Edinburgh Flog It!


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Edinburgh

Paul Martin and the team visit Our Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh. Experts James Lewis and Adam Partridge look for hidden treasures and Paul visits Scottish Parliament.


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The writer Robert Louis Stevenson once said of this city

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"No situation could be more commanding

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"for head of the kingdom and none better chosen for more nobler prospects."

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Well, today, Flog It, if you haven't guessed it, comes from a very busy Edinburgh.

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Scotland's capital could be described as a divided city.

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There's the old, medieval town with the castle on one side and the Grecian-style New Town on the other.

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But in more recent times it's public opinion that has split Edinburgh, and the cause?

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The new Parliament building, opened in 1997.

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It certainly makes a bold statement.

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Here we are, surrounded by lots of Edinburgh locals.

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I'm going to ask them one question -

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what do you all think of your Parliament building, which is just over there -

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does it get the thumbs up or the thumbs down?

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Oh, well, how controversial is that?

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Up or down, I don't know. But somewhere less controversial is our home for today, Our Dynamic Earth.

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Our Dynamic Earth was opened in the year 2000 to celebrate the planet

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and it's one of the top destinations for Edinburgh's tourists.

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But today it's all about antiques.

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And leading the way are our experts, Adam Partridge and James Lewis.

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-Hello, Isa.

-Hi.

-I'm Adam.

-Hello, Adam.

-Welcome to Flog It.

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You've brought along something that caught my eye -

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quite an interesting piece of Art Deco pottery.

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Where did you get this from?

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From my mother. It was always kept in a drawer in my mother's house, wrapped in an old towel.

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When she died I brought it home and I did exactly the same thing.

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I put it in a drawer and it's been there ever since.

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How interesting. So it's never been on display?

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Not that I can ever remember.

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I'd have guessed it had some sort of plant

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in it because you have this discolouration on the bottom here.

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Well, if it did, I have no recollection of that.

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It's never been on display.

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It dates from the 1930s and it's a piece by one of the most well-known

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ceramic designers of the 20th century called Charlotte Rhead, who worked in

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-the potteries at Stoke-on-Trent at a similar time to Clarice Cliff, who everybody has heard of.

-OK.

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Charlotte Rhead was known for these tube-lined designs.

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And most of her things were vases and bowls and big trays and chargers with various designs.

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This is quite an unusual design for her because they're mainly stylised

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flowers and foliage and here you have more trees, really, haven't you?

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-Yes.

-Condition is pretty good, apart from this discolouration in the middle there.

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But apart from that, I can't see any major chips or cracks or anything like that.

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The most desirable of her pieces are the ones that are signed on the bottom. And luckily,

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-yours is one of those that is signed on the bottom.

-Oh, I see.

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This will be a pattern number. This number here.

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So you can look it up and find out what the pattern's called.

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And this mark here is the manufacturer's mark.

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Burleighware, Bur-leigh stands for Burgess and Leigh of Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent.

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So we see a lot of these in the area where I'm based,

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quite near there.

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So they're not hard to value. It's not especially valuable.

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I think they're good value.

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They're undervalued. When you see sometimes the huge prices paid for Clarice Cliff and the likes of that.

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-I know.

-And this is probably going to make £40, something like that.

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-That's fine. That's fine.

-We could put an estimate of £30 to £50.

-OK.

-What's made you sell it?

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Well, maybe somebody somewhere might enjoy it and appreciate

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the design... I'm afraid I don't.

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Yeah. It's not to your taste?

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No.

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-Not not a big wrench?

-No. The wrench was when my mum died. Anything after that...

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-It's just an object, really?

-Yes.

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Well, let's hope it does well at the auction and I shall certainly be there to cheer it on

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-and hope it does well.

-That'd be really good. Aye, I'd like that.

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What a fantastic pocket watch.

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You know, you really don't see many of these around today but that is as good an example as you'll see.

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It's such a shame these things have gone out of fashion, isn't it?

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-Very much so.

-I think the only people left that wear these are

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eccentric antiques dealers and the odd auctioneer, but as objects, people do love them and collect them.

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They come in so many different styles and, of course, they've been used in

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England from the 17th century right the way through until wristwatches took over in the 1930s.

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This is what we call an open face pocket watch.

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In other words, the dial, or the face as people call it, is completely open.

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It's also a key wind pocket watch.

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In the 20th century, we tend to find that a little top winder has been put on the top there.

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You just wind it up in the same way as a wristwatch, without the use for a key.

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If we open up the back.

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A lovely set of hallmarks there. 18, for 18 carat gold.

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So it's a solid gold one. Then we've got the three wheat sheaves, which is the mark for Chester.

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And we've got a date code for 1870.

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So it's a really nice quality watch. Close it up.

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-So tell me, it arrived here at the Flog it tables...

-Yes.

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What is its history up to now?

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Well, when it's been in my care it's been lying in a drawer.

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Prior to that, I'd say 12 years ago, my grandfather died and I got it when I was clearing the house.

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-I can't ever remember it being used.

-Well, watches such as this, now, are worn predominantly at weddings,

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-official functions, but they're not used daily.

-No.

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So this will find its home probably to a collector.

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Value...

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Any ideas?

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I would say

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over £100, £200?

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It will be over £100.

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I think it will be around £200.

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I think we ought to put an estimate of £180 to £250.

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-And probably a reserve of £180 so it doesn't go below that.

-Yes.

