Tavistock Flog It!


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Tavistock

The team travel to sunny Tavistock where Phillip Serrell and Charlie Ross are examining heirlooms. Paul Martin visits Endsleigh Gardens.


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Today's programme is coming from the sunny south-west.

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Welcome to Flog It! from glorious Devon.

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We're at the historic Pannier Market in the heart of Tavistock today

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and all these Devonians are really keen to find out

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what all of their items are worth,

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so let's find out who's first at the tables.

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And scrutinising your family treasures today

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are Charlie Ross and Philip Sewell.

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First up is Philip,

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who has been charmed by an unusual piece of bronze.

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-Bill, how are you doing?

-Fine.

-Where have you come with our little chap? Where's he come from?

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Well, it's very hard to say.

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It belongs to my... or belonged to my mother and father.

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Yes.

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And I've certainly known it for 60 odd years.

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Don't like it?

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I think it's...unusual.

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I didn't ask that. I said, do you like it?

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Well, yes, he's fun.

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What prompted you to consider selling it?

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Because I've never seen anything quite like it before.

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Well, it's in the style of a man called Bergman.

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It's what we call a cold painted bronze

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and I think it sort of dates from the turn of the last century,

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and he did a lot of these subjects,

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Arabic subjects, Eastern subjects, men with carpets, You see quite a lot of these.

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If you can imagine an oil painting, the hardest thing to paint are hands and feet.

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I imagine that must transcend into modelling,

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cos if you look here, I think his hands are a bit out of proportion to the rest of his body.

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If you turn it over on the back, we can't see any mark for Bergman,

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but I think it's definitely in his style.

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You know, it's got his stamp to it.

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The other interesting thing is you sell these prayer mats at auction

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and this is an example of exactly what a prayer mat does and it's exactly what it looks like.

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In terms of value they're quite collectable.

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There's a fair demand at the moment for these sort of Eastern topics and subjects

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and I would think at auction we can put a sensible estimate of one to two hundred pounds on it.

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-Certainly a reserve of no less than £100.

-Yes.

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-If you have a little luck, it might top that top estimate. How does that sound?

-Well, that sounds fine.

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Yeah? I'm really glad your curiosity got the better of you.

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Mimi and Alan, an interesting mix here.

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Perhaps we'll deal with the boxes first because they amuse me and they might amuse the viewers.

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-OK.

-In so much as they've got BBC stickers all over them,

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-and they are sound recordings from programmes.

-Yeah, sound effects.

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I can only imagine they've been stolen. Where did you get them from?

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It wasn't me.

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-I bought a box load of records from an auction...

-Yeah.

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-..a few years ago and they caught my eye because I like quirky things and I thought that was quirky.

-Yeah.

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-Have you listened to any of them?

-I haven't. I don't have a 78 player.

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But there was one particular one that took my eye there

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-which is sound recordings used on Murder On The Nile.

-Yeah.

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And I'm just particularly amused by a selection here.

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"Arabic noises.

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"Anchor chains.

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"Ships paddles.

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"Rifle shots.

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"Beat of Tom-Toms and singing."

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-I'd love to hear them.

-I can imagine the person there actually making the sounds.

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And "Jackal." Anyway, someone's going to really enjoy those.

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Perhaps the BBC will buy them back in case they do the programme again.

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Leaving those on one side, you've got a tremendous collection of slides here,

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actually magic lantern slides, dating I would think from Edwardian times.

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-Late Victorian, Edwardian times. 1900, 1910.

-OK.

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-They are, looking at the boxes here, French.

-Mmm hmm.

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And they are all sorts of different subjects.

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How did you get them?

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-Again, a box lot at an auction.

-Right.

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I was after some magic lantern slides that were of Snow White.

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-Yeah?

-And they happened to be in this box lot along with the Snow White magic lantern slides.

-I see.

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-So you kept the Snow White.

-Yes.

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-And have you got a magic lantern?

-No.

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-So you just hold them up to the light do you?

-Yes.

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-Yes.

-What's your particular love with Snow White?

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-Well, it's to do with sort of early animation stuff.

-Yeah?

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Walt Disney did Snow White and Mimi happened to see these and knowing about my interest in animation,

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she got these and she gave me the Snow White things, but we still had these.

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-Right.

-And some of these perhaps relate to newspaper cartoon characters

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-because in the early years of the century right up until the 1920s...

-Yeah.

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..every newspaper had these things to encourage the children who would then say to their parents,

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-"Please can we have the Daily Whatever to get hold of the cartoon strip."

-Yeah, yeah. Interesting.

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And I think this is probably one such slide, showing rabbits in various poses.

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-There's one particularly interesting one here which is quite obviously First World War battle ships.

-Mmm.

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I think you alluded to the fact it might be the Battle of Jutland.

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-Yes.

-Or something like that. There is just great ones.

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There's sort of children's cartoons here.

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The chap riding a pig and a girl on a bicycle and two chaps having a scrap.

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Value. I think those are fantastic fun,

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but of no significant value.

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If the auctioneers are going to publish an estimate, £50 to £80, something like that.

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-Mmm.

-Yeah.

-Sell without reserve?

-I'm happy with that.

-Happy?

-Yeah.

-Then we'll have fun on auction time.

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-The great thing, these are going to go to somebody with a projector who's going to love them.

-Yes.

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Phyllis and Lavinia, you're not sisters are you?

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-No.

-Sisters-in-law?

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-That's right.

-Yes. So how come you jointly own all of this Majolica?

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Well, they were left to my mother and we split them between us.

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So you have one urn with base each.

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-Yes.

-And one small plaque each.

-That's right.

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So you've both agreed to sell here today then?

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-You want to put them into auction.

-We would like to, yes.

