Oldham Flog It!


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Oldham

Flog It! experts Anita Manning and Kate Bliss search through family heirlooms in Oldham while presenter Paul Martin finds himself in court.


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Like many Lancashire towns, Oldham was all about textile and production in the 19th century.

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At the height of the industrial revolution, there were a whopping 360 mills here,

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making it the centre of cotton-spinning in the entire world.

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It doesn't have quite the same international status today but maybe we can put it back on the map.

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Just look at this big crowd who have turned out with their treasures and trophies for us to value,

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and Anita Manning and Kate Bliss are already hard at work.

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Well, it's all quiet inside the Queen Elizabeth Hall right now,

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but any moment the doors are gonna be open

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and our crowd will flood through - I can hear them coming right now.

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Here they come. There's lots of excitement and anticipation

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as the first few reach the Flog It! blue tablecloths.

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I feel we're gonna be in for a very busy day.

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Sheila, this is a very interesting little brooch.

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I think it's absolutely gorgeous.

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In fact I think it might just suit my jacket!

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Absolutely. It looks lovely, yes.

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Can you tell me anything about it?

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-Where did you get it?

-I actually got it in an adjacent town's car boot sale, within the last 12 months.

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It was just lying there on the stall.

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Apparently there had been a lot of really good stuff

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They said, "You've missed it all."

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That was just there, it was £4.

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£4. That's not a lot of money.

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-Indeed, no.

-Well, do you know where it comes from?

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No. I thought at first it might be Russian...

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-Because of the enamel work?

-Yes.

-I can see where you're coming from.

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And then I looked at what's on the box and I thought, "That's not Russian", so... a bit puzzled.

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It's Scandinavian. It's Norwegian, and if we look on the back

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we can see the initials for Marius Hammer.

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We have an "M" and a little hammer and we have the mark "930",

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which is the silver mark.

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It's slightly better than sterling silver.

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The Norwegians and Swedish were wonderful with the enamelled work

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and this is representing that type of work. Have you ever worn it?

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-No, it's a little bit too big for me, really...

-It's a wee bit fanciful.

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And it's a little bit ostentatious.

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-So a little fanciful for today's taste?

-Yes.

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But at the same time it would be of interest to the collector

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and it is a collector who would buy this type of thing.

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What sort of date would it be?

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Well, it's early 20th century, up to maybe '20s or '30s,

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so the estimate I would put on it,

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considering that it's a very finely crafted piece...

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We have a maker's name,

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it's in the original box, and that type of thing is popular just now.

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Taking all these factors into account,

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I would estimate it 80-120.

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-Now, would you be happy to sell it at that price?

-Yes.

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I'd never wear it. I'd never wear it.

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So it was quite a good investment for £4!

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It certainly was, wasn't it?

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Well, shall we put a reserve on it?

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I think so, just to protect it.

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We'll put a reserve of £80, the lower estimate,

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and I'm sure it will do very well.

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I find that enamelled and cloisonne works are doing very well just now.

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-Kevin, I've been itching to have a go with this all day!

-Right.

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Tell me, was this yours when you were a little boy?

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Yes. My parents bought it for me when I was...

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in the '60s, probably, when I was about 12 years old.

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James Bond was around at the time and I liked James Bond, of course,

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and I liked cars, because I was a kid and so, yes.

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This must have been quite some present when you were 12 years old.

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It is the ultimate, isn't it?

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Corgis came out in 1956, I think, released by Mettoy

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and became really very popular with young boys particularly, because of their moving parts.

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You could open the windows, they had things you could do with them,

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so of course they released a range relating to TV programmes and films.

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The DB5, 007's vehicle, in gold, was really quite something.

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-It was.

-So, talk me through all these moving bits

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because wasn't this really was the ultimate car?

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Right. I'll put the old glasses on... the age...

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You press the little exhaust pipes at the back

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and the bulletproof screen pops up

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then you press this little button here

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-and the machine guns and...

-At the front.

-..look, they've come out.

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And then very carefully you press this one, and I'll just put my hand over because...

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-Oh, there he goes!

-The roof pops up and a man comes out and there he is.

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-That's brilliant.

-There's your little bits.

-And he would fly out if we let him, wouldn't he?

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He would. If you want to scrabble on the floor, you can make him fly out.

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But the downside for collectors with all these moving parts

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-was that things went missing so easily.

-Yeah.

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And this little ejector man, not very big, would often fly out

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-and get lost and that would be the end of that.

-That's right.

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But you have kept him, here he is, and...this is also the really exciting bit,

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we've got top secret-documents underneath, haven't we, because in the box we should have...

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the...

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instructions, and here we go.

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You've kept them. There they are. Look at that!

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They look as if they've hardly been touched, inside there.

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And inside there is a spare little man.

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I can feel him. There he is.

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Excellent. So it's just as it should be. So, what about value?

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I mean, as a collector yourself, do you have any idea?

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Not really, no, because I haven't got too many old toys

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and you can't get accurate valuations if you go around to some of the dealers

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because they want them for themselves.

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Well, I'm gonna be conservative.

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I think is going to go well in our fine art sale for you,

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but I'm going to say roughly between £70 and £100.

