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Up for valuation by experts Philip Serrell and Michael Baggott in Derby are a German painting, a pair of Disney figurines and an 18ct diamond ring that is not all it seems.


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It's been invaded by the Romans, the Saxons and the Danes.

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It's also outlived the plague and leprosy.

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But can Derby survive Flog It? We'll see.

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When it comes to antiques, Derby's reputation is formidable.

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Since 1750, local craftsmen have been producing porcelain.

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140 years later, that porcelain won the Royal Seal of Approval from Queen Victoria.

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To this very day, Royal Crown Derby remains highly collectable.

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But will we find any Crown Derby at today's venue, the Assembly Rooms?

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The queue is on its way in, so let's see what the people have got.

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It looks like we could be in for great day. No sign of any Crown Derby yet though.

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Here at the Derby Assembly Rooms,

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our experts are leaving no stone unturned in the hunt for treasures.

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Experts Michael Baggott and Mr Philip Serrell

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are already on the scent and if they flush it out, we'll flog it!

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First up is Michael, who's been intrigued by what looks like a jewellery box.

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Rosy, Jane, I love the promise of an unopened box.

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So let's have a look and see what we've got here.

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Wonderful. I don't think the original box, but a beautiful little gold, aquamarine and sea pearl brooch.

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So tell me who does the pendant belong to?

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It belongs to me.

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And it was my great granddad's.

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Did it skip you? Did you say...?

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Yes, my mum's had it for years in a cupboard and she gave it to Rosy.

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Fantastic thing to be given. No chain, but have you ever worn it, or tried to put it on a chain?

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No. It's been in the box for years.

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-Not your taste?

-No.

-It's strange how jewellery goes in fashion.

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At the moment, everyone wants bold, 1950s, modernist jewels, Art Deco.

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It's moved away from this fine Art Nouveau work,

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which is a tremendous shame, because look at the amount of time and care that has been taken to make that.

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Those little aquamarines didn't cost a lot

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and the sea pearls were a matter of a few pennies each,

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but the quality of manufacture...

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And there, just in the top corner,

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we've got a little pad stamp for nine carats.

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It would have been too fragile to mark this with any assay office marks.

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You'd have just obliterated it. So they've just thickened it up there so it will take the impression.

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-Any idea how old it is?

-I don't know.

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-No.

-Well, it's Art Nouveau, it falls into that period

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from 1890 up to about 1905, with commercial production into 1910.

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I think this is about 1900, so obviously going back to your great aunt.

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That would fit in nicely. It's a lovely thing.

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Any idea of the value of it?

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-None at all.

-Well, it might surprise you, might shock you, but I think in the region of £80 to £120.

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-That's good.

-Was that what you were expecting?

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Oh, yeah!

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When something is made of gold and gem stones, you expect it to be wildly valuable.

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So you sort have to temper your expectations.

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As you say, it's been locked away in a cupboard.

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So if we put a fixed reserve of £80 on it, and it makes that or hopefully

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makes the top end - keep our fingers crossed - what are your plans for the money?

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My mum needs a new car, so I'll probably put it towards that.

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It might buy a couple of tyres. We'll see what happens on the day.

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-Thank you so much for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

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Peter, I like this.

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This caught my eye from over there.

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-Thank you.

-I like slightly Impressionistic 20th-century moderns,

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slightly loose, that kind of thing. And this fits the bill.

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Tell me about it.

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-My mother in Germany.

-You're German?

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My mother-in-law, they had a bit of money, but to turn the money into something more valuable,

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because the German mark was losing value, so they bought the pictures.

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-OK.

-They knew pictures are better...

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-A better investment.

-A better investment.

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And of course she died

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and the picture is now left for my wife and me.

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-And my wife died two months ago.

-I'm sorry to hear that.

-Yes,

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so I'm left by myself and so what can I do with the pictures?

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OK. Well, let's talk about this one.

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For me, it's got everything going for it.

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It's got the right colours, it's quite loose and it's a good size.

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Hoff Muller...

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we've got a bit of information on the back here, which is quite nice.

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It's in its original frame, isn't it?

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-Yes, it is.

-You can see it's been signed.

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30th October, 1932.

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-Hoff Muller.

-Hoff Muller.

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-And there's the English translation.

-That's the English translation.

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Autumn on Uppersea near Bernau?

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-So that's in Austria?

-Yes.

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The condition's good as well.

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A lot of people go, "It's not my cup of tea,"

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art is so subjective. But I like it and I wish I could paint like that.

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I'd be proud of doing something like that.

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-Thank you.

-I did look him up ten minutes ago in the book.

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Hoff Muller does have form.

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There is a price guide.

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He's had about ten works of art, oils on canvas, put up for sale

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in auction and they have all varied from around 300 to 500 euros. I don't know

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if he's more popular in Germany, but he was a poster painter

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and his prints sell for quite a lot of money.

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Looking at the way he paints,

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-you can see, he paints like a poster painter, can't you?

-Yes.

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It needs more information to go with it to make the whole story full.

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Nevertheless, we can put it into auction,

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-if you'd like to sell it. Would you like to sell it?

-Yes. I would.

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We could put this into auction with a value of about £70 to £100.

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-Hopefully it will get just a bit above that. Would that be OK?

-Yes.

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-Hopefully it might end up back in Germany with a collector.

-Might do.

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-Well, we'll find out.

-Thank you.

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So here we've got Lady and the Tramp.

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Not lady and the tramp, but Lady and the Tramp!

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-Lady and the Tramp.

-Now, you said that, not me!

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-That's right!

-Cos these are from the Walt Disney film, aren't they?

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-Yes.

-How did you come by these?

-At a garden party, I either won them or got them for a small amount.

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How long ago was this?

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-This was 20 years.

-So mid 1980s?

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Yes.