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So why do you want to get rid of your half?

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-Because my children absolutely hate them.

-They hate it?

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Yes, they do and I'm not very keen.

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-And what about you?

-The same.

-Same?

-Yes.

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Which one's yours, Phyllis?

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-Um that one.

-This one.

-And this one, yes.

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There's a little bit of damage on the lizard's tail here.

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Yes, there is. Not made a very good job of it really.

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No, but at least it's obvious.

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-You're not trying to deceive anybody so that can be done professionally and well hidden.

-Yes.

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But they are cracking, aren't they?

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Well, they are so typical of Majolica.

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-That's what you expect to see.

-Yes.

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It's an earthenware vessel

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coloured with so many bright interesting glazes of naturalistic form all over the jug.

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You've sort of got pond weed and all kind of algae and moss

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which is a great habitat for all of these wonderful creatures, frogs and lizards, newts, bugs.

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But just look at those handles.

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The modelling is so naturalistic, it's so lifelike.

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-And they've even got the lizard's sort of skin. Can you see?

-Yes.

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They've got little tiny scales put on there.

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When the clay was wet they've pushed bits of cloth on there

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-and picked up the undulations of the thread.

-Yes.

-Just to get that texture of scales.

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-How did they actually do this? Is it shredded?

-No, it's just...

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-it's rolled out pieces of clay, and then chopped with a knife, tiny little pieces.

-Is it really?

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But it's the modelling in the creatures that is so lovely.

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I'm going to have a look at the backs a minute. You can see "Portugal"...

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-Yes.

-..stamped on the back. Now, this indicates to me that it's around 1900, 1910.

-Right.

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Because the earlier ones weren't stamped Portugal.

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Right, let's talk about value.

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I'd like to split the two lots. I think the two plaques will sell separately in one lot.

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-Right.

-With a valuation of two to three hundred pounds.

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-Mmm-hmm.

-But I can see them doing the 300 quite easily.

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-Yeah.

-And the two jugs I'd like to put in the sale with a valuation of £300 to £500

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-and I'm hoping they'll easily do the 500.

-Yes, that's fine.

-We'll put a fixed reserve of £300 for the pair.

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-Yeah.

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

-Yes.

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-And a fixed reserve of £200 for the little plaques.

-Right. Yes.

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It's a striking collection, absolutely striking, and let's hope they're kept together.

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-How are you doing?

-Fine, thank you.

-Yes.

-Terry, this is your powder compact?

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Not my powder compact, Philip, no.

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It was my grandmother's on my father's side.

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-That is a huge relief.

-That is with me as well.

-Yeah, but this is now yours?

-It is.

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-And why do you want to sell this?

-I no longer use it.

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I used it for a while, but then I went onto the compressed powder.

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Compressed powder. You'll appreciate I don't use make up that much.

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Well, not in public, clearly.

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-Why do you both want to sell it?

-Well, it's just sitting indoors doing nothing.

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It was passed to the daughter. She wouldn't have any use for it or even appreciate it.

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-Really?

-Not now. Which is a shame.

-I think it's lovely.

-It is, yeah.

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And the thing about it is, you know, that is just pure its time isn't it?

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-Yes.

-It's pure Deco.

-Let's just have a look. It's Mappin & Webb.

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-Yeah.

-You know, one of the best names there is.

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Marked for 1936. Enamelled.

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You've got a lovely little compact mirror in here.

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-The only problems with it is, you know a lot of people think that porcelain's really fragile.

-Mmm.

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-But things that are enamelled are really fragile as well.

-They are.

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-And this has been perhaps dropped.

-Dropped.

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-In someone's bag.

-Yeah.

-Or dropped on a table and we've got a chip to the enamel there and another there.

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-That one is not that bad because when it's...

-You don't notice that.

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..closed the clasp covers it, but that nonetheless is going to detract a little bit from its value.

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I think these are going to become quite collectable

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-and this is where antiques are great value for money because you imagine going to Mappin & Webb today...

-Yes.

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..and buying a silver enamel compact.

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-How many hundreds of pounds would that cost you?

-Yes, yeah.

-Thousands.

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I think this is probably £40 to £60.

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-Mmm-hmm. Yeah.

-We'll put a fixed reserve on it of £30 for you.

-Yeah.

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That's what it's worth, but I think whoever gets that at auction will have a real good buy.

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-You happy with that?

-Yes.

-Very happy with that.

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-Let's hope it does well.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

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We were hoping for a good start to the day and oh, boy, have we found one?

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Philip and Charlie have been working flat out, we've got some cracking items and I don't know about you,

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but I can't wait to find out how these do when they go to auction.

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I think Philip is right on the money with this unusual piece.

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Even if it's not a Bergman, it'll create a lot of interest.

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Out of the archive and into the saleroom again for Myral and Alan's ancient vinyl records.

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And equally elderly are the slides.

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Let's hope the bidders are there.

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I know Lavinia and Phyllis thought these pieces of Majolica were hideous,

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but I think they're unique and wonderful. I wonder what reception they'll get in the saleroom.

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Terence and Ann's compact by Mappin & Webb is a name to conjure with

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and it's why I have a feeling it might do rather well.

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And we're hoping for the very best prices here today

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at Eldreds Auction Rooms just outside of Plymouth.

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And on the rostrum today is auctioneer Anthony Eldred

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and he's been taking a good look at our Majolica.

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I don't know what you think, Anthony, but I love these. The more creepy crawlies, the better.

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They belong to Phyllis and Lavinia and I'm going to put them into the sale,

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-if that's all right with you, as two lots.

-Right.

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The wine jugs, the ewers on their own bases, three to five hundred,

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and the two little plaques, two to three hundred.

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-What do you think of that?