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I think if two people really want it for their collection,

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it could make more than that, but that sort of estimate is gonna tempt the buyers and it should do well.

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-It's quite a few quid more than my mum and dad paid!

-I bet it is!

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Barbara, it's a great example of a field telescope.

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Tell me, what are you doing owning a wonderful scientific instrument like this?

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It's my father-in-law's. It were fetched back from the War...

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-Oh, really? He used it in the war?

-Well, he must have, yes, I think so.

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Gosh. He must have thought a lot of it to carry it all the way back,

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-because a lot of these just got left by the wayside.

-Yes.

-Where did he see action?

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Well, he was all over, but I believe he came down at Norway...

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-He was shot down, was he?

-Yes, and the Norwegian people looked after him,

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and then he came home after.

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It's a boy's toy, isn't it, really?

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-Yes.

-And it actually does work, because I can just see there,

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I can check out the exit sign and it is crystal clear. Have you used this?

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Oh, yes, we have used it a few times, but it's that heavy...

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-It is heavy, isn't it?

-Yes, it's hard to use.

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-If you're looking...

-I'll use your shoulder as a tripod!

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Do you really want to sell this?

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-Yes.

-Because there's a nice story, though.

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Oh, yes, but the children don't want it and it's just a shame being stuck in the cupboard really,

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so you know that's why I've fetched it along.

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-Are you not gonna stargaze any more?

-No, no, no.

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Or check out the neighbours and see what's... a bit of curtain-twitching...!

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-"What's going on over there?"!

-No, no, no.

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OK. Value-wise,

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the good news for you is it's signed, "Dallmeyer, London, 1915."

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The bad news is this...

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-One stress fracture in the brass. Can you see that?

-Yes.

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-It's about an inch long.

-Yes.

-That's a shame.

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That devalues it, because people that collect scientific instruments are purists, believe me.

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Everything has to be accurate. They're very, very fussy collectors.

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I'd like to put it into auction with the typical auctioneer's cliche, 80-120. It's gonna sell for that.

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I was rather hoping this would do around the £160 mark cos it's a great London maker,

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-but unfortunately...

-That little chip.

-That stress in the brass...

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But I reckon we stand a chance of getting 80-120.

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-Right. That's fine.

-I really do. I like it, and it's usable.

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It's great.

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-Hello, Lois.

-Hello.

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I've pounced on you this morning

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because I'm a bit of a sucker for baby plates,

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and you've got a really charming example with a matching little mug.

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Where did these come from?

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It came from my aunt.

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When my son was born he was quite ill

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and my aunt was telling an old man that she looked after about him

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-and he gave her this cup and plate from my son.

-What a lovely present!

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So, have you ever used them?

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No, no. It's just been wrapped up and put in the loft.

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Right. Well, do you know anything about the design?

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No, just that people do collect the Mabel Lucie Attwells, that's all.

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That's right. Well, that's the name that we look for, actually,

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one of the names we look for, with baby plates and related wares.

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You're right, they've become quite collectable.

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In recent years, a whole market has opened up

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and there are two things that make them commercial.

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Firstly the manufacturer of the porcelain or pottery,

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and secondly the design.

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Now let's just have a look at the factory,

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and if we turn this over we can see we've got the name "Shelley" on the bottom here,

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so we know it's a very well-known British manufacturer.

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Shelley was well-known for producing a whole range of utilitarian wares,

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-and we can feel that this plate, as most are, is very heavy, isn't it?

-Yes.

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It was made to last with toddlers throwing things around the place.

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This is pottery, but if we look at the matching mug,

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we can see this is quite fine, and it's made of porcelain.

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If I run my hands...hold it up to the light you can see my fingers through it

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and that's actually quite fine china, but let's look at the design,

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cos that's the other thing that makes these commercial.

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What do you think of it?

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It's really cute, and the little saying on it is really...

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It's lovely, isn't it? Very often we have nursery rhymes illustrated

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but here we have a little verse...

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Isn't that sweet? It's charming for any child, and what we've got here

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is a design that is probably taken from a children's book

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because Mabel Lucie Attwell was known

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in her time as a fantastic children's illustrator of books,

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and her designs were taken from the books and applied to children's wares being made at the time,

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and this probably has come from one of her annuals or one of her books.

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Well, one thing about your example, both the bowl here and the mug,

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I don't think, Lois, I've seen an example in such amazing condition.

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So often they were used and became, if they weren't chipped or cracked,

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then the transfer printing was scratched,

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and this is just as-new, and the little mug as well,

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so that is going to be really important for collectors and will help it, price-wise.

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I would put them obviously in the same lot, they're matching items,

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and probably a conservative value at auction, I would say, £30-£50.

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-Yes.

-Does that sound good?

-That sounds good.

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-Excellent. Well, I would hope that we get a very good price for you.

-Yes, thank you.

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We've seen all kinds of goodies at the tables today

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and now it's time to whisk some items off to the saleroom.

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This stylish Norwegian brooch was going for a song at a car-boot sale,

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and could prove a real gem for Sheila.

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Kate's sure the James Bond car with all its gadgets will be licensed to thrill in the sale room.

