Bury St Edmunds Flog It!


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Bury St Edmunds

Flog It! comes from the Athenaeum in Bury St Edmunds, where the experts peruse the antiques and Paul Martin falls in love with a Victorian curiosity.


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Today Flog It is in Bury St Edmunds.

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Now, I've checked the address...

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this should be the place for today's valuations.

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Gosh, it looks a bit too small, if you want my opinion.

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Well, this is the Nutshell,

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allegedly the smallest pub in the country.

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It's cute and quaint and very tiny.

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Not much good for valuation day, is it?

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The most people they've ever squeezed in here is 102 plus a dog called Bob.

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That's the record.

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But somewhere in this town there's a massive queue

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waiting for me and they're all wanting their antiques valued.

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Well, this is more like it.

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Look at this. Welcome to the Athenaeum in Bury St Edmunds,

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and it looks like our experts, David Barby and Adam Partridge are hard at work.

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Adam is first up and it looks as though he's found someone to share a drink with.

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So you're Gordon and I'm Adam,

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and is there any Gordon's gin in here?

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-No.

-There would have been at one point.

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-I think so.

-What can you tell me about this object.

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-A real antique.

-Well, it was given me by an ex-employer when she retired.

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-OK. What were you working as?

-I was working as a stud groom.

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A stud groom. Near Newmarket?

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On a thoroughbred stud, right.

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Did you know it was anything or did you think, "Oh, thanks"?

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Well, no I didn't know much about it really.

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-Were you pleased to receive it?

-I was.

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But I was looking through an old antiques magazine

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-and a photograph of that very one was in this magazine.

-The very one.

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So therefore I regarded it as a reform flask.

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Sometimes these are called reform flasks, but those are generally

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the ones that have political figures and judges and things like that,

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but what all this is about is to fill with liquor

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and have a secretive drink in those days when it was illicit to do so.

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So it's the equivalent of having a brown paper bag

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round a bottle of cheap lager nowadays, isn't it?

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And you just have a sly swig out of what

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-appears to be a decorative figure.

-That's right, yeah.

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So it dates from the mid-nineteenth century.

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And we've got a maker's mark on the reverse, Oldfield & Co.

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Not a very well-known name, Oldfield & Co.

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-So why are you selling it then?

-Cos coins are more attractive than...

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-OK, you'd rather have the money...

-Yeah.

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-..than have that.

-Yeah.

-What's it worth?

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You seem to have done a bit of research on it.

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-It's got to be worth £100.

-You're right.

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Because on the... I've seen reform flasks

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which perhaps are better quality than this.

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They can go up to as much as £400.

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Yes. Depending on the political figures and their rarity.

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This is quite an obscure item.

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Oldfield and Co aren't very well known about.

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There are other examples that have come up,

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but I think £100 is a good guesstimate, really.

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-We could put that as a reserve, is that what you want?

-Yes, please.

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So if we put estimate of £100 - 150.

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-Reserve of £100 and hopefully we'll find somebody with the spirit to take it on.

-All right.

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Tell me,

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where did you get this from?

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I used to help out in an antique shop, around 21 years ago and the owner gave it to me.

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I decided I'd get rid of it because we don't have the space.

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He must have thought a lot of you, because this is a delightful piece.

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Yes, he did... and of my husband.

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He used to help out too.

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-Did you use this as an inkstand?

-Oh, no, no.

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-Just on the side.

-Yeah, just as an ornament.

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This is quite a nice piece. Made as a souvenir.

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This was in the Loire area of Brittany

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where they did a lot of pottery. And we call this pottery faience.

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And they decorated it with scenes of a domestic life.

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Costumes of that area of Brittany.

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This one's quite nice because it has this wide

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space for putting your pens and it's got these two compartments

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there for ink and are they...

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-Oh, yes, they are separate.

-Yes.

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Oh, that's good. That's rather nice. I like that.

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So you could wash those out.

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You could have one for red and one for blue,

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-and what would you put in the top here?

-Quills?

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I think you'd put stamps. Because we're talking about

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a period when this was made when a postal system was in operation.

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So this one on the back says, "Henriot Quimper, France, 80."

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-I think that may refer to the pattern number, not the year.

-Yeah.

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To have France on it would mean it would have to have been made after 1891

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which was when the McKinley Tarriff came into force.

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That was American legislation that stated anything made abroad

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had to have a place of origin on it

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before it could be imported into America.

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So that would date it to the end of the nineteenth century.

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Right. Just think in terms of price on this one, have you any idea yourself?

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-I would have thought about £50.

-£50.

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Even though it's got this damage here it's still going to command interest,

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because people do like this.

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It's colourful. I think you're bang on with the price.

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I think probably about £60-£80.

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-If you stick by the £50 reserve, I think we should achieve that.

-Yes.

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-So you're happy to go ahead.

-Quite happy with that.

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I'm longing to ask you. What are you going to do with that money?

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Go for a day's racing, I think.

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-You like the gee-gees.

-Yes.

-Right.

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-Let's hope we make enough money there to put on a gee-gee.

-Yeah.

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Harry, this is fantastic.

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It's one of the best things I've seen for a long, long time.

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I want to know how long you've had this and where it's come from.

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Well, it's been in my bungalow, recently. But I've had it 58 years.

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58 years, OK.

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And before that, that was my grandfather's.

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-Can you remember this as a young lad?

-Yes.

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And you must have thought, "Tell me all about this.

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-"Can I have a look?" Don't you think it's amazing?

-I do.

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-It must have taken hours...

-I haven't seen nothing like it before.

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..to do. It's absolutely brilliant.

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This is definitely late Victorian, round about 1880, 1890.

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Look at the work that's gone into it.

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Lots and lots of seashells, cowries, conches,

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bivalves, hundreds of them that have made the tiling on the roof.

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-Yes.

-You look at the veranda and it's absolutely full of sand.

