Northampton Flog It!


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Northampton

Presenter Paul Martin and experts Mark Stacey and James Lewis visit Northampton. Paul heads out to hear a fascinating tale from nearby Lamport Hall.


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Edward William Godwin was a Victorian dandy, and at the age of 27, he was let loose on this.

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Today, we're going gothic, at the Guildhall in Northampton.

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Welcome to Flog It!

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Not one to hide his light under a bushel,

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Edward unleashed his young talents on the magnificent Guildhall.

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The Victorian facade is inspired by medieval architecture,

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and it is absolutely breathtaking!

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Just look at the wonderful spiralling turrets,

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the tiny little statues, the gothic arched windows.

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It really is a wonderful achievement for such a young man.

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Godwin was a flamboyant character,

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who mixed in rather colourful circles.

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Writer and wit Oscar Wilde, and James Whistler, the painter,

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were amongst his friends,

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and he caused a real scandal when he had an affair with

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the famous actress Ellen Terry, fathering two illegitimate children.

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But today, we're here to value antiques with our very own Whistler and Wilde,

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experts Mark Stacey and James Lewis.

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-I'm glad I'm Wilde!

-I bet you are!

-Cos some of us are in the gutter but we're looking at the stars!

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Isn't he... What a poet!

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-Genius!

-Genius!

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Everyone is pleased to get out of the rain and into the shelter of Godwin's splendid hall.

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James is first at the table, so let's see what he's found.

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Glenys, there are a few things over the last few years

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that have been a great investment.

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One has been postcards, another's been coins,

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and militaria, in general, has been a good investment.

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So you've got two linked to one here,

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because we've got militaria and we've got postcards.

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These are wonderful. They're known as silks, and these were

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sent back by the troops in the First World War to their loved ones and parents at home.

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How did you come to have them?

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They were my grandmother's. She collected them for years, I gather.

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Everybody that knew her collected them, sent them back, posted them,

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and when she died, we found the collection in an old shoe box.

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Right. Well, they're interesting. We've got varying designs -

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floral ones, ones with little flags on, and some more unusual ones.

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We've got the Machine Gun Corps there.

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And that's a nice one - 1918.

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Of course, 1918 was a happy New Year

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because it was the year the war ended. What else have we got in here?

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We've got the military theme continuing here.

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Logically enough, being in Northampton...

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-The Northamptonshire Regiment.

-Absolutely.

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Ah. The town hall, Northampton.

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Yeah. Where we are now.

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From what we've already said, they're family cards.

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How did you come to have them?

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It was just in the house, tucked away in an old shoe box.

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Opened it up, and there they were.

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I think shoe boxes were made to carry postcards.

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I think you'll be amazed about how many people have shoe boxes

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full of postcards at home!

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And the fun was sorting through them, looking at them,

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reading the messages on the back.

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-Working out who was who.

-Yeah, trying to!

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And you can actually uncover secret love affairs as well

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with all these postcards!

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Oh, so that was what was going on with Granny!

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It's amazing when you think you've seen elderly people

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and you always think of them as Granny,

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but when you see love poems and things that were being written

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-80 years ago, it's quite emotive and it brings things home to you.

-Yeah.

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OK. You've obviously brought them here for a reason.

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We've got the postcards, and little lace hankies as well.

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They all link in. Silk hankies. We've got this, too.

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It's inscribed, "The Territorial Force Association.

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"County of Northampton,"

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again, which is good.

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Local history. "The Great War". That's what they called it.

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And, of course, that would have been given

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along with maybe a commemorative medal or something like that.

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So not a lot of value there, but as a package,

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I think we've got somewhere between £200 and £300 worth there.

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-Lovely.

-All right?

-Yeah, smashing.

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Are you selling them for a reason?

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Because if they've been in the family a while,

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-there's going to be a reason for selling.

-I am.

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Go on then, tell me.

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My niece emigrated to Australia 20-odd years ago.

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She has always said, "I want you to come and see me."

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-Yeah.

-This year she came over and she said, "You've not kept your promise yet, when are you coming?"

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So my eldest daughter then said, "Mum, I'll pay your air fare, you get your spending money."

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-So this is what it's for.

-Have a wonderful time.

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-I will.

-Fingers crossed we'll have a wonderful time at the auction first.

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-Otherwise you'll not be having a wonderful time!

-I know!

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Trudy, I'm armed with my art index guide.

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So tell me about your watercolour.

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It belonged to my great great uncle.

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-It was my great grandfather's brother, so I think that's right.

-OK.

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It was always hanging up in his house, and when he died, it was just one of the things that came to me.

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-A family heirloom?

-Yeah.

-A sunny cornfield.

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It is absolutely beautiful.

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My great grandad, he worked in the farm,

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and my mum said, this is what Great Grandad would have done.

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-So it reminds me of him as well.

-And have you enjoyed looking at it?

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I have, yes. Yeah.

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-It does look like a sunny picture.

-Let's take a closer look.

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Let's take it off its little easel...and have a look.

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That's an accomplished hand. Look at the figures, and the women there,

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helping bundle up.

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These chaps are having a picnic and rest halfway through the day.

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Sussex, more than likely, with a red tile roof.

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Oh, it's beautiful. It's a proper harvest scene, isn't it?

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And it's signed here, look.

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"Henry J Kinnard".

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And if you look up here, in this book,

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of relative works that he would have sold before, if they'd gone through auction, it would all be in here.

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I've taken the liberty of finding it, and there it is, look,

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It's Henry J Kinnard. Flourishing between 1880 and 1908.