-Well, I'm at the opposite end of the scale. I don't like them at all, personally,

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but I can appreciate them for what they are

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and I think you're absolutely right to put them in as two separate lots.

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How can you not like something like that? Look at the handles.

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Well, I would say the opposite. How can you possibly like them?

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-Really? You just don't like them.

-They're grotesque.

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No, I can appreciate them, but they're not something I'd want on my sideboard.

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But they're very typical of this sort of thing

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coming out of Portugal very late in the 19th Century.

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Have many people been looking at them on auction preview day?

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-Lots of interest?

-Well, I'd like to say yes, but not yet. But I'm sure there will be interest.

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They'll come out of the woodwork.

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-Do you think I'll get the top end of the estimate?

-With the ewers, I think you will get the top end.

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-The plates, a little bit of damage on them so I think that's going to effect the issue, but maybe.

-Yeah.

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Well, fingers crossed there's going to be lots of interest later on.

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Well, we'll have to wait and see, but I'm sticking to my guns.

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Now, how about that bronze?

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-We don't know if it is Bergman. We had a good look.

-Yeah.

-It's the quality though.

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It's a great cold painted bronze and it's worth every penny of that one to two hundred.

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-Yes.

-Might be Bergman's son, you never know, but it is that quality

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and I think this could do £250-350. That's what I'm hoping, fingers crossed.

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I think that it will make its money.

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-Yeah.

-And the real thing is, that's the flavour of the month, that's what people want to buy.

-Yes.

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-The days of the copper warming pan are long gone.

-Yes, exactly.

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-That's what they want.

-It's going under the hammer. Let's hope this astral carpet flies across Dartmoor.

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Our next lot - 143.

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It's a cold painted bronze figure of an Arab kneeling on a prayer mat.

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There is it, and several bidders.

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I am bid £120 against you all in the room at 120.

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Come on, a bit more than that.

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140, 150,

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160, 170, 180.

0:15:320:15:35

At £180, still against you all.

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190, 200. At £200.

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Are you done then at £200?

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Yes. £200. Top end of the estimate.

0:15:450:15:48

-Very good.

-You'll take that won't you, Bill?

-Yes.

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What are you going to put that towards?

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-I've got nine grandchildren.

-Gosh.

-And two christenings coming up.

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Wow.

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Next up the magic lantern slides.

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We've got Alan, but unfortunately the wife, Mimi, where is she?

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-She's missing.

-Well, yes, she took off.

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She's in the States. She's visiting her parents.

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OK. I know you're a big fan of animation and this was a present to you, wasn't it?

0:16:150:16:20

Yes. It was a surprise for me and she...

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It did surprise me as well!

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Why do you want to sell them?

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Because I've got the best ones. She saved the one or two for me and these are what's left.

0:16:290:16:35

Yeah. What are we looking at? £50 to £80? Not a great deal of money.

0:16:350:16:39

No. Hopefully, they'll make 80, and goodness knows about the records, the BBC records.

0:16:390:16:44

-Yes, the recordings.

-I'm not even sure we're allowed to sell them.

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We're going to find out.

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Next is lot 207. It's some BBC 78rpm records of sound effects

0:16:500:16:55

and some magic lantern slides.

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There they are and £20 bid for those. Against you all at 20.

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5, 30, 5, 40, 5, 48, 50.

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At £50 at the very back. At £50.

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At 50 then. Are you all done at £50?

0:17:080:17:11

Sell at 50. Quite sure at £50?

0:17:110:17:14

-Yes. Spot on. £50.

-About right.

0:17:140:17:17

-Well, well done.

-Happy?

-Yes. Yes.

-£50.

-Yes.

0:17:170:17:21

It's now Ann and Terry's turn to flog their item off and it's a lovely silver compact.

0:17:260:17:31

Great name, Mappin & Webb. We're looking at £40 to £60 on this.

0:17:310:17:34

-Right.

-It was your mother's.

-My grandmother's.

-Your grandmother's.

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Handed down through the family and I've just spotted a little flag on the lapel there.

0:17:380:17:43

-Kernow. That's the flag of Cornwall, isn't it?

-Spot on.

0:17:430:17:47

Got to do a proper job now.

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I feel quite the foreigner here.

0:17:490:17:52

-It's nice. A good name.

-We'll do well.

-I think they'll sell it.

0:17:530:17:57

-Let's hope we get that £60. Good luck, you two.

-Thank you.

0:17:570:17:59

It's going under the hammer now.

0:17:590:18:01

Next is lot 452.

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It's a Deco-style compact, there it is, and I'm bid £30 for it.

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Against you at 32, if you want it.

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At 32, 5, 8, 40. 2, 5, 8. At £48.

0:18:100:18:15

At 48 then. 50 if you want it.

0:18:150:18:18

-Fresh bidding at two. 55, 58.

-That's good.

0:18:180:18:22

And 60 now. And two.

0:18:220:18:24

65, 68.

0:18:240:18:27

At £68 then, all done.

0:18:270:18:30

-Good.

-Good.

-I've got to say, well done, Philip.

0:18:300:18:33

-That's a good valuation. That's lunch out for you two.

-Well done.

0:18:330:18:38

-My pleasure.

-Thank you very much.

0:18:380:18:40

Lavinia and Phyllis, it's great to see you again and I've got to say don't they look absolutely splendid.

0:18:450:18:52

We've got the Palissyware just about to go under the hammer.

0:18:520:18:55

We've split it into two lots.

0:18:550:18:57

-Yes.

-And first up is the two little ewers, the wine ewers on separate bases. OK?

0:18:570:19:02

So what's going through your minds? Any regrets?

0:19:020:19:05

-No. None at all.

-Get rid.

-Just glad to get rid of them.