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Little particles that have been glued on everywhere.

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-Yeah.

-You've got sea sponge.

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-It's completely out of scale, isn't it?

-It is.

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There's some big chickens down there, which are bigger than the little people.

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Yes!

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And it's in its original glass case, which is leaded at the side.

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I can see you've Sellotaped it all together.

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Yeah. Some air came in there and the other side

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and the rest has deteriorated, as the shells are coming off of it.

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Yes. It's starting to deteriorate.

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The case needs looking at.

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Do you know, I just noticed.

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I just noticed in the window they've got little net curtains.

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Yes.

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It's brilliant. The turrets, as well. Do you know, I love this.

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What do you think of the value?

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Come on, how much?

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-Two to three hundred.

-Has someone told you that?

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-No, no. Nobody told me.

-Well, you're spot on.

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Spot on. I'd like to put it to auction with a value of two to three hundred.

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Why do you want to sell it?

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Well, as I say, I'm in a bungalow that's deteriorating

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and someone else might have the pleasure of looking after it.

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-Won't you be sad?

-No.

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Well, I think this is going to find a home with a collector.

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It could go in a museum of curios, that's for sure.

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Yes. I'd rather see it like that than deteriorating and break right up.

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-It's a little villa to die for.

-That's right.

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-We'll put it in at two to three and hopefully, fingers crossed.

-It'll go up.

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Yes, right. You know the spiel.

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Yes, I know.

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-Good morning, Stephanie.

-Morning.

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Very nice pair of vases. Where did you get these from?

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I got them from my mother-in-law

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who inherited them from my husband's grandmother.

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So they've passed down the family.

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-Yes.

-How long do you reckon you can trace them back for.

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Possibly 80 - 90 years.

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-Interesting.

-And then I took them because I really liked them.

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Had them in my house for a while.

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Nearly lost one of them.

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How was that?

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We were having a barbecue and a bird flew in the house.

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My brother chased it, and as he chased it, it knocked one

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of the vases and he caught the vase and the bird flew out the window.

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-Really?

-Still only one.

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-Flying catch.

-Yes, yes.

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You liked them because you've had them on display.

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-And then I went off them.

-Why?

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-I don't know really.

-Right. OK.

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Well, they're quite easy to date and to describe

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because on the bottom they've got the mark there,

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which is W&R, Stoke-on-Trent and Florida.

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-Yeah.

-So, this W&R

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stands for Wiltshaw and Robinson.

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-You may not have heard of them.

-I haven't.

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-But you will have heard of Carlton Ware.

-Yes, I have.

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Later, these became Carlton Ware.

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This is the first mark of Wiltshaw and Robinson when they opened in 1890.

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So these are one of the first things that came out of that factory in Stoke-on-Trent.

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-OK.

-Florida is just the name of the pattern.

-Oh, is it? Oh, right, OK.

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Yes. They've never been to Florida.

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I was going to say, it doesn't resemble a Florida I would put on.

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No, it's not the thing you immediately think, "Oh, look, Florida."

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It's just making them sound a bit more exotic than they really are.

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It doesn't do it for me, I'm afraid.

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-This style was very much done at the end of the 19th century.

-Yes.

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Royal Worcester, one of the best factories, they did a lot of this

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cream background, known as the blush ivory ground with flowers on the top and gilding,

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-so this was more affordable Royal Worcester.

-Yeah.

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-It's more a printed design, so they're not very valuable.

-Oh, OK.

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-You want to sell them, don't you?

-I do, because they're not me.

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We haven't got a lot of room to keep stuff that I don't like so.

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-No, they're no good in the loft, are they?

-No, not really.

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So value-wise, any idea?

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-A fiver, then I won't be disappointed.

-Stick a nought on it.

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About £50? Oh, that's not bad.

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£50. Something like that. £50-80 estimate,

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-reserve of £40 so they don't go for less.

-No, that's fine.

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And let's see what happens with them.

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-OK.

-I'm not going to ask what you'll do with the money,

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because they'll just cover your travel expenses.

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-Yes, petrol.

-But I look forward to seeing you at the auction.

-Thank you.

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Now we're ready with our first four items to go under the hammer.

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And I hope Gordon's spirit flask makes him some money.

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He knows his stuff and he's looking for at least £100.

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the French inkstand looks like a real bargain at £60 to £80.

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Fingers crossed the bidders think so too.

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I love this shell house.

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It's one of the quirkiest things we've seen on Flog It!

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Trust the Victorians to produce something so curious.

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And it's time for Stephanie to sell her vases.

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They've been in the loft where no-one can appreciate them.

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We've left Bury St Edmunds and travelled to the pretty market town of Diss, in Norfolk,

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where we plan to flog all our items at TW Gaze auction rooms

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and the sale room is that side of the water,

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so let's get over there and find out what's happening.

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Today's chief auctioneer is the lovely Elizabeth Talbot

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and it looks like Harry's shell house has caught her eye too.

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-What a lovely Victorian...

-It is fantastic.

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A real Victorian folly and so rare these days.

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The Victorians loved shells and they employed them

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in all sorts of ornamentation, as you well know.

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And that's all very well except that as a material they're very fragile

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and delicate and also they have been around as objects

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long enough for them to go in and out of fashion so a lot have been thrown away.

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But to find such a large example and such one...

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it's not just a cottage, it's a very intricate design.

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-Yes, it's beautiful. A lot of time, a lot of energy and patience.

-Yes.

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have been put into that, so very labour intense.

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It's been in his family three generations.

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-Has it, really? Has it really?

-This kind of kit really doesn't come to the market too often.

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No, it doesn't. Certainly, as I say, not as lavish and extraordinary.

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I love the fencing on the outside and the gate post.

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With coral and seaweed. It's got everything going for it. I put £200-300 on it.

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I think that's very, very fair. Very, very fair. I think...