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British born, and looking at his folio of works

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that have sold through auction, they're all watercolour on paper,

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-and they're all painted around the Sussex area.

-Oh.

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So that's quite nice,

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because that's what we've got, a Sussex cornfield.

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And that sold in auction for £800.

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-Blimey! I'm surprised!

-Has that surprised you?

-It has, yeah.

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-Yes.

-He's a sought-after artist.

-Really?

-Yeah. He really is.

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There's a little bit of foxing.

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-Yeah, yeah.

-That's going to hold it back a bit.

-Yeah.

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Needs a little bit of conservation,

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but it just needs that foxing to be stopped dead in its tracks.

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I'm surprised you want to sell this, Trudy.

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It's on the wall, you're enjoying it, why not carry on for a few more years?

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Well...maybe I will!

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THEY LAUGH

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No, you can't, this is Flog It! You've come here to flog it!

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-No, seriously, I'm not going to twist your arm.

-I know. No.

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I just think... I do like it.

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Erm...

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But it's not my favourite picture.

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And the money would come in useful?

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-Yes, the money would come in handy.

-It would be nice to get £400 or £500 for this.

-It would.

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It would, yeah.

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-Would you like to put it in to auction?

-Yes, OK.

-Are you sure?

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-I'm sure.

-Let's put it into auction, with a value of £300 to £500.

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-OK. I definitely want a reserve on it, though.

-Of 300?

-300, yeah.

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I think 300's fine.

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All right, then. Yeah, OK, let's see what happens on the day.

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Thank you for bringing it in. It's charming.

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Sandra, imagine you're in late 19th-century Paris

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in one of those wonderful big townhouses that you would find,

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and you walk into your living room, this is the sort of thing you'd find on the fireplace.

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These are French, these are 1870, and I think they're fantastic.

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Really good quality.

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-Did you find them in France?

-I did not find them in France.

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I found them in Northampton at an antiques and craft fair,

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and two things attracted me - the design on them, which I thought was lovely,

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and I'm curious about them, I've never seen anything like this.

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There was a great fashion in the late 19th century for opalescent glass, glass that's slightly opaque,

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slightly different colour, and it came in browns, beigey colour like this, blues, greens, pinks -

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every colour you could imagine, and a lot of these pieces

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were made plain and they were then farmed out to cottage industries,

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where people would paint them and then sell them on.

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Whereas these are a far more classy type of vase.

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These are factory-produced,

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decorate by a professional artist, and almost certainly French.

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And the shape is wonderful.

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They're hand-gilded, great scrolling feet on there.

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And the aesthetic movement was inspired by the Japanese,

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and, of course, the Japanese in the 19th century -

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we didn't have trade links with Japan, and Commodore Perry, an American commodore,

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went over to Edo, or Tokyo,

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and signed what we now call the Treaty of Edo.

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That allowed trade links to start again between the West and Japan.

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The first time a lot of people, mainly in the big cities,

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saw anything to do with Japan, were the big exhibitions.

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Imagine you go into this great big hall and you see Japanese stuff for the first time.

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Absolutely fascinating, and that's what this is.

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Were these sold as a pair or were they bought separately?

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Vases generally were sold as a pair, just like candlesticks.

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Occasionally you would get a very large individual piece

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but when they were like this they were sold as a pair and worth more as a pair as well.

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-Right.

-Obviously you love them, you love the colour. It matches your jumper.

-Thank you.

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So why sell them?

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I'm selling them because my central heating's broke down.

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-Oh, no!

-I want to replace it, so I need some money.

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And I can't display them anywhere. I'd rather someone enjoyed them.

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We need to raise a bit of money for a full central heating system. I don't think we'll get there.

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I'm nearly there.

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-Just need a top-up?

-Yes.

-OK.

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I reckon they are going to make £70 to £100.

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Is that top-up going to be enough? Not quite, probably.

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Well, yeah.

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Lovely. Let's take them along.

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-Let them go under the hammer and see how we do.

-All right. Thank you very much.

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-Hello, Sandra.

-Hello.

-Hello, June.

-Hello.

-Very nice to see you.

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You've brought an interesting autograph album along today

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with lots of stars of screen and theatre in there.

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But one in particular caught our attention and I'm going to show that now.

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The wonderful Stan Laurel, from Laurel and Hardy.

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-Yes.

-Fantastic. How did you happen to get it?

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It's my gran's autograph book which my mother gave me a few years ago.

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She used to work in a restaurant in London.

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-Really?

-That's how she's got all those autographs.

-Wonderful.

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We've also got in here some wonderful photographs.

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-Gracie Fields, of course.

-Yes.

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And here we've got two unique photographs of Stan tucking into a nice plate of roast dinner.

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And tell me, June, did your mother cook this food?

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My mother would have cooked that food and that is in the restaurant

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-that she was the chef at in Piccadilly in London.

-Fantastic.

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That was when? Some time ago.

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-Just after the war.

-He looks as though he's thoroughly enjoying it.

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Your mum must have had a fascinating time in that restaurant.

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I think so. She had some very interesting customers

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and I did go to the restaurant several times.

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I used to go and sit in the kitchen and watch her cook.

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She obviously specialised in good, old-fashioned British lunches.

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Yes, she was a very good cook. A lady chef.

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These are really unique and for a collector, of course,

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of Laurel and Hardy memorabilia, to be able to get a photograph

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which nobody else has seen, I guess, before,

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-would be quite an important acquisition to their collection of memorabilia.

-Yes.

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We have more modern TV personalities.

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We all remember the British actors of the '70s and '80s.

