Barnsley Flog It!


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Barnsley

Experts Michael Baggott and Philip Serrell value antiques in Barnsley. Paul Martin visits a snuff mill to find out about expert James Lewis's snuff box collection.


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Where we are today is going through a major period of regeneration, as you can see by the cranes behind me,

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and the plan is to make it a 21st century market town.

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Welcome to Barnsley.

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We're certainly in a modern part of Barnsley for our venue,

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the Metrodome Leisure Complex,

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where, hopefully, there's a lot of people waiting inside. Fingers crossed.

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# Ta-da! # "Flog It!" is here.

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Wow, look at this! A full house and everybody's sitting patiently,

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laden with bags and boxes, ready to see our two experts, Mr Philip Serrell and Michael Baggott.

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Chaps, are you ready for this?

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-BOTH: Absolutely.

-And what have you got here?

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Just a lovely beer jug, isn't it?

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-Gorgeous. And Michael?

-Fantastic bit of 19th century bronze.

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-Well, half a bit.

-Well, you've got a full house.

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There's plenty of antiques. Get diving through those bags and boxes.

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Lily, I hope, um...

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we haven't brought your savings with these two. Robbed any banks today?

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They're charming things, albeit that one's a little worse for wear. Where did they come from?

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I don't really know. I know there's some family history, but a cousin gave them me 16 or 17 years ago

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and yeah, they've been passed down through the family, somehow.

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-They're nice because they're local.

-Yeah.

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We've got an impressed mark on the bottom of a daisy.

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-Yeah.

-That stumped me, but we've got a very good off-screen expert on porcelain

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-and she said they're Mexborough pottery.

-Yeah.

-That was founded

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in about 1795. These are typical of the 1830s, 1840s.

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-Yeah.

-And they've got this sponge decoration to the base,

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which you see on Staffordshire Prattwares, cos they're called the Pratt colours,

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and you also see it in Yorkshire, and we're in Yorkshire today,

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-so these are wonderful bits of naive craft.

-Yeah.

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-And I don't really think they were meant to survive any length of time.

-Sure.

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You know, you bought a money box.

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There's a fairly big gap on the back and you could probably get a couple out with a knife, but not a lot.

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And they were, as I think this one was, smashed to get it open...

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-Possibly.

-..and glued back together. But they're a lovely bit of naive English folk art.

-Yes.

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-And it's fabulous to have a pair, cos they were never meant as a pair.

-No.

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I mean, you can see at the front here we've got a black window frame and the yellow curtains on this example.

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But we've got pink here and the green and the little faces poking out.

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We've got the applied decoration here of a little tree, and I think this is lovely and crisp -

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this sprigged and applied decoration.

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That's absolutely marvellous.

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And then, somewhat mournfully, we've got this ghostly, classical figure that seems to be laying flowers down.

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I hope it's a cornucopia of bounty and not a wreath, but I could be wrong.

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THEY LAUGH

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I've said the date. I've said where they're from.

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Any idea of what they're worth?

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Not really. No. You get year things, but you don't know, do you?

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No. I think we've got to value them, really, as one good one...

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-Yeah.

-..with a little chip, and buy one, get one free...

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-because this is really in quite rough condition.

-Yeah.

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-I think at auction we should be happily in the £150 to £250 area...

-Right, my love, yeah.

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-..with a fixed reserve of £150.

-Right, love.

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Why have you decided to sell them?

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Because we're going into a bungalow and we've got to let some things go.

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-Right.

-My family are not wanting them.

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-Really?

-So they'd only just go in the attic, you know, so it's a shame when somebody could love them.

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-It is, especially when British pottery of this period's so keenly sought after.

-Yeah.

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It wouldn't surprise me if they went on over the 250 mark,

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-but we've got to be cautious, with the damage.

-I understand.

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-So if you're happy, we'll put them into the auction...

-Yes, love.

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..and see where they end up -

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see if you get enough money to fill both of them up!

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Blimey, Christine, these are imposing!

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-Yeah. Very nice.

-How long have you had these?

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20 to 25 year.

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-And were they a family heirloom?

-No. We bought them at a sale.

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-At a sale?

-Yes.

-And how much did you pay for them?

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£120.

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We thought we'd paid a lot for them when we bought them.

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-You know what auctioneers are like!

-Yeah.

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So with a bit of inflation today, these probably ought to be worth

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-somewhere between 500 and £1,000.

-Yeah, but they'll not be.

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-Why did you like them?

-Well, we've got a cottage, terraced house,

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with beams and with old-fashioned sideboards, and I wanted something for on the end of my sideboards,

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and I've had them there ever since. And I've loved them.

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They are known as lustres.

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-Yes.

-And the light hits these droppers and sort of refracts in all sorts of different ways.

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When you bought these 25 years ago, they were very fashionable.

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They've fallen from grace along with copper kettles, copper warming pans,

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and part of the reason for that is there's this whole sort of late Victorian clutter scene.

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You know, people buy their houses, they buy their cottages,

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and in the '70s and '80s they went out and filled them to the gunwales with everything, didn't they?

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-Yes.

-Knick-knacks here - everywhere. And now, tastes have changed.

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People are very much into minimalism and rather than have perhaps ten bits

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-that might have cost them £100 each, they'd rather have one statement piece at £1,000.

-Yeah.

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You know, and the way that we decorate our homes,

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the way that we decorate our houses, has changed dramatically.

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So I think the way we've got to look at this is that you bought these for £125 25 years ago,

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-so very roughly they've cost you £5 a year...

-Mm-hm.

-..just to have the pleasure of owning them.

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-Yeah.

-So that's the way you've got to look at this.

-Yeah.

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-Cos you're going to lose some money here.

-Oh, yeah.

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In my eyes, these are very late.

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-They're simply decorative.

-Yeah.

