Harlow Flog It!


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Harlow

Flog It experts Charlie Ross and Mark Stacey are searching through family heirlooms in Harlow. Presenter Paul Martin sneaks down the road to investigate the Spy Museum.


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Today we're 20 miles from London, in a town that was at the forefront

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of Britain's post-war plans to reinvent urban life.

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Welcome to Flog It!, from Harlow.

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Many of the buildings in Harlow were designed by world-famous architects.

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This is known as The Chantry, designed by

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husband and wife team, Maxwell Fry and Jane Drew,

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both social idealists

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who believed the better the quality of the building, the better the quality of your life.

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Maxwell and Jane helped bring Modernist architecture to Britain in the 30s,

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introducing us to the bold new ideas of iconic figures such as Walter Gropius and le Corbusier.

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They also designed many award-winning public buildings around the world

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and today we're in the thoroughly modern Latin Bush Centre(!)

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And looking for the best items to take to auction are our two experts,

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Mr Charlie Ross and Mark Stacey.

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Sorry to interrupt, guys. We've got a massive queue. Good luck.

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There's no time to lose, so let's get going with our first valuation.

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Chris, you bought this wonderful pot in to show us. Why have you brought it in?

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Really to find out a little bit more about it.

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-My husband's done a little bit of research on the internet.

-The good old internet!

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Yes, and we think it's Satsuma, we're not 100% sure, obviously we'd like you to clarify that.

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Well, you're spot on, it is Satsuma.

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Now, Satsuma is a Japanese earthenware pottery

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which tends to be a very creamy texture,

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and a key point to identify Japanese Satsuma ware is this mark here, Chris.

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You see that circle with the cross in it? That's the Princess Satsuma,

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so that tells you that it's come from the Satsuma region, and this, of course, is the maker's mark.

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I can't read it, I'm afraid, but it is a very nice piece.

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What I can tell you is it won't be one of the major artists,

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it won't be by Kinkozan or Yabu Meizan.

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They produced top-quality pieces, very finely painted and all-over decorated.

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This is typical of that slightly earlier to mid period,

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sort of 1880, 1890, because of these deep rich

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blue enamels, very thick enamels on that, and basically,

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obviously if I could read Japanese it would help,

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because this is obviously telling a story.

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As we move it around you can see you've got these various

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gods and mortals in various scenes going round it.

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The whole thing is wonderfully put together, very tactile.

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Why are you selling it?

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It's a little bit big for our home and it doesn't

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hold any sentimental value for myself or my husband, really.

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It was his grandparents' and we don't want it, to be truthful.

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To be truthful... fair enough.

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We live different lives these days.

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Our Victorian and Edwardian grandparents wanted the house filled with aspidistras...

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-That's what was in there.

-You know, and I can tell.

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I'm coming onto the bad bit next because inside we've got

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-a nasty stain and there's been some water-staining on the outside.

-Yeah.

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But I just think it's such a lovely pot, it's a really nice, perky piece.

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In terms of value, now what do you think?

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I don't know about two, three, £400... I don't know!

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That's a typical auctioneer's thing two, three, £400, whatever!

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-It depends on the day, yeah!

-It depends on the day.

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I think it's somewhere between those, actually.

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I'd put an estimate of £300 to £400 on it with a reserve of £300,

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-with 10% discretion on the day.

-Yeah, yeah...

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Would you be happy with that?

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Yes, my husband's told me that he doesn't want it to go for nothing.

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Let's hope it does really well at the auction.

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Let's hope so!

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These are very visual objects, Peter.

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I think they're delightfully coloured, very stylised.

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-Do you know what they are?

-Flagons.

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Flagons? Well, that's absolutely right, they're whisky flagons.

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-Have you looked at the bottom of them?

-I think they're Royal Doulton.

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They are, absolutely right. Have you had them a long time?

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They belonged to my mother, who is 90 this year.

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-Oh, really!

-Yes, and she recently...

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because of that she had to downsize, and these flagons she offered to my son,

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Christopher and he said to her, "Ooh, thank you ever so much",

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and then when Mum had gone, he said, "They are absolutely hideous!

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"I would not give them house room, dispose of them!"

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-So...

-Is mum still alive?

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-Oh, she is, very much so!

-Oh, my goodness me!

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She'd better not hear of this story!

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Do you know how old they are?

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Not at all. I know nothing about them whatsoever.

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Right. They're 1920s.

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Right...

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You can tell from the Doulton stamp with Doulton England underneath it...

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they're 1920s with a lovely sort of stylised poppy decoration -

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not that the colour's poppy at all,

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and then this fabulous crisp acanthus leaf decoration running up the body.

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They're not that practical, to be honest, they haven't got spouts.

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I suspect they don't pour that well, and I don't suppose you've ever used them for that?

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No. They've got no lip, have they?

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No, they haven't. What surprises me is the condition.

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You would expect, over a hundred years, these to have been chipped.

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There are no chippings or damage to them whatsoever.

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Now, going onto the value, I would say you ought to have a guess.

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My wife guessed about £20 and I guessed about £120, so...

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-You've won the valuation award!

-If you split the difference...

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No. I think we can do better than split the difference,

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because I would attach a value of certainly £100 to £150.

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I think they might make a little bit more, but I think a safe valuation is £100 to £150 and reserve at £100,

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perhaps a bit of discretion, because after all, your son would rather have the money than the pots!

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-Yes, I'm sure!

-Yeah...

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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20th century modern world, it doesn't get better than that, does it? Concorde memorabilia...

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what an iconic plane and do you know something, if I had the money when

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that plane was in service, I would have been on it!

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I missed out, but somebody who didn't is Sylvia here.

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She flew on that aircraft and here's the memorabilia to go with it -

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a certificate, in-flight magazine, Concorde brochure and, of course,

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the Concorde menu as well.

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Let's see how they travelled in style, shall we.

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Oh, look, Kiwi fresh fruit for an appetiser, garnished asparagus and

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cucumber as a main course, cheese and crackers, glass of champagne...

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all on board Concorde.

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If this was part of the plane itself, the fuselage or

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part of the interior, it's worth thousands of pounds.

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There are so many Concorde collectors out there.

