Barnsley Flog It!


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Barnsley

Valuing heirlooms and antiques in Barnsley are experts Michael Baggott and Philip Serrell. Paul Martin visits local artist Graham Ibbeson to find out about his sculptures.


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LineFromTo

-Today, we've come up north, and you can tell.

-CHEERING

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What a brilliant atmosphere!

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I'm amongst straightforward talking people, because their town motto is,

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"Judge us by our actions."

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And today, Flog It! has come to...

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-ready? Barnsley!

-ALL: Barnsley!

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Well, Barnsley's coat of arms... and here it is -

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look, right there - together with its motto,

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celebrates local traditional industries,

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such as coal mining and glass-making,

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but sadly, they're not around today.

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But there still is a good sense of civic pride,

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which should serve us well.

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We're here at the Metrodome.

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And I've a feeling our experts - Philip Serrell

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and Mr Michael Baggott - are going to be judged

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by their actions when we get to the sale room.

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So, let's hope they get their valuations right.

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So, Barry, enjoy a drink?

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-Oh, yeah.

-Oh, yeah.

-Oh, yeah.

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What...port, sherry and claret?

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All in one glass, yeah.

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-Where'd you get these from?

-Car boot sale.

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How much did you pay for them?

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-£6.

-You're a man of generosity, aren't you?

-Yeah.

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He wanted eight actually, but...

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-And you beat him down?

-Yes, aye.

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-How'd you do that?

-That's the Yorkshire man in me.

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Do you have Horlicks to make you sleep at night?

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-Like that advert.

-Don't need it.

-You don't need it?

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I've a wife.

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Did you buy them because you thought they were cheap or because they were nice?

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-I liked them.

-You liked them?

-Yeah.

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Plus, I knew they were a give-away at £6.

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Well, they were at eight as well. Where do you think they were made?

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I'd imagine Staffordshire.

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I think so. There's something written on the back of this one

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that could well be Copeland.

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-They're certainly English. What date do you reckon?

-1850s?

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Spot on. Absolutely spot on, and I think they're great.

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They would have been used... probably in a wine merchants.

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Possibly even in a big country house, in the wine cellar.

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They would have been hanging on the barrels.

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And you can just see the remains here, and it is very, very faded.

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It would have had... who the shipper was, the year,

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which vineyard it came from.

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And these would have been annexed to each barrel.

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And I think they're really, really collectable. I think...

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-that we can put £40-£60 estimate on them all day long.

-Yeah.

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I think we can reserve them at £30.

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-I think that's a real come-buy-me estimate.

-It should be.

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It's a real come-buy-me estimate. And if you have a bit of luck,

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they might just go and make £100.

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-Yeah, yeah.

-So you'd be pleased with that?

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Definitely, yeah. I've a wife and eight kids, so I need some money.

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-Eight?!

-Aye.

-Don't need to ask what your hobby is, then.

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I tell you one thing... Don't you get home and get confused

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-as to what the difference between port, sherry and claret is?

-No.

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Valerie, you don't often see things like this, do you?

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No, you don't.

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Can you tell me where you got it from?

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Well, my father-in-law, who's been dead about ten year,

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he were a big gardener.

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And he had allotment, which is built on now.

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And he were digging to put some potatoes in,

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and he struck something. And he thinks, "Is it a rock?"

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and he's digging around this rock, and it were that,

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that come out of ground.

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And when he got it home, somebody told him to clean it

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with water with lemon in.

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And that's the result, and it's not been touched since.

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It's been put in a hut and passed from pillar to post. Nobody wanted it.

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And I heard Flog It! were coming,

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and I said, "I know what I'm going to do."

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-Now is the time...

-And here we are.

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..to get the allotment vase out and see what it is.

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And see what it is.

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Right. Well, as you rightly say, it is half a vase.

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This is all beautiful cast bronze.

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Yeah.

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That's a bit of cast iron from the hardware shop,

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that someone's put it on.

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-It's what I would say was a homemade repair...a restoration.

-Yes.

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Any ideas of how old it is?

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Well, I've been told its Grecian.

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In our mind, we're thinking it's at least 150 years old.

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You're not far off.

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If it were Grecian, absolutely a Grecian vase,

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-it would be 4,000 years old. What this is, is Greek revival.

-Yeah.

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And we started to get it in this country and on the continent

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in about 1810, 1820.

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More so in France, and the revival - the Classical revival at this time -

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is rather chunky and hefty and less delicate.

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-So we've got these very thick, chunky handles.

-Yeah.

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And those, to me, are absolutely 1820, 1830.

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Apart from saying that it's either English or French, I can't be any more specific than that.

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Because what would have had a foundry mark on,

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would have been the base.

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Which is now probably...

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-Still in allotment.

-Still in the allotment.

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Or under houses.

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What it is, as it stands, is half a good vase.

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So - value, value...

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What's a sack of potatoes now?

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-Cos that would have been the alternative.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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I think we can pop that into auction,

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-and it's going to take somebody's eye at maybe £40.

-Yeah.

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-So, if we put that on as the reserve...

-Yeah.

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-..at an estimate of £40-£60 and see where it goes.

-Yeah.

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Who knows? Someone might have dug the foot up a few years later,

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and they go, "At last!"

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Splendid. Well, we'll put it into the auction and keep our fingers crossed.

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Hello, I had to sit next to you, because I've seen plenty of these.

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-We've talked about them on Flog It! before. What's your name?

-Narina.

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-Sorry? Na...

-Narina.

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-Where's that from?

-It's a South African name.

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Oh, how beautiful! Narina, very nice.

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I've never heard that before. There's always a first on "Flog It!"

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Right, look at this little tiny symphonium.

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How long have you had this?

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We found it in my mother-in-law's house when she passed...

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Well, when she passed away.

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Gosh, look at this. It's a portable CD player of the day, isn't it?

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-Apparently.

-18...what, 1880s? 1890?

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Isn't it lovely? A table-top one.

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You can take it on a picnic, that's what it was all about.

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-Does it still work?

-Yes.

-Go on, wind it up.

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All you do is pull this.

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SYMPHONIUM PLAYS

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-Yes.

-How much faster you go...

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Yeah. Well, it is clockwork. That just winds it up, doesn't it?