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and it's in its original case, it's a joy.

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And it is definitely a piece to go to somebody who loves it

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and understands it and there are some very keen collectors again,

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for Victoriana and shell products, but this is exceptional. I think it's lovely.

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So thank you for bringing it cos I'm excited.

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The spirit flask with £100-150 on belongs to Gordon and I don't think for much longer.

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It's a proper antique, isn't it?

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Don't see many of them and it's immaculate...

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-It's condition is immaculate.

-It is, yeah.

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Why do you want to sell this, anyway?

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Nobody else in my family are interested.

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-Or doesn't understand about it.

-No.

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-Proper antique.

-Spirit flask.

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-Do you drink spirits, Gordon?

-I do.

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Straight from the bottle, not from the flask.

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I wouldn't say that.

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What are you implying?

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Totally medicinal, you know?

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What's your tipple of choice?

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-Pardon?

-What's your chosen tipple.

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-Drop of scotch.

-Drop of scotch.

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Anyway, chaps, it's quality and it's in immaculate condition.

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-Good luck.

-Salt glaze reform flask.

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Square depicting old Tom sitting precariously on his barrel there.

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I start here at £55. £55 is bid at 55 now.

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55 now, where's 60?

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-60, 5, 70, 5, 80, 5.

-That's better.

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90, 5, 95 with me at 95,

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now I'll take 100, 100 is bid, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150.

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At £150, are you all done at 150?

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That hammer's gone down. We like that sound.

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Good solid sold sound. 150, Gordon.

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-Top end of the estimate.

-Yeah.

-Perfect.

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What are you going to do with 150 quid. There is a bit of commission to pay.

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-I'm going to count it.

-You're going to count it...

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make sure it's all there.

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Next up, we've got the ink stand at £60-80 and it's good to see you again, Liz.

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-Who have you brought?

-My mother, Margaret.

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Hello, pleased to meet you. Classic inkstand.

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Typical French.

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Good, decorative item.

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It is. And that type of pottery has been going on almost for two centuries.

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This one's probably turn of the last century.

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Why do you want sell this, anyway?

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-Basically, I haven't got the room and I've got four cats diving about the house.

-Are you a cat lover?

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My daughter is, anyhow.

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-Yeah, oh, yeah.

-Well, look good luck.

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Let's hope we get top end of the money.

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Quimper monochrome triple inkstand there.

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Comprehensive inkwell. Start me at 50.

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£50 there. £30 I'll take.

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You've all gone quiet. Come on.

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£30... a lot for the money there at £30, anybody want it?

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-20 the hand only. Starting at 20, 22, 25,

-Right, now we're in.

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28, 30, 2, 35, 38,

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38 40 - new bidder, 40 bid now, where's 2?

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-At £40 only.

-Come on.

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£40 is a good piece for only £40.

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Are you all done?

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Didn't sell.

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-Didn't sell.

-We taped it in with the reserve which is the best thing

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we could have done because there was no interest here.

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I wouldn't have sold it for £40.

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-Really.

-It's worth twice that, really.

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Yes, yes.

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-Harry, it's good to meet up with you again.

-Thank you.

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You made my day back at the valuation day six weeks ago.

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Oh, you did. Harry walked in with this.

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Look at this. Here's your shell house.

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I just hope someone's prepared to shell out £2 - 300 today.

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I'd like to see it do more than that, but you don't know with auctions.

0:17:570:18:01

No, you don't. That's true.

0:18:010:18:03

What have you been doing in the last few weeks since we saw you.

0:18:030:18:06

Just in the garden, growing vegetables.

0:18:060:18:09

-Yeah, do you like doing that?

-Yes.

0:18:090:18:11

Right, this is now the moment of truth.

0:18:110:18:16

Lot 325 is next.

0:18:160:18:18

The fine, unusual and very rare Victorian model

0:18:180:18:21

of a cottage is made entirely of shells.

0:18:210:18:23

There in the back corner on the side there, lot 325 and I start at £100.

0:18:230:18:29

£100 I have.

0:18:290:18:31

At £100 only, wave if I miss you, it's a rarity, this.

0:18:310:18:35

at £100 where's 110?

0:18:350:18:36

120, 130,

0:18:360:18:38

140, 150, 160,

0:18:380:18:42

-170, 180...

-Come on, we're getting there.

0:18:420:18:45

..190, 200, are you sure?

0:18:450:18:47

Back with me at £200 now.

0:18:470:18:50

At £200 only, 210, 220,

0:18:500:18:54

220 now with me at 220.

0:18:540:18:58

Are you all done at 220?

0:18:580:19:00

-Gone.

-That was easy. I'm satisfied.

0:19:000:19:03

Yeah. I was expecting a little more but nevertheless

0:19:030:19:06

we pitched it at two to three, didn't we?

0:19:060:19:08

Yes, we put a reserve on for £200.

0:19:080:19:10

-Are you happy now with it?

-I'm happy.

0:19:100:19:12

-You're gonna say goodbye to it.

-That's very nice.

0:19:120:19:16

It's got a bit more Sellotape wrapped round it.

0:19:160:19:19

I see it. Yes, that's right.

0:19:190:19:21

Hey, it's gradually falling apart.

0:19:210:19:24

-Harry, it's been a pleasure to meet you.

-And you.

0:19:240:19:26

-Get back to the garden. Few hundred quid in your pocket.

-Yes.

0:19:260:19:30

Taking the rostrum for this next lot is auctioneer, Steve Stockton.

0:19:300:19:34

-It's good to see you again.

-Thank you.

0:19:340:19:36

Pair of vases from Stoke-on-Trent. Late 19th century...£50-80.

0:19:360:19:40

Early Carlton Ware.

0:19:400:19:42

Should do a bit more as pair?

0:19:420:19:44

Well, I think that's fairly accurate.

0:19:440:19:46

Is it? He's sticking by his guns.