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I see no ships

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but I hope a sharp-eyed dealer will spot this telescope

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with so much history attached to it,

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and can we tempt a doting parent to splash out

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on this Mabel Lucie Attwell plate and mug?

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Let's find out.

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We've certainly got a roomful of bidders here at the Calder Valley Auction Rooms just outside Halifax

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-and let's hope they're all here to spend some money... Aren't you?

-Yeah!

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And our man on the rostrum today is auctioneer Ian Peace.

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Something that's just come out of the loft is Lois's little baby plate and mug,

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the Shelley, the little set, and someone that should know about baby plates and mugs is Kate here.

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Your little girl must be going through the terrible twos right now, is she?

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Almost, almost! She's got attitude, I think.

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-Ooh! And another one on the way!

-I know!

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-Fancy buying this one, then?

-I wish I was allowed to! It is really...

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I had forgotten what super condition this is in.

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That's the one thing you don't see very often with baby plates.

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Surely it's got to do more than £30-£50? Kate, come on, let's pray for £60, £70.

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I would hope it would get top estimate, anyway, fingers crossed.

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Lot number ten, this Shelley Mabel Lucie Attwell baby's plate and mug,

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very nice. £30 shall we say, 30, 20, 20 I'm bid, I'll go fives.

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At 20, at 20, and 25, 25, 30, and 5, 40 and 5, 50 and 5, 60.

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At £60. Any further bids at £60?

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-Not bad. Come on!

-At £60... at £60 and 5, at 65, 70 and 5, 80...

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That's more like it, isn't it?

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£80. Are we done? £80.

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-Well done!

-You were right!

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Well, done, but condition, condition, condition...

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that's what it's all about. So, £80.

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That's not bad, is it? What are you gonna spend that on, then?

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Probably a meal out with my son.

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-Is he here today?

-Yes, he is.

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I can see why. You're dressed perfectly for a meal out.

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A slap-up lunch somewhere. Great result there.

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I didn't think it would do that much, I have to say. It's a great result.

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Yeah, it's brilliant, that.

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-Thanks very much.

-They're here to buy.

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Right now it's my turn and next up it's the four-draw telescope.

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Barbara, I've got my eye on you, and this lot! Hopefully they'll bid on this.

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I'm feeling a little bit nervous, though.

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Condition is against it, as we said on the day,

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but we've got a discretion of £60 and I'm sure it's gonna find a home.

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It's got to! It's real quality...

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he said!

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Brass and leather four-draw fold telescope, a London maker.

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Do I get an opening bid of £50?

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40 anywhere, £40 for the telescope?

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40 I have there. £40. £40 and 5, at £45, at £50, £55.

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Anybody else now at £55?

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It's a named telescope, a London maker, at £55.

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Any further bids at 55?

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Are we all done at £55? Going to sell at 55.

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Are there any further advances?

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At £55 then...

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He did sell it. Yeah, £60 discretion we had, so he's used it. We just,

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just got that away!

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That was close, that was really close!

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-Well, it sold!

-We were one pound in our limit for our 10% discretion on £60.

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-I'm sorry it didn't get the top end but we got it away, didn't we?

-Yes.

-Just...

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Right, are we connected? 5, 30, 40 and 5, 50 and 5.

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Anyone fancy an Aston Martin DB5?

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You gotta be right here right now for this one.

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It belongs to Kevin, not for much longer.

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We've got a valuation of £70-£100. Why are you flogging this?

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Nobody to leave it to. Maybe it should be somebody else's memory now.

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Yeah. A collector will buy this one, and pay top money for it.

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It's one owner, very low mileage!

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757, a boxed Corgi toy, James Bond Aston Martin DB5.

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It's got its instructions, its driver, it's all there.

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What am I bid for 757, ladies and gentlemen?

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Open me at £50, £50, 40 then, 40 I'm bid.

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-Thank you. £40.

-Oh, gosh! Come on!

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And 5, 50 and 5, 55, 60, and 5.

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At £65, 70 at £70. Anybody else?

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75, sir, 80 and 5, 90 and 5, 100.

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£100 I'm bid. Anybody else?

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£100. It's all there. At £100.

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At £100 front row...

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-Gosh, Kate, you were right!

-The market has changed.

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Well, yeah, but I do think someone's got a bargain.

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-I do too, yeah.

-I really do.

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Never mind. I mean, for a car like that, in that sort of condition

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needs a specialist toy sale, then you've got a worldwide market, but you're right, 100 quid.

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Well, it's a couple more diecasts!

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Sheila, hopefully we'll make you lots of money right now...

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-A million!

-It's a packed room. I don't know about that!

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This is a 20th-century brooch, it's definitely worth £80-£120.

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-How much did you pay for it?

-I paid four, I think.

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Well done!

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Where are these car-boot sales?

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Well, I think it was a lady not really knowing what she was selling, you know,

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because I'd missed most of the stuff at the stall and that had been left behind.

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A lot of people don't know the value of 20th-century modern, and it's really making big money right now.

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Are you an every-sort-of-weekend car booter, or just sort of a fair-weather one?

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A fair-weather one.

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-You've gotta be hard as nails, haven't you, to get up very early in the morning?

-Yeah.

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-Do you do boot sales at all?

-No, no.