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And each disc plays a single tune. So you could buy discs

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on these little thin sheets of steel of your favourite tune.

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It is! It's just like buying a little record, isn't it?

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These are highly collectable. Very, very collectable.

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Do you know that?

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-I had heard, yes.

-The mechanics are perfect.

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The box is a bit tatty, but it does say symphonium on it.

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Do you know what? I think, if you put that into auction,

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you're going to get around about... I'd say, £200-£300.

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Hmm, very nice.

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-Is that all right?

-Yes.

-Why do you want to sell it, though?

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I don't think the children will want it when we've gone.

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We've all sorts in the house. We've got...

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Something like this, kids won't want.

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But if you were to put it in the back of the wardrobe...

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-Where it's been for a long time.

-..for safe keeps...yeah,

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for another 40-odd years, they might learn to appreciate it.

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-Ooh...

-Daughter?

-Who am I talking to here?

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Your daughter? I never knew that.

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You didn't tell me that. Can we flog your inheritance?

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Yes, if anyone wants it.

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-What's your name?

-Lindsey.

-Lindsey. Now, do you like this?

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Probably just the history of it.

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-Would you like to keep it?

-No, no.

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Would you, would you not? We're going to get a sale, are we?

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-No, I think she should sell it.

-Shall we flog it?

-Yes.

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Would you like to flog it? Let's do it then.

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Let's put this into auction with a value of £200-£300,

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-a fixed reserve of £170.

-OK.

-OK.

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It's a deal. Put it there.

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Eric, you brought along a bar tariff, which is good for me, hey?

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"Lindrick Gold Club, Ryder Cup, September to October, 1957."

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Do you know the first thing that interests me on here?

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-It's the prize of booze.

-Yeah, it's lovely, i'nt it?

-Seen this here?

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A bottle of Veuve Clicquot champagne - 35 shillings.

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-What's that, £1.75?

-Yes.

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A double whiskey, five shillings - 25 pence.

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So presumably, there's something on the back of here, is there, that's...

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There is. There's the signatures

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of most of both teams for the Ryder Cup that year.

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-Are you a golfer?

-No, not at all.

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Why have you got this, then?

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It was given to me by my father.

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He was a wine waiter, I believe, or something of that nature, with a company called Porter Rights.

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I think they provided the wines

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and spirits for that particular event.

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And working there, he had the foresight

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to get the signatures of the teams.

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The names that I recognise on here...

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-Peter Alliss clearly is a great golf commentator.

-Yes.

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Christy O'Connor...

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Some great names here. Do you know why

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-it was at Lindrick Golf Club?

-No, I'm not a golfer,

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-so I wouldn't know that.

-Sir Stuart Goodwin

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was a very wealthy Yorkshire industrialist,

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and he financed the Ryder Cup team in 1957, to the tune of £10,000.

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-That's like millions of pounds he's given them, in today's terms.

-It is.

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-It's a lot of money for that.

-So he sponsored the British...

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which was the British then, not Europe, as it is now...

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He sponsored the British Ryder Cup team

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to play against the United States, and he chose the venue.

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Being a Yorkshire man, he chose Lindrick Golf Club. And Great Britain won that year,

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-didn't they?

-I believe so, yes.

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I think it's a really lovely thing.

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You want to know what it's worth, don't you?

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-That would be nice, yes, please.

-Valuation's a strange thing.

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If you've got three of these,

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and that one makes a fiver, and that one makes a fiver,

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there's a very fair chance that that one's worth a fiver. It's comparison.

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I've never seen anything like this at all.

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So I'm really flying a bit blind here. I...

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-I think we can put an estimate on this of £100-£200. OK?

-OK.

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OK, with a fixed reserve of £100...you know,

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I think, with some of these names on there,

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and the story behind it, and the fact that we're in Yorkshire to sell it.

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I think all of that adds together, you know,

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and I would hope that it would do very, very well.

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Let's just hope that they pitch up at the auction and start bidding for it.

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-You happy with that?

-Very happy. Thank you.

-Good man.

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Well, that was really interesting, and do you know what?

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I can't wait to see what it goes for.

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In fact, I don't have to wait any longer.

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It's now time to flog it!

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'With a wife and eight kids to support,

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'let's hope Barry makes the top end of the estimate

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'for his wine cellar labels.

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'Imagine digging up this bronze vase.

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'It's not an antiquity, but it should make more than a bag of spuds

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'when it goes under the hammer.

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'Another unwanted treasure... Someone at auction must want this symphonium.

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'It's such an entertaining item.

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'And finally, Eric's signed bar tariff is unique.

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'Therefore, any collector of golf memorabilia should snap this one up.'

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Well, now it's time for our experts to be judged by their actions,

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here at ELR Auction Rooms in the heart of Sheffield.

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And the man holding court today, with the gavel, is auctioneer Robert Lee.

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But before the sale gets under way,

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let's ask him to judge one of our items.

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110, 120, 130, 140,

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150, 160.

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Sold, commission.

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This belongs to Eric, and it's a bar tariff,

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but it's been signed by the Ryder Cup Team,

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for the golf tournament here in Lindrick,

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-which is not far away from here.

-Just down the road, yeah, not far from Worksop.

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And Eric's father was a wine waiter.

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-So he was in the right place at the right time.

-That's true.

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And he's got all the signatures.

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We've got a valuation of £100-£200, for this little card.

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I think it certainly should be doing 150, £200, no problem.

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I'm not a golfer, so I wouldn't know any golf names,

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apart from Tiger Woods, cos he's always on the telly at the moment.

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But I'm sure... I'm sure

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that will get the top end, as you say.

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-I'd have thought so.

-Golf memorabilia is big business.

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They spend a fortune on playing golf.

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Golfing history, if you can have a little bit of it...

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-That's true.

-..it's worth having.

-Yeah.

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'And first to go under the hammer is Valerie's bronze vase.'

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Your husband dug this up, didn't he? Or was it the father-in-law?

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-Father-in-law.

-In a patch of potatoes.

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I think that's a classic find.

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Well, it's the cheapest way to acquire antiques, isn't it?

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-Dig 'em up.

-Yeah.

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Will we get the top end?

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I don't know. I mean, it's a speculative thing,

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because we've got half of it,

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and the base is a replacement.

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But I think it's perfect if somebody wants it for their garden.

