:42:590:43:03

That's where I'd like to buy a house.

0:43:030:43:05

-That's where you're destined now?

-I hope.

-Good luck, it's a brave move.

0:43:050:43:09

-Thank you.

-I hope you achieve it.

0:43:090:43:11

Right, thank you very much.

0:43:110:43:12

Well, that's it for our owners. The auction's still going on but it's all over for them.

0:43:170:43:21

We've had some great results, and it's fair to say everyone's gone home happy.

0:43:210:43:26

They've enjoyed themselves and so have we.

0:43:260:43:28

I hope you've enjoyed watching today's show.

0:43:280:43:30

Sadly, that's all the time we have.

0:43:300:43:32

So until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:320:43:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:410:43:43

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:430:43:45

The team visits Stoke-on-Trent to value the public's antiques with help from experts David Barby and James Lewis. Presenter Paul Martin takes time out to visit the world-famous Lovell telescope.