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A very young Jim Davidson there, and John Craven, of course, my favourite on Newsround.

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Then of course more film stars here.

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Wonderful. It goes right up to the present day.

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We've got Paul Martin.

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-And I've got his autograph.

-Yes, but this is the rarer one, it's unsigned!

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Now we've got to think of a value on these things.

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I think we're probably looking at something like £100 to £150.

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We'll sell them together because they belong together, really.

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Maybe putting a reserve of 80 so we don't sell them for nothing.

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But if two or three collectors are warned through the internet that things like that these are coming up,

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-I suspect there will be quite a lot of interest.

-Mm.

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-Having said that, it will probably buy you lunch for two today, won't it?

-Yeah.

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Not as good as your mum's, I bet.

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Wonderful. I look forward to seeing you at the auction.

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I hope this isn't another fine mess you've got us into.

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MUSIC: LAUREL AND HARDY THEME

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James was excited by Glenys' wonderful collection

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of wartime silks and postcards, so we'll meet again at the auction.

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I hope Trudi reaps the reward of a family heirloom,

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the delicate watercolour of a harvest scene by Henry J Kinnard.

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Sandra needs to fix her central heating,

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so we need to catch the bidders' eye with these Japanese fish vases.

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And another album, but this time full of autographs and photos of the stars.

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Let's hope the room isn't silent when these are in the spotlight.

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We've just crossed over the border into Leicestershire for today's sale

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in the heart of Market Harborough where we find Gilding's Ltd.

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On the rostrum today's auctioneer is Mark Gilding.

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Let's go inside and find him.

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45, you're out. 48, 50.

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Glenys, let's see if we can get you to Australia, shall we?

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A lot riding on this, with all those silk cards.

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There's a lot of them and if you break it down to £2 or £3 a card, that's where our valuation is.

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I totally agree with you, James. £200 to £300.

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Let's hope we're in for more of a surprise.

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-Let's hope so.

-Let's do it.

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170, a collection of World War I silk postcards, a handkerchief,

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and a Northampton Territorial Force certificate, framed. Lot 170.

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A low start here, £110 I'm bid.

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At 110 for these. 110, 120, 130?

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140, 150. 160, 170.

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180, 190. £200 bid.

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-Hooray!

-Right, we're in.

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220. 230.

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240. 250.

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-Come on.

-Yes!

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270.

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-290, £300.

-We're going to do it.

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320 do I see? 320 back in.

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330. 330. At 330 he's out.

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At 330. Selling at £330.

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We're going to take that. That's sold at £330.

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-Brilliant, thank you so much.

-That'll get you over there.

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I've got the ticket, I just need my spending money.

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A few dollars there.

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-A few dollars indeed.

-Beauty, mate!

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Sandra and June, it's good to see you.

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Grandma's autograph book is just about to go under the hammer.

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Made all the rarer and hopefully the value's gone up with that one signature of you know who.

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You never know!

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More importantly, it's the Stan Laurel pieces.

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-Yes.

-That lovely photograph of him tucking into the traditional Sunday lunch

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-that of course your mother cooked for him.

-Let's flog it, shall we?

-Yes.

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An autograph book containing various signatures including Stan Laurel

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and a photograph album, some signed.

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Commission bids start me here at £100.

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Oh, straight in at 100.

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100 I'm bid. All out at £100? 100. I'll take 10 if you like.

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Commissions in at £100. It will be sold, make no mistake.

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£100 on commission.

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Selling away at £100.

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That was quick, wasn't it? Blink and you miss it.

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But it has gone.

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-That's the main thing.

-Yes.

-What are you doing with the money?

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I'm going to buy a set of nice saucepans.

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Are you? Something for the kitchen!

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-Yes.

-Good for you. I've never heard that before.

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It's kind of in the theme

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because you sold the kitchen photographs,

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and this is something to replace them. Very good.

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We've got the Kinnard. It's a lovely watercolour. £300 to £500.

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I had a chat with the auctioneer earlier and he agreed with the valuation, so we're spot on.

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At least we've got a fixed reserve - if it doesn't sell it's going home.

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-I'm happy to take it home.

-Are you having second thoughts?

-No, I'm happy either way.

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I won't be disappointed.

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We're going to find out what it's worth right now.

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335. A Henry John Kinnard. A sunny cornfield watercolour.

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Signed and titled. Nice watercolour, this.

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-Come on.

-Bids start with me at £210.

0:18:460:18:51

210 I'm bid. 220, 230, 240, 250, 270,

0:18:510:18:56

-280, 290.

-We're going to sell it now.

0:18:560:19:00

£300.

0:19:000:19:02

In the room at £300. It will be sold.

0:19:020:19:05

At £300.

0:19:050:19:08

Well, it went. We said three to five, it was within estimate.

0:19:080:19:13

-That's good.

-Isn't it? Where's the £300 going?

0:19:130:19:16

I've got some sash windows that badly need repairing so it might go towards that.

0:19:160:19:20

Rattling away and rotting away.

0:19:200:19:22

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:19:220:19:23

-Thank you for bringing such a quality piece in as well.

-Thanks.

0:19:230:19:28

Right, Sandra, two glass vases just about to go under the hammer.

0:19:360:19:40

£70 to £100 we've got the valuation on.

0:19:400:19:42

I know you've got a very keen eye and you love car booting and all the fairs.

0:19:420:19:46

Yes, and I love auctions.

0:19:460:19:49

Has anything caught your eye here today?

0:19:490:19:51

-Yes.

-Come on, whisper in my ear!

0:19:510:19:54

Behind you, that picture.