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How long have you had this?

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-30 years since.

-Where's it been, then?

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In a hut, in garage...

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chucked out, fetched back.

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-So this really is time to get rid of, isn't it?

-Yeah, yeah.

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Well, let's hope we get you the top end of Michael's estimate. Good luck.

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Early 19th century, Greek revival bronze urn.

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£100 for it? It has all gone quiet.

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£50 for it? Let's start at the bottom.

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We've got 30, can we see 32?

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Can we see £32 in the room?

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Any interest?

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32, 35, 38, 40,

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42, is it? Looking for 45. New bidder, 48?

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45 on the phones.

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-Telephone bidding. I didn't expect that.

-No.

-Anybody for 48?

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All done at 45?

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Sold.

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-Yes!

-Brilliant. Well done, Michael, spot on.

0:14:390:14:41

That is a cracking bit of garden art, actually,

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if you wanted to stick it outside.

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Yes, I just hope the poor chap on the phone can pick it up.

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Cos the postage on it... It weighs a ton!

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Going to cost you £300.

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-Yeah, it does, yeah.

-Well, you got rid of.

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That's the best thing, isn't it?

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Mum's 80 in February, so it'll do for a do...a birthday do.

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Ah, wonderful. A birthday do.

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-Yeah.

-Proper knees-up for Mum, who's 80 years old.

-80, yeah.

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And her boyfriend as well, 80.

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-Narina and Lindsey, good luck.

-Thank you.

0:15:160:15:19

Let's make some music, let's get those discs spinning.

0:15:190:15:21

We've got that lovely little symphonium -

0:15:210:15:24

small size one, £200-£300.

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I haven't had a chat to the auctioneer.

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So that's kind of a good sign really,

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cos he agrees with my valuation.

0:15:310:15:33

Otherwise, if I'd undervalued it, he'd have said, "Paul..."

0:15:330:15:36

..bring me aside and said, "I think you got it a bit wrong."

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In which case, I'd tell you now. But he said nothing.

0:15:390:15:41

So fingers crossed, it's on the money, two-three.

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-We're going to find out.

-Good.

0:15:440:15:46

Late 19th-century German symphonium, together with the discs.

0:15:460:15:50

Don't forget them. Forced to start the bidding at £200.

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-We've sold it...

-200 is the opening bid. I'll go 210,

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in the room. Let's have 210, discs included.

0:15:580:16:02

With me at 200 only.

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All done at 200?

0:16:040:16:07

Bang, hammer's gone down. What happened was,

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he had a commission bid, left on the book

0:16:110:16:13

-by somebody that couldn't be in the auction room.

-Right.

0:16:130:16:16

An absent bid, basically.

0:16:160:16:17

Unfortunately, there was nobody in the room to bid against that guy.

0:16:170:16:21

He may have left more than 200, in which case someone in the room would have bid him up.

0:16:210:16:26

-But nevertheless, it's sold.

-That's brilliant, yeah.

-£200.

0:16:260:16:29

-What are you going to do with that?

-A little bit for the grandchildren,

0:16:290:16:33

and a little bit for me and my husband.

0:16:330:16:35

We've just moved house, so there's things we're still doing there, so...

0:16:350:16:38

-What about a little bit this way?

-Which way?

-All of it this way.

0:16:380:16:42

Well, no, grandchildren.

0:16:420:16:43

Ah...

0:16:430:16:45

-Got it now.

-She's had enough.

0:16:450:16:46

She's had enough.

0:16:460:16:49

Right, here's a one-off for you. How do you put a price on this one?

0:16:580:17:01

Well, someone did, and it was our expert, Philip.

0:17:010:17:04

£100-£200, I quite agree with it, it belongs to Eric, and your father...

0:17:040:17:08

he was in the right place at the right time, wasn't he?

0:17:080:17:11

-He was, yes.

-He was a wine waiter.

0:17:110:17:13

I think there'll be a lot of local interest on this.

0:17:130:17:16

It's been properly catalogued.

0:17:160:17:17

It's been advertised, and it's on the internet.

0:17:170:17:20

Those things will ensure that it finds its level.

0:17:200:17:22

If you hadn't had all those things, perhaps ten or 15 years ago,

0:17:220:17:26

then you're gambling. I don't see that as being the case.

0:17:260:17:29

-It might make hundreds of pounds, but we'll find out.

-We're going to.

0:17:290:17:32

Golfing memorabilia is big business. We've seen it before on the show.

0:17:320:17:36

-Eric, good luck.

-Thank you.

-Good luck.

-Thanks very much.

0:17:360:17:39

Lot number 578. 1957 Ryder Cup bar menu from Lindrick Golf Club,

0:17:390:17:44

bearing 20 signatures including the team captains,

0:17:440:17:49

Peter Alliss, Tommy Bolt, Peter Mills and others.

0:17:490:17:54

The bidding has started at £100.

0:17:540:17:56

Let's have 110. Let's have 110 for it, let's have 110.

0:17:560:18:02

110, 120, 130.

0:18:020:18:05

Anybody for 140? I'm out, and I'm too soon to be out.

0:18:050:18:08

Must be 140 elsewhere.

0:18:080:18:10

Feel like I'm giving this away. Anybody else for 140? 140, 150.

0:18:100:18:17

Anybody else for 150?

0:18:170:18:20

All done at 140? Hammer's dropping.

0:18:200:18:23

You're right. I mean, estimate... great, great valuation.

0:18:230:18:26

I tell you what I think, Paul,

0:18:260:18:28

if you don't know the value of something when you're unsure,

0:18:280:18:31

you put it to auction.

0:18:310:18:32

That will tell you what the value is, and we've just witnessed that.

0:18:320:18:36

It's properly advertised. Everybody's seen it who wants it,

0:18:360:18:39

-and it's made what's it worth.

-Yes.

-Fine.

-Happy with that?

0:18:390:18:42

Very happy with that, yes. No problem at all.

0:18:420:18:44

OK. What will you put that money towards?

0:18:440:18:47

It's a trip towards...

0:18:470:18:50

-It's a trip to Nepal for my son, Andrew.

-Oh, fantastic.

0:18:500:18:54

His school sponsors a children's school in Nepal,

0:18:540:18:57

and they do a three-week trip there,

0:18:570:18:59

so that'll go towards his trip there. That'll be towards that.