0:19:460:19:49

-He's a cheeky chap, really.

-Yeah.

0:19:490:19:51

You're not giving anything away here.

0:19:510:19:53

I sometimes put my neck on the line.

0:19:530:19:55

Well, I am, I'm saying it's right.

0:19:550:19:58

We have a pair of W&R Florida pattern vases.

0:19:580:20:01

Slot 490 and I have two bids on the sheet.

0:20:010:20:06

Going to start that £42 do I see 5?

0:20:060:20:10

£42 now where's 5? 45, 48, 50, 55,

0:20:100:20:14

55 with me, do I see 60?

0:20:140:20:17

55 with me on commission, do I see 60? Any advance on £55?

0:20:170:20:23

-£55, Stephanie.

-That's good.

0:20:230:20:26

-That's all right.

-You were right.

0:20:260:20:28

-Stuck to your guns.

-Yeah.

0:20:280:20:29

We've got to give you that one, then.

0:20:290:20:31

-That's good.

-That put a big smile on your face.

0:20:330:20:36

You were first in the valuation day, weren't you? You were. Got up really early for that?

0:20:360:20:41

It was my sister-in-law that dragged me along because I have to hold my hands up.

0:20:410:20:45

Never seen the program.

0:20:450:20:47

But she dragged me along because of you, I think.

0:20:470:20:50

I wasn't quite sure why when I got there...

0:20:500:20:52

..she's just got back from Egypt and she's not well, so couldn't make it.

0:20:540:20:58

-Well, send her my love.

-I will, I will. Yes, OK.

0:20:580:21:00

-Thank you so much for coming in.

-Thank you.

0:21:000:21:03

You can send her home with one of these.

0:21:030:21:05

-I carry it with me to remind me of him, but you can have it.

-Thank you.

0:21:050:21:08

Could he sign it at the back.

0:21:080:21:10

Just to her, not me.

0:21:100:21:12

Now imagine living in a beautiful old house

0:21:230:21:25

in the countryside just like this one.

0:21:250:21:28

A dream come true for most of us.

0:21:280:21:30

But what happens when things start to go wrong with it?

0:21:300:21:34

For Paula Sunshine, a problem with her house turned into a real mission in life, believe me.

0:21:340:21:40

And it also unearthed some hidden passions.

0:21:400:21:44

Eleven years ago, Paula and her husband bought this five hundred year old timber-framed house.

0:21:470:21:53

Soon after, they found it had terrible damp problem,

0:21:530:21:57

but they could find nobody to help them sort it out,

0:21:570:21:59

so Paula literally took matters into her own hands

0:21:590:22:03

and has spent the last decade sorting out its problems

0:22:030:22:06

and returning this house to its former glory.

0:22:060:22:09

And I'm here to find out how she set about doing it.

0:22:090:22:13

Paula learnt many traditional skills from bricklaying to lime plastering,

0:22:150:22:20

but the one I'm here to find out about is wattle and daub, an age old form of wall panelling

0:22:200:22:25

which, in Paula's house, had been destroyed by damp.

0:22:250:22:28

Paula, I love what you've done to the house. It's absolutely stunning.

0:22:280:22:32

You've got that whole theme running throughout as well. Love the decor.

0:22:320:22:36

We talk about wattle and daub. Look at these uprights.

0:22:360:22:40

These would have been in-filled.

0:22:400:22:41

Yes. In fact, you can still see the ledges here, but these

0:22:410:22:44

ledges are missing their wattles, which are the upright ones.

0:22:440:22:48

-Which would be, what, local willow?

-Hazel. Hazel rods.

0:22:480:22:52

Hazel material.

0:22:520:22:53

-Tied on.

-And then you plaster on top of that with your render?

0:22:530:22:57

You'll do one side and then you come round and daub the other one.

0:22:570:23:03

Wattle and daub panels do perform a function.

0:23:030:23:06

They're lungs of the building, so when you get rain water entering into render cracks,

0:23:060:23:11

which everybody does, they may not know about it,

0:23:110:23:13

but it's happening inside the walls,

0:23:130:23:17

that soaks into the wattle and daub and then evaporates through the panel.

0:23:170:23:20

And it's all very invisible.

0:23:200:23:22

You don't see it happening, but it allows that moisture to dissipate and dry out.

0:23:220:23:27

-And can we have a go at that?

-You can.

0:23:270:23:30

-Now?

-Shall we?

0:23:300:23:33

Right, Paula. I guess the main ingredient is the clay.

0:23:410:23:44

Where do you get this from?

0:23:440:23:46

-Usually, the local farmer. I try and get it as local as possible, because that.

-Transporting it, yes.

0:23:460:23:51

Also that's what they would have done originally.

0:23:510:23:54

All the ponds that you see next to old buildings, tend to have been

0:23:540:23:58

made by the extraction of the clay to do the wattle and daub.

0:23:580:24:01

That'll do.

0:24:040:24:06

-And you tread that in?

-That's right.

0:24:060:24:09

Jump in, squash it down.

0:24:090:24:11

It's quite therapeutic isn't it, really?

0:24:120:24:15

It is quite satisfying.

0:24:150:24:17

It's quite interesting, these days,

0:24:170:24:19

to find a material that is so simple

0:24:190:24:22

-and can actually be used to build houses with.

-Yes.

0:24:220:24:25

Then we add some of this straw.

0:24:270:24:28

What will the straw do to this? Help it bind together?

0:24:290:24:33

Yes, it actually bulks up the mix,

0:24:330:24:35

better insulation and also stops it from breaking up as it dries.

0:24:350:24:40

So you put the straw in like that, and tread it in.

0:24:400:24:44

-Keeps you fit, doesn't it?

-It does.

0:24:470:24:49

Bit more water.

0:24:510:24:52

Bit more water, make it really sloppy.