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-And on that basis, I think it will do very well.

-Good.

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Let's take it along and see how it does.

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Good, thank you, yes.

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Mary, welcome to Flog It and thank you for bringing the best thing I've seen all day today.

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-In fact, the best piece of Monart glass I've ever seen.

-Oh, right.

-And I've seen a lot of it.

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-Probably not as much as up here in Scotland, because it came from Scotland, as you probably know.

-Yes.

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Where have you got it from?

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Well, it belonged to my granny and then my mother.

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-And it was passed down to my sister and myself.

-So it's come all the way down the family?

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Probably from when it was made.

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Monart was made at the Moncrieff Glass Works.

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A Spanish family started the business. The Ysart family.

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-So you have the "Mon" from Moncrieff and the "Art" from Ysart combined to make the name Monart.

-Oh.

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And this is a wonderfully big piece. I mean, most of the ones I see

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are going to be this high and little bits and pieces.

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-Yes.

-And that just completely blows them away.

-It is, it's lovely.

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We've never seen a piece as big.

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No, I've never seen one either.

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And you've got the typical Monart effect, with the gold speckles of the aventurine that's used in there.

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And I'm sure on the base you'll have the raised mark on the base.

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Which, it's such a big thing, we'll just carefully lean it over and...

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Oh, you've got the original sticker as well. The original label.

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Yes, the label is on.

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And a lot of Monart glass is distinctive by this raised circular pontil on the base,

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-but there is no further proof you would need than this here.

-Yes.

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And I would call that exhibition quality.

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That's the sort of thing they would have taken to their shows to say, "Look at what we can do here.

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This is the top end of glass making, really."

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So, why have you brought it along to Flog It?

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Well, it belongs to my sister and myself and we just wanted to find out what it was worth

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and we don't really have the space to sort of have it in the house.

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It's a big thing.

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-It does...

-It needs...

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-A nice position.

-You can't just stick it on the sideboard, can you?

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-So you can't split it with your sister.

-No.

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So that's another problem. It's about the best piece of Monart you'll see.

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-In Scotland, people are going to fight for that.

-Oh, that's good.

-My estimate would be £800 to £1,200.

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I initially thought less, but because it's such a big piece, I think it should be achievable.

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-Oh, that's good.

-How does that fit in with your expectations?

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-Yes, we thought about £1,000.

-Well, that's right in the middle.

-It's along the lines we were hoping.

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I don't think that's unrealistic.

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If we could put a reserve of £800, it won't go for any less.

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And I presume the money will be split?

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Oh, yes, 50/50.

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-And thank you for bringing just a wonderful piece of glass.

-Right.

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Kerry Rose, every time I see Beatrix Potter it's childhood memories,

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isn't it? Did you grow up with them as well?

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They were in my gran's room a lot and I learnt to play with them, so, yes.

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And did you get Beatrix Potter stories read to you as a kiddie?

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Yes, I did.

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It really interested me.

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I love everything to do with Beatrix Potter, the stories, the figures, anything I could get my hands on.

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-Who was your favourite?

-It would have to be the frog or Sir Isaac Newton.

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And where is the frog?

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-He's at the front.

-Oh, it's a frog, I thought he was a toad.

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He's a frog.

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I have to say, my favourite is Mrs Tiggywinkle.

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I always remember Mrs Tiggywinkle.

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That was the story my parents used to read to me when I was small.

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And, of course, now, Beatrix Potter is bigger than it ever has been.

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And there is a massive following.

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Now, the earlier the figures, the more valuable they are.

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And the original Beswick figures had a gold back stamp.

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Then later they had a brown.

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Then, eventually, they were taken over by Doulton and Royal Albert.

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So if you've got figures like this at home, look underneath.

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And if we've got a brown back stamp, like this, it's a

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-reasonable age, but not the very early ones, late '70s or '80s.

-OK.

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Individually, some of them are more rare than others.

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You do get some of them that are worth in the high hundreds.

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-There's none of those here today.

-OK.

-This little chap here, he's Pickles.

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He's quite rare. And the chap that I thought was a toad but isn't, Mr Jackson, he's quite rare as well.

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So those two are probably the best and they're worth £50 to £80 each.

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OK.

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And then the others are around £20 to £25 each.

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So if we have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight.

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So we've got £160 there.

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And we've got...

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I think we ought to have an estimate of £250 to £300.

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-Right.

-And a reserve of £200.

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-OK.

-So we don't go below that.

-Yeah.

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But if you love Beatrix Potter, why are you selling them?

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I've got a baby in the house now.

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So I can just see everything getting ruined so I want to sell them on,

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get some money and get him toys that he can play with.

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-Yes.

-And he'll ruin these. And I can see them in pieces.

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Yes, exactly. So, I mean, I am sure they will sell no problem at all. I'm confident.

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Now this is a bit of fun.

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It's a Victorian modulator. What does it do?

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Well, it's a teaching aid for music.

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Basically it's a tonic sol-fa.

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So, the teacher would stand here with the baton and all

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the pupils would be singing, "Doh, ray, me, fah, soh, lah, te, doh".

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It picks out the fifths and the tonics and the fourths as well.

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And it helps you modulate. It's a fantastic thing.

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I've seen them printed on paper before.

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This one is a full drop and it's printed on linen so it's had a lot of use and you can roll it back up.

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If you were to put that in auction today it would fetch around £30 to £50 in that condition.