0:19:050:19:09

OK, OK. Let's just hope we get top end, shall we? It's going under the hammer now.

0:19:090:19:13

On next lot - 248.

0:19:130:19:15

This is a pair of Palissy style Portuguese lid ewers. There they are.

0:19:150:19:19

Several bids for them. I am bid £380.

0:19:190:19:24

-Against you all at £380. £380.

-Straight in.

0:19:240:19:28

390, 400.

0:19:280:19:29

And 10. 420, 430, 440,

0:19:290:19:32

450, 460, 470, 480, 490, 500.

0:19:320:19:38

-And 10, 520, 530 there.

-Ah, how brilliant.

0:19:380:19:43

540. At £540, fresh bidding.

0:19:430:19:46

At £540 then. Quite sure at 540.

0:19:460:19:50

-Yes.

-That's lovely.

0:19:500:19:53

One lot down, one more to go. We've got £540 so far.

0:19:530:19:57

Here's the second.

0:19:570:19:59

Next is lot 254.

0:19:590:20:01

It's two Palissy Portuguese dishes again.

0:20:010:20:05

And a lot of bids again.

0:20:050:20:08

-I'm bid £230. Against you all at 230.

-Right, we're in.

0:20:080:20:14

Five if you want them. 35 and 240, 250, 260, 270.

0:20:140:20:20

At 270 then, in front of me. At £270.

0:20:200:20:24

Are you all done then at £270?

0:20:240:20:27

That was short and sweet.

0:20:290:20:30

I was a bit frightened for a moment, but we got £270.

0:20:300:20:34

So that's not bad. That's nearly the top end of the estimate.

0:20:340:20:36

Let's add those together and I make that, what is it, £810.

0:20:360:20:42

-Very good.

-Not bad, is it?

-No, it's very exciting.

-Happy?

0:20:420:20:46

-Yes, very happy.

-Yes.

-You've got to be!

-Glad to get rid of them.

0:20:460:20:50

If you think celebrities are just a modern TV invention, then think again.

0:21:050:21:11

I'm in Endsleigh Gardens near Tavistock in Devon.

0:21:110:21:16

I'm surrounded by the creation of one of England's trendiest landscape gardeners from almost 200 years ago.

0:21:160:21:22

The sixth Duke of Bedford built this marvellous home here in the early 19th Century

0:21:220:21:26

and he commissioned architect Sir Jeffrey Wyattville to lay out the surrounding gardens.

0:21:260:21:31

The problem was, Sir Jeffrey wasn't really up to the job.

0:21:310:21:36

Enter Humphry Repton, self-taught landscape gardener and the darling of the landed aristocracy.

0:21:380:21:44

His fashionable picturesque style graced stately homes throughout the country

0:21:440:21:49

and the duke now summoned him to sprinkle some horticultural magic over Ainsley.

0:21:490:21:56

Repton was only too happy to oblige.

0:21:560:21:59

Although Humphry Repton had suffered a carriage accident, he wasn't put off his latest commission.

0:21:590:22:05

He'd arrive on site in a wheelchair and set about his work.

0:22:050:22:09

Being a practical man, he soon discovered that Wyattville's layout

0:22:090:22:13

was a bit too dangerous and rugged for the Duke of Bedford's children to play in.

0:22:130:22:19

So Repton went to work.

0:22:200:22:23

One of the main problems was the steep drop between the house and the river

0:22:230:22:27

so he fenced it off and created a beautiful terrace.

0:22:270:22:31

The icing on the cake was this little gem in the corner which was one of Repton's trademarks.

0:22:310:22:38

This shell grotto is the reward

0:22:410:22:43

that the adults and children alike got when they reached the end of the terrace. What a surprise.

0:22:430:22:50

It's built of stone and granite, but it's been clad in seashells, crystals and minerals alike.

0:22:500:22:56

Highly exotic for the day and it's also a not-so-subtle reminder

0:22:560:23:02

that your hosts are far richer and more worldly travelled than you are.

0:23:020:23:08

Another Humphry Repton trademark was his famous red book,

0:23:150:23:18

so-called because they were bound in a Moroccan red leather,

0:23:180:23:22

each made for a particular client, this one for the Duke of Bedford.

0:23:220:23:25

And it is the original brochure for the before and after shot.

0:23:250:23:30

If you look at this, you can see what it looked like with Wyattville's designs.

0:23:300:23:34

Very precarious and quite dangerous for children to play on that terrace

0:23:340:23:38

and you turn this leaf and it shows you what it looks like

0:23:380:23:41

with Humphry Repton's design,

0:23:410:23:43

a wonderful safe terrace, a promenade to walk along.

0:23:430:23:46

And each picture is a work of art within itself.

0:23:460:23:50

And packaging his work like this to give to the client certainly was good for business.

0:23:500:23:55

Humphry Repton's tastes were for something more eventful,

0:23:570:24:01

more rustic, a style called picturesque.

0:24:010:24:05

This meant making the most of the natural setting.

0:24:050:24:07

For example, by redirecting streams like this,

0:24:070:24:10

so they cascaded down the hillside, creating an informal rural idyll.

0:24:100:24:16

However, Endsleigh House gardens over the years gradually fell into disrepair

0:24:180:24:23

and it is only fairly recently that they have been restored to their former glory.

0:24:230:24:28

So what's it like to do the gardening in a place like this?

0:24:280:24:31

-Let's find out from head gardener Simon Wood. Hi, Simon.

-Hello.

0:24:310:24:35

-Thanks for talking to us.

-That's OK.

0:24:350:24:37

-We're in the rock garden, aren't we?

-We are.

0:24:370:24:40

-What was it like before you got your hands on this?

-Very overgrown.

0:24:400:24:44

Everything was still here, you just couldn't see it.

