Harlow Flog It!


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Harlow

Experts Mark Stacey and Charlie Ross gather a choice selection of antiques to flog in Harlow, including a stunning Japanese pot.


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Today Flog It is in Harlow, a town made to house some of the post-war population moving from London.

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Harlow's design was the vision of chief architect and town planner Sir Frederick Gibberd.

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In 1951 he was responsible for this building, The Lawn.

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That is so iconic because it is Britain's first-ever tower block.

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But this isn't where today's action is happening.

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It's here, across town at the Latton Bush Centre.

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We've got a massive turnout here with their antiques.

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Mark Stacey and Charlie Ross are raring to go, so let's get this huge crowd inside.

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-Hello, Anthony.

-Good afternoon.

-Thank you so much for waiting and bringing this lovely coffee set.

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We all know what it is, but before we examine it, give us the family history.

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-Well, we know it's been in our family since 1939.

-Right.

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I would think it was a wedding present for our parents.

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They were difficult times and it's not a thing you would buy with war coming on.

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-You've always used it as a coffee set?

-The last time, and I can only remember using it once,

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-I think I drank tea out of these.

-The cups would take tea, but it is a coffee set.

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This is known as the Bonjour set.

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This is definitely a coffee pot in the long oval pattern.

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The teapot is much shorter and circular. I would say it is a little bit earlier than 1939.

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So it was probably second-hand, which often happened generations ago.

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I would have thought it tends to date to mid-1930s.

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The best period for Clarice Cliff is from the end of the 1920s

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up to 1935, 1936.

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After that, the patterns went a little bit...less quality.

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Less dynamic. I'm not absolutely sure of the pattern. I'm calling it pomegranate.

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These look like pomegranates. But what we will do is look out for the pattern

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and I'll let the auctioneers know. What I like is this lovely, open, triangular handle,

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which is so 1930s.

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I think there will be quite a lot of interest, even though it's not very bright and bold.

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It's complete and, more importantly, perfect, which is the nice thing.

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In terms of value, I would say, if we put it into auction,

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I would keep it slightly on the conservative side so that we tempt people.

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-But I would have thought £500-£800.

-Really?

-How do you feel about that?

-All right.

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-And we'll put a reserve of 500.

-Fine.

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-I suspect it will make the high end on a good day.

-Thank you.

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It's so nice to see a complete set in such good condition.

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-Thank you for being patient with us and I'll see you at the auction. Let's hope for a top price.

-Thanks.

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-Right. Henry and Mark here, whose are the candlesticks?

-Mine.

-He's giving moral support?

-My son.

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-So who's getting the money if we flog them?

-We all are!

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-How many is all?

-Two, four.

-Four of you? They'll need to make some money!

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-Where did they come from?

-A friend left them to me.

-And what do you know about them?

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-Nothing. Nothing at all.

-Do you know they're candlesticks?

-Oh, yes!

-Good!

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-What are they made of?

-Silver.

-Correct!

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-Top of the class. Have they got a hallmark?

-Yes.

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I think it's a lion on it.

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The great thing about a bit of silver is you can tell who made it, where it was made and when.

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The lion you were talking about is the lion passant.

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The moment you see the lion, you know they're silver. Next to the lion is an anchor.

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It is an assay mark, so they were made in Birmingham.

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If they had a leopard's head, they were made in London. A crown was Sheffield, et cetera.

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There's a letter N.

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Now the letter N on there tells you that they were made in 1912.

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So they're post-Victorian. Corinthian column candlesticks.

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Probably the most popular design.

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And they are dwarf candlesticks. Sometimes they make 10 or 11-inch ones.

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And these are sort of 7 inches. I quite like the squat format.

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-They would clean up beautifully. You haven't cleaned them?

-No.

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A lot of people don't clean silver. If you rub them too much, you rub through the silver.

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B) You'll destroy the decoration.

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C) Worst of all, you can clean off the hallmark.

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-What are they worth?

-A couple of hundred?

-What do you reckon?

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-Two, three hundred?

-You should be doing my job!

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Know what I think they're worth? 200-300!

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-It's not as if they're the rarest things in the world.

-No, no.

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But of all silver objects, candlesticks are the most popular. I think 200-300 is spot on.

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-We'll put a reserve of 175 on them. Happy with that?

-Yeah.

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-Thank you for bringing them along. That's 50 quid each. Or will you get most of it?

-I like that!

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Chris and Jean, thank you so much for struggling in on this hot day with a great lump of furniture.