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And talking of auctions, right now, it's time for our first batch of antiques to go under the hammer.

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Isa's Art Deco bowl is one of Charlotte Rhead's more unusual designs

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so my guess it is will be snapped up today.

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What a superb quality item this gold watch is, but it's time

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for it to go and I'm sure it's going to do well for Gillian.

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It's fantastic to have a lot with local interest, and such a superb piece.

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Monart doesn't get any better than this.

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And Kerry Rose is scared her new baby might wreck her childhood favourites

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so it's time for them to find a new home.

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Well, for today's sale we've travelled just south of Edinburgh

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to Rosewell, by bus, to the Thomson Roddick Auction Rooms.

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Fingers crossed we're going to have a fantastic day.

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Today's auctioneer is Sybelle Thomson.

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Let's see what she has to say about one of our lots.

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This is nice. It's not my kind of thing, but I appreciate good studio pottery.

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A bit of Charlotte Rhead.

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It belongs to Isa. It was her mother's and Isa has just inherited it and doesn't want it.

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We've got a valuation of £30 to £50, which isn't a lot for Charlotte Rhead.

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No, Charlotte Rhead is very collectable.

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She probably has been a bit overshadowed by Susie Cooper and Clarice Cliff,

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but this is the Sylvan pattern and it is actually quite collectable.

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I think she might get double the bottom estimate.

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-That's good - £60-odd then?

-Yeah.

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I think that's still relatively cheap.

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Yes. It's very collectable.

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Fashion dictates prices, that's the problem.

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-A few years ago that would have fetched quite a bit more money.

-Oh, yes, £100 or £150 easily.

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But a nice piece and her popularity is growing.

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Gillian, it's nearly time. It's time for the pocket watch to go under the hammer.

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We see a lot on Flog It and I think this is one of the best ones I've seen for a long time.

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-It's a lovely one. It's gorgeous.

-A great example of the period and it's in nice order. Yes.

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You would be keeping it if it was yours, wouldn't you?

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-Yes, I would.

-So would I. It's not a lot of money as well, considering what has gone into making this.

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The equivalent today would be £3,000.

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And lots of people spend £1,000 on a watch today so it's a good thing to have.

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It's going under the hammer.

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18 carat gold open faced pocket watch

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and I have two closed bids and I'm a starter at £180.

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-Oh, straight in, Gillian, £180.

-220, 240, 260, 280, 300, 320.

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Oh, this is more like it.

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340, 360, on commission at 360.

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Any advance on 360? At £360.

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-Yes!

-Oh, that is a great result.

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Justice is done because that was a really nice watch.

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And you know, we're not allowed to buy things and I was thinking,

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"Gosh, if that went for £200 I would like that!" That was a brilliant result.

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-Yes.

-That was quality throughout.

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-So what are you going to spend your money on?

-A new dishwasher.

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-A new dishwasher!

-Yes, absolutely.

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-Are you really?

-Yes.

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Has the old one packed up then?

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Yes, and I'm missing it. I'm on my second bottle of washing-up liquid.

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I can't be doing with it!

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It's big, it's bold and it's local.

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We've got a Monart vase just about to go under the hammer

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with a valuation of £800 to £1,200, belonging to Mary.

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I think it's absolutely gorgeous.

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We've seen seen them on the show before

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and we've reached £800 to £1,200 for smaller ones, so fingers crossed this is worth a little bit more.

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On a good day, it's got to be, Adam?

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I think it's a wonderful example and we're hopefully going to get

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-a good result today.

-We're going to find out right now.

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The very impressive large, red Monart vase.

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-I'd like to see this do £1,800.

-It won't.

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£1,000? 500? I've got 450 bid.

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-Who's on the telephone? 450?

-Should be a good place to sell it, really.

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500, 520, 550, 580,

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600, 620, 650, 680, 700,

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720, 720, 720.

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Anybody else want in at 720?

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750, 780, 800?

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Selling all the time at 800?

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800, 800. In the front row it looks a lot for the money at 800.

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Selling in front at 800.

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-It's selling.

-Any advance on £800?

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Selling once, selling twice at £800.

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Oh, you're so right.

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Just a grand less than your prediction, Paul.

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You know, I was rather hoping for something special from that.

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-I was as well.

-I was too, but never mind. That's good.

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Kelly Rose, were you a big Beatrix Potter fan?

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I liked the figurines that used to sit in my gran's room and I used to sit and play with them all the time.

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-So you remember them when you were so high, looking at them?

-Yes.

-Oh, bless.

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We have a valuation of £200 to £300 put on by James. 12 figurines.

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Yes, they're not the oldest ones but they're all in nice order and there

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are a couple of rarer ones there, so fingers crossed they'll do well.

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Let's hope we get the top end of James's estimate.

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-Hopefully.

-Good luck. This is it.

-12 Beswick Beatrix Potter figures.

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£200 for the lot? 200, 100.

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100 bid. 120, 140,

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160, 160, 180, 180, 180, 180, 200.

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200, 200, 200, anyone going on at 200? The bid is on my left.

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Any advance on £200? At £200.

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Sold it. £200.

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We just did it. Within estimate.

0:18:570:18:59

-That's OK, isn't it?

-Yes.

-We'll settle for that.

0:18:590:19:01

Yes, maybe I'll get something nice for £200.

0:19:010:19:05

I'm sure you will. Enjoy the shopping.

0:19:050:19:07

If you're potty about pottery, you're going to love this next item.