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-And I'm not sure you won't throw one at me when I tell you what I think they're worth.

-Go on. Try me.

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-Really?

-Mmm.

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I think that they might make £50 to £80, and you should put a £40 reserve on them. Ouch.

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Yeah. Well, I've had my pleasure from them.

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-So you're happy to sell them?

-Yeah, because...

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Just let them go. Let somebody have some pleasure, instead of them being wrapped up in the loft.

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-Yeah. I bet they're a pig to clean, aren't they?

-Yeah.

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-It's worth you get rid of them for the cleaning.

-Yes.

-Right. We'll settle on that, then.

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Carol, Staffordshire lions.

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-Are they yours?

-Yes.

-How long have you had these, then?

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Well, actually, I've only had them two years.

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That was when my father died and obviously they were inherited...

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-from his parents.

-So they've been in the family and passed down through the generations.

-They have.

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-I'm the fourth generation.

-Can you remember these as a little girl?

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I can, on my grandparents' sideboard.

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Well, I guess that's where they belonged, really, didn't they,

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-or on the mantelpiece, on a windowsill or down by the side of the fireplace.

-Yeah.

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Aren't they lovely? It's a lovely pair.

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One of the glass eyes is missing...

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-Yes.

-..on one of the pair. This one here.

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-Yeah.

-But otherwise...

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Apart from them... It's like crazed paving...

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Don't worry about that. That's the craquelure.

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-Right.

-That's acceptable.

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-I wouldn't buy any Staffordshire figures without that craquelure, that glazing.

-Right.

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That's part and parcel of this country pottery from Staffordshire.

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There wasn't any one maker.

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There were a few little factories producing these wares around Staffordshire,

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known as Staffordshire pottery, and they made the classic flatbacks.

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-Can you remember seeing those?

-No.

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It was almost like these, but the figure wouldn't have a back to it.

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-Oh, right.

-They were only meant to face away from the wall.

-I see.

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-They were a country ware that most people could afford.

-There's no markings on them.

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Nobody knew they were Staffordshire.

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-You won't get any marks on them.

-Is that because of the age?

-No. No.

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These date to round about sort of 1870, 1890, somewhere around there.

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They weren't stamped because there wasn't one particular family maker.

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-They were all small potteries.

-Right.

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So there were half a dozen within Staffordshire producing flatbacks and figures like this.

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-Why are you flogging them?

-I don't particularly like them.

-You don't like them?

-Not really.

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I wouldn't have them in my house, no.

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-You've had them two years, haven't you?

-But in a bag.

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-Oh, I see.

-In a cupboard.

-In a cupboard?

-Yeah.

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-They look fun if you've got a cottage and you've got them in the window.

-I've got a modern bungalow.

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My brother... I mean, obviously, whatever I do get for them,

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I'll share with my brother, but he won't have them in his house, either.

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-Wouldn't he?

-No.

-They're not particularly beautifully modelled, are they?

-No.

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When you see the lion's mane and his face, there's not a lot of detail.

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Would it be disappointing if I said

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you might be lucky and get around £150 for the pair?

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No. Not at all. No.

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-On a good day, you should do that.

-Right.

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But I'd like to put them into auction with a value

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-of £100 to £150.

-Yes.

-With a bit of discretion on the 100.

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Yeah. That's fine, Paul. Yeah.

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-Yeah?

-I'm happy with that, yeah.

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-That's lovely.

-It's an old one. I don't think it looks very nice.

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Well, the thing I like about that is that it's understated because, you know, you go and buy

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these watches today that cost you thousands and thousands of pounds - diamonds all around them,

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mother of pearl faces - they're not very subtle, are they?

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-No.

-I'll talk about it in a minute, but I want you to tell me the history of this piece first.

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Well, my father inherited it and it's come to me after his death, of course, and I've never worn it.

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It came down through the family and you don't want it.

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-You want to sell it.

-Yeah.

-Oh, Henry, that'd break my heart to sell that.

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It's not a very nice-looking watch, I don't think.

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-Do you know how old it is?

-I believe it's about 1930.

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Well, let's just have a look.

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We haven't told the viewers at home yet who made it, have we?

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We'll leave that to surprise them.

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Shall we leave them to think it's a Timex?

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The face just comes off and, in fact, just above the second hand sweep here is the maker's name.

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-Yeah.

-It is a Rolex. It's a Rolex. I think it's absolutely lovely.

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What I love about the second hand sweep, on all quality watches, it doesn't go tick, tick, tick.

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It just sweeps round.

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-Very smooth.

-And that's just absolutely lovely.

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And if we have a look at the case here,

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we can see again the maker's name and their import mark. So you reckon it was 1930?

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I believe so.

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-I think you're probably three years out. There are import marks here for Glasgow 1927.

-Oh, right.

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Right. Now, the bracelet is clearly a cheap replacement.

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That, with a nice strap on it, nice black strap, I would love to own that.

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Yeah, well. There you are.

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And if that were in my family, there's no way I'd be selling that.

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-There's only one thing we haven't discussed.

-What do you reckon?

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-What do I reckon?

-Yep.

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I think this sort of retro look, vintage look, is really popular at the moment.

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I think that we can put an auction estimate on that of £200 to £400.

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-Oh, right.

-We'll put a reserve on it of £200

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-and we'll give the auctioneer 10% discretion if he needs it.

-Of course. Yeah. Yeah.

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But you know, that catalogued, on the internet, I'm sure it'll do well.

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What are you going to spend the money on if it makes £200 or £300?

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-Well, car needs a service.

-Car needs a service.

-I'm a pensioner.

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-Well, good luck, and I hope it does really well.

-Much obliged to you.

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Thank you for looking at it.

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Well, there are still plenty of bags and boxes

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for our experts to rummage through, but right now,

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we've found enough antiques and collectables for our first visit to the auction room.