0:24:520:24:54

That's it.

0:24:540:24:55

So just explain the two differences - the wattle and the daub.

0:24:550:24:59

The wattle is the bit, the hazel bit,

0:24:590:25:03

or you can have oak and the daub is what I'm standing in.

0:25:030:25:06

-The magical mix.

-You've got to turn over now.

0:25:060:25:09

-Are you ready for this.

-Which is the clay and straw and water.

-Yes.

0:25:090:25:13

I teach homeowners and I sometimes go on site and teach builders.

0:25:130:25:16

Passing on this kind of information is so important, it really is.

0:25:160:25:20

It's a very expensive thing to have done.

0:25:200:25:23

-It's labour intensive.

-Very.

0:25:230:25:25

I mean, you can see I can only do...

0:25:250:25:28

to make up the daub and to wattle up a panel,

0:25:280:25:30

about my height and size it takes a day.

0:25:300:25:34

So it would be very expensive to have 100 panels in your house repaired.

0:25:340:25:39

So people tend to say, "I'll go and learn how to do it."

0:25:390:25:42

One more bit of treading then.

0:25:420:25:44

Yes.

0:25:440:25:47

-I hear you've got a nice gooey mix there now.

-All right.

0:25:470:25:50

I think...

0:25:500:25:52

You give that a turn and it's ready to use.

0:25:520:25:55

That's it.

0:25:590:26:00

Put it in the wheelbarrow and we'll get daubing.

0:26:010:26:04

-Heavy.

-Yes, it is, isn't it?

0:26:040:26:08

-Waste not want not.

-Ah.

0:26:080:26:10

Every bit is precious.

0:26:100:26:12

OK.

0:26:140:26:15

-We've got two panels here.

-We have.

-They look a bit different.

0:26:230:26:27

That is what you were explaining inside?

0:26:270:26:29

That's right. And that method's peculiar to East Anglia,

0:26:290:26:32

whereas down the south of the country

0:26:320:26:36

you get this sort of woven panel.

0:26:360:26:39

Mainly, because they have very wide panels

0:26:390:26:41

and once they go over a certain width you can't really

0:26:410:26:44

do this tied method because it becomes too flexible

0:26:440:26:48

whereas the woven method is much more rigid.

0:26:480:26:50

When you're doing a woven panel, it has to be green hazel, that is,

0:26:500:26:53

it's cut and then used fresh, whereas with these they can be as old as the hills, really.

0:26:530:26:58

I've even used really ancient hazel.

0:26:580:27:00

-Is that because as they start to dry out they get rigid, they're not pliable.

-Yes.

0:27:000:27:05

You need to be able to bend them.

0:27:050:27:06

Well, I'm feeling quite pliable. We're now going to

0:27:060:27:10

put some plaster... put our daub on, should I say.

0:27:100:27:14

And your rubber gloves.

0:27:140:27:15

Which I've got in my pocket. Right, here we go.

0:27:150:27:18

OK. So, you've literally got to put it in by hand

0:27:180:27:23

-and you just force it in.

-Yes.

0:27:230:27:25

There's no way you could pick that out with a trowel and plaster it on.

0:27:250:27:29

If you get children to do it, they roll it up into balls and throw it from quite a distance.

0:27:290:27:34

-And it sticks like hell on there.

-Effective Yeah.

0:27:340:27:37

I can start anywhere really?

0:27:370:27:39

Anywhere you like.

0:27:390:27:41

It's jolly good fun, actually.

0:27:410:27:42

Oh, this is serious stuff, but it does feel really childish.

0:27:440:27:49

-That doesn't look too bad now, Paula, does it?

-No, it's very good.

0:28:030:28:06

How long will it take you to finish your house?

0:28:060:28:10

Well, I'm 44 now and I'm hoping by the time I'm 50

0:28:100:28:14

I will have done it.

0:28:140:28:16

Put your feet up and take it easy.

0:28:160:28:18

You've preserved something for future generations to see.

0:28:180:28:22

-That's what it's all about.

-It is.

0:28:220:28:24

I thoroughly enjoyed myself here. You know that?

0:28:240:28:27

I'm proud of this. I really am.

0:28:270:28:30

-You deserve a cup of tea.

-My mud wall.

0:28:300:28:32

Fantastic. Unfortunately, I've got to get back to my day job

0:28:320:28:36

and get back to the valuation day and see what's turning up.

0:28:360:28:39

So better wash up.

0:28:390:28:42

-Thanks so much, again.

-Right. Pleasure.

0:28:420:28:45

Pat, this is an intriguing collection of memories.

0:28:580:29:02

Of stars, of sports and theatre.

0:29:020:29:05

How did you come by them?

0:29:050:29:07

Well, my father collected some for me.

0:29:070:29:11

He knew quite a lot of theatricals and I met quite a few.

0:29:110:29:14

Right. So where...what did your father do? Was he in the theatre?

0:29:140:29:18

No. He was a chemist and an optician in Blackpool in the Emporium.

0:29:180:29:25

He used to get a lot of the ladies come in and say,

0:29:250:29:28

"Freddie, darling, have you got anything for me this week?"

0:29:280:29:31

It was during the war and rationing.

0:29:310:29:33

Make-up was short, yes.

0:29:330:29:35

-Right.

-He knew so many.

0:29:350:29:37

-Hence, all these autographs.

-Yes.

0:29:370:29:39

This is a wonderful collection. Absolutely marvellous collection.

0:29:390:29:43

I've quickly gone through it and put some little markers in.

0:29:430:29:46

The first one that I love is Freddie Mills, the boxer.

0:29:460:29:49

-Yes.

-And he's got RAF. Did he box for the RAF?

0:29:490:29:52

-Yes, I think he did.

-And he was in the RAF, wasn't he?

-Yes.

0:29:520:29:56

So this was probably taken when he was...

0:29:560:29:58

-Before he became one of the champions.