0:24:440:24:46

So what makes this unmistakably a Repton garden?

0:24:460:24:50

What do you look for in Humphry Repton's designs?

0:24:500:24:52

Repton tended to look at the wider landscape

0:24:520:24:56

and use the natural beauty that's abundant here.

0:24:560:24:59

Incredible. And how do you get the water to sort of this level?

0:24:590:25:02

-Is it sort of pumped up?

-No, no. Everything is naturally fed through gravity.

0:25:020:25:06

-It's taken off the main stream.

-Yeah.

-It runs into various sediment tanks

0:25:060:25:11

and is then channelled throughout the garden into various features that we see today.

0:25:110:25:16

-Well, let's wander down there and take a look.

-Certainly.

0:25:160:25:20

Gosh, look at this. When you think of most rockeries, Simon,

0:25:200:25:24

they're normally about knee high, but this is absolutely massive!

0:25:240:25:27

-It must have taken a lot of guys back then in Humphry Repton's team to manhandle these.

-A huge amount.

0:25:270:25:34

-They were all brought in by block and tackle, horse and cart.

-Local stone?

0:25:340:25:38

Local, but also imported from around the world.

0:25:380:25:41

-Yeah.

-So a huge amount of work involved in getting them here.

-Yeah.

0:25:410:25:45

Oh, there is light at the end of the tunnel, Simon.

0:25:470:25:50

-And look at the view you get greeted with. My word.

-It's beautiful.

0:25:500:25:54

-It's absolutely stunning!

-It really is beautiful.

0:25:540:25:57

-What's that building there with the thatched roof?

-The dairy. The old dairy.

0:25:570:26:02

'This has never been a working dairy, it was simply constructed

0:26:040:26:07

'to fit in with Repton's vision of an informal garden.

0:26:070:26:12

'Repton even suggested that a peasant dwelling

0:26:120:26:15

'be built on an island in the grounds,

0:26:150:26:18

'so that a wisp of smoke from its chimney could animate the scene.

0:26:180:26:22

'Nothing was too much for the Duke of Bedford.

0:26:220:26:25

'Every morning, when he was in residence, a servant would row over to the island,

0:26:250:26:29

'open up the empty cottage and simply light a fire, all for the Duke's delight.'

0:26:290:26:34

I'm beginning to understand what Humphry Repton was all about now.

0:26:350:26:39

I'm just surrounded by it.

0:26:390:26:41

-Well, exactly. I mean, behind us, you can see a perfect example - plenty of moving water.

-Mm-hm.

0:26:410:26:46

Here at Endsleigh, we've got lovely steep valley sides,

0:26:460:26:49

-plenty of bedrock, it was all about the natural feel.

-I like the scale of the buildings.

0:26:490:26:54

-Like little follies, especially the cottages.

-All designed to be viewed and they worked,

0:26:540:27:01

but it was just making everything so picturesque.

0:27:010:27:04

Endsleigh's been described as the most complete example of picturesque-style planting.

0:27:040:27:09

And it was Repton's last major undertaking.

0:27:090:27:12

-I'd like to think all he'd learned throughout his...

-Is here.

-..working career was used here at Endsleigh.

0:27:120:27:18

-Yeah, he saved the best for last.

-That's it.

0:27:180:27:20

Isn't it wonderful that these superb gardens

0:27:320:27:34

have now been reinstated to their former glory?

0:27:340:27:38

Endsleigh House is a fantastic hotel so you can come here at your leisure

0:27:380:27:42

and enjoy these tranquil surroundings, but for us, it's straight back to the valuation day.

0:27:420:27:48

It's still busy here in Tavistock and Charles has come up roses.

0:27:550:28:00

Shirley, beautiful plates, lovely decoration.

0:28:000:28:03

Where did you get them from?

0:28:030:28:05

-Um, they were given to me as a Christmas present about ten years ago.

-Right.

0:28:050:28:09

-They were in a display cabinet.

-Yes.

0:28:090:28:12

And when I moved house, I didn't have room for the display cabinet.

0:28:120:28:16

-Right.

-So the plates came out and I don't really want them any more.

0:28:160:28:22

There is no point in having this if you can't look at them.

0:28:220:28:25

-That's true, yeah.

-Do you know who they're made by?

0:28:250:28:28

-Cauldon.

-Cauldon. And I thought they'd be Coalport or Worcester,

0:28:280:28:32

some really top quality manufacturer.

0:28:320:28:35

Cauldon is good, but I would say they're sort of the top of league division two.

0:28:350:28:40

-Now these are hand painted, these floral scenes.

-Right, yeah.

0:28:400:28:43

And if you look, there's a signature.

0:28:430:28:45

They're all painted by a man called Pope - S Pope.

0:28:450:28:49

-Well, I've never actually noticed that before.

-Have you not?

-No.

-No.

0:28:490:28:53

-So each plate has a value on its own.

-OK.

-Not just the fact that you have a collection.

0:28:530:28:57

-And very much obviously done for display purposes.

-Right.

0:28:570:29:01

-You would never dream of putting cod and chips on these.

-No.

0:29:010:29:04

There's another fascinating thing on the back which you may have looked at and may not have done.

0:29:040:29:09

I'll turn mine over, um, and Cauldon, England there,

0:29:090:29:13

but have you noticed another name on the back?

0:29:130:29:15

Not that I took any notice of it, no.

0:29:150:29:18

Marvellous name - Bailey, Banks and Biddle -

0:29:180:29:21

sounds like an old firm of London solicitors, but it's not.

0:29:210:29:24

-Bailey, Banks and Biddle Company, Philadelphia.

-Oh, really?