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Although one of Lily's money boxes is a bit worse for wear, I still think this lot has real appeal.

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So I hope they do well.

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Christine's lustres have fallen out of favour, so let's hope that's not the feeling in the sale room!

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The Staffordshire lions have been part of the family

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for four generations, but it's time for them now to join a new pride.

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And finally, Henry's watch is a great make.

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Fingers crossed it makes great money.

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Well, they say money makes the world go around, so let's hope the planet

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is definitely spinning today for our owners, because they've come here

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to ELR Auctions in the heart of Sheffield to flog their earthly possessions.

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And here to tell us what he thinks of Lily's money boxes is auctioneer Robert Lee.

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Robert, I love these two little money boxes.

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Proper country pottery - or Yorkshire pottery.

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And this one, as you can see, has been broken to get the money out and I think that tells a story.

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I absolutely love them. I love the little faces in the window and I think that's well on the money.

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They should be doing that. They might be worth that each.

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-Lovely things. It's a shame about the damage, but as I say...

-It tells a story, though.

-That's right.

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There's been money in there and they've shook it and smashed it.

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It's a shame but it's a lovely pair.

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-Have you had any interest in these so far?

-Quite a few people have telephoned for it, so...

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So we're looking at the top end plus, do you think?

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-I'm going to say £250.

-Plus.

-Yeah.

-That's what we like to see.

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Well, we're going to find out in a few minutes. Thank you, Robert.

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-I think it's time for you to get on the rostrum and do your magic.

-Thank you.

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I love this next lot. We've got the two little Yorkshire money pots which you fell in love with.

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-I absolutely adore them, Paul.

-Lily, good luck.

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-You've had them for 16 years.

-Yes.

-I'd have a tear in my eye, selling these.

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-I wouldn't sell them. Would you?

-No. They'd have to pry my fingers off them to get them.

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They're not a pair, but they'll look fantastic on a mantelpiece.

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I like the smashed one best, with the two little cheeky faces.

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A pair of Mexborough pottery Prattware money boxes. Lovely pair.

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Top quality.

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£130 is your start price for them.

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Let's have 140. 140...

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for the Mexborough. 140. 150. 160.

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Yeah! They were a bit slow to put their hands up to start with.

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160. 170. 180, sir. 190. 200. 210?

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Too soon to be out.

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Top of the room at 200. Anybody else for 210?

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They're going to go, reluctantly, at £200.

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Have we finished? Hammer's dropping.

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-Yes. There was a delayed reaction.

-There was!

-Lily, £200. Not bad.

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-We got mid-estimate.

-It is, because there's a good one and...

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You liked the glued one, but there was a lot of glue in the glued one!

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But that's what I love about it.

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You know, it's a sort of a naive repair and it was done by somebody that loved it

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and wanted to make use of it - a classic bit of recycling.

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-Yeah.

-Well, that's £200, Lily. What are you going to do with that?

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We're moving down to a bungalow, so it's going to help with expenses.

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Yeah. And that haemorrhages money, doesn't it, moving?

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-It is. It's hard work.

-A stressful time, as well.

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-Yeah.

-Have a good drink, won't you?

-I will, love.

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Someone else who's selling the family heirlooms is Carol here.

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Now, these Staffordshire lions have been in the family...

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-what, four, five generations?

-Yes. That's right. Yeah.

-Grandmother's...

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-I've forgotten, was it wedding present?

-It was. Oh, yeah, it was.

-Why, why, why? Do you know,

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-I would keep these even if they were in the wardrobe.

-I don't want them on display.

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My children don't want them on display. My brother don't want them.

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I think they're fun, but I'm a bit sort of...

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I like my country pottery. I'm sort of stuck in the past.

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I noticed when I was viewing the sale room yesterday, there's another pair.

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-Yes.

-Did you see that?

-Yes, I have. Yeah.

-Not as good as our lot, though.

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-Right.

-Not as good as our lot. Let's hope that we get that £150.

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Lot number 62. Pair of 19th century pottery lions.

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Unusual how they're resting on those balls.

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£200 for them.

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For the pair.

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100.

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The bidding has started at 70.

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£70. I'll take 75 elsewhere.

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75 for the pair.

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I'm struggling if I can't get 75 for these, help me out, somebody.

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Any interest?

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With me at 70 on the book. Have we finished?

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Didn't sell.

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-Right.

-They're going home. It's a good job we put a reserve on them.

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-Yes.

-We've protected it.

-Right.

-They're worth £100 any day.

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Well, we've got a Rolex watch for sale, but it's not mine, it's Henry's here.

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-And it was made in Glasgow in 1920s, 1930s.

-Older than I thought, yes.

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-Philip, £200-400 sounds cheap for a Rolex.

-Yeah.

0:18:190:18:23

-It's got a bit of style, hasn't it?

-Yeah. It's got a replacement strap. That's no problem.

0:18:230:18:26

No problem at all. Why are you flogging it if it works so well?

0:18:260:18:30

I don't think it's a very attractive watch to look at.

0:18:300:18:32

I know it's a Rolex and it looks nice.

0:18:320:18:34

-I've got another.

-Oh, right. OK. You like that style more?

0:18:340:18:39

-Yes.

-What does Philip wear? Philip needs a watch.

0:18:390:18:41

I can't afford a watch.

0:18:410:18:43

Lot number 275. The gentleman's Rolex silver-cased wristwatch.

0:18:430:18:49

Import mark for 1927. Another beauty.

0:18:490:18:53

-Lots of interest on the book.

-Good.

0:18:530:18:55

I'll start this one at £420. 420.

0:18:550:18:59

I'll take 440 elsewhere.

0:18:590:19:02

440 I'm looking for.

0:19:020:19:05

This one's going to sell.

0:19:050:19:07

Anybody fancy 440?