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Right. Cos they're from Lady and the Tramp, which is Walt Disney,

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-and Lady and the Tramp would be what, mid-70s?

-I don't know.

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-They are by Wade.

-Yes.

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Little Wade whimsies and little Wade Lady and the Tramp figures that we normally associate

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are very tiny and these are the blown-up versions.

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So that is Dashy the Daschund and which one is this one?

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We think that's Trusty. He is a Bloodhound, isn't he?

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He's a Bloodhound, absolutely.

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These things were mass produced and weren't intended to be great quality like Derby, Worcester or whatever.

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So why do you want to sell them?

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They're on a window sill at the moment.

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Or they were, but we put them into a cupboard, because we thought the value of them, in a window sill,

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if a grandchild knocks them off, they won't be worth anything.

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-Absolutely right.

-So we thought, well, let's dispose.

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You know, five years ago, I think these things were probably worth more than they are now.

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But the advent of the internet and people selling these things

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has meant that it flushes more of them out and the days of high prices for these, in my view, is gone.

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Now, we've looked at some auction records this morning and

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we've found some figures that, three to four years ago,

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these two might have made between £200 and £300.

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But I think those days have gone.

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If you've got something that's a bit of a kitsch market, which sort of goes up and down on a fad

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or a fashion, which I believe these are, then prices of those can fluctuate greatly.

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It's my view that at auction you need to estimate these at £80 to £120.

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Now, if you have a real result,

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it might be

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that they might go and make £150 to £200.

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I think you might just struggle with them and our 80 to 120 is a good estimate.

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You know, the valuation of something, really, is what somebody's prepared to pay for it.

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So when we go to Bamford sale room, my guess is we'll find out what these

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are worth. And I imagine that we'll all be wrong!

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Thank you very much for coming.

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-We'll see you at Bamford's.

-OK. Thank you.

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We'll be coming back to more valuations a little later in the show.

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Before that, let's see how our first three items do at auction.

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Firstly, there was the little gold and aquamarine brooch that Michael fell for.

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But will the price be right for Rosy?

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This painting by German artist Hoff Muller certainly caught my eye.

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I hope it makes a good price for Peter.

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Finally, Philip may have doted on the dog figurines,

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but will the bidders be bitten by their charms?

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For today's auction we're staying in the heart of Derby.

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But before things get going, I grabbed a quick chat with auctioneer and Flog It regular, James Lewis.

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We've got a couple of hounds for you and it's not Philip or Michael,

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it is in fact two lovely Wade figures.

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They're far prettier!

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They belong to Cedric and Jean and Philip has put £80 to £120.

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It's the name, they're very collectable and they're dogs.

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Wade made these blow up figures for a number of years.

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The little miniature Wade whimsies sell every time. They're very easy to sell.

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It's a mad world when 18th-century porcelain can be very difficult,

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and you get something like this from a cartoon that sells week in, week out, without any problem.

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-20th-century collectables. That is where the market is.

-Childhood memories as well.

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And there is a book price, so people feel safe buying things like this.

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Dalton figures, isn't it? Flick to the page, look it up, Beswick hunting sets, all the same thing.

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I have to say, I actually quite like them,

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and I think Philip's got a secret love for them as well.

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He's a hound dog!

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-Top end?

-Yes, I hope they'll make top end.

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It's what I'd have put on, typical auctioneer's estimate, £80 to £120.

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I hope they'll make a bit more. I like those a lot.

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Next under the hammer is Jane's gold and aquamarine brooch. It's been in the family for a long time.

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-How can you bear to part with it?

-It's been in a drawer for years...

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-It's the answer we always get.

-The usual answer.

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There's no point keeping things in drawers. Move them on

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-and get something you want with the money.

-Yeah, spend the money. Did you ever wear it?

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Nobody wore it, that I know of.

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-You don't want to keep it in the family. Kids don't want it?

-No, they're not interested.

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-Let's flog it. That's what we're here for.

-Absolutely.

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Let's put it under the hammer right now. This is it, good luck.

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Art Nouveau nine-carat gold pendant

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set with aquamarines and sea pearls.

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And start the bidding, we've got a single bid on it, £60. And five now.

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£60. 5. 70. 5.

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75. 80 and 5. 85. 90.

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Against the commission at £85. 90 now.

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At 85. 90 behind?

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No. At 85. Lady standing, at £85.

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Do I see 90? With you at 85.

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-That's a good result.

-That's a fair price.

-£85, Jane.

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It's better than putting it

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-in a drawer, at least you've got the money to spend.

-Thank you very much.

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Spend it on something you're not going to put in a drawer!

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-Me and my daughter are going to spend it between us.

-There you go.

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It's my turn to be the expert. We've got the wonderful, slightly loose, Impressionistic

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Hoff Muller oil painting and it belongs to Peter here.

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We've got a value of around £70 to £100.

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I'm hoping for the top end. Fingers crossed.

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This is the first picture in the sale going under the hammer, so we're testing the water, really.

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But I know we need top dollar, because the money's going towards

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-your wife's headstone, who passed away recently.

-Yes. I'd be very grateful.

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-What have you been up to in the last few month since we saw you at the valuation?

-Not much.

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-Just organising things?

-Organising, yes, and preparing some more things to go for auction.

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OK. Well, good luck, this is it.

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Hoff Muller, a super picture, that one.

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Really has got a good look about it.

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Dated 1932, two bids on it.

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One at £55, one higher. £60 starts. And five now.

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At £60 and five do I see?

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Five. 70. Five?

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It's with me, it's against you. £70 with me and five do I see?

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At 70, all done at £70.

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These are the moments I dread in an auction room.

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We give a valuation

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at what we think is a good pitch

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and hopefully people bid against each other and work the bid up.

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But there was only two bids left.

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-It can't be helped.

-But we got it away and that's a start.