-Exactly.

0:29:580:30:01

Then, this I find fascinating.

0:30:010:30:05

Because here are two characters with table tennis bats.

0:30:050:30:09

-What do you know about these?

-Alec Brooks and Victor Barna.

0:30:090:30:13

Victor Barna was a lovely man.

0:30:130:30:15

He was Hungarian and he was eighteen times world champion table tennis.

0:30:150:30:21

And the one I love because I used to go ballroom dancing, is Joe Loss.

0:30:210:30:25

-Yes, he was brilliant.

-He was good, wasn't he?

0:30:250:30:28

There we have a much younger version of Joe Loss and this is his orchestra.

0:30:280:30:32

-Look, it says, "In The Mood."

-Oh.

0:30:320:30:36

-That was his opening tune, wasn't it?

-I've got the record.

-Have you?

0:30:360:30:39

-Have you really?

-Yes.

0:30:390:30:42

And then here, must be your pride of place,

0:30:420:30:46

Bing Crosby and he's just signed it, "Sincerely, Bing."

0:30:460:30:51

-Yes.

-Where did you get this?

0:30:510:30:53

Friends got me that one.

0:30:530:30:54

Bing Crosby came over to entertain the American forces.

0:30:540:30:59

-Because you must have been young when you got these.

-I was still at school.

0:30:590:31:03

You've got a lovely collection.

0:31:030:31:05

We've got to talk in mercenary terms about money.

0:31:070:31:10

Why do you want to get rid of these?

0:31:100:31:12

It doesn't mean anything to my children, it's before their time

0:31:120:31:17

and I thought somebody else could get pleasure from it.

0:31:170:31:21

There are so many albums. Not repeated exactly the same with all these artists.

0:31:210:31:26

You've got a nice selection,

0:31:260:31:28

but I wouldn't put this more than £80 to £100, that price range.

0:31:280:31:31

-Fine.

-So we'll put it up for sale?

0:31:310:31:34

-Yes, please.

-All these memories.

-I know.

0:31:340:31:36

I can't take them with me when I go, can I?

0:31:360:31:38

But you can spend the money!

0:31:380:31:40

Thank you very much. It's been so enjoyable talking to you

0:31:430:31:45

and reliving the experiences that you've had.

0:31:450:31:49

-Thank you very much.

-Do you go to the auction?

0:31:490:31:51

-Yes.

-Oh, well, I have an autograph, a photograph of you.

-Thank you very much.

0:31:510:31:56

-Cathy.

-Hello there.

-Nice hat.

0:32:050:32:06

-Thank you.

-Welcome to Flog It!

-Thank you.

0:32:060:32:09

Why would you like to sell a beautiful object like that?

0:32:090:32:13

With central heating instead of live fires,

0:32:130:32:16

and it's not doing it any good,

0:32:160:32:17

so it's been in our pantry for the last three years.

0:32:170:32:20

There's a good reason - living in a pantry.

0:32:200:32:22

Where did you get it from?

0:32:220:32:24

It came to my mum from a great aunt about 20 years ago

0:32:240:32:29

and I know it's beautiful,

0:32:290:32:31

but it just sat on the sideboard for a lot of years.

0:32:310:32:35

It's a very nice example, a good, large size early to mid-19th century tea caddy.

0:32:350:32:42

In rosewood, edged in boxwood and cross banded along the top in rosewood as well.

0:32:420:32:48

Beautiful object with these gilt metal claw feet on it and of course,

0:32:480:32:55

for tea, so you'll see the two divisions there,

0:32:550:33:02

you'd have had green tea one side, black tea the other.

0:33:020:33:05

And a sugar bowl in the middle.

0:33:050:33:09

But this is the wrong sugar bowl.

0:33:090:33:11

This is from your local Chinese takeaway, or...

0:33:110:33:15

Well, it came with the box.

0:33:150:33:17

It sits in there, so why not,

0:33:170:33:18

but it shows where the glass bowl originally would have been.

0:33:180:33:23

So very nice object indeed.

0:33:230:33:25

A lot of collectors for tea caddies nowadays

0:33:250:33:28

and this is a good, large example of that sarcophagus form.

0:33:280:33:31

A bit of a funereal look to it almost, isn't it? Casket.

0:33:310:33:34

I like the way it goes up rather than...

0:33:340:33:38

-A very pleasing object to the eye, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:33:380:33:42

-Any idea what it might be worth?

-No idea.

0:33:420:33:44

We sell quite a lot of these, so they're not hard to value,

0:33:440:33:47

but I would think it should make 120 to 180 at auction

0:33:470:33:51

and hopefully a bit more, that's probably slightly conservative.

0:33:510:33:57

If we put a reserve of 100, if it doesn't make 100, it should go home.

0:33:570:34:00

-I'll pop it back in the pantry.

-If it doesn't make 100.

0:34:000:34:04

But it is a lovely example.

0:34:040:34:05

Would you put the money towards anything in particular?

0:34:050:34:08

Um, probably just take Dad out for a meal.

0:34:080:34:12

-Not another hat, then?

-No, no, I've got quite enough.

0:34:120:34:15

Rosemary, lovely to see you again after...how many years?

0:34:250:34:28

Oh, it must be about 40 years since we first knew each other.

0:34:280:34:32

Because we used to go to the same youth club.

0:34:320:34:35

-Yes.

-Great fun in those days.

0:34:350:34:37

-We had a lovely time,

-Absolutely wonderful.

0:34:370:34:39

And the parties, the parties at my parent's house.

0:34:390:34:42

Yes. It was all so enjoyable. It seems like an alien world.

0:34:420:34:47

-When you look at today, yeah.

-Dear oh, dear.

0:34:470:34:49

Why are you getting rid of these?

0:34:510:34:53

They're my husband's.