0:19:130:19:16

It's by Charlotte Rhead and belongs to Isa, but not for much longer.

0:19:160:19:19

-No.

-I can say that now definitely.

0:19:190:19:22

-Yes.

-It's a lovely bit of Charlotte Rhead. It's a gorgeous little bowl, so why are you selling this?

0:19:220:19:29

Well, nobody has enjoyed it in my family and when I

0:19:290:19:33

did a search on Charlotte Rhead I discovered that she had

0:19:330:19:39

breast cancer and subsequently died from it.

0:19:390:19:42

And because I'm in remission from breast cancer, if there's

0:19:420:19:46

-any money that's where it's going to, cancer care.

-Oh, bless you.

0:19:460:19:50

Let's hope we can get top money.

0:19:500:19:52

Charlotte Rhead is a great name, Adam, you know all about this.

0:19:520:19:55

-I think her work's really nice.

-On a good day will we get more than £50?

0:19:550:19:58

On a good day we'll get about £70, I think.

0:19:580:20:00

Well, let me tell you, I had a quick chat with Sybelle, our auctioneer,

0:20:000:20:03

and she said on a really good day it would double your bottom end.

0:20:030:20:06

-So hopefully that's £60.

-It will still be excellent.

0:20:060:20:10

We're going to find out exactly what it makes right now. Here we go.

0:20:100:20:15

For the Charlotte Rhead Art Deco octagonal bowl

0:20:150:20:18

and I've two bids and we're started at £30.

0:20:180:20:20

30 bid, 30 bid. 35, 40, 5, 50, 5, 60, 5, 70.

0:20:200:20:28

£70 on commission. At 70.

0:20:280:20:30

Any advance on 70? At £70.

0:20:300:20:34

Spot on.

0:20:340:20:36

-That's great.

-Great.

0:20:360:20:38

-Well done, Adam.

-Very pleased.

0:20:380:20:40

-Brilliant.

-And thank you so much.

0:20:400:20:42

What a lovely lady.

0:20:420:20:44

Edinburgh is only one of a handful of cities in the world

0:20:520:20:55

declared as a World Heritage Site because of its incredible and historic buildings.

0:20:550:21:01

Today I've come to visit one of its newest and most controversial.

0:21:010:21:06

It's possibly the most talked-about building in Edinburgh.

0:21:060:21:09

The home of the Scottish Parliament.

0:21:090:21:11

When Scotland voted to govern itself back in 1997, its new Parliament needed a home.

0:21:150:21:19

And what it got was something out of the ordinary.

0:21:190:21:22

Catalan-born architect Enric Miralles was commissioned to build it.

0:21:220:21:28

Miralles' vision was for Parliament to sit comfortably within its setting.

0:21:320:21:36

So his concept focused on the relationship between the building and the landscape.

0:21:360:21:41

The way the building juts out of the ground echoes the shape

0:21:460:21:49

of the nearby volcanic mountains and the roofs of these buildings were designed to look like leaves.

0:21:490:21:54

He died before the Parliament was finished so we'll never know what a lot of these features,

0:21:540:22:01

like these granite and oak panels on the outside of the building, really mean.

0:22:010:22:06

People think those shapes look like hairdryers.

0:22:060:22:10

To me, they look like the Scalextrix triggers for driving cars. But who knows?

0:22:100:22:15

You've got the look at the building, work it out for yourself and enjoy it.

0:22:150:22:21

So far so good, I've liked the outside.

0:22:260:22:28

So let's find out how these architectural statements continue on the inside.

0:22:280:22:35

This is the main entrance hall and the first thing you notice is these wonderful -

0:22:430:22:49

there's three of them, great big, concrete vaulted ceilings

0:22:490:22:53

and they are so incredibly smooth to touch.

0:22:530:22:56

They contain Kemnay granite from Aberdeenshire.

0:22:560:23:00

The stone floor throughout is from Scotland.

0:23:000:23:03

Up there are crosses that have been cast into the wet concrete and that

0:23:030:23:08

emulates 13th-century stonemasons' work on early cathedrals.

0:23:080:23:13

And that shape represents the cross on the Scottish flag.

0:23:130:23:17

Above these two great big oak double doors is a huge great big stone lintel up there,

0:23:200:23:26

removed from the original building where Parliament was held until it was dissolved in 1707.

0:23:260:23:32

The idea is today, members have to pass through there.

0:23:320:23:36

They see that and it reminds them of their origins and history.

0:23:360:23:40

How does this building work in the running of modern political life?

0:23:400:23:45

This is the debating chamber, an incredible space.

0:23:520:23:56

Today I've been shown around by the Presiding Officer, Alex Ferguson.

0:23:560:24:01

-So pleased to meet you. Thank you for showing me around.

-Not at all.

-What is your role here, Alex?

0:24:010:24:07

My role is similar to the Speaker at Westminster with minor differences,

0:24:070:24:12

principally chairing debates in the chamber from

0:24:120:24:16

the seat down there, above and in front of the members.

0:24:160:24:19

Everywhere you look, it's beautifully put together.

0:24:190:24:23

-Yes.

-Some dynamics of architecture are beyond me. I'd need to spend time here.

0:24:230:24:28

How long have you been here?

0:24:280:24:30

We've been here over four years. Walking around this building, which I know well, I find new things.

0:24:300:24:37

New dynamics. New spaces and different views and different symbolism.

0:24:370:24:43

It's a constant exploration and voyage of discovery.