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It's an honest start. Thank you so much for coming in.

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It's your turn next! We've got the Wade figures.

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-Cedric and Jean, great to see you again. Who is the dog lover?

-I am.

-They were yours, were they?

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Why are you flogging them now?

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I thought someone might like them for their collection as they're rare.

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We've got a value of £80 to £120, Philip.

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I had a quick chat to James the auctioneer before the sale

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and he chuckled and said, this is so typical, these things are selling so well,

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compared to anything, let's say, 18th-century porcelain.

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-Nonsense, really.

-It is crazy, absolutely crazy.

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But there are collectors that want this kind of thing.

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-You sell them at your sale room?

-Absolutely.

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The pair of Wade Disney blow-up figures, Lady and the Tramp.

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We've got three bids,

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£70 starts them. 70. 80 now?

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80 do I see? 80. 90? 100. And 10.

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Look at the price of these!

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At 120. 130. New place. 140. 150.

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150. 160. 170?

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170, shakes his head at 170.

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Are you sure? At 160, it's here.

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All done at 160. 165 if you like.

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At £160, are we all done?

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The hammer's gone down at £160.

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Can you remember buying them?

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-Yes.

-What did you pay for them?

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I got them from a white elephant stall

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in a garden party and it was about 20 years ago.

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And what did you pay for them?

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-I can't remember.

-About a pound, I would think.

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-A couple of quid. What a good investment!

-I bet it wasn't £160, that's for sure!

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If you've got any Wade figures like that, hang on to them or put them into an auction,

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because they're making top money right now.

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For most of us, a wood like this one in Derbyshire

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is a place where we come for a pleasant walk for the day,

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maybe with the dog, embrace nature and see a lot of wildlife

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and hopefully have a nice picnic and then at the end of the day go home.

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There's not many of us would think of spending the night here,

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especially without a tent, let alone go foraging for food.

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But there is one man who does exactly that, and his name is Dave Watson,

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and he teaches bushcraft skills here at Spring Wood, and he's promised to show me

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how I can live in this environment with just the things that surround me.

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Dave! It's great to meet you.

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-Hi.

-What's your dog called?

-Jess.

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She's beautiful, a collie, how lovely.

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So what are the key ingredients I need to survive in the woods?

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Well, you need to have a shelter, you need a fire.

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Yeah, keep warm.

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Some water and some food.

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So everything is here around us right now?

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Yes. A bit like learning a language, you've got to understand how to interpret it.

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-It's all here.

-And you've got to know where to look?

-That's right.

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OK, I see you've got some A-frames there. Shall we start

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by looking at how to build the home? OK.

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Here's one that was done yesterday by a bunch of schoolchildren.

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About an hour's work there with obviously lots of them, so perhaps two or three hours for yourself.

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Looks nice and cosy, that will keep you warm, so we've got a home established there.

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That's obviously the start of it, the superstructure.

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-It is, it's very important.

-Let's have a look at that.

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So what we've got here is a strong ridge pole,

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which we've just stuffed into the ground to find like buffer.

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We've got two strong branches, and they're propping it up.

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Next, you want some poles to make the frame.

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Shall I give you a hand? What happens here?

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OK, thick end at the bottom

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and then just find a place where it naturally lays.

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-So now we need to weather-proof it.

-That's right.

-Next stage.

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So we need a few more branches to form like an anchorage, and then we get bundles of bracken,

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fronds pointing down, and then it really is a thatch.

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And this, if it's done well, really keeps the weather out.

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That looks nice and cosy. So we've got our home built.

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The next thing is to build a fire in front of it so we can keep warm.

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Yes, but for the method we are going to use today, we are going to need some string.

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String is another invaluable tool that the woods can provide.

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Stinging nettles supply the fibres needed to produce a cord.

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The nettles are first stripped, revealing the strong internal fibres.

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They're then dried out over a number of hours.

0:18:280:18:30

These fibres are then bound using a simple twisting technique.

0:18:300:18:34

One of the many uses for this natural string is to create a bow.

0:18:340:18:37

OK, here's one that I made last year.

0:18:370:18:41

This has been used for making several fires.

0:18:410:18:44

-Hopefully it'll do another one for us today.

-What's the next stage?

0:18:440:18:49

Well, we've got string, we've got a bit of hazel, which is like a universal drill.

0:18:490:18:53

We get that on, a stone as a bearing block.

0:18:530:18:57

That pushes the pressure down.

0:18:570:18:59

It could be a hard bit of wood.

0:18:590:19:02

Then we need something to catch the coal, so we've got a slip of bark.

0:19:020:19:08

So put the drill in place and then start off slowly,

0:19:080:19:12

making sure it all sort of works.

0:19:120:19:15

And look at that.

0:19:150:19:17

That's very quick! I didn't think it would be that quick.

0:19:170:19:20

Well, I can make it last longer if you want.

0:19:200:19:24

No!

0:19:240:19:27

I love the smell. Oh, that's wonderful.

0:19:270:19:30

We've wafted it, it continues to smoke, so we know we've got a coal,

0:19:300:19:34

and then we take the base away,

0:19:340:19:37

let the oxygen feed into this,

0:19:370:19:41

and then this is going to get bigger and hotter, so I'm not rushing.

0:19:410:19:44

Then we've got some dry grass,

0:19:440:19:46

in the centre of which I've got some fine tinder,

0:19:460:19:49

a bit of rosebay willowherb.

0:19:490:19:51

We've formed it very much into the nest,

0:19:510:19:53

and then we take this precious ruby, drop that into the centre.

0:19:530:19:58

Fold it over.

0:19:590:20:02

Some long, drawn out blows.

0:20:020:20:04

-Fire!

-Exactly!

0:20:080:20:10

-And there we go.

-Oh, dear, look at that.

