Basingstoke Flog It!


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Basingstoke

Paul Martin is joined by experts Catherine Southon and James Lewis in Basingstoke, where James finds an art nouveau bowl and Catherine sees a gold pocket watch.


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There's been a market held here every Wednesday in this town for the last 700 years,

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but today there's a new attraction, there's a different buzz,

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because Flog It! has come to Basingstoke.

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Basingstoke expanded rapidly during the 1960s,

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but this marketplace is at the very heart of the old town,

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which even has a mention in the Domesday Book,

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which dates way back to 1086.

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And over the centuries the traders have come here to ply their goods

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and all the crowds - well, they've come here to snap up a bargain.

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Well, here at the Anvil we've drawn a great crowd of our own

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and all the people of Basingstoke are eager to trade their antiques,

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and they're here to ask that all-important question, which is...

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ALL: What's it worth?

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They're gonna find out, because we've got two great experts -

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Catherine Southon and James Lewis who are desperate to value this lot,

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so let's get them inside and put them out of their misery.

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And it's not long before something with a great name catches James's eye.

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Bridget, David, a wonderful piece of Art Nouveau pewter work.

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Is this something that's been in the family a long time?

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I can remember it in my grandparents' house in the '40s.

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-Right.

-1940s and I don't know where they got it from,

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-but it's been around for 60, 70 years anyway.

-Yeah.

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So it's likely... Well, that's almost new.

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-This was probably made around 1915, 1925 something like that.

-Right.

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If you turn it over, we've got a clear set of marks there -

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"English Pewter Made by Liberty & Co."

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And really that is the name that everybody looks for

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in terms of 20th century pewter,

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and then we have the number underneath that - 01130.

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It's a five digit number, so it's quite a late one.

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The earlier ones only had four numbers.

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The most famous of the designers is a chap called... Do you know?

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-Archibald Knox.

-Archibald Knox.

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And everybody hopes that they have a piece of Archibald Knox.

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Sadly, this isn't.

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This is probably by, well it is by Oliver Baker,

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a designer who studied actually in Birmingham,

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in Victoria Street in Birmingham.

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And did lots of wares in the same sort of style as Archibald Knox,

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but had a much heavier, more masculine approach to it.

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Whereas a lot of the Archibald Knox wares are embossed, some are cast,

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this is very much cast, with its weight.

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The Archibald Knox piece would no way be as heavy as that.

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So it's been in the family for as long as you can remember?

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Yes, yes.

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-Isn't it something you want to pass down, generation to generation?

-No.

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Our children don't want it, so...

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-Why?

-Don't ask us!

-I wanted it.

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David's aunt had it after his grandmother and then it came to us

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and I had ideas of putting it in the fireplace with dried flowers in it.

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I never got round to doing it and that was 12 years ago,

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and so I think "Oh, well, 12 years, it's time to move it on."

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You need to persuade your children

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-to start appreciating things of this period.

-We try!

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I suppose they spend their weekends with flat-pack furniture,

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putting it together with an Allen key like most of my mates.

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But I have to say, this for me, I love this.

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The period really does appeal

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and I'd like to put on an auction estimate of...

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It's not going to...

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I'm afraid you're not going to go on holiday with it,

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it's not gonna get you very far.

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It's gonna be £50 to £80, something like that,

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and let's protect it with a reserve. Let's stick £40 on it.

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-If it doesn't make that, we can try it in another sale.

-Yes.

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-Is that OK for you?

-Absolutely, yes.

-Yep.

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-Super, and you're able to come to the auction?

-I hope so, yes.

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-Let's take it along and see how it does.

-Good.

-Thank you very much.

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Hi, Frances. Thank you for coming along today

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and bringing along these rather interesting ginger jars.

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Tell me about them. Where did you get them from?

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I was given them by my granddad in 1994.

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As far as I know, they were an engagement present

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for my nan and granddad, it must have been probably about 1930,

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so that's as far as I know the history.

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Now you said that your grandparents got engaged in the 1930s?

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That would correspond with these, because they are Art Deco,

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they are certainly Art Deco in shape and they do date from the 1930s,

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so that would work rather well. Do you like them?

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-Is it something you're interested in?

-I do like them.