0:19:200:19:22

-They see you coming, don't they? They wouldn't sell to Anita!

-I'm too busy standing at a rostrum!

0:19:220:19:28

731, a cased silver and enamel brooch by Maris Hammer,

0:19:280:19:32

with filigree jots. There we are,

0:19:320:19:35

original case. What am I bid for this?

0:19:350:19:37

Shall we say 100, 80, 50, £50?

0:19:370:19:40

50 I'm bid there, £50, 60, and 70, at 80, 90,

0:19:400:19:46

100 and 10, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180.

0:19:460:19:54

£180 I'm bid.

0:19:540:19:57

At £180 on my left there, at £180. Are we all done?

0:19:570:20:03

180...

0:20:030:20:05

Yes! £180! You see!

0:20:050:20:09

A lot of people don't know the value of 20th-century modern.

0:20:090:20:12

-It's like darts! 180!

-You didn't think it would sell?

0:20:120:20:15

Oh, I didn't, did I?

0:20:150:20:17

Oh, ye of little faith!

0:20:170:20:19

Right now it's time for a trip down memory lane,

0:20:250:20:28

to a police station in the heart of Manchester where time has stood still.

0:20:280:20:32

These cells and courtroom have seen plenty of action in the past 100 years

0:20:320:20:36

and they're about to see a bit more action right now, with a character you just might recognise.

0:20:360:20:42

MUSIC: Theme from "Dixon Of Dock Green".

0:20:490:20:52

Working the beat, you know, is very funny sometimes,

0:21:050:21:10

and my inspector only recently he arrested a man

0:21:100:21:15

who was a very dodgy character.

0:21:150:21:18

Listen, there's some misunderstanding.

0:21:180:21:21

-We can work this out.

-You've had your say.

0:21:210:21:24

It's my turn now. Sergeant, Policewoman 1 and I

0:21:240:21:26

were on three beat outside the Queen Elizabeth Hall when I saw this man acting suspiciously.

0:21:260:21:31

-I wasn't acting suspiciously.

-No, let me get my say in.

0:21:310:21:33

He's got a sack, he's got items in here which are valuable, and when I questioned him about them,

0:21:330:21:38

-he said, "People have given them to me".

-I've heard a lot of fairy tales

0:21:380:21:43

-in my career, but that is a load of rubbish.

-It's not.

0:21:430:21:48

People giving you their ancient antiques. How much is that worth?

0:21:480:21:53

Well, the pair, possibly around £200-£300.

0:21:530:21:56

They're not gonna give you stuff like that.

0:21:560:21:59

Well, they trust me! I'm with the BBC.

0:21:590:22:01

Well, I don't trust you. What's your name?

0:22:010:22:03

Don't laugh at me!

0:22:030:22:05

Stand up straight as well, leaning all over the counter.

0:22:050:22:08

Listen, it's been a long day.

0:22:080:22:11

-Yes, it has for me, too.

-People are waiting for me...

0:22:110:22:13

-And it's gonna be a long night for you now.

-Why? What do you mean by that?

0:22:130:22:17

You're gonna stay in the cells until the morning, then it's straight to court.

0:22:170:22:20

-No, you've got this all wrong, I tell you.

-Put him in cell number 1, please.

0:22:200:22:25

Listen, listen, this is a complete mistake!

0:22:250:22:28

-..to the officer.

-This is not right.

0:22:280:22:30

You've got this all wrong...

0:22:300:22:32

This is Flog It!, not Dixon Of Dock Green. Let me use the phone...

0:22:340:22:39

-HE SIGHS

-Let me out!

0:22:400:22:43

'If you can't stand the suspense,

0:22:440:22:46

'you can find out what happens when I come up before the beak

0:22:460:22:49

'a little later on, but what I'm really doing here at the Greater Manchester Police Museum

0:22:490:22:53

'is finding out more about crime and punishment in the city since this station was built in 1879.

0:22:530:23:01

'Back then, there was a great deal of poverty in Manchester.

0:23:010:23:04

'The main crimes at the time were theft, fighting and being drunk and disorderly.

0:23:040:23:09

'In that year, a staggering 23,000 people were arrested or summonsed

0:23:090:23:13

'by Manchester Police, almost 5% of the city's population.

0:23:130:23:19

'So the police were kept pretty busy,

0:23:190:23:21

'but now I'm going to get my own back on my arresting officer

0:23:210:23:25

'and interrogate Dennis Wood who joined the force here in 1950.'

0:23:250:23:31

So, paint the picture. What was it like back then when you first started?

0:23:310:23:34

Well, it hadn't changed much from very early Victorian times in that we were all on beats

0:23:340:23:40

walking about small areas with lots of policemen all over the place.

0:23:400:23:46

All the criminals used to complain there were too many of us

0:23:460:23:49

and they couldn't get round the corner without being knocked off.

0:23:490:23:53

But what about back in Victorian England in the 1870s, what was going on then?

0:23:530:23:57

If you think about this station and its position in 1879,

0:23:570:24:03

over my shoulder here were warehouses and office blocks and banks,

0:24:030:24:09

in other words all the things you would find in a highly commercial city like Manchester.