0:19:540:19:56

-Right. Are you going to have a bid?

-No.

0:19:560:20:00

-Why not?

-I've got to take it home.

0:20:000:20:02

I have to walk and go by bus.

0:20:020:20:04

-Do you?

-Yes. I just like looking at stuff at the moment.

0:20:040:20:07

I think you could be in for a nice surprise with these vases.

0:20:070:20:11

I'll keep my fingers crossed.

0:20:110:20:12

65 is a pair of opaque glass vases in tapering form

0:20:120:20:15

on gilt scrolled feet.

0:20:150:20:17

Enamel decoration of carp. I start with commission bids here.

0:20:170:20:20

£70 I'm bid.

0:20:200:20:21

Straight in at 70.

0:20:210:20:23

Five, 80. Five, 90.

0:20:230:20:25

Five, 100. 110, 120.

0:20:250:20:27

-Are these my vases?

-Yes, listen!

0:20:270:20:30

160, 170, 180, 190, 200.

0:20:300:20:35

£200 here, then, at £200.

0:20:350:20:37

210 I'm looking for. Look around.

0:20:370:20:39

£200. Selling away at £200.

0:20:390:20:42

Yes. That's a good sound, isn't it?

0:20:420:20:46

That hammer going down. £200.

0:20:460:20:49

-I'll have to go back to Norfolk.

-I think you will, do you know that?

0:20:490:20:52

You have got a cracking good eye.

0:20:520:20:54

I'm surprised at that. It's really good.

0:20:540:20:57

They're quality, aren't they? And the condition was bang on.

0:20:570:21:01

I'm going back to Norfolk.

0:21:010:21:03

It's all up there in Norfolk.

0:21:030:21:05

Nestling next to a village church in the rolling countryside of Northamptonshire

0:21:150:21:20

we find Lamport Hall, a modest stately home

0:21:200:21:23

containing many treasures, all with their stories to tell.

0:21:230:21:28

It was the home of the Isham family for over 400 years

0:21:310:21:34

and we pick up the tale with Sir Justinian, the second baronet.

0:21:340:21:38

A highly educated and cultured gentleman.

0:21:380:21:41

Also a very happy chap back in 1656,

0:21:410:21:43

because at the age of 47 he fathered his first son, christened Thomas.

0:21:430:21:49

Little did he know that Thomas was to turn into a tearaway, with a taste for the finer things in life.

0:21:510:21:57

George Drye is here to tell us more about the extravagant life of the third baronet of Lamport.

0:21:570:22:03

Am I right in thinking Thomas was the apple of his father's eye?

0:22:060:22:10

Traditionally that's the theory, but more researching Thomas,

0:22:100:22:15

we wonder whether actually his dad knew that

0:22:150:22:17

he had a naughty boy on his hands and wanted to keep him within sight.

0:22:170:22:21

But that said, he certainly took the trouble to make sure Thomas was educated thoroughly.

0:22:210:22:28

He wasn't going to be the son of the squire who just knew how to hunt and fish, although he did.

0:22:280:22:34

And indeed when Thomas was a young boy, he bribed him by paying him

0:22:340:22:39

six shillings a year to keep his diary in Latin.

0:22:390:22:45

-Right, OK.

-He trained him to be quite a sophisticated young man.

0:22:450:22:49

So he's obviously a clever chap. He got into university.

0:22:490:22:52

What happened then? When did he inherit all this money?

0:22:520:22:56

He inherited it surprisingly early in his university career.

0:22:560:23:00

His dad took him down to Oxford, dropped him off at Christ College, Oxford,

0:23:000:23:04

went off to a local inn and promptly died.

0:23:040:23:07

That's really sad.

0:23:070:23:09

He was the baronet on his first day at Oxford, extremely wealthy.

0:23:090:23:13

His first job was to take his dad's coffin and put it back here.

0:23:130:23:17

Worth remembering that Thomas at 18 was in charge of all the family finance,

0:23:170:23:22

that's how it worked in those days.

0:23:220:23:24

Gosh. Did he ever go back to Oxford?

0:23:240:23:27

Yes, he went back. He didn't have a glittering career.

0:23:270:23:30

He didn't like Oxford very much. They made him work.

0:23:300:23:34

I'm not sure that was much to Thomas' liking.

0:23:340:23:37

So, like a lot of students, Thomas decided to go on a 17th-century gap year,

0:23:400:23:45

which was then called the Grand Tour,

0:23:450:23:47

taking in everywhere from Paris to Rome.

0:23:470:23:49

The 20-year-old, armed with his father's fortune,

0:23:490:23:53

quickly gained a reputation as one of the first international playboys.

0:23:530:23:59

If he was sort of a wild character here, back in England,

0:24:060:24:09

what must he have been like in Paris and Florence and places like that?

0:24:090:24:14

-I know.

-Uncontrollable.

0:24:140:24:16

Well, that's a question of opinion.

0:24:160:24:19

He certainly had a mistress out there and she's over there, actually, on the painting you see.

0:24:190:24:25

Thomas is holding a miniature and that's Gabriella, Gabriella Boncompagni.

0:24:250:24:30

He burned all the candles at every end.

0:24:300:24:33

You know, any kid on a gap year now with have lots of money to spend would just go wild.

0:24:330:24:39

He got through 1.3 million on his gap year.

0:24:390:24:42

Oh, gosh!

0:24:420:24:43

Not cheap.

0:24:430:24:45

That's an awful lot of money.

0:24:450:24:48

How many of us if we spent that money would still find that what we bought was being discussed 350 years later?