0:19:070:19:09

With me at 420. Hammer's dropping.

0:19:090:19:13

Brilliant. We've done it. At the top end. That's a good result.

0:19:140:19:18

-Thank you very much.

-£420.

0:19:180:19:20

What will you put that money towards?

0:19:200:19:22

I need a lot of repairs on my car so mostly go towards that.

0:19:220:19:26

-And then I've got a couple of great grandsons, so give them a bob or two.

-What are their names?

0:19:260:19:31

-Jack and Billy.

-Jack and Billy. Well, give them our love, won't you?

0:19:310:19:35

-And get the car fixed.

-Thank you.

-Thanks very much.

0:19:350:19:37

Will we get Christine her money back for those Victorian lustres?

0:19:470:19:50

I don't think Philip thinks so. We're looking at £125 refund.

0:19:500:19:55

-But she's had the pleasure of owning them.

-50 to 80.

0:19:550:19:58

50 to 80 we've got on them.

0:19:580:20:00

We've got a full house here. I think we might just do it.

0:20:000:20:05

We're going to find out... find out right now.

0:20:050:20:08

This is it. Good luck, everybody. It's going under the hammer now.

0:20:080:20:10

Pair of Victorian style mill glass table lustres with the crown tops.

0:20:100:20:16

Here they come. Lots of interest.

0:20:160:20:18

Lots of interest. See.

0:20:180:20:21

£130 is your start price for them.

0:20:210:20:25

-Well done.

-Anybody fancy 140 in the room?

0:20:250:20:28

-Brilliant.

-140 for them.

0:20:280:20:30

So with me on commission at 130.

0:20:300:20:33

No-one's putting their hands up, but it's on the books with commission.

0:20:330:20:38

With me at 130. Hammer's dropping.

0:20:380:20:41

Yes.

0:20:410:20:43

-Fantastic.

-You've done really well. Well done, you.

-Oh, that's lovely.

0:20:430:20:47

And I know what you're going to put the money towards. Tell us all. Come on.

0:20:470:20:52

I'm going to go to the Cotswolds for a long weekend with my husband Alan.

0:20:520:20:57

And it will be nice spending money.

0:20:570:20:59

-Well done, you.

-And tour all the antique shops in Stowe.

0:20:590:21:02

-We'll have a look.

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:21:020:21:04

This is a room with a secret.

0:21:100:21:13

In there, two men are mixing a secret recipe.

0:21:130:21:17

A recipe for what, do you think?

0:21:170:21:20

A recipe for snuff.

0:21:200:21:23

Well, I've left the hustle and the bustle of the auction room behind me

0:21:360:21:39

and I've come here to Wilsons and Co.

0:21:390:21:42

One of the last remaining independent snuff manufacturers left in the country.

0:21:420:21:47

The family run business here at Sharrow Mills, in the heart of Sheffield, has been producing snuff

0:21:470:21:53

from a secret recipe which dates back as far as 1737.

0:21:530:21:58

The original machinery used to grind the tobacco to make snuff still survives.

0:21:580:22:04

It's left as a testament to a bygone age.

0:22:040:22:08

Now, although snuff taking isn't as popular as it used to be,

0:22:100:22:13

one aspect of it still is very popular and extremely collectable, and that's snuff boxes.

0:22:130:22:19

To tell us more about it is a familiar Flog It face and a good friend of mine, James Lewis.

0:22:190:22:24

James, thank you for bringing a small part of your collection cos I know it's massive, isn't it?

0:22:240:22:29

It is. I think I've got about 3-500, 4-600 altogether.

0:22:290:22:35

Something like that. I'm not sure exactly how many.

0:22:350:22:37

When did you start to collect snuff boxes?

0:22:370:22:41

When I was younger, I had a passion for wood, just like you.

0:22:410:22:44

And the problem is, when you're a schoolboy or just about to go to university,

0:22:440:22:49

you've got nowhere to put furniture.

0:22:490:22:51

If you're going to collect wood or treen or anything like that,

0:22:510:22:54

you have to collect small things. I thought what better than snuff boxes.

0:22:540:22:58

So, I had an interest back as a teenager,

0:22:580:23:02

but the passion for snuff boxes really came from one of my first ever visits that I made as an auctioneer.

0:23:020:23:09

I went to see a lady in a little tiny cottage and halfway through the valuation I heard this...

0:23:090:23:14

HE SNORTS

0:23:140:23:16

I turned round to see this lady with snuff dribbling down the nostrils, all over herself and she went...

0:23:180:23:26

-"Want some, lad?"

-And did you?

-No. I didn't. I didn't.

0:23:260:23:31

Today, I probably would have, but back then I was too shy and I said, "Oh, no, thank you."

0:23:310:23:36

And left her to it. But it started a strange fascination.

0:23:360:23:41

Gosh. Well, let's talk about some of the varieties and maybe pick on half a dozen.

0:23:410:23:46

OK. There are two types, really.

0:23:460:23:48

You get the pocket snuff, which always have a very tight fitting cover, for obvious reasons.

0:23:480:23:52

And then you have the table snuff.

0:23:520:23:54

The table snuff is normally bigger and sometimes has a loose cover.

0:23:540:23:59

These three at the front here are all table snuff boxes

0:23:590:24:03

and thereby one of the most important snuff box makers of the early 18th century,

0:24:030:24:08

a chap called John Obrisset,

0:24:080:24:10

he was the son of silversmith and specialised in working in horn and tortoiseshell.

0:24:100:24:17

And he was snuff box maker to Queen Anne.

0:24:170:24:20

Oh, really. So that certainly is a name to look out for.

0:24:200:24:23

Yeah. Queen Anne herself was a snuff taker.

0:24:230:24:25

-Can we have a look at one of those?

-Yeah. And wonderful detail.

-That really is nice, isn't it?