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But this little package alone with its menu is worth £60 to £80

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and I think the memories that you've got are worth far more than that.

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It's a trip of a lifetime.

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I can see you've got tears in your eyes, reliving it, re-flying it.

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How many of you would love to fly on Concorde?

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All of you! Has anybody? No, no, no!

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What lovely memories! Sylvia, thank you so much.

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Thank you very much.

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-Hello, Keith.

-Hi.

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You've brought a very interesting object in,

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a medal from the Battle of the Nile. Where did you get it from?

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I bought it in a shop in Cornwall some three years ago when Nelson was quite popular.

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Yes, 2005, the bicentenary.

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That's it, yeah, and my view was to buy it with a view to selling it on at some stage.

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-And that's why you've brought it in to us today?

-Yes, indeed.

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Of course, it's the Battle of the Nile, 1798, one of Nelson's famous victories.

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At the time, these would have been handed out to different classes so

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for Nelson and the other admirals, they would have had a gold version.

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For the junior officers, there would have been a silver version, so we

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-know, of course, as a bronze medal, it would have been for a rating.

-Yes.

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We'll have a little look here.

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Now we've got here, you know,

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Rear Admiral Lord Nelson of the Nile and obviously a portrait of him.

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He did actually like

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advertising himself, he wasn't shy at the time,

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and then we turn it over and then of course we've got

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"Almighty God had blessed his Majesty's Arms" and then we've got

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the details of the battle underneath and obviously a representation of the ships that were involved.

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These do come up from time to time and at the moment, they don't always make a huge amount of money.

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This one, for example, we would suggest an estimate of £200 to £300.

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-Now does that sit comfortably with you?

-It does.

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We'll put a £200 reserve, of course, because we want to protect it.

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We don't want to give it away, so we should put a £200 fixed reserve.

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-How would you feel about that?

-Fine, very happy with it.

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Thank you for bringing such an interesting

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and historical item in and I look forward to the auction.

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Thank you very much.

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Outside, people are still arriving laden with treasures,

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but right now we're heading off to the auction room,

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and here's a quick recap of all the items we're taking with us.

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First off, it's Christine's piece of Satsuma pottery, which I'm sure

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will cause a happy stir in the auction room.

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Even though Peter's son thought these whisky flasks were hideous,

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they'll hopefully be plenty of Doulton collectors at the sale

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who are gonna snap them up!

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And finally, it's amazing how much historic medals can fetch,

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and I'm sure Keith's is no exception.

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All your family heirlooms will be going under the hammer here

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and hopefully reaching top prices.

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Fingers crossed at Reeman Dansie Auctions in Colchester.

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The man on the rostrum is auctioneer James Grintner.

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Next up that wonderful Japanese Satsuma jardiniere.

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We have that in the sale valued at £300 to £400 but unfortunately,

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we don't have its owner, Christine, but we do have Robert, her son.

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Now where's Mum? On holiday?

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-Grand Canaria.

-Oh, lovely!

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-Getting a good tan?

-Yes, indeed.

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-So you're looking after the house, are you?

-Oh, yes, yes.

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Say no more, then!

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Keep quiet, then!

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Do you like this jardiniere Mum's selling?

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It's not that pretty, but it's OK.

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Nothing you want to inherit, really, is it?

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-No...

-Get the money and spend it, that's what I say!

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Mark, we're looking at £300 to £400.

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Had a chat to the auctioneer, James Grintner, he agreed with the value.

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He did say, though, that the market has slightly dropped.

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The Americans and the Japanese aren't buying any more because

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of the credit crunch, so it's affecting us all.

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It is, and Robert sums it up as well, because he says I don't want it.

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The younger generation don't want things like this so that does affect its marketability.

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Yeah, and what do you do with them?

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Put them in the bay window and put an aspidistra in them!

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I love it, I think it's such a lovely shape, that melon shape.

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-It's your thing.

-So I like it.

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OK. Fingers crossed. We're gonna find out.

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The good quality late 19th century Satsuma jardiniere.

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One there, what do you say for it?

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I have two commissions and I'll start the bidding at £200.

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Two commission bids!

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At 200, 210, 220, 230, 240,

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250, 260, 270, 280, 290.

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At 290 there's a bid over here now at 290. At £290, are you all done?

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GAVEL FALLS

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Yes! Would have liked a bit more, but we crept in there,

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just under the lower end, £290.

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I think you should get on the phone to Christine, now...

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And tell her, yeah...

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She'll be by the pool and you can actually say,

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"Christine, it's gone, £290, less a bit of commission, of course."

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-OK?

-Thank you.

-Thank you, Robert.

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# Don't ask me because I don't know what

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# But it's like that and that's the way it is. #

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It's a great name, Royal Doulton,

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it's about to go under the hammer. It belongs to Peter.

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We've got the whisky decanters, valued by Charlie Ross here,

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our expert, between £100 and £150. Could be drinks all round!

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It's going under the hammer.

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It's the pair of late Victorian Royal Doulton flasks, with stoppers,

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the art nouveau floral decoration, as shown.

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What would you say to start me? £100 to start me?

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£100, £100 I have, 110, 120, 130...

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Bit more, bit more, bit more!

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140, 150.

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At 150 down here now, at 150.

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At 150 as bid.

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Are you all done now at 150?

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Yes. Hammer's gone down.

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£150!

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-Top end of the estimate!

-Spot on!

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Drinks all round, Charlie!

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-Interesting story, though, because they were your mother's.

-Yes.

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-She's now 90.

-Yes.

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Congratulations, and she passed them onto your son?

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-She did.

-Why did you miss out?

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Basically because I thought they were gross,

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so I said to my son, "You're more than welcome to them!"

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Oh, brilliant! Good name, good make?

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-There are always collectors of Doulton, aren't there?

-Brilliant.

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We're all ready to do battle.

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We've been joined by Keith in the nick of time.

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It's that bronze medal from the Nile.

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-£200 to £300.

-That's right.

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Why are you selling this?

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-Put some money in the bank.

-Right, OK. Save it for a rainy day!

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-Absolutely!

-Saving up for something.

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We've seen a lot of medals before in the past.

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It's kind of a hard thing to value?

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Very. I was all at sea with this one, I have to say.