0:24:480:24:54

It's a lot of money. I'd love to go and see, George, what he spent it on. Can we go?

0:24:540:24:58

I'd love to show you.

0:24:580:25:00

These are some of Thomas' paintings.

0:25:100:25:13

Some Salvatore Rosas.

0:25:140:25:17

And these are Thomas' on the stairs as well,

0:25:170:25:21

-all the way up the stairs as you can see, all brought back by Thomas.

-He did have a good eye, didn't he?

0:25:210:25:26

Do you think? Your eye is probably better than mine for these things, in fact.

0:25:260:25:31

Young Thomas was having a whale of a time and his trip turned into a three-year shopping spree,

0:25:330:25:38

in spite of a constant flow of letters from Lamport pleading for his return home.

0:25:380:25:43

Instead of Thomas coming home, box after box full of artworks arrived.

0:25:430:25:48

Oh, gosh, George, look at these. You didn't tell me about these.

0:25:510:25:54

-No, I didn't.

-Fine art meets furniture.

0:25:540:25:57

My word, that's all painted on glass panel, isn't it?

0:25:570:26:00

Yes, in reverse. They're an acquired taste to the English eye.

0:26:000:26:03

Yes, they are. That's typically continental.

0:26:030:26:06

What must the family have thought when this arrived? They must have thought he'd gone bonkers.

0:26:060:26:12

Don't forget, of course, his poor brothers and sisters were here.

0:26:120:26:16

His sister depended upon him for her dowry, which he wasn't providing for her,

0:26:160:26:20

so she wasn't going to get married in a hurry. Money was going out.

0:26:200:26:23

He was getting into debt and these things were coming to the hall, so it must have been fairly tense!

0:26:230:26:28

I'd have thought so. What happened? What happened once he got back?

0:26:280:26:32

Well, he finally agreed to come back, in part because his favourite sister had died

0:26:320:26:39

and his little brother was losing his cool about the whole thing.

0:26:390:26:44

Thomas finally pitched up, in debt,

0:26:440:26:48

in desperate need of money,

0:26:480:26:51

so the family agreed that he had to be married to a rich heiress.

0:26:510:26:56

But unfortunately, his reputation by that stage had got ahead of him

0:26:560:27:01

and there were two or three girls who took one look,

0:27:010:27:05

-or, probably the parents, said not on your life.

-Party animal!

0:27:050:27:09

Yeah. But in the end they found a very wealthy girl, who was apparently quite pretty, too.

0:27:090:27:13

She was the daughter of a Dutch merchant in London

0:27:130:27:17

and obviously she'd get the title and her children would become the Baronet

0:27:170:27:23

and her dad would settle all of Thomas' debts

0:27:230:27:26

and then supply also an extensive dowry on top of that.

0:27:260:27:30

All was set up, all agreed,

0:27:300:27:32

and then sadly, on the eve of his wedding day, Thomas died.

0:27:320:27:36

Oh!

0:27:360:27:39

-What age was he?

-24.

0:27:390:27:41

-What did he die of?

-Well, they all died of smallpox.

0:27:410:27:43

It was a sort of cancer of the 17th century, really.

0:27:430:27:46

When it wasn't plague in the southern parts of Europe, smallpox killed them.

0:27:460:27:51

What happened to the estate?

0:27:510:27:53

Well, the estate was handed on, went to his younger brother.

0:27:530:27:57

But obviously he had no financial help because the marriage didn't take place.

0:27:570:28:01

No. The younger brother had to do the best he could.

0:28:010:28:04

-Yet nothing's really mentioned about him.

-No. We have a portrait of him.

0:28:040:28:08

He's tucked in the corner of the drawing room where nobody ever sees him.

0:28:080:28:13

20-odd years ago when I came here, this house was pretty derelict

0:28:130:28:16

and we spent all that time putting it back together again, getting the contents restored.

0:28:160:28:21

My heart goes out to Justinian, the younger brother, for stitching it all back together again,

0:28:210:28:26

-but everybody really fancies Thomas.

-George, thank you so much for showing me around.

0:28:260:28:30

It's well worth a visit, coming here. There's so much to see.

0:28:300:28:34

-I'm going to now take another look.

-OK.

0:28:340:28:36

Back to the valuation day, where Mark has met someone familiar.

0:28:400:28:46

-Hello, Anita.

-Hello.

-Or should I say Joan Rivers?

0:28:460:28:49

Because we've all commented on it, you do look like Joan Rivers.

0:28:490:28:54

-You're not a relation, are you?

-No, I don't tell rude jokes!

0:28:540:28:58

Oh, good, neither do I.

0:28:580:28:59

Now, moving on to something much more important,

0:28:590:29:02

this lovely little butter boat, or cream jug.

0:29:020:29:05

-Where did you get it from?

-I got it from a table top for 20p.

0:29:050:29:09

Now, tell us, what's a table top, like a jumble sale?

0:29:090:29:13

-It's a bit upmarket to a jumble sale.

-Right.

0:29:130:29:17

-This was here in Northampton?

-Yes, yes.

-For 20p?

-Yes.

0:29:170:29:22

When was that?

0:29:220:29:23

It was about a year ago.

0:29:230:29:25

-And can we have the address of the next one?

-No!

0:29:250:29:29

-You're keeping it a secret, aren't you?

-Yes!

0:29:290:29:31

Well, did you have any idea what you were buying?

0:29:310:29:34

-I thought it was very pretty.

-The shape and the flowers.

0:29:340:29:37

Yes, the shape. I'd never seen anything like it before.

0:29:370:29:41

I thought it's really pretty, so I bought it, because I like pretty things.