0:20:130:20:17

And then you get fine sticks placed on there.

0:20:170:20:22

If the flames look like they're dying down, we can...

0:20:220:20:25

Get the oxygen in there.

0:20:250:20:26

That is really good, Dave.

0:20:320:20:34

We've got a great fire going to keep warm. What we need now is some food.

0:20:340:20:38

Dave assures me that in this stretch of woods alone there are enough nutrients to sustain us.

0:20:380:20:43

And taking a brief stroll from our shelter, we came across just some

0:20:430:20:47

of the wood's edible plants and wild foods.

0:20:470:20:50

Even more important is knowing what to avoid.

0:20:500:20:53

-Plants like this, the foxglove.

-It's poisonous, isn't it?

0:20:530:20:56

Deadly, so you do need to know what you're talking about.

0:20:560:20:59

To highlight what a great diversity of wild foods can be found here,

0:20:590:21:03

we headed back to camp, where Dave had prepared some other plants.

0:21:030:21:08

-Well, the fire looks good, Dave. It has picked up now.

-Yes.

0:21:080:21:11

We've talked about what sort of foods are available,

0:21:110:21:15

and you went on a forage this morning before I arrived.

0:21:150:21:19

-What have you got?

-Well, I've got a few treats.

0:21:190:21:21

We've got some of those berries.

0:21:210:21:23

We've got some redcurrant, which is out,

0:21:230:21:26

and that's lovely and sweet.

0:21:260:21:29

-Have one of those.

-Thank you.

0:21:290:21:31

Oh, that's beautiful.

0:21:310:21:33

What are those?

0:21:330:21:35

-Well, this is ear fungus.

-Urgh!

0:21:350:21:38

It's quite pleasant, when you chop it up, stir fry it, this is great.

0:21:380:21:42

-You can't eat it raw like that.

-Well, you can.

0:21:420:21:45

It's like rubber, is it? Ear fungus - where does that come from, a tree?

0:21:450:21:49

Yes, it comes from elder, mostly.

0:21:490:21:51

-Yeah.

-We've also got some of the wild garlic, the ramsons,

0:21:510:21:55

and that grows abundantly in places.

0:21:550:21:58

Lovely! That's gorgeous.

0:21:580:22:02

What else is in there?

0:22:020:22:04

-We've also got some horns, or the shoots of the reedmace, and this is good food.

-Can you eat that raw?

0:22:040:22:11

-It's not a good idea, because it comes from a pond.

-Oh, right.

0:22:110:22:15

So, it's good to make sure you can neutralise all of the bacteria.

0:22:150:22:19

So it's best sort of chopped up and cooked.

0:22:190:22:22

It's all about knowledge. The more knowledge you've got, the easier it is to survive.

0:22:220:22:26

The more time you put into honing your skills, the less effort it is to do whatever task you want to do.

0:22:260:22:32

Point out the difference between survival and bushcraft.

0:22:320:22:35

Well, on the surface a lot of skills may fit the same,

0:22:350:22:39

but the root of them is quite different.

0:22:390:22:42

So, in survival you're fighting against the situation,

0:22:420:22:46

to get to a better place.

0:22:460:22:48

With bushcraft, you're working with your situation.

0:22:480:22:52

I can see you love what you doing

0:22:520:22:54

and it must be wonderful passing on this knowledge to all people

0:22:540:22:58

from all walks of life, kids, city people,

0:22:580:23:01

they come here and they develop a new personality, basically.

0:23:010:23:05

That's what makes me tick.

0:23:050:23:07

Yes, I can see that.

0:23:070:23:09

Yeah, I recommend it to anybody, even if it's just for the day.

0:23:090:23:13

Come and learn a bit about bushcraft skills.

0:23:130:23:17

-Thanks so much.

-Pleasure.

0:23:170:23:19

We're back to our valuation day at the Derby Assembly Rooms,

0:23:230:23:26

and there's plenty more people to see, so let's get things going.

0:23:260:23:30

Sheila, thank you for bringing this very intricate drawing along today.

0:23:300:23:35

-Can you tell me, how did you come by it?

-As far as can I remember,

0:23:350:23:39

I found it in a box of bits under a stall at a book fair several years ago.

0:23:390:23:43

I think I paid about £2 for it or something.

0:23:430:23:47

But it's been stuck in a drawer ever since.

0:23:470:23:49

Flog it!

0:23:490:23:51

You've got a tremendously good eye if you can pick that out of a box at book fair.

0:23:510:23:56

To all intents and purposes, I thought it was a book illustration,

0:23:560:23:59

and it well may be a drawing for an illustration that was put into production.

0:23:590:24:04

It's that diminutive size and we've got it here, two fantastic tigers

0:24:040:24:10

and this wonderful exotic landscape that I don't think really exists.

0:24:100:24:14

We've got it signed here by AT Elves.

0:24:140:24:18

-I'll be honest, that's not an artist that I...

-Or is it Elwes?

0:24:180:24:21

Now you're testing me. Let's have a look.

0:24:210:24:24

Yes, it is, you're absolutely right, Elwes,

0:24:250:24:28

and it's not an artist I have come across before, but he is obviously a very gifted individual to do this

0:24:280:24:34

very fine work, simply with a pen, to give such a realistic effect.

0:24:340:24:38

How can you tell it is an original?

0:24:380:24:40

You can see under a lens that it's fine penwork and not an engraving.

0:24:400:24:43

It's really, for a minor artist,

0:24:430:24:46

too much trouble to go to forge something

0:24:460:24:49

that might only be worth, as you paid for it, £2 at the time.

0:24:490:24:53

I think if somebody offered that to me for £500 to £1,000 and it was by a major artist,

0:24:530:24:58

and I had nothing to back it up, I would be slightly suspicious,

0:24:580:25:02

but the value is an indicator, at least in this case,

0:25:020:25:06

of its genuineness as an original pen and ink washed drawing.