0:18:590:19:03

Ah, trip of a lifetime.

0:19:030:19:04

Tell him to take a camera.

0:19:040:19:06

We could be in for a little surprise now.

0:19:130:19:15

Just been joined by Barry - I have Philip, our valuer.

0:19:150:19:18

£40-£60 on these five wine labels...

0:19:180:19:22

-which you picked up for, how much? Remind us all.

-£6.

0:19:220:19:25

£6 for the lot.

0:19:250:19:28

-A poorly octopus...£6.

-I think... Yes... I think, you know...

0:19:280:19:32

We could do £150, if there's two buyers that like these right now.

0:19:320:19:36

I think if you get two people who are interested in, sort of, wine memorabilia and the like,

0:19:360:19:41

-I think... Let's just hope we have some spirited bidding.

-Yes.

0:19:410:19:45

And I think each little label could be worth £30-£40 each.

0:19:450:19:48

-So, add that up...

-400.

0:19:480:19:50

-Ching, ching.

-I think they'll do £100.

-Hopefully, hopefully.

0:19:500:19:54

There's a good crowd here, a good crowd of people here.

0:19:540:19:57

-So they'll make what they're worth.

-Yup. I'm hoping for 150.

0:19:570:20:00

-You know what Philip wants, let's find out.

-We know what I want.

0:20:000:20:03

Yeah, more the better.

0:20:030:20:04

Let's find out what this lot want. We've got a packed auction room.

0:20:040:20:08

Let's see some hands go up in the air.

0:20:080:20:10

Three earthenware wine cellar labels,

0:20:100:20:12

together with two circular numbered bin discs.

0:20:120:20:15

Some nice 19th-century pottery.

0:20:150:20:17

Other people like them,

0:20:170:20:19

-there's lots of interest on the commissions.

-Great.

0:20:190:20:22

-I'm forced to start them at 140.

-Oh!

-Get in there.

0:20:220:20:26

I'll take 150, from somebody in the room. 150, is it?

0:20:260:20:30

-Come on.

-With me at 140, 150.

0:20:300:20:35

I'm out. Looking for 160?

0:20:350:20:36

150 at the top. Still cheap.

0:20:360:20:40

Finally, at 150. Have we finished?

0:20:400:20:43

Yes, hammer's gone down. £150.

0:20:460:20:48

-You were right.

-Well, you've got...

0:20:480:20:51

great eyes for spotting a bargain at a car boot sale.

0:20:510:20:54

I went to Specsavers.

0:20:540:20:56

Over the years, both the great and the good have been immortalised in bronze.

0:21:090:21:13

And, traditionally,

0:21:130:21:14

figurative sculpture can look serious and austere.

0:21:140:21:17

But the man who produced this piece is producing works in a rather different vein.

0:21:170:21:22

# Bring me sunshine

0:21:220:21:24

# In your smile

0:21:250:21:26

# Bring me laughter

0:21:280:21:30

# All the while... #

0:21:300:21:31

Barnsley-born artist Graham Ibbeson has a great sense of humour

0:21:310:21:35

and certainly looks on the funnier side of life.

0:21:350:21:37

So I've come here to find out

0:21:370:21:39

what makes the man behind these comic sculptures really tick.

0:21:390:21:43

# To each brand new bright tomorrow

0:21:430:21:46

# Make me happy

0:21:460:21:48

# Through the years

0:21:480:21:51

# Never bring me

0:21:510:21:53

# Any tears... #

0:21:540:21:56

Graham, it's so good to meet the man behind the sculpture.

0:21:560:21:59

I've seen your work

0:21:590:22:00

quite a few times, when we've been filming "Flog It!"

0:22:000:22:03

Once in Northampton, one in Perth

0:22:030:22:05

and there was one other, which is, of course, this guy, outside Rugby School.

0:22:050:22:09

William Webb Ellis, yeah, yeah. Big lad.

0:22:090:22:12

Where did it all start? You are a trained artist, aren't you?

0:22:120:22:15

I went to art school and I was basically good at drawing.

0:22:150:22:19

And this old Polish tutor got me to kind of, make sculpture.

0:22:190:22:23

He saw my drawings and just said they looked very three-dimensional.

0:22:230:22:27

And he steered me that way.

0:22:270:22:29

-What about other sculptors that have inspired you as a young lad?

-None.

0:22:290:22:33

-None?

-I was kind of inspired by comic books. I come from...

0:22:330:22:38

My work's almost like illustration.

0:22:380:22:41

So, I like the DC Thompson,

0:22:410:22:44

Dandy and Beano, Bamford seaside postcards. All that stuff.

0:22:440:22:50

So I come from a different angle.

0:22:500:22:52

I mean, I really don't know what fine art's about.

0:22:520:22:56

-I'd rather people go into a gallery and titter.

-Yes.

0:22:560:22:59

-Rather than go in the gallery and...

-"Oh, what's that all about?"

0:22:590:23:04

Yeah, so deep. But my work is accessible.

0:23:040:23:06

-Yes.

-Because of who sees it.

0:23:060:23:09

You know, a kid in the street, or some kind of intellectual.

0:23:090:23:13

Everybody can enjoy it, on different levels.

0:23:130:23:16

What came first, the comedy or the serious ones?

0:23:160:23:19

Well, I had to learn my craft to abuse it. It's a bit like Les Dawson.

0:23:190:23:26

Les Dawson looks like he plays the piano badly.

0:23:260:23:30

But he is a kind of virtuoso piano player.

0:23:300:23:34

So, I had to learn my craft before I can actually take it...

0:23:340:23:38

-Yeah, diversify.

-..diversify and make caricatures.

0:23:380:23:41

One of the little bronzes outside caught my eye. It's the little Buddha with goggles on.

0:23:410:23:46

I come from a kind of council house estate.

0:23:460:23:48

You know, my dad were a Barnsley miner. Come here, you little...

0:23:480:23:52

And I liked the idea of a guardian angel.

0:23:520:23:54

So, I made a guardian Buddha, angel, little god.

0:23:540:23:58

But he's got an industrial screw on his head,

0:23:580:24:01

he's got goggles, he's got medals from his past deeds.

0:24:010:24:04

And I've called it The Head Of The Little Barnsley Buddha.