0:24:430:24:46

It's definitely got an energy about it.

0:24:460:24:50

I'm glad you feel like that, because I feel there is.

0:24:500:24:53

There's a very different feel.

0:24:530:24:55

You can walk into an area and feel a palpable warmth and another area

0:24:550:24:59

where you feel much more light and openness and accessibility.

0:24:590:25:04

Almost every time you turn a corner there's a different feel.

0:25:040:25:08

I like the symbolism cut through the louvre in the light there. Little men, are they?

0:25:170:25:22

Indeed, little men. I commend you for

0:25:220:25:24

picking that up, because most people think they're bottles.

0:25:240:25:28

They represent the people of Scotland listening to their Parliament in action.

0:25:280:25:33

You can see them all around the walls in different

0:25:330:25:36

-colours as well.

-And that's the public gallery?

0:25:360:25:41

The public gallery stretches right along and you can get about 250 people in it.

0:25:410:25:45

It's really close.

0:25:450:25:46

That is something that people often comment on, how close it is.

0:25:460:25:50

You can almost reach out and touch the members.

0:25:500:25:52

We decided to keep it open and accessible -

0:25:520:25:55

it's about the Parliament and people working together.

0:25:550:25:58

Yes.

0:25:580:26:00

What is the general public's reaction when they get inside?

0:26:070:26:11

I like the bit when you say, "When they get inside", because

0:26:110:26:15

what usually happens is that people come in with a frown on their face.

0:26:150:26:19

By the time they've seen the sheer quality of the workmanship and

0:26:190:26:23

the warmth and all the different aspects,

0:26:230:26:27

nearly always they leave with a smile and I do find that exciting and encouraging.

0:26:270:26:32

Miralles's attention to detail is second to none.

0:26:360:26:41

It's absolutely mind-blowing, from these lovely sweeping curves of the laminated seats to the laminated

0:26:410:26:48

oak beams that are trussing this roof over a vast expanse, and it's just a joy to behold.

0:26:480:26:56

I love the natural light scoops everywhere.

0:26:560:26:58

Looking through that window over there is an internal courtyard, but looking at it,

0:26:580:27:03

it looks like 13th-century architecture with flying buttresses

0:27:030:27:07

jutting out, supporting the building. It really is good.

0:27:070:27:11

It's craftsmanship at its very best.

0:27:110:27:13

This must be one of the most controversial buildings of modern times.

0:27:170:27:21

It has been described as a concrete blot, a Lego set gone wrong.

0:27:210:27:26

That's probably partly due to the fact that it cost over £400 million.

0:27:260:27:31

But the dust has now settled.

0:27:310:27:33

This building has won many great awards for architecture, including the prestigious Stirling Prize.

0:27:330:27:40

It is unashamedly modern.

0:27:400:27:42

The detail inside is absolutely incredible. It is full of vitality.

0:27:420:27:47

You've got to see this.

0:27:470:27:48

I absolutely love it.

0:27:480:27:50

And if I'd have been one of the Scottish craftsmen

0:27:500:27:53

working on this project, I'd be very proud of myself.

0:27:530:27:58

Back at the valuation day, Adam has found some toys to play with.

0:28:080:28:11

Good morning, Emma.

0:28:110:28:13

-Hiya.

-These are surely not your toys from childhood?

0:28:130:28:17

-No, they're not.

-No, they're rather older than that.

0:28:170:28:20

-Where did you get them from?

-My aunty gave me them.

-Right.

0:28:200:28:24

She hopes they'll be worth a lot of money

0:28:240:28:27

and I can flog them for a lot of money, but I'm not sure.

0:28:270:28:30

-She hopes or you hope?

-I think she hopes, but I'm a bit more sceptical.

0:28:300:28:34

-A bit more realistic.

-Yes.

-But they are interesting. They're fun and mildly collectable.

0:28:340:28:39

Do you know where she got them from?

0:28:390:28:41

She got them from an old lady clearing out her attic.

0:28:410:28:44

OK, clearing out the attic.

0:28:440:28:46

You've got the twin tub.

0:28:460:28:48

Hoovermatic washing machine by Chad Valley. Tin-plate washing machine.

0:28:480:28:53

-Have you ever used it?

-No.

-Because it does work.

0:28:530:28:56

You've got your twin compartments there and your water and your switch for wash and dry, and wash only.

0:28:560:29:02

You can drain it and you've got this winder on the side.

0:29:020:29:05

So I think the idea was that little girls washed their dolls' clothing in it.

0:29:050:29:10

And it's got the original box, which is nice to see. It cost 25s 6d.

0:29:100:29:15

That's quite a lot, I think. So it was quite a posh toy.

0:29:150:29:19

I actually sold one of these a few years ago, and it made about £20.

0:29:190:29:24

So it's not worth an awful lot. Then we move on to the typewriter there.

0:29:240:29:29

Also works.

0:29:290:29:32

It doesn't look as though would. But we've got instructions on the back.

0:29:320:29:35

You insert the paper,

0:29:350:29:38

turn the selector wheel to choose your letter and then press it and you can type away on it.

0:29:380:29:45

-Have you ever used that one?

-No.

0:29:450:29:47

It's not worth a lot, but probably worth more than a real typewriter.

0:29:470:29:53

They're virtually impossible to sell now in today's age of computers.

0:29:530:29:58

So I would suggest putting these in the same lot.