0:25:060:25:09

It suffers on a couple of points, though.

0:25:090:25:12

Because it's monochrome

0:25:120:25:15

and because it's diminutive in size and has that look of a book illustration,

0:25:150:25:20

it is not the most commercial thing in the world.

0:25:200:25:23

But it's a very pleasing subject matter,

0:25:230:25:26

and I can't believe that anyone that saw the work that went into it

0:25:260:25:29

could value it at less than say £30 or £50.

0:25:290:25:34

So, a good return on your £2 but...

0:25:340:25:36

-Well, yes.

-Why have you decided to sell it now?

0:25:360:25:39

Well, I was coming to Flog It and to be legal, I have to bring something that I'm willing to sell,

0:25:390:25:46

so that's it.

0:25:460:25:47

So you brought this fellow. Well, I'm delighted that you did.

0:25:470:25:51

I think if you're happy with that and we put a fixed reserve of £30 on it,

0:25:510:25:54

you don't want to sell it for any less than that.

0:25:540:25:58

I don't want to sell it for less than £30, no,

0:25:580:26:00

there's an awful lot of work in there,

0:26:000:26:03

-and if it's underappreciated, OK, I'll keep it.

-Absolutely.

0:26:030:26:07

We'll give it a go at auction, and hopefully two people that love it as much as we do will be there.

0:26:070:26:11

-Thank you so much for bringing it in.

-Thank you, Michael.

0:26:110:26:14

-Jo, this is a sweet little bracelet.

-Yes, I've had it since I was 21.

0:26:190:26:23

-Not very long, then.

-Flatterer!

0:26:230:26:26

So, it was a 21st birthday present.

0:26:260:26:29

Yes, but it was the only chain,

0:26:290:26:32

-which was half of my father's fob chain.

-Fascinating, so you got half.

0:26:320:26:38

-Yes.

-Who got the other half?

0:26:380:26:40

-My sister, for her 21st.

-That's quite novel and quite inventive,

0:26:400:26:44

but I think that's quite sad, because it was chopped off... well, you haven't.

0:26:440:26:49

But then what is it worth to us as a watch chain, as two girls?

0:26:490:26:54

I don't know, I've got no answer for you, but...

0:26:540:26:58

At least we could do something with it, which as a full length of chain we couldn't do anything with.

0:26:580:27:03

I just think in days gone past, our ancestors, bless their cotton socks, they split up silver tea sets,

0:27:030:27:08

by giving somebody the jug,

0:27:080:27:10

-somebody the tea pot and sugar bowl, and I think it's sad.

-It is sad.

0:27:100:27:17

It's sad when things get split up, I also think it devalues them,

0:27:170:27:22

because it isn't how it started out life.

0:27:220:27:25

But in this instance, I can see where you coming from.

0:27:250:27:28

What I find fascinating, is that charm bracelets were very much of thing of yore.

0:27:280:27:33

-Oh, 1970s.

-1970s.

0:27:330:27:36

-Everybody wanted one.

-You had to have...

0:27:360:27:38

Every time you got some money, you went to jeweller and got another little attachment.

0:27:380:27:42

And they were like the Rolls-Royce.

0:27:420:27:44

So a gold charm bracelet in the '70s, that was right up there with the flock wall paper, that was the best.

0:27:440:27:51

So, why do you want to sell it?

0:27:510:27:54

They're old fashioned now.

0:27:540:27:56

There has been a piece of jewellery, they're very noisy to wear.

0:27:560:28:00

Clank-clank.

0:28:000:28:02

Also, the sharp edges pull on your clothing and pull threads of your clothing.

0:28:020:28:06

That's why I've never worn one.

0:28:060:28:09

Well, gold is very much at a premium at the moment,

0:28:090:28:11

and I think we can estimate this all day long at £120 to £180.

0:28:110:28:16

It might go and make you £200.

0:28:160:28:20

It depends where the gold price is on the day of the sale.

0:28:200:28:23

We'll put a fixed reserve on it of £120.

0:28:230:28:25

What are you going to do with the money?

0:28:250:28:27

I have got some guttering that needs repairing.

0:28:270:28:30

Guttering?

0:28:300:28:31

You see, what I think...

0:28:310:28:34

I won't tell you what to do here, but what I think would be really good if this makes £150,

0:28:340:28:39

if you can somehow manage to keep a bit of that £150 away from your guttering,

0:28:390:28:43

just buy something to replace the 21st birthday present that you had.

0:28:430:28:47

So 120-180, you're happy to sell it?

0:28:470:28:50

-That's fine.

-All the sentiment in world won't dissuade you not to.

-Not when I don't wear it, no.

0:28:500:28:54

-I think you're probably right, really. Let's hope it sells well.

-Good.

0:28:540:28:58

Claire, thank you for bringing these wonderful pieces of jewellery along.

0:29:040:29:08

-Can you tell me where you got them from?

-Yes, this was left to me by my grandmother 20 years ago,

0:29:080:29:14

and this one with was left to me by my great aunt.

0:29:140:29:18

-Fantastic. Were they ladies that wore a lot of jewellery?

-Oh, yes, in their day, yes.

0:29:180:29:23

-So these will have seen a lot of use.

-I think so, yes.

0:29:230:29:26

If we look at the ring first,

0:29:260:29:28

-if your grandmother was wearing it, that would be around 1900, 1910?

-Yes.

0:29:280:29:33

Which is absolutely right for the period of the ring.

0:29:330:29:37

We've only got a little 18 carat stamp there, that's fairly normal.

0:29:370:29:41

The one thing that immediately strikes me as being wrong about it is the central stone,

0:29:410:29:47

because you have got this fabulous diamond, probably set into silver,

0:29:470:29:51

so it makes the diamonds very white,

0:29:510:29:54

and I would expect to see an opal there,

0:29:540:29:57

especially that shape, but we've got a rather plain bit of turquoise.