0:34:530:34:56

They belonged to my mother-in-law who died and she wanted him to have them

0:34:560:35:00

but he doesn't like them and nobody else in the family likes them,

0:35:000:35:03

so I thought I'd come along and see.

0:35:030:35:05

-Surely they have sentimental value.

-He says not.

0:35:050:35:08

I used to collect Staffordshire when I was young.

0:35:080:35:11

I had a huge collection and I've told people many times

0:35:110:35:15

-about how they lasted about three months when I got married.

-Yes.

0:35:150:35:19

I like these because they're fairly late-nineteenth century.

0:35:190:35:23

-Yes.

-But I like them because of their sponged work.

0:35:230:35:26

So if you look at Judy, because they're Punch and Judy, this one here.

0:35:260:35:29

They have all this stencilled and sponged decoration all the way around the hat

0:35:290:35:35

and on her dress which is quite good.

0:35:350:35:37

And when we look at Mr Punch, we've got sponge decoration on his hat.

0:35:370:35:42

-It is so unusual to find them with their original bonnet and hat.

-Really?

0:35:420:35:46

Yeah. So this is quite nice.

0:35:460:35:48

I notice that Mr Punch has had the comb on his hat

0:35:480:35:52

has been off but it's glued back and it's an old repair.

0:35:520:35:55

I don't mind that. I don't mind that.

0:35:550:35:57

-It's all part of his character.

-Well, yes.

0:35:570:36:00

I have seen these before.

0:36:000:36:01

Because Staffordshire market, it's not gone in decline,

0:36:010:36:05

but it's not in demand as it was a few years ago,

0:36:050:36:08

or when I started collecting forty years ago.

0:36:080:36:10

-Forty...a long time ago, yes.

-A long time ago.

0:36:100:36:13

Um, so I think if I look at these and put a value on them,

0:36:130:36:16

-I'm going to say about £60 to £80.

-Right, yes.

0:36:160:36:19

If we put these up for sale ten years ago, you'd have got treble that.

0:36:190:36:24

Just shows the fluctuation of fashion and demand.

0:36:240:36:27

But that's just it, isn't it?

0:36:270:36:28

We've moved house and we have nowhere at all to put them

0:36:280:36:33

they're on top of the wardrobe so this is a good opportunity...

0:36:330:36:36

-Well, I think Punch and Judy deserve a better place than the top of the wardrobe.

-They do, don't they? Yes.

0:36:360:36:41

-Perhaps some cottage in this area and they'd look very good on a dresser.

-Yes.

0:36:410:36:46

Let's hope when we go to Diss,

0:36:460:36:47

that somebody's going to be there that appreciates what we've got in front of us.

0:36:470:36:51

-Thank you.

-Rosemary, lovely seeing you.

0:36:510:36:54

-Nice to see you again.

-Thank you very much.

0:36:540:36:57

Another three valuations under our belt.

0:37:000:37:03

So here are three lots heading off to auction.

0:37:030:37:06

Although Patricia's autograph book holds many fond memories for her,

0:37:060:37:10

she's ready to let it go.

0:37:100:37:12

Unless you're a collector, what do you do with a tea caddy?

0:37:120:37:15

Let's hope someone in the sale room has a bright idea.

0:37:150:37:18

And the problem with inheriting antiques is that they're not always to our taste,

0:37:180:37:22

so the best thing for Rosemary to do with her Toby jugs is to flog them.

0:37:220:37:26

Next up, Patricia's autograph book.

0:37:300:37:32

We had a chat to the auctioneer just before the sale started and we think it's a good trade lot.

0:37:320:37:37

-It might get bought to be split up.

-I think so.

0:37:370:37:40

The value's in a few of the autographs and photographs and less in some.

0:37:400:37:45

-There are two records now which were brought in this morning?

-Oh.

0:37:450:37:48

-Bing Crosby to go with his autograph and I brought Joe Loss In the Mood.

-In the Mood.

0:37:480:37:55

Let's hope this lot in Diss are certainly in the mood to buy this.

0:37:550:38:00

Good luck, both of you.

0:38:000:38:02

And to lot 370.

0:38:020:38:03

A fabulous lot, this. An autograph book containing a signed black

0:38:030:38:07

and white photographs with two 78 records by Bing Crosby

0:38:070:38:10

and Joe Loss. So an interesting mixed lot there.

0:38:100:38:13

Some very good names and I'm going to start,

0:38:130:38:15

I've got commission interest at £55.

0:38:150:38:18

55 is a good start.

0:38:180:38:20

£55 now, where's 60? 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 I'm at. 80 now where's 5?

0:38:200:38:28

85 on the telephone, £90, 95.

0:38:280:38:33

95 now on the telephone, 95 on the telephone, do I see 100?

0:38:330:38:37

It's £95. I can sell for 95.

0:38:370:38:41

A fine collection at £95.

0:38:410:38:43

Yes, the hammer's gone down. £95.

0:38:430:38:47

-Lots of memories there.

-Yes, I know.

0:38:470:38:49

I was only a teenager.

0:38:490:38:54

Admiring all the big stars.

0:38:540:38:55

-Blackpool must have been in its heyday back then.

-It was lovely.

0:38:550:38:58

Mind you, it was during the war and there were loads of airmen.

0:38:580:39:02

All wanted to have a good time.

0:39:020:39:04

Yeah. I used to dance with them.

0:39:040:39:06

See, that was my war work I was still at school,

0:39:060:39:09

but that was my war work, entertainment and dancing.

0:39:090:39:13

Thank you for sharing those memories with us.

0:39:130:39:16

And 95 quid. Well, that will get you up to Blackpool

0:39:160:39:20

to have a day trip out, wouldn't it really?

0:39:200:39:22

Pay for the petrol, wouldn't it?

0:39:220:39:25

Elizabeth is now back to auction off our final couple of lots.