0:24:040:24:07

You know, like, "Come here, you little Buddha."

0:24:070:24:09

So, there's all that gag, but it's quite serious.

0:24:090:24:13

I've used a kind of traditional material,

0:24:130:24:15

I've used bronze, I've used, kind of other, other elements.

0:24:150:24:19

But it's still a gag.

0:24:190:24:21

They really do make you laugh. You just have to stop and admire them.

0:24:210:24:24

But when you find out, their titles that you've given them, it's...

0:24:240:24:28

You just fall over with laughter.

0:24:280:24:30

It's part of the fun of making it.

0:24:300:24:32

It's part of the enjoyment of seeing the work.

0:24:320:24:34

Seeing the title. I did a girl screaming at a crab

0:24:340:24:38

but she doesn't know that she's got a crab hanging from her backside.

0:24:380:24:42

You know, she's at the seaside in Bridlington.

0:24:420:24:45

I wanted to call it, Girl With Crabs, and my wife said, "You...!"

0:24:450:24:50

So, I called it North Sea Nippers.

0:24:500:24:52

So, I've got Down To Earth as well, which is a little angel, kind of,

0:24:540:24:59

that's got a, kind of, supermarket carrier bag and a little case

0:24:590:25:02

and she's been really bad up there,

0:25:020:25:04

so Him up there, or Her up there, has sent her back down.

0:25:040:25:08

So, she's got the bottom lip. So, it's just Down to Earth.

0:25:080:25:11

So, it leads people in, the title's funny.

0:25:110:25:15

And I like the innocence of kids. In a way, I'm kind of a naive optimist.

0:25:150:25:21

Graham's positive, light-hearted approach to his work is clearly evident.

0:25:210:25:26

He even draws inspiration from his own childhood innocence.

0:25:260:25:29

There's one called The Grimethorpe Flyer.

0:25:290:25:32

Basically, it's a kid with cardboard wings,

0:25:320:25:34

Fair Isle jumper, long shorts, S belt.

0:25:340:25:37

It's me as a child, trying to escape the village of Grimethorpe.

0:25:370:25:40

So, that's very important to me.

0:25:400:25:43

Another piece, that's a bit of a departure for me, it's Big Mother.

0:25:450:25:50

What it is, is a mincing machine that I've adapted to the shape of a woman.

0:25:500:25:55

There's a handle and little babies come popping out.

0:25:550:25:59

I had a show in Austria. And this Austrian woman accused...

0:25:590:26:03

You know, didn't like the sculpture,

0:26:030:26:05

she was heavily pregnant, and I asked her why.

0:26:050:26:07

She says well, you know, like, "It's ridiculing pregnant women."

0:26:070:26:11

I said, "It's kind of making the men redundant. Don't you like that?"

0:26:110:26:15

She says, "Oh, I like that element but it's probably a man who's turning the handle."

0:26:150:26:19

In addition to his small quirky pieces, over the years,

0:26:210:26:24

Graham has been commissioned to produce various public sculptures,

0:26:240:26:28

of famous people. One of the best known,

0:26:280:26:30

and possibly most loved, is that of Eric Morecombe.

0:26:300:26:33

The original takes pride of place in Morecombe Bay.

0:26:330:26:36

It was fifteen years after Eric's death that the sculpture was unveiled.

0:26:390:26:44

But I'd been involved for six years.

0:26:440:26:46

So, I had to come up with a pose of Eric doing the Sunshine dance.

0:26:460:26:49

What I do is try to get the spirit of the man.

0:26:490:26:52

When Eric's widow came down here to look at it, I'd been six years.

0:26:520:26:56

And this were the one moment I was dreading.

0:26:560:26:58

She saw Eric... my sculpture of Eric...

0:26:580:27:02

and she says, "That's Eric, Graham."

0:27:020:27:05

"Go and get the kettle on."

0:27:050:27:07

And I tell you, I just... Unbelievable!

0:27:070:27:09

The image is just so right, it's so perfect.

0:27:090:27:12

Well, I mean...

0:27:120:27:14

The thing is I do all these people that are dead

0:27:140:27:17

and my sculpture's about life.

0:27:170:27:19

It is really about life.

0:27:190:27:21

Are you going to do a living person soon?

0:27:210:27:24

Yeah, I am doing Dickie Bird, actually.

0:27:240:27:27

He's almost a caricature of himself. So, it's very much like my work,

0:27:270:27:31

what I'm doing with the cricket jumpers round and everything else.

0:27:310:27:35

So, it's going to be an affectionate portrait.

0:27:350:27:37

And he's alive, so I can measure him.

0:27:370:27:40

-You can get him here.

-I have to be quick, he's 75.

0:27:400:27:44

Let's just talk about William Webb Ellis, for a moment.

0:27:440:27:48

Imagine you get the commission. What goes through your mind first?

0:27:480:27:51

Do you do a sketch or do you do a small study?

0:27:510:27:55

Well, this is the kind of maquette.

0:27:550:27:58

It's what we call a maquette, which is a three dimensional sketch.

0:27:580:28:02

It hasn't got to be seen as a replica.

0:28:020:28:05

You know, this is not exactly what the sculpture is going to look like.

0:28:050:28:10

It's to work out the pose.

0:28:100:28:11

-Just a study really.

-It's basically a quick study.

0:28:110:28:14

So, from the time you had the idea, and produced the little maquette,

0:28:140:28:18

to when you finished that, how long did that take?

0:28:180:28:21

Well, not all that long. Maybe two month to make the figure.

0:28:210:28:24

I mean, it sounds a long time but...

0:28:240:28:26

It's a lot of work though, isn't it?

0:28:260:28:29

It's a lot of work, and you've got clients coming up and looking.

0:28:290:28:33

It changed several times.

0:28:330:28:35

If you're doing a running figure, how do you capture that?

0:28:350:28:38

You've got to move it around and make it work for you.

0:28:380:28:41

Are you very critical of your work?

0:28:410:28:43

Any artist worth their salt should be.

0:28:430:28:46

It's a curse and a gift.

0:28:460:28:49

I cannot put the modelling tools down.

0:28:490:28:51

Don't! Please, don't stop!

0:28:510:28:52

You're giving so many thousands out there so much joy and happiness.

0:28:520:28:56

-Oh, thanks.