0:29:570:30:01

But that was her favourite colour,

0:30:010:30:03

so either she bought it because of that, or she had that put in.

0:30:030:30:08

I have a feeling Granny was about mischief and she changed that.

0:30:080:30:13

-Probably, yes.

-Unfortunately, whoever has done it

0:30:130:30:16

has ripped off a little bit of the mount just there.

0:30:160:30:19

It's almost imperceptible. That's a pretty ring, though.

0:30:190:30:21

-If we move on to Great Auntie's watch?

-Great Aunt Kit.

0:30:210:30:25

Did Great Aunt Kit have the smallest wrists in the world?

0:30:250:30:31

She must have, yes. I know it looks small, but I can just about fasten it.

0:30:310:30:36

-You can't!

-I have, I've just tried.

-Oh, my word.

0:30:360:30:39

Well, that's phenomenonal.

0:30:390:30:41

But if you need a testament as to why people were a bit smaller in the '20s, you've got that.

0:30:410:30:46

This is a fabulous cocktail watch, very Art Deco.

0:30:460:30:49

You've got these very Odeonesque angular borders, and its parve set with little diamond chips,

0:30:490:30:54

and what's nice is you've got diamonds set all the way round, which is really extravagant.

0:30:540:31:00

Set in platinum, which was a favoured metal in the '20s and '30s.

0:31:000:31:05

I would be very surprised if that dated very much later than 1925.

0:31:050:31:08

So, why don't you wear them today?

0:31:080:31:13

Well, I don't wear many people wear many cocktail watches now, and the ring just isn't me.

0:31:130:31:19

Don't they have any tremendous sentimental attachments for you?

0:31:190:31:22

Well, yes, they do, but I have been left some other pieces which I do wear.

0:31:220:31:27

And there's no-one else that would look after them or they could be passed to?

0:31:270:31:30

No, it's just very big on your hands.

0:31:300:31:35

-If they've got no real sentimental value...

-Not really, no.

0:31:350:31:38

The best thing, to pop them into the sales.

0:31:380:31:40

So, any ideas of values of them?

0:31:400:31:43

Well, I was hoping about £500.

0:31:430:31:46

Right, right.

0:31:460:31:47

I think had Granny not whipped the opal out and put a bit of turquoise in, that would not be a problem.

0:31:470:31:54

Someone's got to have bit of vision

0:31:540:31:56

and see they see it in auction, and imagine it with a different stone set into it.

0:31:560:32:00

I think we would be safe at £400 to £600 for that.

0:32:000:32:05

The cocktail watch, because it is so small, the bracelet will need some work doing to it.

0:32:050:32:10

That is not an inexpensive thing,

0:32:100:32:13

so I think we're probably £300 to £500 for that as it stands.

0:32:130:32:19

-But a fixed reserve of 400 and 300, if you're happy with that.

-Yes.

0:32:190:32:23

We'll put them into the sale and hope some very sophisticated, elegant,

0:32:230:32:27

Art Deco loving lady with incredibly small wrists comes along to the sale.

0:32:270:32:32

-OK.

-Thank you very much for bringing them in.

-OK, thank you.

0:32:320:32:35

Well, that's the last of today's valuations,

0:32:350:32:37

but before we head off to auction room,

0:32:370:32:39

here is a quick reminder of what we have seen.

0:32:390:32:42

Sheila brought in this delicate illustration,

0:32:420:32:45

but how will it do with Michael's valuation of £30 to £50?

0:32:450:32:49

Joan was given this bracelet from her father's fob chain, and Philip's hoping it will make top end.

0:32:490:32:55

Claire treated us to a double valuation.

0:32:550:32:57

Firstly, there was the petite but stunning Art Deco cocktail watch

0:32:570:33:01

and finally that striking diamond ring with the replacement stone.

0:33:010:33:05

Welcome back to the auction room.

0:33:080:33:10

Flog It regular James Lewis is on the rostrum, and the sale's under way.

0:33:100:33:15

Earlier on, one of our lots had caught James' eye, unfortunately not for the right reasons.

0:33:150:33:20

Well, they say diamonds are a girl's best friend.

0:33:200:33:22

Well, it's a good job, because more than half of our bidders here are women.

0:33:220:33:26

A good 70%?

0:33:260:33:29

Probably 60, 65.

0:33:290:33:30

This belongs to Claire, before you go ahead.

0:33:300:33:34

You're just about to say, "I have to say..." I'm dreading this!

0:33:340:33:37

It's an 18 carat diamond set in silver, it belongs to Claire, it's too big for her.

0:33:370:33:41

It was her grandmother's, so it's been in the family a long time,

0:33:410:33:45

and Michael has put £400 to £600 on this.

0:33:450:33:48

Well, I've known Michael since university days, we go back a long way,

0:33:480:33:52

and he is a fantastic jewellery valuer.

0:33:520:33:54

I disagree with him here, I think he has gone too over the top.

0:33:540:33:58

-It is not "pretty" pretty.

-It's not a very commercial ring.

0:33:580:34:00

-It's been altered.

-It has been altered, it is 18 carat, set in platinum not silver,

0:34:000:34:05

but that's the case with most of these rings.

0:34:050:34:08

Imagine that with a beautiful sapphire or an emerald or ruby.

0:34:080:34:12

That would be a good-looking ring.

0:34:120:34:14

There's a really ugly clump of turquoise in the middle of this

0:34:140:34:18

that looks as if it has nothing to do with the ring whatsoever.

0:34:180:34:22

The diamonds on the outside are a lovely colour.

0:34:220:34:25

But at the end of the day £400 to £600,

0:34:250:34:26

it's a lot of money for a ring with a lump of pale blue turquoise in it.