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I think he's a brave man! I think you need one as well!

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I'm gonna pin one on you if we get it.

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-You never know with these things.

-No, you don't.

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I mean fortunately, we had some help from the off-screen team.

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-Which helped out.

-Which does help us a lot, actually.

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The unsung heroes you could say.

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One thing I can say to you both is, if we do have a discrepancy on the valuation day,

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and you know this at home, we talk to the auctioneer, get his opinion.

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He didn't say anything, so he must agree with Mark's valuation.

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-That's a relief, anyway!

-Right.

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Here we go. We're off. This is it.

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The George III Davidson Nile Medal.

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I have two commissions with me...

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-Oh, great!

-I'll start the bidding at £180. At 180, At 180, 190.

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At 190 I have, at 190, 200?

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-Come on.

-At 190 I have.

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190. £200 I have. At £200 down here.

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Do I hear 210 anywhere? At £200.

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-You're spot on, Mark!

-At £200, are you all done?

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Absolutely spot on! £200, right on the money.

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-Right on the money.

-Well done!

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Had you any idea it was worth that much?

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I wasn't sure, to be frank, but I'm glad with what I've got.

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Comfortably optimistic, weren't we!

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Absolutely, yes.

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-Well, good luck and...

-Thanks for all your help.

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-And put it towards that rainy day!

-That's right!

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Hello and welcome to the Combined Military Services Museum here at Maldon in the heart of Essex.

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This place really is a treasure trove of British military history

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and behind me is an awesome Thunderbird missile,

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and there's plenty more weaponry like that inside, but today

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we're going to be taking a peek at something a little more mysterious, so follow me.

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'We're inside a unique espionage collection, a genuine spy museum.

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'It's one of the most impressive displays of covert

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'operations equipment in the world

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'and at the centre of the collection are the amazing gadgets and gizmos

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'used by two real-life spies who came in from the cold to share their darkest secrets with us.

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'Captain Peter Mason and his wife, Pru, were the real thing,

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'undercover agents who risked exposure, torture and death for their country's cause.

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'Peter and Pru have hung up their reversible jackets now

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'and kindly donated more than 250 items of equipment, clothing

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'and deadly weaponry to the museum.

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'Many of the exhibits here were actually used in secret operations,

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'as well as inspiring the exploits of Ian Fleming's fictional hero,

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'James Bond, played here by Sean Connery.'

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To show me around this fabulous espionage collection

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is my own very own Q, manager, Marilyn Bullivant.

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Hello! This is absolutely fascinating because it's real,

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this is not fictional, it's not made for the movies, is it?

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No, not at all.

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All these items, everything you see here belonged to two real-life spies.

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You must have been so surprised when items started arriving from Peter and Pru?

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We were, because to start with we didn't think it was real,

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we thought it was a bit of a hoax and then all these items that

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you see before you started coming through the post.

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But they're dangerous!

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-Did you have a specialist to open them?

-No, no, just us.

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We sort of started opening the parcels and took out a suit and

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a pair of well-worn shoes, and they just appeared to be everyday items.

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Talk me through just a small part of the collection you've got in front of you.

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OK, this one.

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Looks like an ordinary tin of cigarettes.

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-Is it gonna go off?

-No, you're all right, you're safe with this one.

0:18:370:18:41

-Is it a camera or a gun?

-It just takes a picture of you.

0:18:410:18:43

It's a camera. You pull that down and the lens is there, so that would take

0:18:430:18:47

the image, and of course these are fake cigarettes but with a couple of real ones in there.

0:18:470:18:51

So that's your camera.

0:18:510:18:54

Now the shoes, these look like an ordinary pair of shoes.

0:18:540:18:57

As you can see, they're really well worn,

0:18:570:19:00

but when I looked at them closely, concealed in the heel is a blade.

0:19:000:19:04

-Oh, yes, look at that. Locked into the heel!

-Yep.

0:19:040:19:07

What would that be used for, then?

0:19:070:19:09

Well, mainly if they're in a situation where they were tied with rope, they could cut through.

0:19:090:19:14

Oh, I get it, yes, so using...

0:19:140:19:15

That's it, yep, and I think sometimes if they're in hand to hand combat,

0:19:150:19:19

they would take the blade out to inflict a nasty injury.

0:19:190:19:22

Now this looks like an ordinary pipe -

0:19:220:19:28

it's actually a pistol.

0:19:280:19:30

Take that off and you just pull that, and that would

0:19:300:19:33

detonate the projectile which would come out through a hole there, which could be a bullet or cyanide capsule.

0:19:330:19:39

It seems extremely dangerous!

0:19:420:19:44

You need the Marigolds when you're handling some of these!

0:19:440:19:47

This is affectionately known as "the kiss of death".

0:19:470:19:50

Looks like a lipstick.

0:19:500:19:52

You take the cover off, and it reveals a pistol.

0:19:520:19:55

-Are you gonna put some on?

-And blow my head off!

0:19:550:19:57

It probably wouldn't kill someone, but it would certainly inflict a nasty injury.

0:19:570:20:03

Or slow them down so you could make your escape.

0:20:030:20:05

That's right.

0:20:050:20:06

But that was also used when Pru wore this suit.

0:20:060:20:10

These are their clothes as well?

0:20:100:20:12

Yeah. Their actual clothes. She was actually interrogated when she was wearing this outfit.

0:20:120:20:18

'In fact, the KGB took this photograph of Pru just before the interrogation began.

0:20:190:20:26

'Another of Pru's covers behind the iron curtain was a bare-backed rider

0:20:300:20:34

'in the Circus Americana, and this is the disguise she used.'

0:20:340:20:39

-This is hers as well?

-This is hers as well. This is a reversible jacket.

0:20:420:20:46

You can see here, you've got the plain grey.

0:20:460:20:49

One side to the other.

0:20:490:20:50

One side, and then if she wanted, if she was being chased or followed

0:20:500:20:53

and she wanted to change her appearance,

0:20:530:20:55

she would very quickly take it off, turn it inside out...

0:20:550:20:58

And mingle in with the crowd so they're not following someone in checks any more?

0:20:580:21:02

No. The skirt does as well, but you couldn't whip that off in the street,

0:21:020:21:05

could you, but again, you could change her appearance.