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I'm very proud of you. Give me a bit about your background. You're both involved with a charity.

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That's right. Rainbow Services.

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And it is a charity to fill unmet need of one sort or another, and one of the projects we run

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is to take furniture and donate it to people on low income

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-or on benefits.

-To furnish their bedsits or flats?

-Absolutely.

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This was donated by someone who said, "I'm not sure if it's any good,

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"but if not, please sell it."

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-And this isn't what people want? They want beds and wardrobes?

-That's right.

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Things we get a quick turnover with, to go in a house in Harlow.

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We don't get much call for these desks!

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-Writing desks!

-We need practical things for people.

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They need wardrobes, beds, sofas. We pick up good quality furniture.

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Well, carry on the good work. Let's hope this adds to the kitty.

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-Do you like it? Would you fancy buying it?

-Not in my house, no!

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It wouldn't necessarily go. I can see its charm.

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As a writing desk, it is very usable.

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It's quite small.

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This would fit into a large Victorian house or a small cottage.

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It's not got a great deal of age. It looks like an 18th-century piece,

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-but in fact it's early 20th century.

-Oh, right?

-Yeah.

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I'd put this around 1930s and it's Dutch.

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-Oh, is it?

-Yes. If you start at the floor,

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it's on lovely flattened ball feet, so typical of the Dutch craftsman.

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It's well-made, hand-made.

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It's not machine-made, which is really nice.

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The colour of the oak is very good. If I take one drawer out,

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you can see the whole construction, even the drawer linings, it's all made of oak.

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They've taken pride in it because all the drawer faces are veneered in oak

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and reversed to make a chevron. They didn't need to do that, but it's nice and adds value.

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Those little architectural details make it a little bit more expensive than it would normally be.

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Right. I expect you want to know roughly what it's worth.

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If this was an 18th-century piece, it would be £1,600-£2,000,

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for a continental writing desk.

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But it's early 20th century.

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I think it's got a value of around £200-£300.

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I'd like to see it get to £300, but we need two people. That's all.

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Hopefully, we'll have half a dozen fighting for it! But...

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I think if we put this into auction we've got to put it on with a valuation of £100-£200

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-and a reserve at £100.

-That's all right.

-More than we anticipated.

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-And hopefully two people will fight over this.

-Great.

-It's lovely to know about, to get the history.

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Martin, HMS Ganges Association? You must be a naval man.

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-Ex-naval man.

-Ex?

-I joined when I was 15.

-Good time?

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Very tough time. Very strict.

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-Is that where you found the pot?

-No.

-Where's it from?

-When I came out of the navy, I lived in Chelsea.

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-Right.

-And the lady above me said, "Could you clean my windows?" So I said, "Certainly I will."

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-She said, "I'll pay you." I said no.

-A gentleman.

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In 1966, just after the World Cup, she called me up and said, "I'm moving."

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She said, "I'd like you to have that." I used to pick it off the windowsill very carefully,

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-put it on the chest of drawers.

-And you never dropped it.

-No.

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-And?

-It's been in the cupboard ever since!

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-So you don't actually like it?

-No, I...

-No use for it?

-No use for it at all.

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-Know anything about it?

-Nothing.

-Wonderful, isn't it?

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-I will now appear to be wildly knowledgeable about it! I've looked at the bottom!

-You have!

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I think I can tell it was Doulton, Doulton Lambeth. That factory started in the 129th century,

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-making drains.

-Oh, right?

-Pottery drains.

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Then they got a bit more refined and started making jardinieres and all sorts of pots

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-and went on to become the Royal Doulton company.

-Right.

-In about 1920.

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What I think is most interesting is the decoration of it.

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-A lot of Doulton Lambeth wares weren't glazed.

-They weren't?

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No. And this is glazed and, across the middle, looks just like a piece of Wedgwood

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-and yet it's Doulton. As if they were influenced by Wedgwood.

-I'm with you.

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Looking at the bottom, it's stamped 1881.

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-That is 130 years old.

-My God.

-Of moving it backwards and forwards. Not by you for 130 years!

-No!

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In that windowsill.

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And all the rosettes, the glazing, is in perfect condition.

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-And it's got a value.

-Has it?

-Any ideas?

-30 quid?

-You could certainly double that.

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And add a bit more, hopefully. It's certainly £50-£100.

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-Right.

-I would want to put a reserve of £50 on it.

-That's fair enough. Absolutely, yeah.

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On a really good day, if somebody likes the way it's glazed,

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it might well trickle on to £100. Thank you very much for bringing it along.