0:24:250:24:32

You can hold that up to the light.

0:24:320:24:34

-Yeah.

-Look at that. You can see right through it and look at the detail.

0:24:340:24:37

Great quality. Just as we find today that smoking is really quite a controversial subject,

0:24:370:24:43

snuff taking itself was controversial throughout the ages.

0:24:430:24:47

And although Queen Anne was a snuff taker,

0:24:470:24:49

a hundred years earlier, King James, he despised it with a passion.

0:24:490:24:55

So if you were caught taking snuff in the presence of King James, you would end up in the tower.

0:24:550:24:59

-Really?

-Yeah. Oh, he loathed it. Wherever he went, he would have messages sent forward,

0:24:590:25:04

"Do not take snuff, do not even indicate snuff in the presence of the king."

0:25:040:25:09

But in its heyday during the 18th century, snuff taking developed into an important social grace.

0:25:100:25:16

It remained popular, well into the 20th century

0:25:160:25:18

and it was said you could tell a lot about a man's social status by the way he took his snuff.

0:25:180:25:24

Open the lid.

0:25:280:25:30

Take a pinch between the finger and thumb.

0:25:300:25:33

Hold it for a moment so the warmth of the finger will bring out the bouquet of the snuff,

0:25:330:25:39

so you get the benefit of the flavour and inhale it.

0:25:390:25:42

Close the snuff box.

0:25:440:25:46

And then, if you like, just a little flourish with your coloured handkerchief.

0:25:460:25:51

I'm not a snuff box snob.

0:25:510:25:53

I know a lot of these people say it's a silver gilt,

0:25:530:25:57

it's solid gold, it's this, it's that, it's encrusted with rubies.

0:25:570:26:00

And to be honest, that actually leaves me quite cold.

0:26:000:26:03

-You like the tactile items.

-Yeah.

-Working man's snuff box.

-Absolutely.

0:26:030:26:07

I've seen a few of those. That's like the poor man's pinch.

0:26:070:26:10

Yeah. Absolutely. Now, you generally call these Scottish snuffs.

0:26:100:26:13

-I'm pleased you said that.

-I can get away with it as a pure 100% Scot, so I can get away with it.

0:26:130:26:19

-The mean pinch.

-That's exactly what they called them. Mean pinch.

0:26:190:26:22

And they were made in brass and horn and treen.

0:26:220:26:24

The idea was that you would close the gap in the centre

0:26:240:26:28

so when you take the pinch of snuff, you can't take too much. Bit of fun.

0:26:280:26:32

-Very eye-catching. I love the ram's horns.

-They're brilliant.

0:26:320:26:36

Classic Scottish ram's horn snuff moles, they were called.

0:26:360:26:41

With a lovely silver mount. That's quality all the way through?

0:26:410:26:45

Yeah. I think I've got about 30 of those altogether and they come in different shapes and sizes.

0:26:450:26:50

Somebody has attached a silver watch chain to that so that they can carry it and put it over their arm,

0:26:500:26:57

because that one doubles as a snuff box on top, but also the end screws off and you can fill it with whisky.

0:26:570:27:03

That's a good idea, isn't it?

0:27:030:27:05

A lot of these are English and continental.

0:27:050:27:07

Where else in the world were they made?

0:27:070:27:10

Well, they were made almost everywhere. The interesting thing is,

0:27:100:27:13

in China they don't have snuff boxes, they have snuff bottles, simply because a sign of status in China

0:27:130:27:20

was to have wonderful, long, decorative fingernails.

0:27:200:27:23

If you have long fingernails, you can't take snuff from a snuff box.

0:27:230:27:27

-You can't even...

-No. You have a little shovel and straight up.

0:27:270:27:32

Now you're talking about that, we're in the best location possible

0:27:320:27:36

to show this sort of thing and this is obviously ground down tobacco.

0:27:360:27:40

-Do you think we should try some?

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:400:27:44

-Didn't know you were a noseologist.

-Is that what it's known as?

0:27:440:27:47

Yeah. A snuff taker in the 18th century was known as a noseologist.

0:27:470:27:50

I don't fancy trying any of this stuff.

0:27:500:27:52

-Go on.

-No, we should try some fresh stuff when we get outside or we'll sneeze our heads off.

0:27:520:27:58

We're antique people. We should be trying the old stuff. Go on.

0:27:580:28:02

Oh, I don't rate that at all.

0:28:080:28:10

No.

0:28:100:28:12

Whatever you do, don't try that at home.

0:28:120:28:15

Back at the valuation day, Philip has sniffed out

0:28:240:28:27

something small and collectable, but it's not a snuff box.

0:28:270:28:31

-He's good, isn't he?

-Like circles.

-Yeah.

0:28:350:28:39

That's what I keep going round in. Roger, tell me about him, then.

0:28:390:28:44

Right. He belongs to a friend, who was given him when she was one.

0:28:440:28:49

-Yeah.

-And she's now 61.

0:28:490:28:51

So we can date it to about 1940s, perhaps earlier.

0:28:510:28:55

Perhaps earlier, because I think it wasn't new when she was given it.

0:28:550:28:58

-So perhaps somewhere between 1920s and '40s.

-I would think so. Yeah.

0:28:580:29:00

-Not played with much.

-No. She tends to keep things in boxes.

0:29:000:29:04

Yeah. What intrigues me is that she's kept this for 60 years.

0:29:040:29:08

Why sell it now? Why not sell it 20 years ago?

0:29:080:29:10

Nobody wants it in her family.

0:29:100:29:13

-Yeah.

-And she doesn't want it to end up in a skip.

-Quite right, too.

0:29:130:29:16

-She loves him.

-Yeah. She loves him.

0:29:160:29:19

-Yes.

-So she loves him that much that she's going to do the Solomon trick

0:29:190:29:22

-and make sure that somebody else now enjoys him.