-You are bringing them sunshine. Thank you very much.

0:28:560:28:59

Back at the valuation day, Philip has found a couple of ladies

0:29:060:29:09

who also have something to smile about.

0:29:090:29:13

-Judith and Doris, how are you both, all right?

-Fine, thanks.

0:29:130:29:16

-Fine, thank you.

-Local girls?

0:29:160:29:17

-Yup.

-We are.

-Barnsley lasses?

-That's right.

0:29:170:29:20

Why have two Barnsley lasses

0:29:200:29:22

got a watercolour from Surrey, and a watercolour from Hampshire?

0:29:220:29:26

Because they're my sister in law's.

0:29:260:29:29

-So, you brought them here for her today?

-Yes, we have.

0:29:290:29:32

Unfortunately she's disabled, so she can't get herself.

0:29:320:29:35

They've been handed down

0:29:350:29:37

from her grandmother, to her mother, and eventually to her.

0:29:370:29:42

So, Janet, your sister-in-law, doesn't like these?

0:29:420:29:45

-Oh, she loves them.

-She loves them.

0:29:450:29:46

She loves them? So, why is she selling them?

0:29:460:29:49

Her mother was an antiques dealer. And she's had to go into a home.

0:29:490:29:54

Unfortunately, Janet's inherited rather a lot of the antiques.

0:29:540:29:58

-So, basically, something's got to go.

-Something's got to go.

0:29:580:30:02

-Oh, yes, oh, yes.

-Do you like them?

-I do. I think they're pretty.

0:30:020:30:05

They're a bit out of grace and favour at the moment.

0:30:050:30:08

Yes, all right. Had the sky been a little bit different, more blue,

0:30:080:30:11

-I think it would have been...

-More blue?

-Yes.

0:30:110:30:14

Do you think that's because that's the way it's been painted?

0:30:140:30:17

No, I think it's because it's faded. It's been in the sun.

0:30:170:30:20

Can't tell you much, Doris, can I, eh? I think you're spot on.

0:30:200:30:24

And if you just have a look at this one here, look.

0:30:240:30:27

And that looks as though it's been in the damp.

0:30:270:30:30

Do you want to come and sit here?

0:30:300:30:31

HE CHUCKLES

0:30:310:30:33

You're spot on. This has been in the damp.

0:30:330:30:36

There's nothing much you can do about that, other than repainting it.

0:30:360:30:39

It's affected the paper, you know,

0:30:390:30:42

we've got these sort of autumnal themes here, and the clouds are

0:30:420:30:46

-almost the same colour as the trees, aren't they?

-Yeah, uh-huh.

0:30:460:30:49

It's a real shame, because they're lovely pictures.

0:30:490:30:52

You've got this shepherd and shepherdess.

0:30:520:30:55

It's signed here by the artist, Fred Hines.

0:30:550:30:57

Fred Hines was a Victorian artist, who was quite active from about 1875,

0:30:570:31:02

through to the first, sort of, ten, 20 years of the 20th century.

0:31:020:31:06

And a well recorded artist. But the problem you've got...

0:31:060:31:09

-It's quite simple to value something in good order, right?

-Yeah.

0:31:090:31:12

But when you've got to start valuing something in bad order, right?

0:31:120:31:17

And really, I mean, that does just hit you, doesn't it?

0:31:170:31:20

Yeah, it does spoil, yes.

0:31:200:31:22

So, what you've got to do is you've got to pitch them

0:31:220:31:25

at a price that is almost, "Come and buy me."

0:31:250:31:28

That makes them attractive to someone in the sale room.

0:31:280:31:31

I think that you should estimate them at between £100-£200 for the two.

0:31:310:31:36

I think you should put a fixed reserve on the two at £80, all right?

0:31:360:31:40

On that basis, do you think Janet would be happy to sell them?

0:31:400:31:43

-Yes.

-Well, yes, they do want to get them out of the way.

0:31:430:31:46

I mean, we've sort of crammed everything in every nook and cranny we could, haven't we?

0:31:460:31:52

Let's just hope that the estimate that I put on them,

0:31:520:31:54

really does, sort of captivate a bit of interest.

0:31:540:31:58

Somebody might say, "Yes, they are pretty, I like them and I'll buy."

0:31:580:32:02

Let's keep our fingers crossed and hope they do well.

0:32:020:32:05

I'd love them to do well for you.

0:32:050:32:07

I've seen these before.

0:32:110:32:12

It's majolica, it's from Stoke on Trent, from the potteries.

0:32:120:32:15

Caroline, tell me about it?

0:32:150:32:17

As far as we know, it's come down through the family.

0:32:170:32:20

My grandmother's aunt, originally, we think, bought it new

0:32:200:32:23

and passed it down through the family.

0:32:230:32:25

-Really? So, you've inherited this?

-Yes.

-Have you any kids?

0:32:250:32:29

I have. One daughter, but being a single parent...

0:32:290:32:32

-OK, yeah, it's got to go. You need the money.

-Unfortunately, yes.

0:32:320:32:36

-Yeah. Do you like it?

-I don't like it at all, unfortunately.

0:32:360:32:40

It makes it easier to sell if you don't like it, doesn't it?

0:32:400:32:43

I can appreciate the works of it, but it wouldn't suit my house.

0:32:430:32:47

-Me neither.

-It's a strawberry dish, or a strawberry bowl.

0:32:470:32:50

-This one dates to around about 1870, 1880.

-Really?

0:32:500:32:54

Yeah, late Victorian piece,

0:32:540:32:56

and so fashionable as a centre piece during the day.

0:32:560:32:59

It's so typical of majolica.

0:32:590:33:01

It's got that lovely high lustre glaze to it

0:33:010:33:03

and those wonderful bright vivid hues of,

0:33:030:33:06

as you can see, blues, greens and pinks.

0:33:060:33:08

But, the key to the value...

0:33:080:33:10

George Jones always initialled his wares.

0:33:100:33:14

What he modelled, he initialled, with a G and a J.

0:33:140:33:18

Which he would have signed, right up until 1873.

0:33:180:33:21

Now, unfortunately, that's not on the base.

0:33:210:33:24

-Nevertheless, it still would be catalogued as George Jones.

-Right.

0:33:240:33:29

-If you could trace those numbers, do you see those serial numbers?