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-My pleasure.

-Well rescued!

-Thank you!

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We've seen some cracking items, but can we flog them?

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This 1930s Clarice Cliff coffee set has languished in the sideboard. Could it be a hidden gem?

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They're small, but are these silver candlesticks beautiful enough to attract an admirer?

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Will the bidders turn out for this Dutch desk? It's all in the aid of charity.

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And can this gift for Martin's window-cleaning skills sparkle and shine today?

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All our lots will be going under the hammer here at Reeman Dansie Auctions in Colchester.

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The man on the rostrum is James Grinter.

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This pair of silver candlesticks should light up the saleroom. We're looking for £200-£300.

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They belong to Henry and Mark here. This could be your inheritance!

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-Dad's not passing them on?

-No!

-And you don't want them.

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So, £200-£300. I love the Corinthian columns. Little mini columns.

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-Lovely.

-They'll always sell well.

-Yes. They'll dress any dinner table.

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-You should have had a dinner party before the valuation day!

-Take a bit of cleaning, though.

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-They do.

-Have Flog It in for dinner.

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-Nothing wrong in that!

-No, true.

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Let's find out what the bidders think.

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Lot 219 is a pair of George V silver candlesticks. A handsome pair of sticks here.

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Start me at 150? 150 to start me?

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140? 140 is bid there. At 140. At 140.

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Do I hear 150? 150. 160.

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170. 170 is bid down here now. At 170.

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180? At £170, I'm going to sell them.

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All done now at 170.

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You've got £170. We had a reserve at 175, so he's used a little bit of discretion.

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-I'm sure he'll make the money up. We didn't light the room up!

-They weren't expensive.

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No. That's auctions for you. They've gone!

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Now it's the Clarice Cliff! It wouldn't be Flog It without Clarice.

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Fingers crossed we get top money today. Now, Mark, you said it was pomegranate at the valuation day.

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-Well, it looks like them.

-I had a chat to James. He thinks it might be passion fruit.

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I'm happy for it to be whatever fruit makes the most money!

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OK! Well, we've got £500-£800 riding on this. Let's hope for Anthony's sake we get the top end.

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Good luck.

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Now the 1930s Clarice Cliff passion fruit pattern coffee set.

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£400 to start me? 400 I have.

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At £400 now. 420. 420.

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440. 460. 480.

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-At 480 in the corner now.

-Come on!

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500 anywhere? At £480.

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It's going to be sold. Are you all done?

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-480.

-480.

-We were just above the reserve.

-Just.

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-That's how these things happen.

-It is. We needed two more people to push that bid.

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-Disappointing slightly.

-But I did say on the day that the pattern isn't the most exuberant.

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If it had been the melons or something a bit more exotic, we might have got a bit more,

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-but there you go.

-Watch out for your patterns.

-Watch out for your fruit!

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Martin saw some wonderful things window cleaning in Chelsea! One was the Doulton jardiniere!

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-What a spot that was! And you've brought your wife, Mary, for moral support.

-Yeah.

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-Do you like the jardiniere?

-It's all right. I'm not...

-No.

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-Not really my thing.

-We'll flog it anyway. We hope for £50-£100 put on by Charlie.

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I want to know more about this window cleaning!

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-I used to live in Flood Street.

-Where Margaret Thatcher lived.

-She lived at the top of the road.

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-I never cleaned her windows.

-Well, a security risk!

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She wouldn't pay me my money!

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Number 100 now is the Doulton Lambeth jardiniere with applied frieze.

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Say for it 50? £50? 40?

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40 I have. 40. At £40.

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Do I have 45? 45. At 45. 50.

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-We're selling it.

-At 50. 55?

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At £50 bid.

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Are you all done?

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-Bang on the lower end. £50. That's OK, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-It's been in the wardrobe!

-I've earned a bit of interest on it!

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Yes!

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Right. My turn to be the expert. Remember that lovely Dutch desk? It's a bit of quality.

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We've got £100-£200 on it. It belongs to Rainbow Services,

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who help furnish houses for underprivileged people.

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-We're not here with Chris today, but we do have Jean. And?

-Jacquie, the director of Rainbow Services.

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-Pleased to meet you. What a lovely charity.

-Wonderful.

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-It's a really good idea. Things we don't need can furnish people's houses.

-Absolutely.

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It's a cracking piece of furniture.

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We're going to turn it into cash. It's not a period piece, or it would be worth a lot more,

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-but hopefully, you never know, we'll get more than £200.