-Exactly.

0:29:220:29:24

-He's clearly tinplate.

-Yeah.

0:29:240:29:27

And what we call a gold plush teddy.

0:29:270:29:29

And I would think that he is probably German, certainly European, but probably German.

0:29:290:29:34

-Does she have any idea what he's worth?

-She hasn't a clue.

-I think...

0:29:340:29:38

-Is he a he? We'll call him a he. Does he have a name?

-She calls him Ted.

-Ted. That's original, isn't it?

0:29:380:29:44

-I think that Ted will make £50-80 at auction.

-Lovely.

0:29:440:29:49

And I think we'll put a reserve on Ted at £45. How's that?

0:29:490:29:53

-That's magic.

-Do you think she'll be pleased?

-Very pleased.

0:29:530:29:56

-Shall we just send him on his merry way again?

-Lovely.

0:29:560:29:58

I like to see him go.

0:29:580:30:00

He seems to have a slightly concerned look on his face.

0:30:030:30:07

The thing is, he's not going anywhere, that's the problem.

0:30:070:30:10

Jackie, have you been on holiday to lots and lots of different places or did you get these somewhere else?

0:30:140:30:21

I got them from my granddad.

0:30:210:30:24

Right. Was he an avid collector of these things?

0:30:240:30:26

-Yes. I've got a lot more at home.

-Oh, my word.

0:30:260:30:30

-Are they something you like?

-Yes, but they're just in a box in the attic.

0:30:300:30:35

-Not doing very much.

-Not doing very much at all.

0:30:350:30:37

-Did your grandfather tell you anything about them?

-No.

-No?

-Don't remember anything.

0:30:370:30:42

Basically, they fall under the term "crested china" and they are souvenirs for when you go on holiday.

0:30:420:30:48

They're produced in fairly large numbers and the first manufacturer was William Henry Goss.

0:30:480:30:54

This piece here was the only bit by him, but it's a good illustrative piece.

0:30:540:30:59

He developed this very fine parian body which was perfect

0:30:590:31:03

for slipcasting into all sorts of designs and we've got the Goss mark on the bottom which is a falcon,

0:31:030:31:09

cos he was working at the Falcon studios in Stoke,

0:31:090:31:13

from about 1862 up to 1934, when he was bought out,

0:31:130:31:18

but these other pieces are contemporary with him by his competitors.

0:31:180:31:23

So we've got here, this fantastic ambulance which is by Savoy China

0:31:230:31:29

and that, I would think, with the red cross on it, would be something made during the First World War.

0:31:290:31:35

So it would be quite a patriotic thing to buy this and, possibly,

0:31:350:31:39

-some of the proceeds would have gone to our boys in the front.

-Oh, I see.

-Similar thing with this shell.

0:31:390:31:46

What's tremendous fun and probably the most sought out

0:31:460:31:50

of all of these is this little ship and we've got on it Wembley, April 1924,

0:31:500:31:57

so that was made for the Wembley exhibition.

0:31:570:32:00

And it's actually marked Wembley China,

0:32:000:32:03

with the appropriate mark underneath.

0:32:030:32:05

I have to say, Goss has done a bit of a rollercoaster as far as values have gone.

0:32:050:32:11

In the early '80s, late '80s, it was really sought after and individual pieces were making a fortune.

0:32:110:32:17

Now, it's all settled back down again.

0:32:170:32:19

-Any idea of what they might be worth as a group?

-I have none at all.

0:32:190:32:23

-Not any idea.

-No.

0:32:230:32:25

Just come down through the family.

0:32:250:32:27

And it's just something that you've inherited, isn't it?

0:32:270:32:30

-Yeah.

-If these pieces were by Goss, they would be a lot more valuable than they are.

-Yeah.

0:32:300:32:36

So I think the thing to do is put all these together in one lot,

0:32:360:32:41

cos a couple of them have got chips and cracks

0:32:410:32:44

and these really more commonplace pieces are worth £2 each.

0:32:440:32:49

I see.

0:32:490:32:51

Really, I think we'd be looking at auction between £50 and £80 for them,

0:32:510:32:56

as they are, and you never know, if one collector desperately wants a Wembley battleship,

0:32:560:33:01

they might pay a little bit more, so if you're happy, we can put these in to the auction with a £50 reserve

0:33:010:33:07

so they won't go for any less and see how they go.

0:33:070:33:11

Yeah. Yes. That's fine by me.

0:33:110:33:12

That's splendid. Thank you so much for bringing them along.

0:33:120:33:15

You're welcome. Just glad to get rid of them.

0:33:150:33:18

-Hi. Hello.

-Hello.

-What's your name?

0:33:240:33:27

-Christine.

-Can I ask you, Christine, you're clutching that purse...

0:33:270:33:30

-I am, aren't I?

-..what have you brought along for our valuers to look at today?

0:33:300:33:35

-I'm a big fan of Flog It.

-Yeah.

0:33:350:33:37

-I'm also a collector.

-Right. Of what?

-Salt and peppers.

-Oh, are you?

0:33:370:33:40

-Salt and pepper shakers. Cruets.

-Cruets. Yeah.

0:33:400:33:42

Yeah. And I bought this one recently.

0:33:420:33:45

-I'm never going to sell it. It's not for sale today.

-In auction?

0:33:450:33:48

-Yes. On eBay, actually.

-OK.

0:33:480:33:50

-I thought you might like to see this one.

-Oh, go on then.

0:33:500:33:53

Oh, yes. Oh, look at that.

0:33:530:33:55

I'm sure our experts would like to see that one, as well.

0:33:550:33:59

-It's a little gavel.

-The ends untwist.

0:33:590:34:03

And that's the salt and pepper.

0:34:030:34:05

-Oh, look at that. So you put the salt in there.