0:29:410:29:45

-I collect different things.

-It's a lovely object. I want to tell you about it.

0:29:450:29:49

-It's 18th century.

-Really, that old?

0:29:490:29:52

Yeah. It's over 200 years old.

0:29:520:29:55

-I'm amazed.

-It's a wonderful little thing.

0:29:550:29:57

It's a little butter boat, for melted butter or a little cream jug, something like that.

0:29:570:30:02

It's wonderfully modelled, as a leaf, with these lovely little sprays and sprigs of flowers on it

0:30:020:30:09

and this lovely body, moulded with the leaves.

0:30:090:30:12

It's got a little bit of a firing fault there, but that's absolutely fine.

0:30:120:30:17

Minute damage on it, incredible.

0:30:170:30:20

I'd love to be able to tell you the factory but I've been racking my brains

0:30:200:30:24

and I've been asking colleagues here.

0:30:240:30:26

There's so many different possibilities.

0:30:260:30:29

I don't think it's Worcester, but it could be Lowestoft, it could be any number of the Liverpool factories.

0:30:290:30:35

It could be any number of Staffordshire factories.

0:30:350:30:39

What I've done is taken some digital photographs of it,

0:30:390:30:42

and I'll have a word with a few colleagues when I get home

0:30:420:30:46

and whatever we find out we'll put it in their catalogue description, and maybe boost it up a bit.

0:30:460:30:52

Now, from 20p, how much do you think it's worth?

0:30:520:30:57

-No idea.

-£20, £50?

0:30:570:31:02

Possibly. Possibly.

0:31:020:31:04

I think you're going to be quite pleased, actually, because I think we should put it in at £200 to £300.

0:31:040:31:09

-£200 to £300?

-Yes.

0:31:090:31:12

-Really?

-200 to 300.

-I don't believe that.

0:31:120:31:15

We'll put a reserve on it.

0:31:150:31:17

-Yes.

-Maybe £150.

-Really?!

0:31:170:31:20

I don't know, if two collectors want it... It's in such lovely condition, I'd love it at home.

0:31:200:31:25

It's in such lovely condition it could really fly.

0:31:250:31:28

-It's a lovely little object.

-Thank you very much.

0:31:280:31:31

-What a very good eye you've got.

-Yes, I have, actually.

0:31:310:31:34

Chris, if there was an award for bringing the heaviest thing ever to Flog It, I think you'd have won it.

0:31:420:31:47

These are incredibly heavy, aren't they? You can hardly lift them.

0:31:470:31:51

The first thing to say is they're clearly cast in solid bronze

0:31:510:31:55

and they're plaques of Gladstone and Victoria and are they family pieces?

0:31:550:32:00

They look as if they've been somewhere dirty.

0:32:000:32:03

They were found in my grandfather's garage.

0:32:030:32:06

-Really?

-18 months ago.

0:32:060:32:08

No idea at all of family history?

0:32:080:32:11

-No.

-How long they've been there, why they were there?

-No.

0:32:110:32:14

Well, they clearly have a value.

0:32:140:32:16

I know this sounds really crude but I think the first thing we need to do is actually weigh them

0:32:160:32:21

and make sure we don't sell them at less than scrap value, but these are too good for that.

0:32:210:32:26

They really are.

0:32:260:32:28

They've survived for 120 years and I'd like to see them survive another 120.

0:32:280:32:33

They're marked on the back. I'm sure you've seen it there.

0:32:330:32:37

It says, "Cast by D Smith, 28 Clerkenwell Close, London."

0:32:370:32:44

The only thing I can suggest is that having looked on the internet and finding no D Smith at all,

0:32:440:32:52

and no trace of a caster,

0:32:520:32:54

what I believe these are are probably a commission

0:32:540:32:59

to be made as special individual objects,

0:32:590:33:02

which is why we have no trace of them.

0:33:020:33:05

-You bought them along so you obviously want to sell them.

-Yes.

0:33:050:33:08

-Any idea of value?

-None at all.

0:33:080:33:11

When it comes to market value,

0:33:110:33:14

-they aren't the easiest things to place.

-No.

0:33:140:33:19

Who would want a solid bronze plaque of Queen Victoria

0:33:190:33:24

that would actually probably cause incredible damage

0:33:240:33:27

to any piece of furniture it was put on and wouldn't be able to be hung on a wall, either?

0:33:270:33:32

-No.

-Gladstone is probably a little bit easier to sell

0:33:320:33:36

because of course there's the political history with Gladstone.

0:33:360:33:39

He was one of the most popular prime ministers of the 19th century

0:33:390:33:43

and actually was Prime Minister for four terms,

0:33:430:33:47

starting in 1868 and eventually out of office in 1894.

0:33:470:33:52

And this plaque is dated 1888 on the back there, as I'm sure you've seen.

0:33:520:33:56

I reckon we ought to put an estimate of £120 to £160 on them

0:33:560:34:02

and if they don't make that, then you might as well keep them.

0:34:020:34:06

-Yes.

-They've got to be worth that for scrap.

-That's right, yeah.

0:34:060:34:10

-Yeah? How do you feel?

-That's fine, yes.

-Brilliant.

0:34:100:34:14

-Hello, John.

-Hello there.

0:34:220:34:24

You've brought this long-case clock.

0:34:240:34:26

Can you give us a little bit of the history?

0:34:260:34:28

Well, I got it about just under 30 years ago,

0:34:280:34:31

when I was rather enthusiastic about clocks

0:34:310:34:34

-and one of my ambitions was to have a long-case clock.

-Yes.