0:29:580:30:01

An estimate of £30 to £50 on the two and see what they make.

0:30:010:30:06

-What do you think?

-Great.

-You're not going to miss them?

-No.

0:30:060:30:10

Where do they live at the moment?

0:30:100:30:12

-In a cupboard.

-That's no good, in a cupboard.

0:30:120:30:15

Will you do anything with the money?

0:30:150:30:17

It's not a lot but...

0:30:170:30:19

-I'm going on holiday.

-So a bit of spending money on holiday.

0:30:190:30:22

-Excellent. Well, have a good holiday, Emma, and thanks for bringing them.

-Thank you.

0:30:220:30:27

For a Scottish tea service, the last thing you would expect to entice you into eating

0:30:310:30:37

cakes off this would be insects and bugs all over it!

0:30:370:30:40

The reason is it's not Scottish, it's French.

0:30:400:30:42

They eat anything, it wouldn't put them off.

0:30:420:30:45

But here we have a Paris porcelain.

0:30:450:30:48

French tea or coffee service from the early 19th century.

0:30:480:30:53

What's it doing here in Edinburgh?

0:30:530:30:55

It belonged to my granny who used to work for Lord Hamilton of the Dalzell Castle in Motherwell.

0:30:550:31:01

And when he died, she was allowed to furnish a home from Dalzell Castle.

0:31:010:31:07

And she took it from Dalzell.

0:31:070:31:11

Oh, fantastic.

0:31:110:31:12

We've got a tea or coffee pot there made around 1810, 1820, in France.

0:31:120:31:19

And, I have to say, I love the decoration on it.

0:31:190:31:22

The idea of painting insects on your porcelain came from Meissen in the 18th century.

0:31:220:31:28

Whereas the porcelain was so valuable in those days, but once you fired it in the kiln,

0:31:280:31:35

if it had a blemish on it, you wouldn't throw it away as a second, as they do today, you'd say,

0:31:350:31:41

"Oh, I've got a black mark there, what can we do? I know, let's paint a little beetle over it."

0:31:410:31:46

But this, 200 years old and in lovely condition.

0:31:460:31:51

The gilding here is as good as the day it was made.

0:31:510:31:55

Sadly, the finial has been off at some stage, but that could be restored, so you would never know.

0:31:550:32:01

Lovely.

0:32:010:32:03

This is something that has graced your china cabinet for the last however many years?

0:32:030:32:07

No, I don't have a china cabinet.

0:32:070:32:09

-Since my mother died it's been in the cupboard. I've never taken it out and never used it.

-Never?

0:32:090:32:14

Never. I don't have a china cabinet or anything like that.

0:32:140:32:18

Therefore, to stick it on the bathroom windowsill

0:32:180:32:22

or something, I thought, "No, that's not what it's for."

0:32:220:32:26

I'm sure somebody will love it.

0:32:260:32:28

I hope somebody will have other parts that they can reunite.

0:32:280:32:32

This would have been one of thousands of services made in this style at that period.

0:32:320:32:39

So you will find people with a cup and a saucer, a plate and sugar bowl.

0:32:390:32:44

Eventually,

0:32:440:32:45

-if you can find people to buy other bits and reunite it, that would be lovely.

-It would be.

0:32:450:32:50

So now we need to come to a value.

0:32:500:32:53

The teapot is the bit that is damaged and that's what people collect, really, as a main piece.

0:32:530:32:59

We've got a coffee cup and no saucer.

0:32:590:33:02

We've got a plate on its own and a milk jug with no sugar.

0:33:020:33:06

So I think if we put an estimate of £60 to £100 on it, with a firm

0:33:060:33:13

reserve of £60, so it didn't go below that, I think that would be OK.

0:33:130:33:18

How do you feel?

0:33:180:33:20

I had no idea how much it was going to be at all.

0:33:200:33:23

And whatever we get, my sister and I have to share it, because it came from my mother.

0:33:230:33:27

-There's not going to be a lot to share.

-No, but then we can buy something different that we

0:33:270:33:35

might not just spend normal money on.

0:33:350:33:37

While you're here, have a look and see if there's a bit of porcelain

0:33:370:33:41

or a painting or a vase or something that you might like to replace it.

0:33:410:33:45

That would be a good idea.

0:33:450:33:47

Megan, how are you today?

0:33:530:33:54

Fine, thank you. How are you?

0:33:540:33:56

I'm very well too.

0:33:560:33:58

No-one has ever asks me back, so thank you for that.

0:33:580:34:01

And how have you come to own this lovely little ivory box?

0:34:010:34:05

When my Aunty Ceri moved into her new house,

0:34:050:34:07

the guy who owned it before left a lot of rubbish in the attic.

0:34:070:34:12

So he said, "You can keep whatever is in the attic and just chuck it out if you don't want it",

0:34:120:34:17

so we chucked everything else out, but we kept that and a couple of other things.

0:34:170:34:21

So he did left some quite good stuff in the attic, but he was too lazy to clear it out.

0:34:210:34:26

-Yes.

-And he thought he'd be generous and say you could keep it. Wow, that's quite good.

0:34:260:34:31

-Do you like it?

-Yes, it's different, I like it.

0:34:310:34:35

It's very, very intricate.

0:34:350:34:37

It's amazing carving, actually.

0:34:370:34:39

-It's carved from ivory.

-Yes.

0:34:390:34:41

It dates from the end of the 19th century. So over 100 years old and it's Cantonese.