-Yeah.

0:34:050:34:07

And pepper in there.

0:34:070:34:10

-That is a cruet for an auctioneer, isn't it, if there ever was one?

-It feels nice.

-Can I have a hold?

0:34:100:34:16

You can. Go on, since it's you.

0:34:160:34:17

Oh, look at that. How much did you pay for this?

0:34:170:34:21

-A fiver.

-It was a steal.

0:34:210:34:23

-Post included.

-You're joking.

-No, I'm not.

0:34:230:34:26

Thanks for bringing it and I'm sure if you ever put it in to auction, all our experts would bid on that.

0:34:260:34:33

Janet, you've made my day bringing this little fellow in.

0:34:390:34:43

-Oh, good.

-Can you tell me where you got him from?

0:34:430:34:45

It was brought to us at the church we attend.

0:34:450:34:47

People bring us things to sell at bric-a-brac sales, coffee mornings

0:34:470:34:52

and we're never sure what we're going to find when we open the box.

0:34:520:34:56

This particular box arrived and I was sorting it out and this little fellow appeared.

0:34:560:35:01

Good Lord.

0:35:010:35:03

So it was actually given to us.

0:35:030:35:06

-That's marvellous. And it'll be sold on behalf of the church.

-Correct.

0:35:060:35:09

That's super. What a generous gift. I wonder if the giver knew how generous they were being.

0:35:090:35:14

I don't think so and considering how it was in the bottom of the box,

0:35:140:35:18

there was all sorts of jewellery and broken toys and all sorts of things.

0:35:180:35:22

And that was just amongst them.

0:35:220:35:24

Well, they could be forgiven because it's only a little silver pincushion

0:35:240:35:28

and these things shouldn't be worth a great deal of money.

0:35:280:35:32

-The animals that you get in pincushions, they started to be produced about 1895, 1900.

-Yeah.

0:35:320:35:40

And Boots, would you believe it, produced them?

0:35:400:35:43

-Really.

-Year on year.

0:35:430:35:45

And they would introduce a different animal or two different animals every year to the standard line.

0:35:450:35:50

Some are very common.

0:35:500:35:52

You see chicks.

0:35:520:35:54

You see pigs in different poses.

0:35:540:35:56

You see elephants.

0:35:560:35:58

You occasionally see hedgehogs and they're the more standard patterns that were produced year on year.

0:35:580:36:03

There are rarer ones.

0:36:030:36:05

The rarest, I think, is the lizard, the spider, the lion.

0:36:050:36:09

And they're very sought after, but not far behind them is the camel.

0:36:090:36:13

Now, of course, you get two varieties of camel.

0:36:130:36:16

You get a standing camel and a seated camel and, of the two, the seated camel is rarer.

0:36:160:36:22

-Really.

-So that's a lovely feature.

0:36:220:36:23

Now, it should be by one of the big makers, Levi & Salaman of Birmingham.

0:36:230:36:29

They produced a multitude of these small pincushions and other small work.

0:36:290:36:33

We've got the Birmingham town mark and the date letter for 1903.

0:36:330:36:38

So, that's absolutely right.

0:36:380:36:40

The only thing to hold against it is the cushion itself.

0:36:400:36:46

-Right.

-Cos that is not original.

0:36:460:36:48

But they do perish when they've been used. Pins in and out.

0:36:480:36:52

So that's understandable. The rest of it's in super condition.

0:36:520:36:55

There are no splits or little solder repairs.

0:36:550:36:58

-Often with these pincushions, the necks go.

-I see.

0:36:580:37:01

Cos they're given to overzealous children at the time

0:37:010:37:04

and of course they play with them and this sort of thing happens,

0:37:040:37:09

but that's quite a rare one and it will be sought after at auctions.

0:37:090:37:12

So, it's being sold for the church funds. Let's see how well we can do.

0:37:120:37:17

I think we should put that in to auction for no less than £250-350.

0:37:170:37:24

We should have a fixed reserve of 250

0:37:240:37:27

and, as I say, if two pincushion collectors haven't got the seated camel,

0:37:270:37:33

it could make much more than that, so we'll have to keep our fingers crossed.

0:37:330:37:37

-If you're happy, we'll do that.

-I certainly am happy.

-Splendid.

0:37:370:37:41

Pop it in to the auction and hope it does really well.

0:37:410:37:43

-Thank you so much.

-That's wonderful. I'm glad I've made your day. You've made my day.

0:37:430:37:48

Anybody's silver makes my day, but a pincushion doubly so.

0:37:480:37:52

Another selection of items fit for the saleroom.

0:37:520:37:56

Someone's got to fall in love with this little chap. He's a real bit of fun.

0:37:560:38:00

At £50-80, this selection of crested china is a collector's dream.

0:38:000:38:05

Finally, it's said all good things come in small packages

0:38:050:38:08

and that's certainly true of Janet's camel pincushion.

0:38:080:38:11

What a gorgeous little thing.

0:38:110:38:13

Right, we're scooting along nicely, which brings us to Ted the teddy bear on the scooter.

0:38:150:38:21

-It belongs to Roger and hopefully for not much longer.

-Hopefully not.

0:38:210:38:25

Not with a sort of a £60 valuation.

0:38:250:38:27

Well, I think we put 60 to 80 on it, with a reserve of 45.

0:38:270:38:31

-That's going to sell, easily.

-Should do.

0:38:310:38:33

It's not going to be Roger's for much longer, that's for sure.

0:38:330:38:35

It still works. That's the beauty of it and I love it.

0:38:350:38:38

-Good tinplate toy.

-It's lovely. Yes.

-Why are you selling this now?

0:38:380:38:42

It actually belongs to a lady I know, who's decluttering.

0:38:420:38:45

She's getting rid of stuff, so she wants to get rid of it

0:38:450:38:49

-rather than it be thrown away at some point in the future.