-Yes.

0:33:290:33:32

That will tell you exactly what month and what year this was made,

0:33:320:33:36

and possibly, who by.

0:33:360:33:37

-But I'm pretty sure our auctioneer in Sheffield is going to catalogue that as George Jones majolica.

-Yup.

0:33:370:33:43

Purely because of the detail in the carving, the undercuts, the way the birds...

0:33:430:33:47

You can see right through the wing, through the tails,

0:33:470:33:50

through the legs and underneath the strawberry leaf.

0:33:500:33:53

It's a lovely example of a strawberry bowl.

0:33:530:33:55

Value wise, can I... I'm going to upset you now, Caroline.

0:33:550:33:59

-No, don't.

-Because this has peaked. It peaked a couple of years ago.

0:33:590:34:03

If it was absolutely in mint condition, in its heyday, couple of years ago... £3,000.

0:34:030:34:08

SHE LAUGHS

0:34:080:34:10

But I can point out the damage, look, there's some damage on the foot there.

0:34:100:34:14

And look at the wing tips, you see that?

0:34:140:34:16

There's only one wing that's survived.

0:34:160:34:19

I think, because of the damage, and the lack of interest in majolica at the moment,

0:34:190:34:24

we'd be quite safe to say £500-£800.

0:34:240:34:26

-Still, in that condition?

-Yeah, surprising, isn't it?

0:34:260:34:29

Goodness me, yeah, very. That would be fantastic.

0:34:290:34:32

-Really, really good.

-And the money's going to come in very, very handy.

-Very useful, very useful.

0:34:320:34:38

Tricia, thank you for bringing this beautiful little ring in.

0:34:470:34:50

I mean, it is little. Is it something that you have ever worn?

0:34:500:34:55

-I've only put it on my small finger a couple of times, because it is so small.

-It's tiny, isn't it?

-Tis.

0:34:550:35:00

So, where did it come from?

0:35:000:35:02

It was passed down to me through my mother's side, by one of her aunts.

0:35:020:35:07

-Right, right.

-I think it was her engagement ring,

0:35:070:35:09

but I'm not sure how old it is, or how much it's worth.

0:35:090:35:12

No, well, she must have had the smallest hands in the world.

0:35:120:35:16

Well, if we have a look at it,

0:35:160:35:17

under the lens...

0:35:170:35:20

There is a faint mark on it, which is probably going to be nine or 18 carat.

0:35:210:35:26

But that's worn away and there's a little bit of engraving,

0:35:260:35:30

which is NK and the date 25.

0:35:300:35:34

Which is probably part of an inscription, but unfortunately the rest has worn away.

0:35:340:35:39

But the nice thing about it are these three lovely diamonds.

0:35:390:35:42

And it's a typical ring that you will find anywhere from about 1910, up to about 1920, 1925.

0:35:420:35:49

Where you have five and three stones. It was fashionable for the period.

0:35:490:35:54

And even though the ring itself is very small, the diamonds are quite sizeable.

0:35:540:35:58

You've got about a quarter of a carat on these two small stones, and the central one's just over.

0:35:580:36:04

So, you've got about three quarters of a carat of diamonds.

0:36:040:36:07

So, that's quite nice. Have you ever had it valued before?

0:36:070:36:10

-No? Well, it's a family thing...

-I've had it in a drawer for 30 years.

0:36:100:36:15

Well, you know, the small size, isn't it?

0:36:150:36:17

There's not a lot you can do with it. Hopefully, if it goes to auction,

0:36:170:36:21

someone will size it and it will fit on a larger finger.

0:36:210:36:24

But that's always a tricky and expensive process to do.

0:36:240:36:27

Good thing is that diamonds are really popular at the moment.

0:36:270:36:30

And people don't seem to be able to get enough of it.

0:36:300:36:33

I think it's bling, is what they call it.

0:36:330:36:36

They have a thing for bling, and this certainly is.

0:36:360:36:39

-At auction, I think we'd put it in at £400-£600.

-Right.

0:36:390:36:44

And we'd probably have a shade of discretion on the reserve, but not a great deal. Probably sort of 10%.

0:36:440:36:50

It should do really well because it's flavour of the month at the moment.

0:36:500:36:53

If you're happy to put it into auction, we'll do that.

0:36:530:36:56

But why have you decided to sell it now?

0:36:560:36:59

Well, my daughter's moved to Australia, and I'd love to go and visit her.

0:36:590:37:03

She's moved out there, so it would go towards that.

0:37:030:37:06

-Which would be more use than sitting in a drawer.

-Yes.

0:37:060:37:09

Well, I hope we'll get you part of the way to Australia,

0:37:090:37:12

-if not all the way to Australia. Thank you so much for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

0:37:120:37:16

Well, it's time to pay another visit to the auction room.

0:37:160:37:19

Will the signed watercolours be let down by the fact that they're not local scenes?

0:37:190:37:24

Majolica's not really my thing, but I can certainly appreciate the quality of this piece.

0:37:240:37:29

I've a feeling it's going to do great things at the sale.

0:37:290:37:32

And finally, another true quality item.

0:37:320:37:35

Tricia's diamond ring is a real gem, with an estimate of £400-£600.

0:37:350:37:40

Something for all you fine art lovers.

0:37:490:37:52

Two watercolours, it's Hampshire and Surrey, brought in by Judith and Doris here.

0:37:520:37:57

And, I've got to say, Doris, you look stunning.

0:37:570:38:00

-Thank you.

-You really do. It's good to see you again.

0:38:000:38:03

-Getting excited?

-No, it doesn't do.

0:38:030:38:05

Oh, it doesn't do, does it?

0:38:050:38:07

-I like that.

-It doesn't do.

-Oh, it doesn't do.

0:38:070:38:10

Have to blame Philip. He's roped you in on this.

0:38:100:38:12

£100-£200. I like them.

0:38:120:38:15

I really like them. They're a long way from home. I wish we were down in Surrey.

0:38:150:38:19

You'd make a bit more money. Art travels well, so fingers crossed.

0:38:190:38:23

Fred Hines, a pair, signed, quality.

0:38:230:38:27

£200 for the pair.

0:38:270:38:28

200.

0:38:280:38:30

The bidding has started at 60, we'll start at the bottom.