-Lovely.

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-We've got everything crossed.

-Here we go. This is it.

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Number 732 is a 1920s oak desk.

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-£100 to start me? 100?

-Come on.

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£100 I have. At £100.

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Do 110? At £100 bid...

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110. 120. 130.

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-140.

-This is more like it.

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160. At 160 on my right. All done now at 160? All done.

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That wasn't bad, was it? I got very worried for a second!

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We got stuck on £100. In auctions, you need two people on something to push the bid.

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-That's going to Rainbow Services.

-Fantastic.

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Are you all done?

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We've all seen period dramas on TV where two very well-spoken and distinguished gentlemen

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have a disagreement and, before you know it, it's pistols at dawn.

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It looks very dramatic in the movies, but did duels really happen like that? Let's find out.

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Duelling with flintlock pistols was at its height between 1780 and 1820.

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For centuries swords and lances were used to settle disputes,

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but pistols became the weapon of choice because they gave older and younger gentlemen an equal chance.

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I've come to meet Geoff Walker, who has one of the best collections in the country.

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What a wonderful collection! This is just a small part of it.

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What got you interested in duelling pistols?

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I've always been fascinated by guns. Duelling pistols show the cutting edge of the gunmaker's craft.

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These are, you know, the work of gunmakers at their zenith.

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-Yes.

-There are some famous names represented here.

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-Are we looking at English guns?

-All of them.

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-I only collect English guns.

-They're the best?

-Yes.

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By the time the duelling pistol was in this sort of form,

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English makers were the best in the world.

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-Would they have been made in pairs?

-Nearly all. You've only got one shot. They're muzzle-loading.

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-Of course.

-And so two shots were better than one.

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Let's find out the differences between some of the guns here.

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This is a set of duelling pistols.

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These are very mean pistols - they've got no sights, no decoration.

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They would have been made for a particular customer.

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-So the gunsmith would have measured his hand.

-They were custom-fit?

-Yes.

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They should be an extension of your arm, so you could feel it come up... It would be very natural.

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-Pick one up and they've got a beautiful balance and weight to them.

-They are so tactile.

-They are.

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-What should I look for when I buy a duelling pistol?

-The maker.

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-A good English maker?

-You cannot get better than that name.

-Manton.

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Two brothers - John and Joseph. I prefer John, but a lot of people prefer Joseph.

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At least they didn't settle it in a duel!

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-There was lots of honour at stake back then?

-Yes, there was.

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They vied with each other. There was no real advertisements about guns. They had to have a good reputation.

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A set of pistols, late 18th century, what would they cost then?

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-This is a good example.

-These are Manton, top of the range.

-John Manton at his very best.

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And these pistols in 1790, I have the receipt, cost £23.

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-That's including the case and the flask.

-That's a lot of money.

-A lot of money in 1790.

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I mean, really entry level for a half-decent cased pair of duelling pistols,

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could you get a pair for £6,000 to £7,000?

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-Yes, certainly, that's about where you'd start.

-Entry level.

-Yes.

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But if you want the top names and the top quality, you've got to go further than that.

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Anything from £5,000 to £100,000 for something very rare and very special.

0:23:580:24:03

'Duels were fought over everything and anything

0:24:030:24:08

'from revenge for a violent crime

0:24:080:24:11

'to defending a lady's honour.

0:24:110:24:13

'In the 18th century, honour was more valuable than life itself.

0:24:130:24:17

'The motivation was not to kill the other person,

0:24:170:24:21

'but to gain satisfaction by proving you were willing to risk your life.'

0:24:210:24:26

In the movies, we see two gentlemen back to back, taking paces away from each other.

0:24:260:24:33

-Maybe 20 yards.

-It's by arrangement between the parties.

0:24:330:24:37

Minimum distance was ten paces. Those would be 30-inch paces.

0:24:370:24:41

-8.5 yards would be a minimum distance.

-That's quite close. You can't miss, can you?

-Not really, no.

0:24:410:24:48

But very often they were fought at quite close quarters. 10, 12, 14 paces was quite common.

0:24:480:24:55

They pace out, turn round and take aim. Do they fire straight away?

0:25:000:25:05

Not necessarily. Quite often they would have to decide who should fire first.

0:25:050:25:12

-I didn't know that. I thought it was the first person to get a sensible aim.

-No.

0:25:130:25:19

-The quickest aim, quick draw?

-Some duels were fought like that,

0:25:190:25:24

but more often than not, one gentleman would have to stand and receive fire before it was his turn.