0:21:050:21:08

-Clever.

-And looking at Pru's clothing, this is some of Peter's.

0:21:080:21:11

Again, a reversible coat.

0:21:110:21:13

If he's wearing the tweed coat, he would wear this hat

0:21:130:21:16

which, as you can see, is no ordinary hat.

0:21:160:21:18

-There's a little gun holster in there?

-Yep, metal carry case, which would have the holster.

0:21:180:21:23

He would have the pistol in there, or he would change his appearance to

0:21:230:21:27

a sort of flat cap and scarf and the gabardine rain mac.

0:21:270:21:31

Yes, yeah. It's beautifully made!

0:21:310:21:33

It's very good quality, isn't it? Yes, he did like his good clothes.

0:21:330:21:37

-So, what else have we got here? More cigarettes?

-More cigarettes, yes.

0:21:370:21:40

-This is...

-I guess every spy smoked really, didn't they!

0:21:400:21:43

That's right. This really is bad for your health, this one.

0:21:430:21:46

These are real cigarettes, but that's actually a gun.

0:21:460:21:50

If he was in a situation where perhaps he needed to have access

0:21:500:21:53

to the gun, he would open the case, and if you notice, the end is burnt.

0:21:530:21:57

-Yes, so he knows which one to pick up?

-Exactly!

0:21:570:21:59

-How does it work?

-It twists.

0:21:590:22:01

Wow! These things actually worked?

0:22:010:22:03

Yes, they're real, that's what we're trying to get across to people.

0:22:030:22:07

This is where the James Bond bit finishes.

0:22:070:22:09

These are real, and people really used these.

0:22:090:22:11

It's only when you walk around this fascinating place, you know,

0:22:110:22:15

your head gets around the fact that people risked their lives.

0:22:150:22:18

-Yeah.

-What's this?

0:22:180:22:20

This is just an ordinary hip flask,

0:22:200:22:21

but it actually belonged to Ian Fleming, and Fleming gave it to Peter

0:22:210:22:25

as a present and Peter would advise Fleming on the type of weapons

0:22:250:22:29

and gadgets and guns.

0:22:290:22:31

Used in the movies!

0:22:310:22:32

Exactly. The real Bond,

0:22:320:22:34

and it has still got some whisky in there!

0:22:340:22:37

Not only do they end up with Ian Fleming's whisky flask,

0:22:370:22:42

but like his Bond character, Captain Peter Mason carried a licence to kill.

0:22:420:22:48

Peter was originally a member of the SAS, Britain's crack special forces unit.

0:22:500:22:55

Just after World War II, he joined the famous Baker team.

0:22:550:22:59

Their task was to hunt down Nazi war criminals and, how shall I put it, dispose of them.

0:22:590:23:05

When the Cold War began in the 1950s, Peter and his wife were once again on the front line.

0:23:080:23:14

Many of their assignments were so secret that they are still under

0:23:140:23:17

wraps, but what we see here gives us a vivid idea of the challenges and dangers they faced.

0:23:170:23:23

Spying is difficult, dangerous work with the constant risk of being discovered.

0:23:240:23:30

It's nothing like the glamorous Bond movies we see or the books we read.

0:23:300:23:34

With the need for total secrecy, its heroes and heroines often

0:23:340:23:40

go unnoticed and that's what makes this spy museum so unique -

0:23:400:23:43

it gives us a glimpse into a world we rarely see.

0:23:430:23:47

After all that intrigue, we had better race back to the

0:23:570:24:00

valuation day where Mark has spied something fishy.

0:24:000:24:05

Hello, Sally.

0:24:050:24:06

-Hello Mark.

-Who is the young man next to you?

0:24:060:24:08

This is my grandson, Aiden.

0:24:080:24:10

-Hello, Aiden.

-Hi.

-Nice to see you.

0:24:100:24:12

Now what have you brought along to show us today?

0:24:120:24:15

Well, I've brought along this set of Poole pottery which I've had for some years.

0:24:150:24:19

It's very unusual, I think, and I don't know whether it was

0:24:190:24:24

bought or a gift to perhaps my mother or even my grandparents.

0:24:240:24:27

I don't think my grandparents, they were passed on by then.

0:24:270:24:31

By then, yes. Because we've got...

0:24:310:24:33

I mean it's not that old, of course.

0:24:330:24:35

I would say it goes back to the sort of '50s and '60s.

0:24:350:24:38

There's various indications for that - the use of colour.

0:24:380:24:41

I love this period because it's actually very sparsely decorated but

0:24:410:24:45

it sums it up very nicely, actually, and also the mark on the back.

0:24:450:24:50

We've got the typical Poole mark, the dolphin in the middle, and then we've got some artists' initials.

0:24:500:24:55

-What I particularly like about it, it's a fish set?

-Um hum.

0:24:550:24:59

You would have your salmon or your lobster or your crab or whatever in

0:24:590:25:04

the middle, and then you would serve it on the plates

0:25:040:25:07

and I just think these animals are wonderful.

0:25:070:25:09

I mean they're so naive, but in some ways, so quirky, aren't they?

0:25:090:25:13

They are, yes.

0:25:130:25:14

Have you got a favourite animal?

0:25:140:25:16

I like the frog. That attracted me to it in the first place,

0:25:160:25:19

but when you look at all of them individually, they are so unusual.

0:25:190:25:24

Yes, they are.

0:25:240:25:25

Do you have a favourite one?

0:25:250:25:27

-The snail.

-You like the snail, do you? Do you eat snails?

0:25:270:25:30

-No.

-I think it's great.

0:25:300:25:33

It dates from about sort of 1950s as I said, '60s period,

0:25:330:25:36

and I think it's very quirky and I think Poole collectors will like it.

0:25:360:25:40

-Really? That's good.

-Very difficult to value, I'll be honest with you,

0:25:400:25:43

Sally, we don't see them often and the market does fluctuate on this.

0:25:430:25:50

I mean, I just like it. I think it's got a lot of fun and I'm just hoping

0:25:500:25:53

-somebody else will pick up on the imagination of it as well.

-Yes, yes.