0:38:300:38:34

65, 70, 5, 80, 5, must be 90 elsewhere?

0:38:340:38:39

Must be 90. 90, 5, 100.

0:38:390:38:43

110, 120, 130, 140?

0:38:430:38:47

130 central bidder.

0:38:470:38:48

Anybody else for 140?

0:38:480:38:51

Anybody else for 140? Get your bids in quick. All done at 130.

0:38:510:38:56

Bid now or lose them.

0:38:560:38:57

Yes! £130, Judith, that is fantastic.

0:38:590:39:03

Whose were they, by the way?

0:39:030:39:05

-Well, my sister in law's.

-OK.

0:39:050:39:06

Unfortunately she's wheelchair-bound.

0:39:060:39:08

So, we brought them to the auction for her.

0:39:080:39:11

-Ah, and what's her name?

-Janet.

0:39:110:39:13

Janet. Well, Janet, I hope you're watching right now.

0:39:130:39:15

There's £130 coming your way.

0:39:150:39:18

Right now, something for the ladies. We've got a diamond ring.

0:39:220:39:26

It belongs to Tricia - hopefully for not much longer.

0:39:260:39:28

But we do need £400-£600. But you rate this, so...

0:39:280:39:31

I rate it. It's a nice ring.

0:39:310:39:33

If you had to buy it in a shop, it would be £700-£800.

0:39:330:39:36

It's good value for somebody and we have got discretion on the reserve.

0:39:360:39:40

-So, hopefully, we'll do it.

-Tricia, why are you selling this?

0:39:400:39:43

-Are you wearing diamonds right now? You are.

-I am, yes.

0:39:430:39:46

It's just not my style.

0:39:460:39:48

It was a great-aunt's, so I didn't...

0:39:480:39:50

-It's not really what I would wear.

-OK, not a sad moment, then?

0:39:500:39:54

-No.

-No, just get rid.

-Yes.

0:39:540:39:57

Lot number 250.

0:39:570:39:58

The three-stone diamond ring,

0:39:580:40:00

brilliant cut stones in a claw setting. £300 is your start price.

0:40:000:40:04

£300, I've got starters.

0:40:040:40:07

Anybody fancy 320? 320 I'm looking for.

0:40:070:40:11

Lovely ring, 320.

0:40:110:40:14

You can alter the size.

0:40:140:40:16

320, 340, 360...

0:40:160:40:20

360 is it?

0:40:200:40:22

345 but I've got to go 350. It's going to be 360 now.

0:40:220:40:26

Got to be 360, it's on reserve.

0:40:260:40:29

With me at 350. All done with me at 350.

0:40:290:40:33

Any more interest anywhere?

0:40:330:40:34

All done at 350.

0:40:340:40:37

Not quite sold, that one. If you want to see me after...

0:40:390:40:42

Oh! What are you going to do?

0:40:420:40:43

-Oh, I'll just take it back and...

-Try another day?

-Definitely.

0:40:430:40:47

The person in the room seemed really interested around our reserve figure.

0:40:470:40:51

-And just wouldn't go the £10 more. So, possibly...

-The auctioneer.

0:40:510:40:55

-The auctioneer can do something with him.

-OK.

0:40:550:40:57

He might come to the auctioneer and say, could you sell it to me for 345?

0:40:570:41:01

-And it's as good as selling it for 360.

-Exactly, yes.

0:41:010:41:05

If he's not interested, don't re-enter it into another sale here.

0:41:050:41:09

-No.

-Because it's done the rounds. People would have seen it.

0:41:090:41:12

Hang onto it for six months, put it in a different saleroom.

0:41:120:41:15

This is what's up next.

0:41:220:41:24

And it's made the front page of the catalogue, Caroline.

0:41:240:41:27

The George Jones majolica strawberry dish.

0:41:270:41:29

-I'm feeling a bit nervous, aren't you?

-Very.

0:41:290:41:32

Starting to wobble, but this is what auctions are all about.

0:41:320:41:34

If you've never experienced an auction, you've got to go for the thrill.

0:41:340:41:38

-Now, we've got £500-£800 on this.

-Yes.

-Condition's against it. But some people might not be put off.

0:41:380:41:43

The 19th century majolica strawberry dish, by George Jones.

0:41:430:41:47

Be aware of the condition but it's still a beauty.

0:41:470:41:50

Major interest on the commissions force me to start this lot at £820.

0:41:500:41:56

It's got to do four figures now, hasn't it? Come on.

0:41:560:42:00

Anybody fancy 850? 850?

0:42:000:42:01

850, 880, 900,

0:42:010:42:05

920, 950...

0:42:050:42:07

I'm out. Anybody else for 980?

0:42:090:42:13

980 I'm looking for.

0:42:130:42:15

950 on the phone.

0:42:150:42:18

All done at 950?

0:42:180:42:20

Isn't that a good sound?

0:42:230:42:25

Oh, God!

0:42:250:42:28

£950.

0:42:280:42:31

-Wow.

-You shaking?

0:42:310:42:33

-Yeah.

-So am I, actually.

0:42:330:42:36

-It's a nice feeling, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-It's a nice feeling.

-Shocked!

0:42:360:42:40

-Who are you with here? Got some moral support?

-Yes, my dad and my step mum.

0:42:400:42:43

-Where are they, over there?

-Yeah, over there.

0:42:430:42:46

-Waving like mad. Well, they'll look after you.

-Thank you.

0:42:460:42:50

What are you going to put £950 towards?

0:42:500:42:52

Oh, a holiday for my daughter and then the rest in the bank, I think.

0:42:520:42:56

-Sensible.

-Yes.

-Sensible.

0:42:560:42:57

-Thank you so much.

-Oh, that's OK.

0:42:570:43:00

Thank you. That's what it's all about.

0:43:000:43:02

I hope you've enjoyed watching today's show.

0:43:020:43:04

We thoroughly enjoyed it. If you have anything to flog,

0:43:040:43:07

bring it along to a valuation day and we'll see you on Flog It!

0:43:070:43:11

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:170:43:21

Barnsley is the destination this time. Valuing the heirlooms and antiques are experts Michael Baggott and Philip Serrell, while presenter Paul Martin pays a visit to local artist Graham Ibbeson to find out more about his unique sculptures.