0:25:240:25:31

Or it might have been that they got ready and a handkerchief was dropped as a signal,

0:25:320:25:38

then they could fire at will.

0:25:380:25:42

And gentlemen didn't cheat, or did they? Did they turn after five paces? That's what seconds were for.

0:25:430:25:50

They were umpires, but it's quite tricky with two armed protagonists for a second to say, "Don't do that."

0:25:500:25:58

And there are instances of seconds having to fire a gun to prevent any skulduggery.

0:25:590:26:05

But generally, they were fought with the utmost bravery, chivalry and as gentlemen should.

0:26:050:26:13

I absolutely love these guns. They're so tactile and extremely beautiful to look at.

0:26:220:26:28

Even though they're lethal weapons, they are true antiques.

0:26:280:26:32

Lovely things to own and enjoy the workmanship.

0:26:320:26:36

-Geoff, thank you so much.

-Thank you.

-I've learnt a lot.

-They're wonderful things.

0:26:360:26:42

Back to the valuation day in Harlow, there's, well, magic in the air.

0:26:540:26:59

-Hello, Michael. Hello, Sarah.

-Hi.

-Hi.

-We know what's inside the box,

0:26:590:27:04

but give us a bit of the history first.

0:27:040:27:07

I've had this for about 34 years.

0:27:070:27:11

I used to do table-top magic shows and my aunt in Aberdeen bought it in an auction.

0:27:110:27:17

-I think she paid £20 for it.

-Gosh!

0:27:170:27:20

-34 years ago, you must have been quite young.

-Thank you very much.

0:27:200:27:25

I was about 14 at the time.

0:27:250:27:28

-Have you continued that?

-It fell by the wayside when I was about 20.

0:27:280:27:33

-Sarah, where has it been for the last 20 years?

-In various lofts.

0:27:330:27:38

-You haven't magicked it out of the loft until today?

-No.

0:27:380:27:43

Let's have a look at it. It's in a nice, leather fitted case.

0:27:430:27:47

Oh, it's in nice condition, isn't it?

0:27:470:27:50

Not a lot of damage at all. Normally, you get the odd bit of scuffing.

0:27:500:27:56

I'm always tempted to go like that because a lot of them are opera top hats

0:27:560:28:03

where you fold them and you flick them and they open when you want to wear them, but this isn't like that.

0:28:030:28:10

We've got a nice London maker, Christys' of London,

0:28:100:28:14

and then the Edinburgh retailer.

0:28:140:28:16

Then we've got a nice mark, "Imperial Quality", as well.

0:28:160:28:20

Back when these were popular, in the late Victorian, Edwardian period, heads were a lot smaller.

0:28:200:28:28

Most of the time, they sit on the top of your head, but this is quite a good size. It's too big for me.

0:28:280:28:35

I think it's quite a good size.

0:28:350:28:38

-It's been in various lofts. Your aunt bought it for 20 quid. What is it worth today?

-I don't know.

0:28:380:28:46

We've sold them before on the show. They're not very rare items.

0:28:460:28:50

It's nice that it's got the fitted box, but we must be realistic.

0:28:500:28:55

I'm gonna say that auctioneer's cliche. I think it is probably worth £80 to £100.

0:28:550:29:01

-OK.

-And hopefully on the day, we'll get 100, maybe even 120.

0:29:010:29:06

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah.

-So we'll put a reserve of £80 on it.

-OK.

0:29:060:29:12

Thanks for coming in. I look forward to meeting you both at the auction.

0:29:120:29:17

-Let's hope we pull a magic price out of the hat on the day.

-Excellent.

0:29:170:29:22

I like this. This is typical of what we find at our valuation days.

0:29:290:29:34

It's a watercolour, English, early 20th century, signed by the artist.

0:29:340:29:39

It's a lovely maritime scene, a seascape.

0:29:390:29:42

At auction, this will be worth around about £40 to £60 maximum.

0:29:420:29:48

What I like about it is it's a bit of affordable fine art and I'm gonna put these people to the challenge.

0:29:480:29:55

How many of you buy a print framed and stick it on the wall?

0:29:550:30:00

-Yes.

-Yes.

-All of you. And you spend about £80 to £100 doing it possibly.

0:30:000:30:05

-How many of you have a bit of fine art, signed by the artist, a watercolour or oil painting?

-None.

0:30:050:30:12

Well, you can pick up a piece of art like this.

0:30:120:30:16

It's a good investment, put it on the wall and enjoy it.