0:34:260:34:30

Too much, I think.

0:34:300:34:31

-What would you have put on this if it came into the room?

-I would have put way less on it!

0:34:310:34:35

-Two to three?

-We took this to specialist jewellery sale that we had in Matlock,

0:34:350:34:39

and it was on view there and I asked all the people to look at this,

0:34:390:34:43

it's not in this sale, but we have got it in a sale coming.

0:34:430:34:46

And I've got a lot of bids on it, but there was not a single one above £300.

0:34:460:34:49

I think it's gonna struggle, I'm afraid.

0:34:490:34:51

Bad news on that one, but I'll try my best.

0:34:510:34:53

It sounds like it's going struggle.

0:34:530:34:55

We've heard what Michael said, now we've heard what James has said.

0:34:550:34:58

You've probably made your own minds up what it is worth. We're going to find out what the bidders think.

0:34:580:35:02

-It's now up to you to get on the rostrum and fingers crossed, work some magic.

-I'll try.

0:35:020:35:09

Sheila and Michael, good luck.

0:35:140:35:16

We're just about to put the book illustration under the hammer.

0:35:160:35:19

We're looking for £30 to £50.

0:35:190:35:22

-Yes!

-I take it you both lived a some stage in the same postcode area?

0:35:220:35:26

We were both born in the same area of Sutton Coldfield.

0:35:260:35:30

-About a mile apart?

-Yep.

0:35:300:35:31

But many years apart.

0:35:310:35:34

You we can always tell one another when you've born in the same area.

0:35:340:35:37

-How is that?

-If I told you, I would have to kill you, Paul.

0:35:370:35:40

Like the Masons' handshake for Sutton Coldfielders.

0:35:400:35:44

You look fantastic, Sheila.

0:35:440:35:46

-You put us to shame.

-Stunning. Well, absolutely.

0:35:460:35:50

Thank you, I wore it out shopping yesterday and somebody said you look nice, so I said, "That's it."

0:35:500:35:54

That's the outfit for Flog It.

0:35:540:35:56

That's the outfit to wear. Let's hope it brings you good luck.

0:35:560:35:59

We need the top end of the estimate for this little book etching.

0:35:590:36:02

Pen and ink book sketch.

0:36:020:36:05

I've got one bid and one bid only, and £30 takes it.

0:36:050:36:09

At 30 and two do I see? At 30 and two anywhere.

0:36:090:36:13

At 30, all done.

0:36:130:36:15

-That was quick, Sheila.

-At £30 with, anywhere else? Just take it.

0:36:150:36:20

Hammer's gone down, in and out.

0:36:200:36:22

I think that was very fair for what it was.

0:36:220:36:24

It was a little pen and ink sketch,

0:36:240:36:26

and sometimes you can come to an auction like this

0:36:260:36:30

and find 50 or 60 in a folio for £40 to £60.

0:36:300:36:33

I know you found it very well and bought it cheaply,

0:36:330:36:37

which was eagle-eyed of you.

0:36:370:36:39

Sheila has a cracking eye.

0:36:390:36:40

You've got a good eye.

0:36:400:36:42

You know you have, I can see.

0:36:420:36:45

Everyone from Sutton Coldfield has, Paul.

0:36:450:36:47

Well, this is where we bring out our lucky charm, it's Joan's lucky charm made out of an old watch fob.

0:36:510:36:57

We're looking at £120 to £180?

0:36:570:37:00

-Yes.

-Let's hope we get that top end, because those watch fobs fetch good money.

0:37:000:37:04

I've got a distinct feeling that this '60s and '70s vintage and retro stuff are the next things that take off.

0:37:040:37:11

This could be a Flog It trend-setting moment.

0:37:110:37:13

-OK.

-Watch.

-Watch this space, and start investing.

0:37:130:37:16

Listen to Philip.

0:37:160:37:19

No, don't! Oh, do, do, do!

0:37:190:37:21

Why are you selling this?

0:37:210:37:23

Well, it's '70s, which I don't wear.

0:37:230:37:26

OK, so it's out of fashion.

0:37:260:37:28

It's chunky, noisy, the charms pull the threads on your clothing.

0:37:280:37:32

But bling's in now.

0:37:320:37:34

-But it spoils your clothes.

-OK!

0:37:340:37:36

It's going under the hammer now. This is it.

0:37:360:37:39

Nine carat gold charm bracelet

0:37:390:37:41

with the sovereign and five bids, 140, 160...

0:37:410:37:45

Yes.

0:37:450:37:46

-Get in there.

-And two of them are identical at the top at £255.

0:37:460:37:53

So, 260 do I see?

0:37:530:37:55

All the bidding on the absentee form at £255, anywhere else?

0:37:550:38:00

260, lady in the centre takes it. Against them all.

0:38:000:38:03

£260!

0:38:030:38:06

£271.

0:38:060:38:08

-Crumbs.

-Do you think she is going to wear it?

0:38:080:38:11

James put the hammer down with conviction, £260.

0:38:110:38:15

That is a surprise, isn't it?

0:38:150:38:17

-It is.

-It's the fob chains, as you say, very collectable, everyone wants them.

0:38:170:38:22

The price of gold as well.

0:38:220:38:24

Yes, it is, yeah. What are you going to put that money towards?

0:38:240:38:28

It was a 21st present from my parents, so I feel a bit guilty getting rid of it,

0:38:280:38:33

so I'm going to buy another piece of jewellery that can I wear and can display,

0:38:330:38:38

-and my father would agree with that.

-Lovely. Well, well done.

0:38:380:38:43

Next under the hammer is Claire's Art Deco watch.

0:38:480:38:52

We've got a valuation of £300 to £500,

0:38:520:38:53

we do have the watch, it's going under hammer.