0:25:530:25:57

My gut feeling is that we should put it in maybe at £80 to £100.

0:25:570:26:03

-How would you feel about that?

-Yes, yes, I'd be happy with that.

0:26:030:26:06

Did you have any particular views yourself of the value?

0:26:060:26:09

Well, l didn't think it was going to be madly valuable, but I thought

0:26:090:26:13

as it was unusual that somebody might think, ooh, I'll add that to my collection.

0:26:130:26:17

-Yes, absolutely.

-Somebody who can appreciate it, have it on display, perhaps.

0:26:170:26:21

Are you sad that your granny's selling it? Are you?

0:26:210:26:25

Or would you use it when you grow up, do you think?

0:26:250:26:27

-No.

-No. So all I can say is let's hope

0:26:270:26:30

they're not shellfish out there and bid a lot of money!

0:26:300:26:33

Indeed, that would be good. Thank you.

0:26:330:26:36

Alan and Lesley, which one's the golfer?

0:26:410:26:43

Me!

0:26:430:26:45

-Lesley, you've never tried?

-No.

0:26:450:26:48

Took his golf clubs round once on the green, but they were too heavy!

0:26:480:26:51

-Too heavy?

-Yes.

-You can get a little cart, can't you?

0:26:510:26:54

-They were on my shoulder!

-Didn't use you as a caddy?

0:26:540:26:57

He tried!

0:26:570:26:58

The rotten man! I love these clubs you've brought in.

0:26:580:27:01

-Have you ever played with them?

-Yes, I did.

0:27:010:27:03

-And how did you get on?

-Not too bad.

0:27:030:27:06

-They're a bit different to use from the modern clubs.

-Yes, yes.

0:27:060:27:09

These would date from 1900 to 1920.

0:27:090:27:12

-Oh, yes.

-Yeah.

-We suspect about that age.

0:27:120:27:15

-That's about right, and the shafts are hickory.

-They're hickory shafts.

0:27:150:27:19

Hickory shafts, and leather-bound handles which must have been very difficult in wet conditions.

0:27:190:27:25

They would have been very slippery, wouldn't they?

0:27:250:27:27

-Nowadays with firm rubber grips, you can play in any conditions.

-Yes.

0:27:270:27:31

And yet they still manage to go round golf courses in 67, 68 shots?

0:27:310:27:37

Oh, yes, they did, yes!

0:27:370:27:39

And given you're a greenkeeper...

0:27:390:27:41

-I was a greenkeeper, yes.

-Whereabouts where you greenkeeper?

0:27:410:27:44

-Locally, in Harlow.

-In Harlow?

0:27:440:27:45

Yes, Cannons Brook.

0:27:450:27:46

So with all this time on the golf course, your gardening must have suffered at home!

0:27:460:27:51

-We haven't got a garden!

-You haven't got a garden?

-No!

0:27:510:27:53

A golfer without a garden!

0:27:570:27:59

I think he's grateful for that!

0:27:590:28:01

So he couldn't practice in the back garden!

0:28:010:28:02

Now getting onto value, these are of huge academic and sporting interest.

0:28:020:28:09

-They're not, sadly, worth a huge amount of money.

-No.

0:28:090:28:11

I think for these to be worth lots of money, and clubs can make lots of

0:28:110:28:17

money, they really need to date from the other end of the 19th century,

0:28:170:28:21

early 1800s.

0:28:210:28:24

Then you can be into hundreds of pounds for a club and of course you can go earlier with the golf balls,

0:28:240:28:29

-the feathery balls.

-The feathery balls.

0:28:290:28:31

If you find one of those, then you're into serious money.

0:28:310:28:34

You've got some books, which you'd be happy to sell with the clubs?

0:28:340:28:38

Yes, I would.

0:28:380:28:39

It would be a great collection for somebody to perhaps start with. That's it, a starter.

0:28:390:28:44

You've got one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight clubs.

0:28:440:28:47

Sadly I think the collection is worth £50 to £100.

0:28:470:28:51

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes, I'd be very happy with that.

0:28:510:28:54

-If you're not going to use them.

-No.

0:28:540:28:56

We ought to put a reserve on them, don't you think?

0:28:560:28:58

-Yes, I'd like a reserve.

-£50 with auctioneer's discretion.

0:28:580:29:01

So we don't perhaps sell for less than £40.

0:29:010:29:04

There's a lot of history in these books, isn't there?

0:29:040:29:06

-Oh, yes, there is.

-Who Won What? Did you ever win any competitions?

0:29:060:29:10

Locally, yes. I won a few club competitions and I've

0:29:100:29:12

got my name up on one of the clubs I belong to, one on the board as well.

0:29:120:29:16

-So that will be up forever?

-That's it, yes.

0:29:160:29:19

-Long after you've gone, your name will be on there.

-For a long while!

0:29:190:29:22

-Lovely to meet you and thank you very much for bringing them along.

-Thank you very much.

0:29:220:29:27

-Hello Maureen, hello Darren.

-Hello.

-You're mother and son.

0:29:300:29:33

That's right, yeah.

0:29:330:29:34

God, I feel like Bruce Forsyth on the Generation Game!

0:29:340:29:37

Now, a pair of vases.

0:29:370:29:39

Tell me about them?

0:29:390:29:41

Well, I bought them about 15 years ago in an antique fair at

0:29:410:29:44

-Sawbridgeworth, just up the road, yeah.

-And why did you buy them?

0:29:440:29:48

Because I fell in love with the colour and the feel of them.

0:29:480:29:52

-They are nice.

-We both thought they were beautiful.

0:29:520:29:54

We thought they were gorgeous when we saw them.

0:29:540:29:56

Well, they are. I love this sort of turquoise colour it is?

0:29:560:29:59

-That's right.

-It's a starry blue colour and this lovely...

0:29:590:30:02

it's almost got what is known in the trade as a sort of satin finish.

0:30:020:30:06

-That's right.

-Very smooth to the touch, and you've got this lovely

0:30:060:30:09

lattice work going underneath the pattern, so you've got not only a nice colour but you've got

0:30:090:30:13

-a two-tone type pattern, with of course the terribly Victorian frilly edge.

-Yeah, that's right.