0:24:090:24:16

For about two miles as a belt around the city

0:24:160:24:22

were hovels of houses, only one up and one down when some of them had 20 souls living in them.

0:24:220:24:29

Most of them were thieves and prostitutes and certainly drunkards

0:24:290:24:34

and this place became a bastion between that and a warring tribe

0:24:340:24:40

who every day used to come across into this city, stealing and boozing

0:24:400:24:46

and there was a lot of pickpocketing going on in those days.

0:24:460:24:50

Lots of businessmen were about and they tended to wear gold guard watches in their waistcoat

0:24:500:24:59

and the women were very adept at coming behind them and lifting those out, and off they went with them.

0:24:590:25:05

There were gangs about, of course, just as there are today.

0:25:050:25:09

They didn't have guns, but they used to garrotte people.

0:25:090:25:13

They used to pass a rope around their throat from behind

0:25:130:25:17

and squeeze until the person gave up all his valuables, so it was just, in a way,

0:25:170:25:24

as precarious to be out at night in the city in those days,

0:25:240:25:29

in the early days of the police station, as it is today.

0:25:290:25:32

Well, we're absolutely surrounded by so much police memorabilia, and it is so collectable nowadays.

0:25:490:25:56

Talk me through some of the items that would have been used during Victorian England,

0:25:560:26:00

right up to the time when you left the services.

0:26:000:26:04

Yes, well these items were used right through Victorian times

0:26:040:26:09

-and in my service, probably till about 1970, or later.

-The truncheon hasn't changed much.

0:26:090:26:17

That was the truncheon, or the staff, or the lie detector as they used to call it,

0:26:170:26:23

and that went down a long pocket in the trousers, right to the bottom, down there.

0:26:230:26:29

-It just left that strap in view.

-And you would have used this, yes?

0:26:290:26:34

Well, yes, if required, but the only thing is, if you use it,

0:26:340:26:39

you've only got one hand free, but if it was a serious matter where somebody was threatening...

0:26:390:26:45

With a knife or something...

0:26:450:26:46

Then I would let my thumb drip down into the leather strap there, and out it would come

0:26:460:26:53

and it would all be wrapped up so that nobody could take it off me,

0:26:530:26:57

because there was always that danger that somebody might.

0:26:570:27:00

-Quick off the draw, that!

-Oh, yes!

-Had a lot of practice?

-Like a Wild West sheriff.

0:27:000:27:04

So that was the truncheon.

0:27:050:27:08

Then everybody had a whistle and if you were in any trouble...

0:27:080:27:12

-of course in the absence of radios, then you would blow that...

-WAVERING WHISTLE

0:27:120:27:17

..much louder, and officers on the adjoining beat would hear and allegedly come rushing to your help,

0:27:170:27:24

but very often they would peep round the corner, see the situation and sneak off into the dark somewhere.

0:27:240:27:30

They wouldn't, would they(?) They'd run to your aid!

0:27:300:27:33

-Lots of handcuffs.

-Handcuffs weren't used by police officers on their beats.

0:27:330:27:38

They were quite good and strong

0:27:380:27:40

but really only for use when you already had somebody in custody.

0:27:400:27:47

If you only had that, and you captured a burglar and he was struggling to get away...

0:27:470:27:53

You couldn't get those on him.

0:27:530:27:55

No, you'd have to ask him if he wouldn't mind waiting.

0:27:550:27:58

So what would you do if you caught a burglar quickly?

0:27:580:28:00

Well, if you needed to at all, you had these things, with snaps,

0:28:000:28:04

and those went onto the man's wrist and you were able to twist his arm right up behind his head.

0:28:040:28:11

And those two little fellows were digging into a mass of nerves and little bones.

0:28:110:28:18

-Well, it's a good job I wasn't marched in with that on.

-Yes!

0:28:180:28:22

'All rise.'

0:28:220:28:24

This is Paul Martin, who was found in possession of a collection of antiques, your Worship.

0:28:320:28:39

Thank you, Mr Davenport.

0:28:390:28:41

Mr Martin, would you like to tell the court what you propose to do with this collection of antiques?

0:28:410:28:46

Yes, your Honour.

0:28:460:28:48

It was my intention to flog it.

0:28:480:28:51

Well, it turns out in the end that Mr Martin was in fact genuine,

0:28:520:28:57

and he was selling antiques on behalf of other people.

0:28:570:29:02

It only goes to show

0:29:020:29:04

that you can never judge a book by its cover.

0:29:040:29:09

Good evening, all.

0:29:090:29:11

Well, I think I just about got away with that one!

0:29:170:29:20

Now let's see how things are going back at the valuation day.

0:29:200:29:23

Gary, this is a very sweet little item.

0:29:250:29:29

Now when I was outside and I passed you in the queue, what did you say to me?

0:29:290:29:34

I told you I wasn't getting down on one knee when I showed it you!

0:29:340:29:38

Well, I'm very glad that you did show it to me. I like it a lot.

0:29:380:29:42

What we have here

0:29:420:29:44

is a little Victorian mourning ring.

0:29:460:29:49

It's in 18-carat gold, so it's a high-carat gold

0:29:490:29:53

and we have some very beautiful enamel work round the band with gold lettering, "In memory of..."