-Yes.

0:38:490:38:53

-Exactly. Yes.

-He wants to be loved.

0:38:530:38:55

-Yeah, and that's what happens, isn't it?

-I think Ted will find a new home today.

-And be loved.

-And be loved.

0:38:550:39:01

-She would like that, I know, very much.

-What's her name?

0:39:010:39:03

-Angela. Angela Holland.

-Angela. Well, best of luck. Fingers crossed.

0:39:030:39:07

Little Ted's going under the hammer right now.

0:39:070:39:09

385. Mid-20th century clockwork scooter teddy.

0:39:090:39:14

Must start the bidding here at £35.

0:39:140:39:18

38. 40. 2. Looking for 45. 48.

0:39:180:39:23

50. 5. 60. 5. 70. 5.

0:39:230:39:27

80. 5. 90. 85 seated. Anybody else want to join in?

0:39:270:39:34

All done at 85.

0:39:340:39:36

Hammer's dropping at £85.

0:39:360:39:38

-Yes. £85.

-Ted's pedalled off.

0:39:400:39:45

-Little Ted did the business, didn't he?

-He did the business.

0:39:450:39:48

Oh, that's a great result, isn't it?

0:39:480:39:51

-It's magic. It's superb.

-He was quality, though.

-He was.

0:39:510:39:54

-He was quality.

-He was also fun.

0:39:540:39:56

He was fun, yeah. Puts a smile on your face.

0:39:560:39:59

Hope we put a smile on your face, as well, watching.

0:39:590:40:01

There's lots more in the attic and this is just the start for Jackie.

0:40:060:40:10

Those Goss collections. How many more are in that attic?

0:40:100:40:14

About 50 pieces, probably. Yeah.

0:40:140:40:17

So, if we get a good result today, you can get the rest out.

0:40:170:40:20

-Yeah. Yeah.

-What are they doing up in the attic?

0:40:200:40:24

-They've been sat in a box since they were handed down from my granddad.

-You haven't put them on display?

0:40:240:40:28

-No. Not at all.

-Don't really like them?

0:40:280:40:30

I like them, but I haven't got room for them and I think somebody else who collects it should benefit.

0:40:300:40:36

There's a couple of nice ones. The little ship and the lorry. They peaked, didn't they?

0:40:360:40:40

They had a high in the sort of late '80s and they've petered out.

0:40:400:40:44

Hopefully, with such interesting models, some Goss collector would leap out and say...

0:40:440:40:49

"I haven't got the leopards, I haven't got the car, I've got to have that one."

0:40:490:40:52

A huge amount of crested china.

0:40:520:40:55

Goss and other items included.

0:40:550:40:58

The bidding has started at £65.

0:40:580:41:00

-That's good. We've sold them.

-70 I'm looking for in the room.

0:41:000:41:04

70. 5. 80. I'm out.

0:41:040:41:08

-Anybody else for 85?

-Come on. Come on.

-It's a standing bid.

0:41:080:41:12

All done at 80? All done at 80?

0:41:120:41:15

He's going to put the hammer down.

0:41:150:41:18

-We'll settle for that. Top end. £80.

-Pleased with that.

-Happy?

-Yes.

0:41:180:41:23

We could be in for a good surprise.

0:41:280:41:30

-It's great to see you and you look fantastic.

-Thank you.

0:41:300:41:33

-Michael.

-Yes.

-You love this.

0:41:330:41:35

I love it. A lot of pincushion collectors love it.

0:41:350:41:39

A little silver camel. 250 to 350.

0:41:390:41:42

The auctioneer rated this. I had a chat to him and we both thought,

0:41:420:41:45

"So unusual, you see lots of pigs, lots of hedgehogs, all sorts of animals..."

0:41:450:41:50

You see a lot of camels, but you don't see a kneeling camel. That's the key thing.

0:41:500:41:55

-All the money's going towards the church restoration, isn't it?

-That's correct.

-Fingers crossed.

0:41:550:42:00

A good lot, this one.

0:42:000:42:02

Other people like it.

0:42:020:42:05

The commission's forcing me to start this lot off at £420.

0:42:050:42:10

-Oh.

-Bang. Straight in.

0:42:100:42:13

430 I'm looking for elsewhere.

0:42:130:42:15

430 is it? 430 is it?

0:42:150:42:18

-With me at 420.

-Oh, come on. Come on.

-Get your bids in quick.

0:42:180:42:21

Bid now or lose him.

0:42:210:42:24

-Not bad at all.

-I can't believe it.

-The top end of the estimate.

0:42:250:42:28

Fantastic. £420.

0:42:280:42:30

-I'm so pleased for you and it's going to a good cause, as well.

-Yes.

0:42:300:42:33

It is. Yeah. I couldn't believe when you said 250 to 350, but 420 is fabulous. I'm thrilled to bits.

0:42:330:42:41

-Oh, and namecheck the church again.

-Hillsborough Tabernacle.

0:42:410:42:45

It's obviously in Hillsborough.

0:42:450:42:47

Hillsborough Tabernacle Congregational Church

0:42:470:42:49

and we've got a big restoration programme

0:42:490:42:52

and one of the things we want is a lift to meet the disability act.

0:42:520:42:56

-Right, OK.

-So that's, you know...

-Money's going towards that.

-Yeah.

0:42:560:42:59

-So it's really for a good cause.

-Thank you so much for coming in.

0:42:590:43:02

We've had a great time here in Sheffield, haven't we?

0:43:020:43:05

-We have.

-I hope you've enjoyed watching the show. Join us again for more Flog Its coming up soon.

0:43:050:43:10

Experts Michael Baggott and Philip Serrell value antiques in Barnsley while presenter Paul Martin visits a snuff mill to find out about expert James Lewis's snuff box collection.