0:38:530:38:56

Unfortunately Claire can't be with us, but we do have Michael, £300 to £500.

0:38:560:39:00

-It's got to be worth that.

-I've never seen anything like it before.

0:39:000:39:04

Usually you get them with diamonds around the bezel and you get a black strap.

0:39:040:39:08

-But you've got diamonds half the way down the strap, which is fantastic.

-It catches your eye.

0:39:080:39:12

And I have seen one last week go in a sale for 550 that didn't have as many diamonds in it.

0:39:120:39:18

-That's a good sign!

-So let's hope it hits that top figure.

0:39:180:39:22

The ladies' Art Deco diamond and platinum cocktail watch.

0:39:220:39:27

Very pretty lot, this one, circa 1920, 1925.

0:39:270:39:30

The glass is cracked, but other than that it is a fantastic watch,

0:39:300:39:34

don't let it put you off, easy thing to repair.

0:39:340:39:36

And £210 bid, at £220. At 210 with, 220 do I see?.

0:39:360:39:41

At 210, 220?

0:39:410:39:43

220, yes, 220, 240, 260.

0:39:430:39:46

240 with, 250 if you like.

0:39:460:39:49

240 with me.

0:39:490:39:51

It's not going sell at 240.

0:39:510:39:54

-Unbelievable.

-At 240, are you all sure?

0:39:540:39:56

At 240...no, that's not sold.

0:39:560:39:59

I won't be getting on the phone to Claire straightaway.

0:39:590:40:02

No, I'll have to do it, won't I?

0:40:020:40:05

But if it goes in another specialist sale, another day,

0:40:050:40:09

because maybe the fact that it is such an esoteric thing has put a few people off.

0:40:090:40:15

Yes, it needs a specialist jewellery sale, this is a general auction, and it didn't find a bidder.

0:40:150:40:19

It's disappointing not to see Claire's cocktail watch go.

0:40:190:40:22

Now there's double pressure on that diamond ring, and remember, the forecast isn't good.

0:40:220:40:28

Right, OK, it's time to put Claire's ring under hammer, the one with the turquoise stone.

0:40:280:40:32

You saw Michael talk about it at the valuation day.

0:40:320:40:35

You've just seen James talk about it in his auction preview chat.

0:40:350:40:39

Was he unkind about it?

0:40:390:40:41

No, James said he's known you for years and year and everything you say is spot-on.

0:40:410:40:46

-Stop there.

-I agree with him, cos you're a purist at heart and I love that about you.

0:40:460:40:51

-He said...

-Too dear.

0:40:510:40:54

He did say... He said 200 to 300, rather than 300 to 400.

0:40:540:40:58

As you know, we've got off-screen valuers,

0:40:580:41:00

and we did have our jewellery specialist there on the day.

0:41:000:41:03

-John.

-And my initial feeling about the ring...

0:41:030:41:05

It's been replaced, the stone.

0:41:050:41:07

That horrible turquoise in the middle was about £200.

0:41:070:41:11

But he confidently told me the diamonds were worth £500, so we put it in at four to six.

0:41:110:41:15

But the trouble is, it needs a member of the jewellery trade to see it to buy and to replace the stones.

0:41:150:41:22

-And that's a costly process.

-And I can't see any members of the jewellery trade.

-No, not today.

0:41:220:41:28

Hang on, let me have a good look, Michael.

0:41:280:41:29

-No, no. Fingers crossed.

-You've heard from Michael as well,

0:41:310:41:34

you've probably got your own opinion what is going to happen,

0:41:340:41:38

but watch this, cos it might be totally different, this is it.

0:41:380:41:41

This 18 carat diamond and turquoise ring,

0:41:410:41:44

lovely coloured diamonds, good early ring,

0:41:440:41:47

and lots and lots of interest in it.

0:41:470:41:49

I can start the bidding at £220.

0:41:490:41:53

220, 230?

0:41:530:41:55

That's James and me right.

0:41:550:41:57

250? 250. 280? 280.

0:41:570:41:59

280, 300? 300 with me. 300, 320?

0:41:590:42:06

-300 with me, 320? 350, 380.

-We've sold it.

-Goodness.

0:42:080:42:12

390, 400. 390... One more, go on!

0:42:120:42:18

-Come on.

-I'll buy you a coffee later!

0:42:180:42:20

Come on. £400... £400, well done!

0:42:200:42:24

-He's doing his best, isn't he?

-He's sold it.

-At £400, 410 do I see?

0:42:240:42:28

At 400 and selling at £400. Anybody else?

0:42:280:42:30

Well done, Michael. £400!

0:42:300:42:33

Well done, John! After I'd just said that.

0:42:330:42:35

-Miracles can happen.

-John Kelly was right, he does know his diamonds.

0:42:350:42:39

I'll trust him from now on forever.

0:42:390:42:41

-And I can't wait to get on the phone and tell Claire as well.

-Superb.

0:42:410:42:44

Well, that's it, another Flog It auction,

0:42:500:42:53

we've come to the end of our day, and it was a tough day.

0:42:530:42:57

James Lewis did exceptionally well on the rostrum.

0:42:570:43:00

Some things didn't sell, but maybe just maybe they just weren't meant to.

0:43:000:43:04

I hope you've enjoyed the show today, so until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:040:43:08

For more information about Flog It,

0:43:110:43:14

including how the programme was made, visit the website at bbc.co.uk.

0:43:140:43:18

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:180:43:22

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:220:43:25

Paul Martin and the Flog It! team visit Derby, home to the famous Royal Derby Porcelain, and Philip Serrell and Michael Baggott are on hand for their expert opinions. Up for valuation are a German painting with a moving story, a gorgeous pair of Disney figurines and an 18ct diamond ring that is not all it seems. Paul also gets thrown in at the deep end with a crash course on bushcraft survival.