0:29:530:30:01

and we if we look at the inside we can see the hallmarks for 18-carat gold.

0:30:010:30:06

As well as the hallmark, we have an inscription which tells us a little more about it.

0:30:060:30:14

Now this ring is in memory of Tim Smith

0:30:140:30:19

and this type of thing was worn by, say, widows or whatever

0:30:190:30:26

and behind this little glass panel at the front here we have a little piece of hair.

0:30:260:30:31

Tell me, where did you get it?

0:30:310:30:33

I bought it off the Internet for a present for my wife.

0:30:330:30:36

Aah! How much did you pay for it?

0:30:360:30:39

-About £50.

-Aha.

0:30:390:30:40

And did your wife like it?

0:30:400:30:42

No. She said it was a bit creepy because it had the man's hair in it!

0:30:420:30:47

Well, this is very interesting.

0:30:470:30:49

-I think that £50 is a very small price to pay for something of that quality...

-Oh, yeah?

0:30:490:30:58

If you had to buy the equivalent quality in 18-carat gold today,

0:30:580:31:02

you'd be paying a lot of money.

0:31:020:31:04

But the thing is, people are slightly worried about the mourning aspect of it.

0:31:040:31:12

Now, in Victorian times, after the death of Queen Victoria's husband, Albert,

0:31:120:31:18

mourning became very fashionable and they're highly collectable just now.

0:31:180:31:25

-I'd like to put it into auction, say between £50 and £80.

-Yeah.

0:31:250:31:31

We may make your money back, but I think if you really do want to get rid of it,

0:31:310:31:38

I'd like to get the reserve down to about £40-£45.

0:31:380:31:41

-Yeah, that would be fine.

-Would that it be OK?

0:31:410:31:44

-So, your wife doesn't like it?

-No.

0:31:440:31:47

She's told you to get rid of it?

0:31:470:31:48

-Yep.

-You've brought it to me...

0:31:480:31:50

-Yeah.

-And we're gonna flog it!

0:31:500:31:53

Freda, I love little leather cases and leather boxes.

0:32:010:32:04

-You never quite know what you're going to find inside. What have we here?

-Two miniatures...

0:32:040:32:08

-a lady and a man.

-Let's have a little look.

0:32:080:32:11

Let's open them up...

0:32:110:32:13

and see. Ah, yes. Well, they certainly look like a pair,

0:32:130:32:17

they're mounted in matching Moroccan leather cases, beautifully.

0:32:170:32:22

Where do they come from?

0:32:220:32:23

Well, We bought them off David Dickinson at Dickinson's Galleries in Manchester.

0:32:230:32:27

Did you really? My husband did.

0:32:270:32:29

He bought them as a present for me because I like miniatures,

0:32:290:32:32

-so we've had them 25 years at least, I should say.

-Gosh.

0:32:320:32:36

Have you got a collection of miniatures?

0:32:360:32:38

-These are the only two.

-But he knew you particularly liked them?

-Yeah.

0:32:380:32:43

I like anything really small...

0:32:430:32:45

I particularly like miniatures, but I've just got the two.

0:32:450:32:48

Let's have a closer look.

0:32:480:32:49

We can tell quite a bit about costume, the lady particularly.

0:32:490:32:54

It really is quite flamboyant, I would say quite Bohemian...

0:32:540:32:59

-Yeah, quite sort of...

-Theatrical...

-Sort of oriental?

-Yes, almost.

0:32:590:33:03

It has got that sort of oriental influence, hasn't it? Certainly the Paisley design shawl.

0:33:030:33:07

They look to me to be certainly early 19th-century in date.

0:33:070:33:12

If you look at these lovely pendant earrings,

0:33:120:33:14

they would suggest almost Regency period, early 19th century,

0:33:140:33:18

-and it's almost got a Turkish look about it, hasn't it?

-Definitely.

0:33:180:33:21

That headgear and really rich materials and colours used...

0:33:210:33:26

-They're lovely colours.

-That blue is particularly nice.

-It is.

0:33:260:33:30

Let's look at the gentleman, the pair to her, if you like.

0:33:300:33:34

-He's quite conservative in comparison...

-Yes.

0:33:340:33:37

..in his blue velvet jacket.

0:33:370:33:39

But the face, again, is really nicely painted,

0:33:390:33:42

the detail of his mouth and his complexion,

0:33:420:33:46

beautifully done and set off against this lovely plum-coloured velvet.

0:33:460:33:51

Can you remember what your husband paid for them all that time ago?

0:33:510:33:54

I've actually got the receipt, but unfortunately forgot to bring it.

0:33:540:33:58

-Right.

-I know they were £75 each..

0:33:580:34:01

-Right...

-..then, you know.

0:34:010:34:02

That's quite a lot of money 25 years ago.

0:34:020:34:05

Well, I didn't realise until...

0:34:050:34:07

a couple of days ago that that's what he paid for them,

0:34:070:34:09

because he gave me the receipt, which I hadn't seen before.

0:34:090:34:12

-Well, I can't tell you that they've gone up hugely...

-No, no...

0:34:120:34:16

..in value over that time, but the market for miniatures is still very buoyant

0:34:160:34:22

and these are certainly commercial,

0:34:220:34:24

particularly our theatrical lady here.