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I think they've got a nice pattern about them,

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but unfortunately they're not my colour scheme any more.

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I did used to collect a lot of blue.

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The red took a bit of a background...

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-Right, so they don't go with your decor?

-Not any more, no.

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-So it's time to move them on?

-Yes.

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Well, what I like about them

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is that they are in lovely condition and they are glass.

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I mean from a distance they may look ceramic

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and indeed I thought they were ceramic first of all,

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but as you see them, they are made from glass

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and they look to have been hand-painted

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on the reverse of the glass.

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So you can see here, this is the glass on the outside,

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-but underneath that, that is where they've been hand-painted.

-Right.

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So they're really quite well-done and rather beautiful.

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And also, they've got a lovely clear stamp on the bottom

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that tells us that they were made in Stourbridge.

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And the maker's mark on the bottom,

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so it's really nice and clear for that period.

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The lids, unfortunately, aren't in such good condition -

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these white metal lids which do look a little bit tarnished.

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But nonetheless, the three of them do look to be in superb condition.

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-So certainly you seem to have looked after them?

-Oh, absolutely, yes.

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-Now value-wise, I suggest that we put an estimate on of £200 to £300.

-OK.

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Put a reserve on of £150 so they won't sell below that,

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and I hope the people in the auction room will appreciate this quality

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-and how they've been rather nicely done.

-Definitely.

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-Thanks for coming along.

-Thank you.

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Walter, a cracking chest of drawers and a nice bow-fronted one as well.

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Look at that lovely sweep!

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So, tell me a little bit about its history. Where has it come from?

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It was my mother's and she inherited it from my grandmother.

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-It's been in the family a long time?

-Yeah.

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-And now it's yours?

-Well, yeah, I suppose it is.

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-And you don't want this?

-No.

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Why is that?

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-It's too old!

-Too old!

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-Too big!

-Too big!

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This is the problem with fashion today.

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People have got it in their minds, because it's big and brown

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and not fashionable, it's horrible and not worth anything.

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This is a cracking piece of kit and worth investing in.

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Look at the architecture, look at the craftsmanship.

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You don't find that in furniture built in the last 20 years.

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-No.

-You really don't.

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And look at the way the carpenter has cut the piece of wood -

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that's one single plank.

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That lovely variegated grain, that's called a flame curl.

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That's cut for it's decoration.

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-And this is circa 1840 this chest of drawers.

-Is it?

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Yes, it is just before the Victorian period.

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It's got some nice... decorative handles.

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If you pull this out, you can see the handles have been replaced.

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There would have been a very plain Cuban mahogany drawer knob there,

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but somebody has updated it...

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-Have they?

-With a rather fanciful ormolu piece of metal there,

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just to create the look, you know, rather than get rid of it,

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change the door furniture, revive its appearance.

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I mean I think it's a practical piece of kit, you know.

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It's a quality thing and it's been well-used, I can see that,

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because it's had some damage,

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someone has carted that up and down the stairs and it's fallen over.

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If this was in perfect condition, you'd be looking at £400 to £600,

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but because it's been terribly, terribly damaged, but well-loved,

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-I think we're looking at £100 to £200.

-Yeah.

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You're gonna get the lower end, because somebody has to do some work on it.

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People just aren't buying them and it's so sad,

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but you've pointed out why they're not buying them -

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it's too big, it's too brown, it's too dark, it looks too heavy.

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-That's fine.

-Yeah?

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-Yeah.

-Any fixed reserve?

-No.

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-No reserve? Just let it go?

-Yeah.

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I don't blame you actually, because if it struggles around £80,

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it means you've got to hire a van

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and spend more money to pick it up and take it home.

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-It needs to go.

-It needs to go! OK, see you at the auction.

-OK.

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Alex, I'd love to think that when I'm going out with my camera

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taking little snapshots of whatever throughout Derbyshire and the UK

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that one day in maybe 100 years' time,

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somebody will be looking through one of my albums like this.

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-That's right.

-This is just a wonderful illustration really,

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-of life at sea on a cruise in 1904, just over 100 years ago.

-Beautiful.

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Tell me, is it a family piece or something you found?

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-No, I just collect old photographs, you know.

-OK.

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And I've got thousands, so...