0:30:130:30:21

-These were almost certainly made in the Webb factory in Stourbridge in Gloucestershire.

-Well, that's funny!

0:30:210:30:26

Our last name is actually Webb!

0:30:260:30:28

Well, that's spooky, isn't it! That might be an omen on our favour.

0:30:280:30:32

-We didn't know that when we bought them, though.

-It wasn't on the ticket?

-No.

0:30:320:30:35

And it's almost nice to get a pair, because often one gets broken...

0:30:350:30:39

Or it's chipped or something like that, yeah.

0:30:390:30:41

-Exactly. Now what did you pay for them, 15 years ago?

-£120.

0:30:410:30:44

£120, which is a reasonable sum of money to pay for porcelain.

0:30:440:30:48

-I thought...

-A bargain, and it wasn't cheap.

0:30:480:30:50

I thought it was a lot, but I loved them that much,

0:30:500:30:52

that's why I didn't mind. I thought they were worth it.

0:30:520:30:55

I can see how you loved them, and the family love them.

0:30:550:30:58

Why are you possibly considering selling them?

0:30:580:31:01

Well, they're just packed away in a box.

0:31:010:31:03

I thought if nobody sees them, no point in leaving something pretty packed in a box.

0:31:030:31:08

But why are they packed in a box?

0:31:080:31:09

-They don't go with my colour scheme.

-You've changed your colour scheme?

0:31:090:31:13

-Yeah I have, yeah.

-You see this is the thing.

0:31:130:31:15

They went then, but now you've changed it to bright orange...

0:31:150:31:18

Not quite!

0:31:180:31:20

Well, now it's time to let them go to another collector, who will appreciate them.

0:31:200:31:24

Well, yeah and I hope they love them as much as I do, you know.

0:31:240:31:27

They're too nice to stay in a box.

0:31:270:31:29

Sophia, what a wonderful tea set!

0:31:370:31:40

-Thank you.

-Where did you find this?

0:31:400:31:42

Well, my grandfather has given it to my mother as a wedding gift.

0:31:420:31:47

As a wedding gift! When was that?

0:31:470:31:48

-1956.

-Right.

0:31:480:31:52

Handed down from family...

0:31:520:31:54

I was going to say, this is not 1950s.

0:31:540:31:57

-No.

-Do you know how old it is?

-I think it's '20s or '30s, I think.

0:31:570:32:01

It's 1920s, very much. It's a real...

0:32:010:32:03

The Indians were very influenced by the art deco period.

0:32:030:32:06

-Right, OK.

-So 1920s we've got

0:32:060:32:09

pure art deco lines, particularly if you look at the handle.

0:32:090:32:12

-Yes.

-This is very art deco, squared form...

0:32:120:32:15

Right, OK.

0:32:150:32:18

..of the handle, which I love.

0:32:180:32:19

There are two things, really, that set it aside and make

0:32:190:32:22

-it absolutely obvious that it's not an English tea set.

-Right.

0:32:220:32:26

One is this very intricate Indian chase decoration in the panels.

0:32:260:32:30

If you took that decoration out, then you would think it was completely

0:32:300:32:34

English and also, this extraordinary, very Indian-looking spout.

0:32:340:32:39

You just wouldn't have a spout like that finishing off an English teapot.

0:32:390:32:43

-Oh, I see, OK.

-It's the combination itself.

0:32:430:32:46

It's as if to say this is a pure piece of English workmanship

0:32:460:32:50

-but we've just put a bit of Indian, just...

-Just put something in.

0:32:500:32:53

It looks more or less complete, as far as I can see.

0:32:530:32:56

Perhaps there was another plate originally?

0:32:560:32:58

-Yes.

-And a spoon?

0:32:580:32:59

-Yes, and a spoon.

-It's quite a weight of silver.

0:32:590:33:01

-Yes, yes.

-Well, of course we can't date it exactly,

0:33:010:33:04

because unlike English silver which would have had to have a hallmark,

0:33:040:33:08

and if it had a hallmark we would be able to tell you exactly

0:33:080:33:11

where it was made and we would be able to tell you the date and who made it.

0:33:110:33:15

None of that information is available here, other than of course the

0:33:150:33:19

bottom, where it says "Made in Kashmir".

0:33:190:33:23

Well, we know Kashmir for other things, don't we, rather than silver?

0:33:230:33:26

-Yes, yes.

-Lovely sweaters.

0:33:260:33:28

But because of this design, it is a Kashmir design.

0:33:280:33:31

-It is a Kashmiri design? Is it?

-Yes, it is.

0:33:310:33:34

-That's very interesting.

-Because they do on a piece of cloth as well, you know, the design.

0:33:340:33:38

So we said that this is a Kashmir design, you know, so...

0:33:380:33:41

That's very interesting.

0:33:410:33:42

You yourself can look at that and tell it's Kashmiri?

0:33:420:33:45

-It's Kashmiri, yes.

-Well, I'm learning all the time!

0:33:450:33:48

I think it's wonderful. I think with regard to valuation, now I suppose

0:33:480:33:52

of all the pieces of silver that are least saleable, it's tea sets,

0:33:520:33:56

simply because people don't use them any more,

0:33:560:33:58

hence it's been in your loft.

0:33:580:34:00

-That's right.

-When did you last have a cup of tea out of a silver teapot?

0:34:000:34:03

-We never.

-A long time ago, probably never, so I think

0:34:030:34:07

you're really looking at a value of a few hundred pounds.

0:34:070:34:11

-£200 to £300.

-Yes, OK.

0:34:110:34:12

-It might take off and might make a bit more.

-Bit more, yes.

0:34:120:34:15

But I think £200 to £300 is the sensible estimate.

0:34:150:34:17

-Yeah, fine.

-All right?

-That's fine.

0:34:170:34:19

Why are you selling it?

0:34:190:34:20

I want to send the proceeds to Mother Theresa's charity

0:34:200:34:23

in Calcutta, where my mother used to work.

0:34:230:34:25

-Your mother worked there?

-Yes.

0:34:250:34:26

Let's hope we can leave that £200 to £300 estimate way behind, because it's such a wonderful cause.

0:34:260:34:31

-Cause, yes.

-For Mother Theresa?

-Yes.