0:30:160:30:21

It's got real integrity, heart and soul, and it's a one-off.

0:30:210:30:25

I challenge you all to go out and buy some fine art.

0:30:250:30:29

If you like it, that's an even better investment.

0:30:290:30:33

-John, you've brought a complete history of a man's record in the army.

-Looks like it.

0:30:440:30:51

-Who was he?

-He was my grandfather on my mum's side.

0:30:510:30:55

He fought in the Second World War.

0:30:550:30:58

He was a rifleman in the Scottish Cameronians, in the First Battalion.

0:30:580:31:03

-There he is.

-Yeah.

-Weren't they smart in their kilts?

-He was.

-Wonderfully smart.

0:31:030:31:09

-Did he get through the war?

-Yeah, he died when I was about seven.

0:31:090:31:14

He must have seen a huge amount.

0:31:140:31:17

-He travelled a bit as well?

-He certainly did, yeah.

0:31:170:31:21

What I really love is that he's written here, chronologically, everything he's done with the army.

0:31:210:31:28

So he was in the beginning of the war. In 1939, he was in Calcutta, then he was in France.

0:31:280:31:36

And then subsequently sent to Africa and then Italy, Palestine, Lebanon,

0:31:360:31:41

and finished the war in Egypt.

0:31:410:31:44

-That's right.

-Just that tells you all about the war,

0:31:440:31:49

how the war moved, and that guy saw it all.

0:31:490:31:53

-Yeah.

-Not many of them would have been able to do that.

0:31:530:31:57

-Moving on through here, we've got some very early aeroplanes here, some biplanes...

-That's right.

0:31:570:32:04

..which he caught in flight. There's a wonderful page of recreation.

0:32:040:32:09

And there's a game of polo going on here.

0:32:090:32:13

Keeping fit - look at that for a bit of gymnastics! Extraordinary.

0:32:130:32:18

We haven't got time to go through all these pages,

0:32:180:32:23

but this, I think, is my favourite page.

0:32:230:32:27

-There's a wonderful picture of Gandhi.

-Yeah, that's Gandhi.

0:32:270:32:31

He looks very thoughtful, a man of principles.

0:32:310:32:35

-Now, why are you going to sell it? Your children aren't interested in this?

-Not really, no.

0:32:350:32:42

If you're not keeping them and your children won't use them, what better than to put them into auction?

0:32:420:32:50

-If somebody is gonna pay money for this, they are not gonna throw it away.

-It's gonna be looked after.

0:32:500:32:57

The medals are worth £30 to £50, £40 to £60.

0:32:570:33:01

The album must be worth £100 of anybody's money, £150, I think.

0:33:010:33:07

-That's fine.

-So, 150 to 250, with a reserve of £150. Happy with that?

-That's great.

-Jolly good.

0:33:070:33:15

Thank you very much for bringing it along. This is a real history lesson in one album.

0:33:150:33:21

It certainly is. Thank you very much.

0:33:210:33:24

-Hi, Chris.

-Hi.

-As soon as I saw you holding this, I thought, "I've got to film this."

0:33:290:33:35

It's a wacky, bizarre item. Where on earth did you get it from?

0:33:350:33:40

I inherited this from my grandfather

0:33:400:33:43

via my aunt who has sadly passed away

0:33:430:33:47

and it's resting itself in my house,

0:33:470:33:49

trying to avoid damage from the assorted kids and pets that we have.

0:33:490:33:54

I'm just interested in finding out about it and if it's worth anything.

0:33:540:34:00

A lot of people will be interested in it. I think it's Austrian.

0:34:000:34:05

And late 19th century, so any time between 1880 and 1900. And she's made of pottery.

0:34:050:34:11

These were produced in large numbers, normally figures.

0:34:110:34:15

Or busts. I've never quite seen one so elegant as this.

0:34:150:34:21

Have you always known it like this or has it had other pieces with it?

0:34:210:34:26

-There was a stool.

-A little china stool?

-Yeah.

0:34:260:34:30

But that, I believe, got broken. And it's been sitting on a wooden chair that my grandad made.

0:34:300:34:37

-Originally, these would have been made in pairs.

-I did wonder if it was staring at somebody else?

0:34:370:34:43

There would've been a gentleman with her.

0:34:430:34:47

It's just so ridiculously camp.

0:34:470:34:49

You've got a wonderful plumed hat. The quality is very good. Lovely, delicate expressions on her face.

0:34:490:34:57

And she's holding this wonderful, oversized fan. It's a fantastically outrageous item really.