0:29:240:29:27

So these were made on commission for a company in Philadelphia,

0:29:270:29:33

exported to Philadelphia and sold there,

0:29:330:29:36

then subsequently found their way back to England.

0:29:360:29:40

What about age?

0:29:400:29:41

-I haven't got a clue. Not a clue.

-No. No.

0:29:410:29:44

This Cauldon mark would date them from...

0:29:440:29:50

1895 to 1920, so let's for the sake of argument call them 1910.

0:29:500:29:55

-OK.

-Edwardian.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:29:550:29:57

Um, the only thing I would say against them is they are old-fashioned scenes.

0:29:570:30:01

-Oh, I agree, yes.

-You know, floral decoration like this is,

0:30:010:30:05

although these perhaps aren't quite Victorian, very much have a Victorian flavour.

0:30:050:30:10

-Uh-huh.

-And we are steering away from the very, very ornate.

-Mm-hm.

0:30:100:30:16

-Have you ever had them insured?

-No.

-No.

-No.

0:30:160:30:20

-Have you got a clue about value?

-No.

-No clue?

-Not at all.

0:30:200:30:23

I think they're worth between...

0:30:230:30:26

-150 to 250, that sort of order.

-Oh, really?

0:30:260:30:30

-We ought to put a reserve price on.

-Yeah.

-We shouldn't give them away.

0:30:300:30:33

-No. So what reserve would you put on it?

-I think I would say to the auctioneer £150.

-OK.

0:30:330:30:38

Bit of discretion. If he got within a pitch and a putt of that, let them go.

0:30:380:30:42

-Yes.

-Happy with that?

-I am.

0:30:420:30:44

-Jackie, how are you doing?

-I'm fine, thank you.

-Are you a local lass?

0:30:500:30:54

-No. I moved here from Oxford.

-From Oxford?

-Yes.

-Did you buy this down here or bring it with you?

0:30:540:30:59

I brought it with me. I bought it at Didcot Railway Station.

0:30:590:31:02

-Oh, right. When?

-30 years ago. There's a museum at the...

0:31:020:31:06

There used to be a museum at the train station and that's where I bought it.

0:31:060:31:10

-They reproduce a lot of these signs.

-Yes, but they didn't so much then.

0:31:100:31:14

I don't think they were quite so sought after.

0:31:140:31:17

No. And this is published by British Railways western region.

0:31:170:31:22

-I think this is absolutely lovely.

-So do I. I still like it.

-So...

0:31:220:31:26

Let's talk nitty gritty here.

0:31:260:31:29

-This is a British Railways poster.

-Mmm.

-Pretty sure it's an original.

0:31:290:31:34

"Teignmouth is Devon", so it's promoting the Devon countryside.

0:31:340:31:38

-Travelling by train.

-Yeah.

0:31:380:31:40

-We've got the artist's name here, but I can't quite work that out.

-I've never been able to read that.

0:31:400:31:46

And we've got this wonderful scene here of the girl bathers,

0:31:460:31:50

of the promenade being lit up.

0:31:500:31:53

We've got these wonderful cliffs on the background and I think...

0:31:530:31:57

-The colour of the sea.

-It's just brilliant. Why did you buy it?

0:31:570:32:00

-It's just a lovely scene.

-Why do you want to sell it now?

0:32:000:32:02

Well, I've had it for 30 years and I just think really it's time for a change.

0:32:020:32:07

These things are very, very sought after.

0:32:070:32:10

I think this is a great subject, we're in Devon,

0:32:100:32:13

-it's going to be sold in Devon, um, I can't think of a better place to sell it.

-No, that's right.

0:32:130:32:18

-I think we need to put an estimate on it of £100-£200.

-Right.

0:32:180:32:22

And we'll put a fixed reserve of £100 on it.

0:32:220:32:25

-And I would just hope that it does really, really well.

-OK.

0:32:250:32:28

John, Hillary, lovely to see you

0:32:370:32:39

and I am so enthusiastic about this fabulous collection of postcards.

0:32:390:32:45

The historical content, the condition,

0:32:450:32:48

the numbers and the story behind them. John, enlighten us.

0:32:480:32:53

My father's elder brother...

0:32:530:32:56

-Yeah?

-..who was born in 1888...

0:32:560:32:59

-Yeah?

-Joined the Royal Navy and while he was

0:32:590:33:04

serving on board HMS Lord Raglan must have visited Newfoundland.

0:33:040:33:11

Um, he bought them and sent them home to his parents.

0:33:110:33:15

Right. I think we've only found one that's actually written in.

0:33:150:33:18

-That's right.

-So whether he put them in envelopes or whether he took them back,

0:33:180:33:22

kept them and then took them when he got home.

0:33:220:33:25

-But he had a tragic end, I believe?

-Yes, he was, um...

0:33:250:33:29

The Lord Raglan was torpedoed.

0:33:290:33:32

-Torpedoed?

-Yes, in the Bosphorus.

0:33:320:33:34

-Right.

-And he was killed in 1918.

0:33:340:33:38

1918? And he was born in 1888.

0:33:380:33:41

-Yes.

-So he died at 30.

-That's right.

0:33:410:33:43

So he really collected these, we can date these postcards, can't we?

0:33:430:33:47

-Yes.

-Pretty accurately.

0:33:470:33:49

Most of these are probably bought between, let us say, 1910 and 1914.

0:33:490:33:55

And incidentally, by way of proof, I suppose,

0:33:550:33:59

the one we've found that has got writing on it is dated I think 1910.

0:33:590:34:03

-That's it.

-From Newfoundland.

0:34:030:34:05

And it's quite poignant to read the story.

0:34:050:34:09

And Swan to Mrs Swan. Are you a Swan?

0:34:090:34:12

-Yes.

-Yeah.