0:34:310:34:33

-£500 would be nice, wouldn't it!

-Oh, it would be! Very nice!

0:34:330:34:37

Well, it's goodbye to the valuation day so let's remind ourselves

0:34:390:34:42

of all the lots we're taking off to auction.

0:34:420:34:45

I'm sure Sally's unusual fish set will attract a pool of interested bidders.

0:34:450:34:52

Alan's golf clubs and books would look great decorating the bar

0:34:520:34:56

of a local golf club, but will the worn handles handicap the price?

0:34:560:35:00

They no longer suit her colour scheme, and have been in a box for 15 years, so can Maureen's vases

0:35:000:35:06

find a sympathetic home for £150 to £200?

0:35:060:35:11

And finally, Sophia's extraordinary silver tea service is a real gem

0:35:110:35:15

and I'm sure will attract plenty of interest.

0:35:150:35:18

Next up another of my favourites,

0:35:230:35:25

a bit of studio pottery. It's Poole Pottery from Dorset.

0:35:250:35:29

We don't have Sally our owner with us today, but we do have her

0:35:290:35:32

daughter, Sarah, so where's Mum gone?

0:35:320:35:34

-She's unwell today.

-She's unwell?

0:35:340:35:36

-Oh, I'm sorry about that.

-So I'm taking her place, she'll be fine.

0:35:360:35:39

-Get well, Sally, and hopefully the top end of the estimate will cheer her up!

-I hope so!

0:35:390:35:43

We're looking at £80 to £100, Mark?

0:35:430:35:45

-Yeah, I love it.

-There's a lot of pottery here for that.

0:35:450:35:48

Is this a "come and buy me".

0:35:480:35:50

I hope so. I like it.

0:35:500:35:51

You've got the serving dish for the fish and all those quirky animals in there. We like them on Flog It!

0:35:510:35:57

-We like quirky.

-We do love quirky and I think quirky adds to value.

0:35:570:36:01

It makes it slightly more individual.

0:36:010:36:04

We just need an individual or two right now to bid against each other.

0:36:040:36:08

We do, absolutely and it might swim away!

0:36:080:36:10

Or to shell out top dollar!

0:36:100:36:12

This is it. It's going under the hammer.

0:36:140:36:16

The 1950s Poole Pottery fish service, there you are, Poole Pottery there.

0:36:160:36:20

What do you say to start me? £60?

0:36:200:36:22

60, 60 I have down there now, at 60, at £60. Yeah, 65, 65, 70...

0:36:220:36:27

I think this is so cheap for what it is!

0:36:270:36:29

At £70 down here now.

0:36:290:36:30

At 70, 75, 80, at £80...

0:36:300:36:33

Come on!

0:36:330:36:35

80. At £80 is bid.

0:36:350:36:36

All done now at £80. All done?

0:36:360:36:38

Well, we got it within estimate, well done, Mark.

0:36:400:36:42

-We did, but...

-I think that's an affordable collectable.

0:36:420:36:45

-It should have been more, but that's auctions for you.

-That's fine, yes.

0:36:450:36:49

-We needed another couple of people to put their hand up.

-Fight over it.

0:36:490:36:52

Put their hand up, yeah, a couple more times and we would have got £120, £140 for it.

0:36:520:36:56

-As you say, that's auctions for you, but wish Mum all the best.

0:36:560:37:00

I will do.

0:37:000:37:01

-OK, get well soon!

-Thank you.

0:37:010:37:04

20, 30, 40...

0:37:040:37:06

Well, good luck, Alan and Lesley.

0:37:100:37:12

We've got the eight golf clubs with some books, all from the early 1900s, just about to go

0:37:120:37:16

under the hammer, with a valuation of around £50,

0:37:160:37:18

£60, hopefully £70 odd for the lot.

0:37:180:37:22

I think it deserves that kind of money, Charlie, really!

0:37:220:37:25

-It should be enough.

-Hickory shafts, there's some quality there.

0:37:250:37:28

-And some good makers' names, we should be fine.

-Yeah.

0:37:280:37:31

You were a greenkeeper, weren't you?

0:37:310:37:33

-I was, yes.

-Good job?

-It was a nice, pleasant job working outside, yes.

0:37:330:37:37

What are you holding there in your hand?

0:37:370:37:39

-It's a little golf tee for Charlie.

-Spin it around... there it is.

0:37:390:37:42

Oh, it's a little sexy lady, look!

0:37:420:37:44

-It's a present.

-There you go, Charlie!

0:37:440:37:46

-That's fantastic, thank you.

-I think you're blushing! Oh, she's beautifully modelled.

0:37:460:37:51

-I'd be afraid to lose it, that's the trouble!

-There you go!

0:37:510:37:54

That's a novelty in itself, isn't it?

0:37:540:37:56

It'll make me keep my eye on the ball, won't it!

0:37:560:37:58

Yes, it will. Something to aim for!

0:37:580:38:00

Well, look, good luck, you two!

0:38:020:38:03

-Is he always like this?

-Yes.

-Is he?

0:38:030:38:05

Here we go, it's going under the hammer now. Let's tee off.

0:38:050:38:08

The collection of eight vintage hickory shafted golf clubs and the various books to go with them.

0:38:080:38:13

-I have two commissions and I start the bidding at £80.

-£80!

0:38:130:38:17

£80... do I hear 85?

0:38:170:38:18

At £80 is bid. 85 anywhere? 85, 90?

0:38:180:38:23

At £90, are you all done?

0:38:230:38:26

Yeah! The hammer's come down at £90!

0:38:260:38:29

-That's a cracking result, isn't it?

-It is, isn't it!

0:38:290:38:31

Well, done, Charlie. I think he's got a little lucky emblem there! Ever so proud of that!

0:38:310:38:36

Perhaps you should try selling that and not the golf clubs!

0:38:360:38:40

-That is for the golf clubs!

-Brilliant!

0:38:400:38:42

Next a pair of glass vases made in Stourbridge by the Webb factory

0:38:470:38:51

-and they've been stuck in a box for years, haven't they, Darren and Maureen?

-15 years.

0:38:510:38:55

-15 years?

-That's right, yeah.

-15 years they've been stuck in a box!