0:34:570:35:04

Chris, we come now to the crucial point of how much is she worth.

0:35:040:35:10

If we were putting it into auction, we've got to bear in mind some minor damage, the odd chip here and there.

0:35:100:35:17

But with something as complicated and as old as this, you have to expect that.

0:35:170:35:23

I would suggest £300 to £400. Would you be happy with that?

0:35:230:35:27

-Yeah, that's fine.

-And we'll put a reserve of 300 with 10% discretion on that.

-That's fine.

0:35:270:35:34

On the day, it might be a surprise and fly away.

0:35:340:35:37

-Hopefully, not off the shelf until they've paid for it!

-Yeah.

0:35:370:35:42

-Thank you for bringing such a memorable item in.

-Thank you very much for giving me the information.

0:35:420:35:49

Can the auctioneer magic up some interest in this top hat, complete with fitted box?

0:35:540:36:00

These wartime photos and medals are a picture book of social history,

0:36:000:36:05

but can it win a place in someone's heart?

0:36:050:36:09

And can this lady turn enough heads to win a suitor?

0:36:090:36:13

The auctioneer James Grinter thinks she's got potential.

0:36:130:36:18

I don't know what to say. Mass-produced Victoriana. Massive, great big pottery figure.

0:36:190:36:25

This belongs to Chris. It was his grandfather's.

0:36:250:36:29

And I think it's time to go. We've got £300 to £400 on her.

0:36:290:36:35

-You get a lot for your money.

-It's the largest figure I've ever seen.

0:36:350:36:40

-And me.

-In 27 years, I haven't seen another one like it.

0:36:400:36:44

-It was one of a pair originally.

-There'd be a gentleman.

-A dandy.

-Courting her.

-Exactly.

0:36:440:36:50

-Where would you have displayed it?

-I don't know.

-Perhaps on top of a Victorian upright piano?

0:36:500:36:57

-One either side.

-Or a purpose-made piece of furniture.

0:36:570:37:01

A small chair or little settee made for the two of them to sit together.

0:37:010:37:06

-It's quite fascinating.

-It is.

0:37:060:37:09

The condition is absolutely remarkable. It's perfect.

0:37:090:37:13

It's High Victorian taste, but I think it will appeal to people.

0:37:130:37:18

It's a very decorative thing.

0:37:180:37:21

Not necessarily in fashion today, but I still think it'll do quite well.

0:37:210:37:26

-I'm glad it's the lady. A single gentleman won't sell so well.

-True.

0:37:260:37:31

-£300 to £400?

-It stands a chance.

0:37:310:37:35

-How much more?

-I've never seen one before, so it's difficult to gauge.

0:37:350:37:40

-So we could get more.

-Yes.

-A lot more.

-We could do.

0:37:400:37:44

-Sarah, Michael, good to see you again. Can you do any magic tricks?

-I'm not prepared, sorry.

0:37:530:37:59

Hopefully, your last one will be turning this top hat, valued at £20 35 years ago,

0:37:590:38:05

into £100 right now in the next couple of minutes.

0:38:050:38:09

-We've got a value of £80 to £100.

-It's in good condition.

-It is.

0:38:090:38:14

It's in a nice leather box and top hat size is important.

0:38:140:38:19

-A lot of them are very small.

-They don't fit your head.

0:38:190:38:23

This one does fit, so hopefully we'll be able to get £80 to £100.

0:38:230:38:28

Before that, Michael has one last little magic trick.

0:38:280:38:32

Yeah!

0:38:380:38:40

Hang on.

0:38:410:38:43

-No, there's nothing there.

-You know that already.

0:38:430:38:47

No.415 is the Edwardian, black, silk top hat by Scott. Original box.

0:38:470:38:53

£60 to start me? 60 I have down here. At 60.

0:38:530:38:57

65. 70. 75.

0:38:570:39:00

-80. 85...

-We're getting there.

-We are.

0:39:000:39:04

100. £100.

0:39:040:39:06

Down here at £100. Are you all done?

0:39:060:39:09

We did it. We got that magical £100. Well done.

0:39:090:39:13

There's a bit of commission to pay, but it's a nice meal out.

0:39:130:39:18

Lots of memories for you have gone.

0:39:180:39:20

-Yes, but I've had a good time with it.

-Has he still got the cape at home and the wand?

0:39:200:39:26

-He's got the wand.

-I like the wand.

-Yeah.

0:39:260:39:30

This next lot is a cracking item. Not a lot of monetary value, but there's a lot of history here.