-"Dear mother and father, just to let you know

0:34:120:34:16

"that I am getting on all right and I hope you are all the same at home.

0:34:160:34:21

"This is a very nice postcard.

0:34:210:34:24

"You will see Willy, that's Willy, between two..."

0:34:240:34:29

It says coad fish, C-O-A-D.

0:34:290:34:31

I thought that means cod fish, but they don't make cod that size.

0:34:310:34:35

-I shouldn't think so.

-Maybe then. They've all been caught.

0:34:350:34:38

You'd have fish and chips for the rest of your life! Amazing.

0:34:380:34:42

And the fish either side of him.

0:34:420:34:44

"All from your loving son."

0:34:440:34:46

And that's, gosh, eight years before he died.

0:34:460:34:52

As a matter of interest, we've got people there,

0:34:520:34:55

girls from the West Indies, there's somebody I see,

0:34:550:34:58

the St Lucian belle and the founders of Newfoundland.

0:34:580:35:03

We've got some North American Indians here.

0:35:030:35:07

Bear's Tooth, he looks a severe sort of chap.

0:35:070:35:09

You wouldn't want to come across him would you? Be instantly scalped.

0:35:090:35:14

What made you bring them along to Flog It! today?

0:35:140:35:17

-I did.

-Oh, you did?

-Yes. Well, I suggested it, put it that way.

0:35:170:35:21

-Yeah. Well, you wanted it turned into some money?

-No, I just...

0:35:210:35:25

-Mainly because I get them out about every five years and have a revision of them.

-Yes. Yes.

0:35:250:35:30

-How many have we got here?

-Well, there's 80...

-Six albums.

-Yes.

0:35:300:35:35

And there's 80 per album.

0:35:350:35:37

80 per album and they're full. That's 480 cards.

0:35:370:35:40

Well, I tell you, I think the collection's worth £400-£600,

0:35:400:35:43

and we'll put a reserve of 400.

0:35:430:35:46

And if the top bid is 390, well, so be it.

0:35:460:35:50

You can take them home again and have your look every five years.

0:35:500:35:54

But I'm pretty confident they'll do well.

0:35:540:35:56

And before we go off to auction, let's remind ourselves of what we're selling.

0:35:560:36:02

Shirley's Edwardian hand-painted plates have travelled from America.

0:36:020:36:06

I hope they get a big reception in the auction rooms.

0:36:060:36:09

Jackie's found a bit of a bargain with her railway poster.

0:36:090:36:13

Given its local interest, this should steam away with a good price in the auction.

0:36:130:36:17

John and Hillary's impressive collection of postcards

0:36:170:36:20

is a fascinating record of social history from the early 1900s and deserves a more regular airing.

0:36:200:36:26

Back at Eldreds, Anthony has taken a shine to the railway poster.

0:36:360:36:41

This says it all, "Come to glorious Devon." It belongs to Jackie.

0:36:410:36:45

-Now she bought this about 30-odd years ago from a museum in Didcot and paid £10 for it.

-£10.

0:36:450:36:50

Yes. Philip, our expert, has put a valuation of £100 to £200 on this.

0:36:500:36:54

-It's going to breeze that, surely.

-Yeah, I think it will.

0:36:540:36:58

It's a realistic estimate, um, but we have had conversation

0:36:580:37:02

with the vendor since and she's decided to put £200 on it and I don't argue with that.

0:37:020:37:08

-No.

-I think that's achievable. You know, the estimate has risen now to £200-£300.

0:37:080:37:14

-I don't blame her, actually.

-Yeah. No, I'd give £200 for it.

0:37:140:37:17

-Is this something you like, actually, Anthony?

-I do like it.

-Would you buy this?

0:37:170:37:21

No, I wouldn't, because I think it needs to go into a hotel.

0:37:210:37:25

-Yes.

-Or a restaurant where it is, in Teignmouth.

0:37:250:37:28

Yeah. We're in the right area, plenty of hotels around,

0:37:280:37:31

-so I think that'll be quite hot and a lot of people bidding on that.

-Yeah, I think they will be.

0:37:310:37:36

That sounds promising. Now, about those plates.

0:37:380:37:42

-When you think about it, six plates, but it's six pieces of art, isn't it?

-That's right.

0:37:460:37:51

They are all hand painted by Pope, made for a company in Philadelphia.

0:37:510:37:55

-Yeah.

-Which is quite unusual.

-Mmm.

0:37:550:37:58

We've got £150 to £250 on these. If they were something different like Coalport, what would they be like?

0:37:580:38:04

If they were Coalport, I think they'd be more £500, I really do. Five or six hundred pounds.

0:38:040:38:09

-Well, we're going to find out what they're worth. I think you're right.

-Oh, these are them now?

0:38:090:38:14

Yeah, they're going under the hammer right now. This is it.

0:38:140:38:17

Next, lot 436.

0:38:170:38:20

Six Cauldon porcelain plates,

0:38:200:38:22

each one differently painted. There they are.

0:38:220:38:25

£110 I'm bid for them, against you all at 110.

0:38:250:38:28

-At 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 70, 180.

-Oh.

-Wow.

0:38:280:38:33

At 180 now. All done then at £180 I'll sell them.

0:38:330:38:39

-Yes.

-That's it.

-Blink and you'll miss that.

-Gosh.

0:38:390:38:42

-He ran that up really quickly!

-That was very quick.

0:38:420:38:44

-£180, so you were spot on.

-Yeah.

-Well, I'm pleased with that.

0:38:440:38:48

-Happy with that?

-Yes, I am.

0:38:480:38:49

Jackie, that poster inspired many people to come down here on holiday.

0:38:550:38:59

-I'm sure it did.

-It's got the look and I know why Philip fell in love with it.