0:39:260:39:30

Next up, Cathy's tea caddy. We've got the tea caddy, Cathy can't be with us,

0:39:320:39:38

but we do have her dad, Howie, who's also wearing a very interesting hat.

0:39:380:39:41

We thought you might be Cathy's dad.

0:39:410:39:43

Everybody know me in the area.

0:39:430:39:46

-So where is Cathy today?

-She's still at work.

0:39:460:39:49

She's looking after an elderly woman.

0:39:490:39:52

-She's just a live-in carer.

-OK.

0:39:520:39:55

And she goes from site to site all over the place, all over Britain, more or less.

0:39:550:40:00

-Oh, right.

-We'll be in Oxford next.

-Gosh.

0:40:000:40:03

Oh, nice rewarding work, anyway.

0:40:030:40:05

Send her our regards and hopefully we can send her lots of money after the show.

0:40:050:40:08

-Be nice.

-We're looking at £120, £180 for this tea caddy. Bit of quality.

0:40:080:40:13

-You know your wood. What do you say.?

-I like it.

0:40:130:40:15

-Will it sell?

-Yes. It will.

0:40:150:40:17

Lot 150 is a 19th century rosewood tea caddy of sarcophagus form, there.

0:40:170:40:22

As on this one here, I start at £55. That's a lovely period piece.

0:40:220:40:26

60, 5, 70, 5, 80, 5, 85 with me,

0:40:260:40:31

at 85, 90, 5, 100 and I'm out.

0:40:310:40:34

100 now the front bid at 100, I'll take 10.

0:40:340:40:37

£100, am I missing anybody at £100?

0:40:370:40:41

It's gone. We had a reserve of £100.

0:40:410:40:44

That saves me carting it home.

0:40:440:40:45

That saves you carting it home. It's only that big.

0:40:450:40:48

-Someone got that quite cheaply.

-Mmm. Nice box.

0:40:500:40:53

At least we had a reserve on it. Otherwise who knows?

0:40:530:40:55

Yeah. That's auctions for you.

0:40:550:40:57

Sometimes you can pick up a bargain.

0:40:570:41:00

Now we're going to find out if that's the way to do it, as we reunite two old...

0:41:040:41:10

CARTOON VOICE: That's the way to do it.

0:41:100:41:13

As we reunite two old friends,

0:41:130:41:15

Rosemary and David, because you go back a long way, don't you?

0:41:150:41:18

Oh, yes. Don't tell how many years.

0:41:180:41:20

I won't tell.

0:41:200:41:22

School chums. Anyhow, we've got Punch and Judy, haven't we?

0:41:220:41:25

Two Toby jugs, valuation round about £50 we're hoping for.

0:41:250:41:30

Yeah, yeah. Staffordshire's taken a plunge,

0:41:300:41:33

but these are good mantelpiece ornaments or dresser ornamentations.

0:41:330:41:39

Hopefully, they're different.

0:41:390:41:40

A bit of country furniture.

0:41:400:41:42

We've got that going for it and we've also got the fact

0:41:420:41:46

-that they are a Punch and Judy so there's lots of takers for that out there.

-That's right.

0:41:460:41:50

So good luck, both of you.

0:41:500:41:51

I know you've had a good natter.

0:41:510:41:53

It just seems like yesterday, that's the beauty of old friends isn't it, really?

0:41:530:41:57

What was he like as a youngster?

0:41:570:41:59

I don't think he's changed very much at all.

0:41:590:42:02

Any scandal?

0:42:050:42:07

-Not that I can think of.

-I thought you

0:42:070:42:10

were going to say, "Not that I can mention."

0:42:100:42:12

We'll leave that then. It's going under the hammer now.

0:42:120:42:15

This is it. Good luck, Rosemary.

0:42:150:42:17

Lot 110 now, the pair of late 19th century Toby jugs of Punch and Judy.

0:42:170:42:23

I say £50 on the pair.

0:42:230:42:25

It's good to find them still together at 50.

0:42:250:42:27

-That's true.

-30 I'll take.

0:42:270:42:30

30's bid, thank you. 30 I have.

0:42:300:42:33

30, 32, 35, 38, 40, 2, 45, 48, 50.

0:42:330:42:40

50 at the corner, 50 I'll take 5, 55 new bidder, 60, 5, 70.

0:42:400:42:46

Oh, this is more like it.

0:42:460:42:47

-Oh, this is, yeah.

-70 still the corner at 70 now, where's 5 again?

0:42:470:42:51

At £70 on Punch and Judy at £70, all done?

0:42:510:42:56

-£70.

-Oh, great.

-Brilliant, brilliant.

0:42:570:43:00

-That's fantastic.

-I'm really pleased.

0:43:000:43:02

That's well over the estimate.

0:43:020:43:04

-Thank you, David.

-By ten pounds.

0:43:040:43:07

Well, I think you can carry on having your chat and have a cup of coffee or something.

0:43:110:43:15

That's a good idea. Come on.

0:43:150:43:17

School friends.

0:43:170:43:19

Well, another auction over, and sadly no high flyers, but plenty of satisfied sellers.

0:43:230:43:29

I've got to say our experts really did have their work cut out.

0:43:290:43:32

It's been a pleasure here in Diss

0:43:320:43:34

and we all can't wait to come back, so till the next time, it's cheerio from Flog It!

0:43:340:43:39

For more information about Flog It!, including how the programme was made,

0:43:460:43:50

visit the website at bbc.co.uk.

0:43:500:43:53

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:540:43:57

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:570:44:00

Flog It! comes from the Athenaeum in Bury St Edmunds, where David Barby and Adam Partridge offer up their antiques expertise and presenter, Paul Martin, falls in love with a rather quirky Victorian curiosity. Before the second visit to the valuation day, Paul meets Paula Sunshine, who has renovated her 500-year-old timber-framed house in traditional methods. He also tries his hand at the age-old building method, wattle and daub.