0:39:370:39:43

It belongs to John. And all this social history is the contents

0:39:430:39:48

-of your grandfather's campaign throughout the Second World War.

-That's right.

0:39:480:39:54

-Have you got other things that he left you?

-There are photographs that I'm definitely keeping.

0:39:540:40:01

No.504 is a group of five Second World War medals.

0:40:010:40:04

And the photograph album. £100 to start me?

0:40:040:40:08

-Fingers crossed.

-£100 I'm bid.

0:40:080:40:11

At £100. 110? At £100.

0:40:110:40:14

-110 anywhere? At £100. Any advance?

-There's no bidding.

0:40:140:40:18

Are you all done...?

0:40:180:40:21

-Grandad's looking down, giving you a bit of a ticking off.

-Yeah.

0:40:210:40:26

-John, please hang on to them.

-Definitely.

0:40:260:40:29

Next, that wonderful Austrian pottery figure. She's big, blousy and beautiful.

0:40:390:40:45

She's late Victorian and very rare.

0:40:450:40:47

We talked to the auctioneer about it. We don't have the owner Chris.

0:40:470:40:52

-But we do have his son Robert. Hello. Is Dad on holiday?

-Yeah, but I don't really know where he is.

0:40:520:40:59

-And you don't care.

-No, party time!

-Which means it's party time!

0:40:590:41:04

Yeah, why not?

0:41:040:41:06

-Seriously, if we do really well on this, you will get on the phone to Dad and let him know.

-Sure.

0:41:060:41:13

We're looking for £400-plus. James agreed with your valuation.

0:41:130:41:18

It's lovely. It's very televisual.

0:41:180:41:21

-And as you say, she's blousy, a lot there for £300 to £400.

-Yeah.

0:41:210:41:27

-I think this lot will agree with your valuation. We've got the nod of approval.

-And a wink!

0:41:270:41:33

Good luck, everybody.

0:41:330:41:36

No.63 is the very large, 19th century German ceramic figure of a lady.

0:41:360:41:41

Very unusual. I have two commissions and I start the bidding at £280.

0:41:410:41:46

300 with Ian. At £300. 320.

0:41:460:41:49

340. 360. 380.

0:41:490:41:52

400. 420. 440.

0:41:520:41:55

At 440. The lady's bid now at 440.

0:41:550:41:58

-We're happy with that.

-460.

0:41:580:42:01

480. 500. 520.

0:42:010:42:03

-540.

-This is great!

0:42:030:42:05

560. 580. 600.

0:42:050:42:08

620. 640.

0:42:080:42:10

-660.

-Gosh!

-680. 700.

0:42:100:42:13

-720. 740. 760.

-That's unbelievable!

-780.

0:42:130:42:17

800. 820. 840. 860.

0:42:170:42:21

-880. 900.

-We might get £1,000!

0:42:210:42:23

920. 940. 960.

0:42:230:42:26

980. 1,000. 1,100.

0:42:260:42:29

-1,100?!

-1,200. 1,300...

0:42:290:42:31

-What have we missed, Mark?

-I don't know!

0:42:310:42:35

1,500. At £1,500.

0:42:350:42:38

On my right now at £1,500...

0:42:380:42:41

Are you all done...?

0:42:410:42:43

-£1,500!

-I do believe they're gonna be extremely happy with that!

0:42:430:42:48

They've got to be happy with that. I'm tingling all over!

0:42:480:42:52

What do you think of her? You've seen her around the house.

0:42:520:42:56

-I really don't like her.

-But you like the £1,500.

-I like the 1,500 quid!

0:42:560:43:02

You should phone Dad. That'll make his holiday!

0:43:020:43:05

-He'll probably stay away for another two weeks, so it's more partying!

-Definitely.

0:43:050:43:12

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

-I'm amazed.

-That's incredible.

0:43:120:43:16

I thought 300 to 400 was a little on the conservative side, but it is best to tease the bidders in.

0:43:160:43:24

-But 1,500, you can't beat it!

-What a fine lady! She had a fine figure and she achieved a fine figure.

0:43:240:43:30

We've had great fun here, so until the next time, there's plenty more surprises to come on Flog It!

0:43:300:43:37

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2008

0:43:460:43:50

Email [email protected]

0:43:500:43:53

Experts Mark Stacey and Charlie Ross gather a choice selection of antiques to flog in Harlow, including a stunning Japanese pot. Presenter Paul Martin has a touch of James Bond about him.