0:38:590:39:03

It really is, it just sums up that period, doesn't it?

0:39:030:39:06

What I want to know is, why do you want to flog this?

0:39:060:39:10

I've had it for 30 years, so I've enjoyed it for a long while really.

0:39:100:39:15

-I thought it was time for it to go somewhere else.

-Been on the wall? Yes.

0:39:150:39:19

I know whose wall it'd like to go on. Philip, you're not allowed to buy.

0:39:190:39:22

-It's a really nice thing and that railway memorabilia is collectable from two points of view.

-Yes.

0:39:220:39:29

One from that, one from the Art Deco period, and I think it'll go really well.

0:39:290:39:33

-Well, you originally said at the valuation day £100-£200.

-Yeah.

0:39:330:39:36

-You've had a chat to Anthony.

-Yes.

-You've upped the ante.

0:39:360:39:39

-I'm afraid so.

-He told us before the sale started, we've got a valuation now of £200-£300.

0:39:390:39:44

-But I don't blame you, nor does he.

-I think it'll make its money.

-It's got to.

-It'll make its money.

0:39:440:39:49

-I thought so.

-It'll steam ahead for that £300. It's got to!

-It's quite unusual.

0:39:490:39:53

-Yes, yes.

-It was the steam ahead I was wincing at.

0:39:530:39:56

Next is lot 16.

0:39:560:39:57

It's a British Railways advertising poster.

0:39:570:40:01

There it is, a good local one, Teignmouth in Devon.

0:40:010:40:04

A lot of bids again. I'm bid £220.

0:40:040:40:07

-Straight in.

-Straight in at 220.

-At £220. 30 if you want it.

0:40:070:40:11

At 220 then. 230, 240.

0:40:110:40:14

-This is good.

-250, 260, 270, 280, 290, 300.

0:40:140:40:19

Can't see you now. At £300 by the door then, at £300. Quite sure then?

0:40:190:40:24

At £300, I'll sell it.

0:40:240:40:26

-We're on the right tracks there.

-Oh, you are awful, Paul.

-£300.

0:40:280:40:32

That is, that's...

0:40:320:40:33

I've got to tell you this. We were looking at it before the sale started

0:40:330:40:37

-and Charlie Ross came along and said that man in it's modelled on me.

-Yeah, he was wrong.

0:40:370:40:42

Hillary and John, what a collection.

0:40:490:40:52

We've got six albums with 480 postcards. Lots of social history.

0:40:520:40:57

-You've had these for 25 years? You get them out every five years to look at them.

-That's it.

0:40:570:41:01

-John does.

-Thank goodness you got them out to bring them to the valuation day.

0:41:010:41:05

-They caught your eye, Charlie.

-Yes.

-So much social history in them.

0:41:050:41:09

-The condition on the Newfoundland ones is pretty spectacular.

-Virtually mint condition.

0:41:090:41:13

-And I think you're bang on with £400-£600.

-Yeah.

0:41:130:41:16

I really do. I really do. And I'd like to see the 600-plus mark.

0:41:160:41:20

-Well, we would like to, but...

-LAUGHTER

0:41:200:41:23

-More the merrier.

-Why are you getting rid of them?

0:41:230:41:26

-Because he only gets the albums out every five years?

-I think so.

0:41:260:41:29

The thing is, he has so many things that he doesn't want to get rid of.

0:41:290:41:33

-He's like a magpie.

-Oh, definitely.

-He's not Mr Swan, he's a magpie.

0:41:330:41:37

Definitely. I'm the opposite.

0:41:370:41:40

-Well, good luck, OK.

-Thank you.

-Going under the hammer now.

0:41:400:41:44

Next is lot 74.

0:41:440:41:47

It's a collection of approximately 480 postcards.

0:41:470:41:51

Topographical, Newfoundland, all sorts there.

0:41:510:41:54

America, Australia. Several bids.

0:41:540:41:56

-I'm bid £410 for them.

-Oh, straight in.

0:41:560:41:59

-Well, that's a good start.

-420, 430, 440, 450, 460, 470, 480.

0:41:590:42:07

-This is more like it.

-490, 500.

0:42:070:42:09

Lots of interest. There's three or four people after this.

0:42:090:42:13

530, 540, 550, 560, 570,

0:42:130:42:18

-580, 590, 600. And 20.

-Oh.

0:42:180:42:23

£620 seated. 640 now.

0:42:230:42:26

660, 670, 680, 690 now.

0:42:260:42:31

700. And 20.

0:42:310:42:34

740 seated here.

0:42:340:42:38

At £740, then. Quite sure at 740?

0:42:380:42:44

-GAVEL BANGS

-Crack. That is a sold sound. £740.

0:42:440:42:47

-I just can't believe it.

-Hillary, what's going through your mind?

0:42:470:42:51

-Pretty good.

-I really don't know!

0:42:510:42:53

Tell him to get rid of the rest of the stuff he's got.

0:42:530:42:56

We have coins, he has coins. Ah, not coins, medals as well.

0:42:560:43:00

-What are you going to put that money towards?

-Well...

-Future holidays.

0:43:000:43:04

-Yeah, I don't blame you.

-Yes.

0:43:040:43:06

I don't blame you. If you've got any postcards like that lying around

0:43:060:43:10

just bring them in, because we'll value them, we'll flog them.

0:43:100:43:13

-Yeah.

-I'm going back into your garage after the sale.

0:43:130:43:17

Sadly, we've run out of time from Eldreds in Plymouth.

0:43:170:43:20

So until the next time, plenty more surprises to come on Flog It!

0:43:200:43:23

For more information about Flog It, including how the programme was made,

0:43:250:43:31

visit the website at bbc.co.uk/lifestyle.

0:43:310:43:34

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:410:43:44