0:34:410:34:46

Made for export. Export ware, but it is amazing, that carving on there.

0:34:460:34:51

It's clearly been in an attic

0:34:510:34:53

quite a lot, because it looks like you've got the contents

0:34:530:34:56

of the vacuum cleaner underneath it.

0:34:560:34:57

Which is quite hard to remove,

0:34:570:35:00

because you don't want to snap any of this decoration off.

0:35:000:35:05

A circular trinket box there, it's all carved, even on the bottom.

0:35:050:35:10

Even the base is carved. Have you seen any damage on it anywhere?

0:35:100:35:15

No, I don't think so.

0:35:150:35:17

That's just an age crack there,

0:35:170:35:19

nothing to worry about that.

0:35:190:35:22

But that top is really very nice indeed.

0:35:220:35:25

-So, you've decided to sell it?

-Yes.

-Why are you selling it?

0:35:250:35:29

Because it's just lying about the house.

0:35:290:35:32

We're afraid it'll get broken. If we sell it, I'll give half the money to my Aunty Ceri

0:35:320:35:37

because she was the one who gave it to me.

0:35:370:35:39

And the money I'm going to put some of it towards my mum, because my mum's a single parent

0:35:390:35:45

and she does her best to get us everything we want, but sometimes she's struggling.

0:35:450:35:51

That's nice. What a nice daughter you are.

0:35:510:35:53

That's really nice to hear.

0:35:530:35:56

-So you're going to not keep much of it yourself.

-No.

-No, very good.

0:35:560:36:00

Any idea what that's worth? No.

0:36:000:36:02

-£20?

-Higher.

0:36:020:36:04

-£50.

-Higher.

0:36:040:36:06

£100?

0:36:060:36:09

-I'm not sure.

-I think I would put the reserve about £80 to £100.

0:36:110:36:16

And I think it will make £100 to £150.

0:36:160:36:18

So, shall we put an estimate of £100 to £150 on it, with a reserve of £100 with a little bit of leeway?

0:36:180:36:25

-If it gets to £90, £95, we'll let it go, but not less.

-Yes.

0:36:250:36:29

-Does that sound good?

-Yes.

0:36:290:36:31

Brilliant. Thanks for bringing it in. Very nice indeed.

0:36:310:36:34

It's time to head back to the auction room and here's a quick

0:36:340:36:37

reminder of all the lots going under the hammer.

0:36:370:36:41

It's the toy typewriter and the Hoovermatic washing machine.

0:36:410:36:45

I wonder if it will clean up in the auction room?

0:36:450:36:48

It's time for Janet to let go of her decorative tea set.

0:36:480:36:51

Will the bidders take a flutter on this one?

0:36:510:36:54

And Megan wants to give something back to her mum

0:36:540:36:58

with the sale of this ivory box, so let's hope it fetches a good price.

0:36:580:37:02

Something unusual. A typewriter and a washing machine. Now, is this Flog It?

0:37:100:37:15

They're tin toys and they belong to Emma here.

0:37:150:37:18

-You're looking fabulous.

-Thank you.

0:37:180:37:20

-Are you looking forward to this?

-Yes.

-Let's hope we get the top end of Adam's estimate.

0:37:200:37:26

Unlikely, but you never know!

0:37:260:37:29

We don't often get washing machines on Flog It, do we?

0:37:290:37:31

But it is a bit of fun, isn't it?

0:37:310:37:34

-Yes.

-What are you hoping for?

0:37:340:37:36

I hope it gets the top estimate.

0:37:360:37:38

-You'll put the money towards what?

-I'm going on holiday on Sunday, so...

0:37:380:37:42

-Where are you going?

-Mexico.

0:37:420:37:44

Fabulous, fabulous.

0:37:440:37:46

Let's hope we can get you there with a little bit of spending money.

0:37:460:37:50

It's going under the hammer now.

0:37:500:37:52

British Supertype tin-plate typewriter and a Chad Valley washing machine.

0:37:520:37:57

A nice, interesting lot for the toy collector.

0:37:570:38:01

And I can start these at £20.

0:38:010:38:03

20 bid, 20 bid, 20 bid. 25, 30.

0:38:030:38:06

Yes, there are some hands in the room, that's good.

0:38:060:38:09

45. Right beside me 45. Selling to the gentleman at 45.

0:38:090:38:14

Any advance on 45?

0:38:140:38:17

Yeah. That put them in a spin.

0:38:170:38:20

£45, that's good. That's great.

0:38:200:38:23

-That will help you in Mexico.

-Yes.

-Mum and Dad taking you?

0:38:230:38:26

No, I'm going with my boyfriend.

0:38:260:38:29

-For a month.

-Oooooh! Have a great trip.

-Thank you.

0:38:290:38:32

Next, the French teapot. That belongs to Janet.

0:38:380:38:41

We've got the French teapot.

0:38:410:38:43

We have Janet's sister, Helen, here. Can you remember this teapot?

0:38:430:38:48

I remember it in my grandmother's house and in my mother's house.

0:38:480:38:52

So how come that got divided up between the two of you? How come Janet got it?

0:38:520:38:57

After our mum died, she kept it until decided what to do with it.

0:38:570:39:01

OK. Will you split the money?

0:39:010:39:03

-Yes.

-Yes. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:39:030:39:06

283, the 19th-century porcelain part tea set.

0:39:060:39:10

A nice tea set. £50 for this?