0:38:550:38:59

You opened the box, brought them along to the valuation day.

0:38:590:39:01

Were you happy with Mark's valuation... £150 to £200?

0:39:010:39:05

Yes, certainly, it's fine, yeah.

0:39:050:39:07

Why have they been stuck in a box?

0:39:070:39:09

-They don't go with my decor any more.

-Don't they?

-No.

0:39:090:39:12

I don't want them. I'd be frightened to break them.

0:39:120:39:14

And you don't want them, you don't want to inherit them?

0:39:140:39:17

They don't fit the decor.

0:39:170:39:18

They don't fit the decor and they don't always fit in today's market.

0:39:180:39:21

It's one of those funny areas, Paul, that we bump into.

0:39:210:39:24

Lovely quality, very Victorian,

0:39:240:39:26

but not the most desirable.

0:39:260:39:28

A few years ago these would have been sought-after,

0:39:280:39:30

so I don't think we're gonna have any flyers.

0:39:300:39:32

But you never know with antiques, do you? They go round in circles.

0:39:320:39:36

Fashion changes and in five years, might be worth a bit more money,

0:39:360:39:39

but we're gonna find out exactly...

0:39:390:39:41

-I don't think I'll keep them.

-You don't want to, but you might change the decor

0:39:410:39:44

and all of a sudden they'll fit in in five years time!

0:39:440:39:47

We've got to flog them, that's what we're here for.

0:39:470:39:49

-That's right.

-Let's do it, Maureen. They're going under the hammer.

0:39:490:39:52

Victorian blue satin glass oval formed vases.

0:39:520:39:55

What do you say to start me?

0:39:550:39:56

£100 to start me? 100? £100 I have now, at £100.

0:39:560:39:59

At £100. Do I have 110?

0:39:590:40:01

At £100 as bid. 110, 120, 130, 140, 150.

0:40:010:40:07

At 150, seated now at 150.

0:40:070:40:09

Is there 160 anywhere? At £150 are you all done?

0:40:090:40:14

Just £150!

0:40:140:40:16

You see, you didn't need the boxes.

0:40:160:40:18

-Brilliant. No.

-Maureen whispered in my ear,

0:40:180:40:20

"I brought the boxes, I had a feeling I might be taking them home."

0:40:200:40:23

£150, less a bit of commission, that's fantastic.

0:40:230:40:25

-Very nice.

-What are you going to treat yourself to?

0:40:250:40:28

Well, I've had an extension done to the house, so the money will go towards finishing off the interior.

0:40:280:40:33

-Get some kitchen work.

-Good luck.

0:40:330:40:36

90, five, 100.

0:40:380:40:39

Sophia's Kashmir silver is certainly becoming a big talking point, isn't it, just?

0:40:430:40:49

We had Charlie's original valuation...

0:40:490:40:51

£200 to £300 on the day.

0:40:510:40:54

It's worth probably £500 in weight of silver, if it was English Sterling silver.

0:40:540:41:00

You've cottoned onto this, haven't you, because you rang James up,

0:41:000:41:03

because I had a quick chat with the auctioneer just before the sale started.

0:41:030:41:07

Sophia is now upped the valuation, we've got a fixed reserve of £450.

0:41:070:41:12

So it just might struggle, but you don't know, because you can't tell

0:41:120:41:18

the quality, can you, of Indian silver, you don't know if it's equal amount or slightly less?

0:41:180:41:23

It's not easy to sell something in this country that's "Made in Kashmir"

0:41:230:41:27

on the bottom, as a rule, but, it's stylistically interesting...

0:41:270:41:31

-Very...

-And it weighs a lot.

-And there's a lot there, yes.

0:41:310:41:34

So what really made you change your mind?

0:41:340:41:36

Was it the fact that it was the weight or the sentimental value

0:41:360:41:39

or you just didn't want to let it go for £200?

0:41:390:41:42

Yes, I think so. All of it, really.

0:41:420:41:44

If I'm giving them the Mother Theresa Charity, why not give a

0:41:440:41:49

little bit more than £200, you know.

0:41:490:41:52

What's the point actually letting it go?

0:41:520:41:54

And tell us a little bit more about the charity. Are you involved with it?

0:41:540:41:58

My mother was involved with it.

0:41:580:42:00

She actually worked with Mother Theresa, looking after children

0:42:000:42:03

who are very, very poor and couldn't really afford anything, so literally

0:42:030:42:07

picking them up from the street and looking after them and in fact I was part of it as well.

0:42:070:42:12

Oh, wonderful, so you can remember that as a little girl?

0:42:120:42:15

-Oh, yes, from age 13.

-Did you ever meet Mother Theresa?

0:42:150:42:18

-Yes, yes.

-Oh, wonderful!

0:42:180:42:19

What lovely memories! I can see why you're very protective over this.

0:42:190:42:22

-Fingers crossed, OK. Let's see if we get that £450.

-Thank you very much.

0:42:220:42:26

It's all going to charity, Charlie.

0:42:260:42:28

It's made me tingle, actually.

0:42:280:42:30

Lot 184 is the 1920s Indian white metal tea service.

0:42:300:42:33

I have two commissions on the book and I start the bidding with me at £450.

0:42:330:42:39

Oh, yes! Worry over.

0:42:390:42:42

460, 470, 480, 490, 500, 520, 540...

0:42:420:42:48

-What do I know!

-560, 580, 600.

0:42:480:42:51

At £600, with me on the book at £600. Are you all done?

0:42:510:42:57

Our worries are over! The hammer's gone down.

0:42:570:42:59

£600! Well done!

0:42:590:43:01

Thank you, thank you. I'm really pleased.

0:43:010:43:04

-Giving all the money to Mother Theresa, brilliant!

-Yes. That's brilliant.

0:43:040:43:08

We've had great fun here at Reeman Dansie in Colchester, so until the

0:43:080:43:12

next time, there's plenty more surprises to come on Flog It!

0:43:120:43:16

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:380:43:42

Members of the public are invited to try to make money out of their antiques by taking a risk at auction. Flog It experts Charlie Ross and Mark Stacey are searching through family heirlooms in Harlow. Presenter Paul Martin sneaks down the road to investigate the Spy Museum.