0:34:240:34:26

-I would like to think that you ought to get £200-£300 at auction for the pair.

-Lovely.

0:34:260:34:32

They ought to make £100 each.

0:34:320:34:34

-I'm gonna be cautious and put an estimate of £150-£250 on them.

-Yes.

0:34:340:34:38

-That will draw the buyers, if you're happy with that...

-Yes, I am.

0:34:380:34:42

I certainly think they should make £200...

0:34:420:34:44

-That would be nice.

-If you're happy, we could put a reserve at £150...

-Yes, please.

0:34:440:34:48

So you won't lose any money, certainly, that's a safety net.

0:34:480:34:52

-I won't lose anything... they were a present!

-No, exactly!

0:34:520:34:55

Marian, I am always delighted

0:35:000:35:04

to have some Royal Worcester on Flog It!

0:35:040:35:09

I think that it's a wonderful factory, started in the 1720s,

0:35:090:35:15

always made the best of porcelain,

0:35:150:35:20

noted for its skilled craftsmanship

0:35:200:35:25

and these little figures are a wonderful example of that.

0:35:250:35:29

Do YOU like them, Marian?

0:35:290:35:31

Not particularly.

0:35:310:35:33

I know they're...

0:35:340:35:36

in their own way they're nice, but they're not my style.

0:35:360:35:39

-Where did you get them?

-They were a gift, a thank-you.

0:35:390:35:42

How long have you had them?

0:35:420:35:44

Seven years, about seven to eight years I've had them, and I've never had them on show.

0:35:440:35:50

I called them John and Mary

0:35:500:35:52

and then I wrapped them up in a towel and put them in a suitcase.

0:35:520:35:55

Poor wee John and Mary!

0:35:550:35:57

Let's have a look at them a wee bit closer.

0:35:570:36:01

Now we have a boy and girl figure here.

0:36:010:36:05

If we look, the underneath of the figure will tell us quite a lot.

0:36:050:36:08

We see the Worcester mark here, and this little "A"

0:36:080:36:14

tells us that these figures were made in 1890.

0:36:140:36:20

This set of figures here...1388...

0:36:200:36:24

tells us that this was the pattern number

0:36:240:36:28

and we have the registration mark on the bottom so we've got quite a lot of information on the base.

0:36:280:36:36

And the other good thing, we have the modeller's signature on these,

0:36:360:36:41

and he was Hadley, one of the better-known Worcester modellers.

0:36:410:36:49

The style is...

0:36:490:36:51

it's in the style of Kate Greenaway and the effect is a blush ivory.

0:36:510:36:58

So we have got quite a lot here in these two little figures.

0:36:580:37:04

I would estimate them in the region of £300-£500.

0:37:040:37:10

Would you be happy to sell them at that?

0:37:100:37:12

-Yeah, yeah, I would, yeah.

-Well, let's get them along to the auction.

0:37:120:37:17

I'm sure they'll be very well fancied.

0:37:170:37:20

I hope my estimate is very conservative and they will do much better.

0:37:200:37:26

We'll put a reserve of £300 on them just to protect them, but I'm sure they will sail away at that.

0:37:260:37:32

We're off to the saleroom again, and looking for joy,

0:37:330:37:36

not tears, when Gary's mourning ring goes under the hammer.

0:37:360:37:40

Let's hope it's more popular with the bidders than it was with his wife!

0:37:400:37:44

Small is beautiful, but we're hoping for big things

0:37:440:37:47

from the charming miniatures brought in by Freda,

0:37:470:37:50

and finally, the Royal Worcester figures

0:37:500:37:52

which have a quaint, old-fashioned charm

0:37:520:37:55

and are still very popular with collectors.

0:37:550:37:58

-Poor old Gary! He went out to buy his wife a ring, as a surprise, didn't you?

-Yep.

0:37:580:38:03

£50 it cost you.

0:38:030:38:04

A Victorian mourning ring, which is just about to go under the hammer.

0:38:040:38:09

You took it home to your wife as a lovely surprise and she went,

0:38:090:38:12

-"Gary, I'm not wearing that!" Isn't that awful!

-I know!

0:38:120:38:17

We get such a tough time for not surprising our wives

0:38:170:38:20

and treating them, and when you do, what happens?

0:38:200:38:23

You just get told off.

0:38:230:38:26

"Flog it", she said, "flog it", so hopefully we've got to get £50 back.

0:38:260:38:31

It is so cheap, Paul, but this is a ring that will probably become

0:38:310:38:35

part of a collection rather than wearing...

0:38:350:38:38

People are a wee bit wary of wearing what...mourning rings!

0:38:380:38:44

-What you'd like to say is "dead people's rings"!

-Yes, but I mean it is a bargain for £50

0:38:440:38:51

because it's 18-carat gold, and it's in mint condition.

0:38:510:38:55

562, the Victorian hallmarked 18-carat gold mourning ring.

0:38:550:38:59

What am I bid on this? £50, 40, 30 to open?

0:38:590:39:03

20, thank you. £20 and 5, and 25, 30, £30 and 5,

0:39:030:39:08

at £35, at 35, and 40 here and 5. At 45 over there, at £45.