0:34:340:34:38

I saw this in a local furniture shop and decided to buy it.

0:34:380:34:44

Can you remember what you paid for it all those years ago?

0:34:440:34:48

-Quite a lot of money, actually.

-Oh, really?

-Yes, yes, for the time.

-For the time, yes.

0:34:480:34:53

Well, obviously retail prices are retail prices, aren't they? But you've chosen a nice clock.

0:34:530:34:58

-It's a very simple clock, a typical weight-driven eight-day long-case clock.

-Yes.

0:34:580:35:04

It has the nice maker's mark up there, Richard Smith, Newport,

0:35:040:35:08

-which we settled on Newport, Isle of Wight, I think.

-That's right.

0:35:080:35:13

The circular dial with Roman numerals, the seconds dial

0:35:130:35:17

and then the little date aperture

0:35:170:35:19

and it's a standard inside, a standard weight-driven.

0:35:190:35:22

Yes, eight-day.

0:35:220:35:24

Eight-day, which is good, rather than 30-hour.

0:35:240:35:27

So over 30 years, you've obviously acquired some more long-case clocks.

0:35:270:35:31

I've got a lantern clock, which is actually a Victorian reproduction...

0:35:310:35:36

Of a 17th century one.

0:35:360:35:38

Yes, that's quite a small clock, but it fits in with what I've got.

0:35:380:35:43

We've done some changes to our house which means this clock no longer fits in anywhere.

0:35:430:35:48

-Where has it been living?

-It's been living in a bedroom.

0:35:480:35:52

-Not your bedroom?

-Not the bedroom I sleep in, no.

0:35:520:35:55

Because the ticking would keep you awake all night.

0:35:550:35:58

I had one in the hallway once and even that, in the dead of night, you could hear the ticking,

0:35:580:36:03

and of course we had to turn the bonging off because you'd be up all night with it.

0:36:030:36:08

If you look at the case itself, we've got this nice domed hood here,

0:36:080:36:12

this nice simple trunk, an outswept base with a plinth foot on it.

0:36:120:36:18

All in all, a nice country piece.

0:36:180:36:20

The case is in oak, of course.

0:36:200:36:22

Quite a nice colour to it.

0:36:220:36:25

When it comes to valuing something like this, the maker is known but isn't a major maker.

0:36:250:36:31

It's a nice case but it's not walnut,

0:36:310:36:35

it's not mahogany, it's not got any inlay in it,

0:36:350:36:39

so it's a typical country clock and the market is realistic at the moment.

0:36:390:36:44

-Yes.

-Whereas retail I suppose you'd pay upwards of £1,000, £1,200 or so,

0:36:440:36:50

at auction I think we're looking nearer £400 to £600 with a 400 reserve.

0:36:500:36:56

I would hope, mind you, it'll go towards the top estimate,

0:36:560:37:00

and if we're lucky we might get a bit more for it,

0:37:000:37:02

because it is, it's not too big, either.

0:37:020:37:05

It's got a nice proportion to it.

0:37:050:37:08

-Yes.

-Are you happy to put it in?

0:37:080:37:09

-Yes, yes, that will be fine.

-Wonderful.

0:37:090:37:12

Will it go towards another long-case clock or something different?

0:37:120:37:16

Maybe something different, a different sort of clock.

0:37:160:37:19

-Oh, right, OK. Keeping your options open?

-Yes, yes, yes.

0:37:190:37:22

Time will tell, as they say.

0:37:220:37:25

-I look forward to seeing you at the auction and let's hope it chimes up a huge success.

-Thank you very much.

0:37:250:37:30

Well, let's take another quick look at what our experts have found to take to Market Harborough.

0:37:320:37:37

Only 20p for an upmarket table-top sale.

0:37:370:37:40

Let's hope that Anita's blue and white butter boat

0:37:400:37:43

is the creme de la creme in the sale room.

0:37:430:37:45

The money is on these bronze plaques winning gold

0:37:450:37:48

and not turning out to be a dead weight.

0:37:480:37:50

And it's time for the long-case clock to face the bidders.

0:37:500:37:53

Let's hope all hands are raised before the hammer strikes.

0:37:530:37:57

Next up, John's long-case clock and I've been looking forward to this. I love my clocks.

0:38:070:38:11

This is a good eight-day clock, 18th century, country oak clock

0:38:110:38:16

and the movement's good, it's got a really nice bell to it.

0:38:160:38:19

Yes. Well, I like long-case clocks.

0:38:190:38:21

These days you switch them off because they wake you up in the middle of the night.

0:38:210:38:25

Oh, I leave them on. I leave them on.

0:38:250:38:28

You get used to it after a while, you don't notice it.

0:38:280:38:31

It's quite therapeutic, tick tock.

0:38:310:38:33

And you can wake up dead on the hour.

0:38:330:38:35

-Yes.

-8 o'clock, 7 o'clock in the morning.

0:38:350:38:38

If the clock is well balanced, it sounds beautiful.

0:38:380:38:41

There's something very traditional about a long-case clock in the home.

0:38:410:38:45

Right, well, we've got a value of £400 to £600.

0:38:450:38:48

-Yes, we have.

-I'd like to see it do the top end.

0:38:480:38:50

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

-Under the hammer.

0:38:500:38:53

430 is a longcase clock, the dial sign Richard Smith of Newport,

0:38:530:38:57

and bids start with me.

0:38:570:38:59

I have to start at £330.

0:38:590:39:02

330, at 330?

0:39:020:39:04

340, 350, 360, 370, 380, 390.

0:39:040:39:08

£400 bid, at 400.