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I think the frontispiece is just super,

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with this lovely sepia pen and ink sketch there

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of typical Edwardian life on a cruise ship.

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And then here he's mapped out the voyage, starting in Oban,

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going north to Inverness and down the coast,

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Aberdeen and all the way round,

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Southampton, Plymouth,

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all the way up the other side and home.

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And if we start to look at the actual photographs themselves,

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I have to say the bit that struck me, for two reasons, was Southampton.

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I suppose because we're in Hampshire now,

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but also I was at Southampton Uni

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and this is where I used to go and eat sandwiches at lunchtime.

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And it's called Bargate, and there used to be above bar and below bar

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and none of these buildings were here.

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It was 1960s, horrible flat-roof monstrosities

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when I was at university,

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but looking at that, gosh, what a place it was!

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-It was beautiful.

-Absolutely beautiful.

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And then if we come from Southampton we turn to Portsmouth

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and there we have HMS Victory.

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And, of course, unlike today in dry dock,

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there she is, sitting in the water at sea.

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Portsmouth Harbour, wonderful.

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I mean, this really is a great tour of the ports and harbours of Britain

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and it really will appeal to a photograph collector.

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-Valuing such a thing is difficult...

-I know.

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-It's of far more interest than commercial value.

-I know, I know.

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-But somebody will love it, I'm sure.

-Of course, yeah.

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And if we put an estimate of £40 to £60 on it

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and a reserve of £40, would you be happy with that?

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That would be perfect, yes.

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-Well, let's take it along and see how we go.

-Okey doke. Thank you.

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Well, we've found some cracking items

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and right now it's time to put those valuations to the test.

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It's our first visit to the auction room, in Winchester,

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so while we make our way over there,

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we'll leave you with a quick recap of all the items we've found.

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What a lovely example of Art Nouveau,

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and Liberty is one of the best names.

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This is bound to do well for Bridget and David.

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These Art Deco glass jars clash with Frances's interior decor,

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but I'm sure they'll fit right in with somebody else's.

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When it comes to interior design,

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does anyone want brown furniture any more?

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Well, I think now is the time to buy it.

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And Alexander is parting with an album

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from his collection of old photographs.

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Will this record of an Edwardian cruise sail away? Let's find out.

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For today's auction, we're in this beautiful listed barn,

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where our auctioneer, Andrew Smith, will be overseeing our lots.

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Boy, have we got a show lined up for you today.

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I've been waiting for this moment for the last five or six weeks,

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ever since we had our valuation day where we found all our treasures

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that are just about to go under the hammer.

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Unfortunately, one of our experts is missing.

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We've got Catherine Southon, but James Lewis cannot make it today.

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He's in Derby. We've got a camera on him and a phone link,

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so we can get his reaction to whatever happens.

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Keep watching because there's gonna be one or two very big surprises!

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Right now in the frame we've got Alex and his collection of photos.

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Sort of a nautical theme here,

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-a cruise around the British Isles in the early 1900s.

-Yes.

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Ports, harbours, shorelines.

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-Everywhere, yeah.

-Are you a keen photographer?

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-Oh, god, yeah!

-Yes?

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For ever!

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How many photos have you collected in your lifetime, do you think?

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Ooh, probably 3,000, 4,000, or more.

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We've got about £40 to £60 riding on this.

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It's not a great deal of money,

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but let's hope we get a little bit more

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than James's top end of the estimate.

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I'd like to see £80 to £100 on this.

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Maybe it's wishful thinking, I don't know, but bon voyage!

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James, what do you think? We've got a packed room behind me.

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I'm convinced that this photograph album is gonna do well.

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£40 to £60, maybe top-end estimate.

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OK. Here we go. We're going under the hammer now.

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Lot 122, various ships illustrated there.

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-We have a number of commission bids here...

-Ooh, see!

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-We'll start the bidding at £45.

-Commission bids, lots of interest.

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£45, is there 50 in the room? At £45 and selling...

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50 at the back, commission bids are out. £50 and selling. Five?

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-Come on, more, come on!

-At £50 in the room now, at £50.

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Any more? All done. At £50, last time.

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James was spot on, he said £40 to £60. Bang on in the middle.

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-Brilliant, absolutely brilliant!

-£50 is a great result.

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I was obviously more accurate as a valuer on the day than I am today!