0:39:100:39:12

50 bid. 55, 60, 5, 70, 5, 80, £80.

0:39:120:39:18

Any advance on £80?

0:39:180:39:20

Anyone going on? At £80...

0:39:200:39:23

That is spot on mid-estimate, James.

0:39:230:39:27

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:39:270:39:28

That was a hard one to value, it really was.

0:39:280:39:31

-You've got to be happy with that?

-Oh, yes, very happy.

0:39:310:39:34

Dividing the money?

0:39:340:39:37

Half and half.

0:39:370:39:39

Less a bit of commission.

0:39:390:39:41

You've done the hard work here and Janet did the hard work at the valuation, so it's even.

0:39:410:39:47

A little bit of the Orient comes to Edinburgh.

0:39:550:39:57

A lovely little Cantonese trinket box.

0:39:570:40:00

It belongs to Megan. Hi there.

0:40:000:40:01

-Hello.

-Since the valuation day, Megan has something to show us.

0:40:010:40:06

Let's just have a look at this.

0:40:060:40:08

-What happened?

-Well, I was on my friend's bike and I hit a curb and I went flying forwards.

0:40:080:40:14

And you fell off?

0:40:140:40:16

I went right over the handlebars.

0:40:160:40:19

Oh, I bet that hurt, didn't it?

0:40:190:40:21

-Yes.

-Is it broken?

0:40:210:40:24

It's broken right beneath my wrist, straight across.

0:40:240:40:28

-Oh, so there's a few weeks with that on?

-Yes.

0:40:280:40:31

We wish you all the best of luck. I hope you get well soon.

0:40:310:40:34

-You look fabulous.

-Thank you.

0:40:340:40:36

This is exciting. Is this your first auction?

0:40:360:40:38

-Yes.

-What do you think?

0:40:380:40:40

It's really interesting.

0:40:400:40:43

There's so much to look at you don't know what to look at,

0:40:430:40:46

but right now we should concentrate on Adam, our expert.

0:40:460:40:49

-Were you pleased with the valuation?

-Yes.

0:40:490:40:52

I think this is quality. Really, really good.

0:40:520:40:55

Encouragingly, there is a lot of Oriental stuff in the sale today.

0:40:550:40:59

-Exactly.

-Which I was really pleased to see.

0:40:590:41:01

And it's fetching good prices as well.

0:41:010:41:03

It's in good company. Under the hammer now.

0:41:030:41:06

This is it. Look over there.

0:41:060:41:08

100, 110, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200, 220, 240, 260.

0:41:080:41:15

Oh, they absolutely love this.

0:41:150:41:18

300, 320, 340,

0:41:180:41:22

360, 380?

0:41:220:41:24

It's not stopping.

0:41:240:41:27

-400. 420.

-This is a good price.

0:41:270:41:30

-440.

-This is great.

0:41:300:41:31

-Her first auction experience and you're going to end on a real high.

-Oh, my God.

0:41:310:41:36

460. It's against you. 460. 480?

0:41:360:41:39

500, 500. 520. 550?

0:41:410:41:46

-£550, Megan, they love this!

-600.

0:41:460:41:51

There's a couple of phone bids.

0:41:510:41:53

There's a guy on the phone bidding from home.

0:41:530:41:55

650.

0:41:550:41:57

My goodness me. Didn't you find it in a house?

0:41:570:42:01

-Yes.

-What is Aunty going to say?

0:42:010:42:03

She's going to go mental!

0:42:030:42:05

She's going to go mental!

0:42:050:42:07

I'm going mental, never mind my aunty.

0:42:070:42:11

-Listen to this.

-780, on Jocelyn's phone.

0:42:110:42:15

Would anybody else like in at £780?

0:42:150:42:18

Sybelle has just put the hammer down at £780!

0:42:180:42:24

Now, that's a lot more than £150-odd, isn't it?

0:42:240:42:29

Gosh, I'm tingling. You must be tingling.

0:42:290:42:31

Adam, that went for a staggering amount.

0:42:310:42:33

Not a great estimate in the end.

0:42:330:42:35

-It doesn't really matter. As you said, there was a lot of Oriental.

-The right sale.

0:42:350:42:41

You were only planning on spending £100, weren't you?

0:42:410:42:45

You have £780 to split, it should go a lot further.

0:42:450:42:47

-I bet you can't wait to tell Aunty, can you.

-No.

-How exciting?

0:42:470:42:50

Oh, it was so exciting.

0:42:500:42:53

-Were you shaking?

-Yes.

-I certainly was.

0:42:530:42:56

How about that! What a fantastic day, just south of Edinburgh.

0:43:020:43:06

Sybelle is on the rostrum doing her stuff, but it's all over for our owners.

0:43:060:43:12

All credit to our experts because we've sold absolutely everything.

0:43:120:43:16

It's been brilliant. The highlight was Megan's face.

0:43:160:43:20

It just lit up with a staggering £780 for the little Cantonese box.

0:43:200:43:25

What a surprise. That's auctions for you. So join me for many more.

0:43:250:43:29

Until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:290:43:31

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Limited

0:43:420:43:45

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:450:43:47

Paul Martin and the Flog It team visit Our Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh. Experts James Lewis and Adam Partridge look for hidden treasures and discover a small ivory trinket box that was found in an attic and a fabulous example of Monart. Paul also pays a visit to Edinburgh's newest and most controversial tourist attraction, the Scottish Parliament.