0:39:080:39:10

-We've got 400.

-Yeah.

-£400, 420.

0:39:100:39:12

440.

0:39:120:39:14

This is better.

0:39:140:39:16

440, 460, 480,

0:39:160:39:19

500, 520,

0:39:190:39:22

540, 540 in the room, at 540,

0:39:220:39:26

560 now, 560 on the telephone.

0:39:260:39:30

-This might find its way back to the Isle of Wight.

-580.

0:39:300:39:34

£600 now, £600.

0:39:340:39:38

All out in the room, 600, selling at £600.

0:39:380:39:43

Yes! The hammer's gone down. £600.

0:39:430:39:47

Top end of the estimate.

0:39:470:39:48

-That's good.

-It's very good. Happy?

0:39:480:39:51

Yes, yes, yes.

0:39:510:39:53

Christopher, it's going to be interesting to see

0:39:580:40:01

what the bidders think of these two bronze plaques.

0:40:010:40:04

They're going under the hammer right now.

0:40:040:40:06

We had a chat to the auctioneer earlier. Let me bring James in.

0:40:060:40:09

We agreed with your valuation, it's going to do around about that

0:40:090:40:13

but what do you do with them?

0:40:130:40:14

Do you melt them down, put them in the garden as a bit of garden art?

0:40:140:40:18

It's a shame to melt them down, isn't it?

0:40:180:40:21

But I have to say there's such weight in them, it's possible.

0:40:210:40:25

People are buying copper kettles and things now and scrapping them.

0:40:250:40:28

Yeah. Will the new buyer buy them and put them back in the garage?

0:40:280:40:32

That's where they end up, in the garden shed again, isn't it?

0:40:320:40:35

So these were Grandad's.

0:40:350:40:36

-That's right, yes.

-What did your father think of them?

0:40:360:40:39

He doesn't think a great deal of them.

0:40:390:40:41

That's why he put them in the garage.

0:40:410:40:43

I don't blame you for getting them out because they do need a new home,

0:40:430:40:47

so hopefully they'll find one and they won't get melted down.

0:40:470:40:50

They're going under the hammer.

0:40:500:40:52

140 is a Victorian cast bronze portrait plaque of Gladstone,

0:40:520:40:57

marked cast by D Smith and a similar portrait plaque of Queen Victoria.

0:40:570:41:02

Bids here £55, 55 bid, 65, 75, £80 in the room,

0:41:020:41:08

at £80 at the back, at £80, 85, 90, 95, 100.

0:41:080:41:12

That's OK.

0:41:120:41:14

Your turn, 110, 110, at 110, 120, if you like it.

0:41:140:41:18

110, 110, selling at £110.

0:41:180:41:22

Yes, the hammer's gone down. £110.

0:41:220:41:25

We were thinking along the lines at the lower end, £40 per plaque,

0:41:250:41:29

we'll get them away, so 110 is a bonus.

0:41:290:41:32

Good for you! You found them, hopefully all the money's going to you and not Dad, then?

0:41:320:41:36

No, it's going to my children.

0:41:360:41:38

Oh, great!

0:41:380:41:39

How do you turn 20p into £200?

0:41:450:41:47

Well, just watch this, because Anita here has just brought along

0:41:470:41:51

that lovely little Bow cream jug, we've got £200 to £300 on it.

0:41:510:41:56

You bought it for 20p!

0:41:560:41:57

-Amazing, isn't it?

-I've never had bargains like that.

0:41:570:42:00

-Have you?

-No, I haven't. I normally spend £200 and it's worth 20p!

0:42:000:42:04

THEY LAUGH

0:42:040:42:06

I tried to be fair and double our money and offer her 40p for it but she wouldn't take it!

0:42:060:42:10

Have you had any other good finds like that?

0:42:100:42:14

-Not really.

-No.

0:42:140:42:16

No. Because I collect things.

0:42:160:42:18

-A bit of a one-off, is it?

-Yes, really, yes.

0:42:180:42:21

Let's see what we can do for you, shall we? 20p into 200, here we go.

0:42:210:42:25

185 is an 18th-century porcelain leaf moulded butter boat,

0:42:250:42:30

plain leaf handle, unmarked but possibly Bow.

0:42:300:42:33

I have to start on commission here at £120. 120, I'm bid here at 120.

0:42:330:42:38

-120, 120...

-Come on.

-120, 130, 140 now, at £140, 140 bid,

0:42:380:42:45

150, 160, 170 on the telephone, 180, new bidder.

0:42:450:42:49

-At 180, 190 now. £200.

-Yes.

-At 200.

0:42:490:42:53

-210.

-It's going on a bit!

0:42:530:42:56

220, at 220 now, at 220, 230, at 230 on the telephone.

0:42:560:42:59

Don't you love auctions?

0:42:590:43:02

The telephone wins, £230, all out in the room, selling at £230.

0:43:020:43:06

Yes, made estimate, that's good.

0:43:060:43:09

-That's excellent, really.

-£230 towards the holiday, Anita.

0:43:090:43:13

What place springs to mind?

0:43:130:43:15

-Egypt, maybe?

-Egypt.

0:43:150:43:17

I haven't decided, really.

0:43:170:43:19

That's half the fun, isn't it, looking through the brochures?

0:43:190:43:22

Well, that's it.

0:43:250:43:27

It's all over, sadly. We've come to the end of the show and the auction is just about to end.

0:43:270:43:32

We've had a fantastic day here so join me next time on Flog It! for many more surprises.

0:43:320:43:36

Until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:360:43:39

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:480:43:50

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:500:43:53