0:39:080:39:16

Any further bids? 50, well done.

0:39:160:39:18

-Yeah.

-And 5....

0:39:180:39:20

At £55 at the back of the room.

0:39:200:39:23

£55. Are you done?

0:39:230:39:25

-Yes, we did it. £55.

-Good, good, good.

0:39:260:39:28

Less a bit of commission, that does give you your money back.

0:39:280:39:31

You know what they say, don't you?

0:39:310:39:33

It's the thought that counts!

0:39:330:39:34

-Oh, yeah!

-Did you remind her?

-I kept quiet.

-What's her name?

0:39:340:39:37

-Caroline.

-Caroline! Ohhh!

0:39:370:39:40

-I kept quiet.

-What are you gonna do with this money now?

0:39:400:39:43

-Give it to the boss at home.

-Give it to the boss!

0:39:430:39:45

This is a cracking lot. It belongs to Freda, and not for much longer.

0:39:510:39:55

Two lovely little miniatures, painted on ivory.

0:39:550:39:58

Let's hope we get the top end, sort of £200, I'd like to see. They're quality, Kate.

0:39:580:40:04

They are quality. I hope we'll get there.

0:40:040:40:06

I think it's the lady that's really going to attract buyers, yeah.

0:40:060:40:10

Ladies always do. You don't like portraits of gentlemen.

0:40:100:40:13

We've got the pair of 19th-century oval watercolour miniatures,

0:40:130:40:16

portraits of a young lady and gentleman in leather cases,

0:40:160:40:20

very clean. 705 is the lot.

0:40:200:40:22

Right, shall we say £100 to open the bidding? 100.

0:40:220:40:25

£100, thank you, £100, 110, 120, 130, 140 there, 140, 150, at £150.

0:40:250:40:34

At 150, the gentleman in the back there. £150.

0:40:340:40:37

Any further bids? At £150 they are in market

0:40:370:40:42

and selling at £150 then, first and last time...

0:40:420:40:46

We've done it! We've done it, just.

0:40:470:40:49

-150.

-Yeah.

0:40:490:40:51

Brave punt. That was a good move.

0:40:510:40:53

Good valuation as well, but you wanted to sell them, didn't you?

0:40:530:40:56

-Well, I did, yeah. I did.

-You did...

-I just, you know, for the fun of it, really.

0:40:560:41:02

-So you're happy, aren't you?

-Yeah.

0:41:020:41:04

What will you spend £150 on, less commission?

0:41:040:41:06

I might get a little bit of jewellery, something I can look at.

0:41:060:41:09

I've been waiting for this moment for a good month now. I bet you have, as well.

0:41:180:41:22

Two Royal Worcester figures. We've got £300-£500.

0:41:220:41:25

Is that the right figure? Well, we're gonna find out.

0:41:250:41:28

I had a chat to Ian before the sale.

0:41:280:41:31

He didn't want to stick his neck on the block, you know?

0:41:310:41:34

He said, "I don't know if there's been much interest." He was playing it quite cagey.

0:41:340:41:38

I've seen them on the show before, lots of times, haven't we?

0:41:380:41:42

Condition, fantastic.

0:41:420:41:43

Well, everything is going for these little figures.

0:41:430:41:46

Well, not all that little... they're a fair size.

0:41:460:41:49

-They're a good size.

-Principal maker of Worcester, Kate Greenaway style...

0:41:490:41:53

people love that type of thing. I think they should do well.

0:41:530:41:57

Pair of Royal Worcester porcelain figures, boy and girl.

0:41:570:42:00

549. Very pretty. What am I bid on these? Open me at 300.

0:42:010:42:04

200 then. £200 I am bid there, £200. At £200, at 200...

0:42:040:42:10

At 210, 220, 230, 240, 250.

0:42:100:42:14

At £250, 260, 270...

0:42:140:42:18

Come on, come on, come on. We need 300...

0:42:180:42:21

At 290. At £300, 310,

0:42:210:42:26

320, 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, 390, 400, and 10.

0:42:260:42:36

£410 over there. At £410.

0:42:360:42:38

Any further advances?

0:42:380:42:40

At £410 then, they're going...

0:42:400:42:43

-Yes!

-Fantastic! Spot-on estimate, Anita.

0:42:440:42:47

-Thank you, Paul.

-Right in the middle there. £410.

0:42:470:42:51

Yes. That's wonderful.

0:42:510:42:52

-That's brilliant, isn't it?

-Are you happy?

-I am, yeah. Thank you.

0:42:520:42:56

Well, thank you so much for coming in, and treat yourself, like Anita said.

0:42:560:43:00

-Treat yourself, pamper yourself.

-You deserve it!

-I do!

0:43:000:43:04

Well, that's it...

0:43:070:43:08

it's all over, the auction is finished, the room's emptying.

0:43:080:43:11

This lot are the lucky ones,

0:43:110:43:13

paying for all the items they've just purchased.

0:43:130:43:16

We've had a fun day here in West Yorkshire and I hope you've enjoyed watching today's show,

0:43:160:43:21

so until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:210:43:23

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:460:43:49

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:490:43:52