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Can't fault that! If you've got 3,000 or 4,000 other photographs

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and they're all worth sort of, roughly the same,

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-I think you're worth a small fortune!

-Sshhhh!

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I've just been joined by Frances and Catherine

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and here is something for all you Art Deco lovers.

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And it will set you back £200 to £300, won't it?

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-You like these?

-I do, and they look fantastic here,

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because they've got pride of place, they're illustrated in the catalogue,

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but I made a mistake - I called them ginger jars,

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but I stand corrected, they're actually tea caddies,

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because of the little metal bits.

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OK. Why are you flogging these?

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Because they're just boxed away in the loft at the moment.

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They've never been in a box! Looking at them now,

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they've got a real look about them, a nice trio.

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Well, we've got a fixed reserve of £150.

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I think they're priced to sell.

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Fingers crossed. There's three of them, £50 each as far I'm concerned.

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-Let's hope we get Catherine's top estimate.

-Lovely.

-OK?

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-Yes, thank you.

-Let's do it.

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Lot 420, there's three Stourbridge tea caddies.

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Start me at £200. £200?

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Try £150 then. £150?

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£100 if you like. £100, thank you, and ten.

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-At £100 and ten, 110, 120...

-Come on!

-130, 140.

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At £140. Any more?

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Right up at the top - 150, 160.

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£150, it's with me at the moment at £150 at the top. Any more?

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At £150, then, for the very last time.

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We sold them, the hammer's gone down.

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-Right on the reserve.

-That's fine.

-They've gone.

-Yes, yes.

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-It's better than having them in the box.

-Definitely.

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What will you put the money towards?

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Hopefully in the future I may try and start off doing a family tree

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for my grandparents in their family name.

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That's nice, a bit of genealogy, yes.

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-So it will be put away until I'm able to start that.

-How exciting.

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What a lovely idea! How fantastic!

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For the next lot, it's Andrew's colleague, Nick Jarrod,

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who will be conducting the auction.

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Right, my turn to be the expert.

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That wonderful set of chest of drawers,

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the Cuban mahogany ones, they belong to Walter.

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We've got the chest of drawers.

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Walter can't be with us today but we've got his daughter, Hayley.

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You've seen these as a little girl,

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-because they've been in the family quite a long time.

-They have, yes.

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-Yes, a long time.

-You may have used them in your bedroom!

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We had them around.

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Look, I hope you get the top end of the estimate for dad.

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-He was quite adamant that he didn't want a reserve.

-He didn't.

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They're just here to go and as you can see, if you look around,

0:17:450:17:48

we've got one, two, three, four, five...

0:17:480:17:50

-there's about ten chest of drawers here.

-Very similar.

0:17:500:17:53

It's very similar. They call it brown furniture.

0:17:530:17:56

They've talked the price right down,

0:17:560:17:58

but quite frankly, now is the time to buy them,

0:17:580:18:00

because they are a good investment,

0:18:000:18:02

so fingers crossed, somebody will pay good money for this.

0:18:020:18:06

Here they go.

0:18:060:18:07

Lot 855, the bow-front chest of drawers. Good chest here.

0:18:070:18:11

Start me at £100 for it. £100?

0:18:110:18:15

100? No?

0:18:150:18:16

50 then? Just to get me going. £50, no less.

0:18:160:18:20

£50, surely? For the bow-front chest, £50? I won't sell it for less.

0:18:200:18:25

£50 somewhere?

0:18:250:18:26

Nobody wants to buy a chest of drawers!

0:18:260:18:29

If nobody wants it at 50, we'll pass on it.

0:18:290:18:31

No? OK, well, we'll move on.

0:18:310:18:34

That's incredible, isn't it!

0:18:340:18:36

Oh, dear. Oh, well.

0:18:360:18:38

We can re-enter it here in another sale,

0:18:380:18:41

rather than you sort of put it in the car and take it home.

0:18:410:18:46

If he wants to sell it, let it go for £50, we can contact dad,

0:18:460:18:50

-he can put it in another sale coming up in a couple of weeks.

-OK.

0:18:500:18:54

It just goes to show, all of these chests of drawers here,

0:18:540:18:57

all of this furniture, nobody wants it.

0:18:570:19:00

-£50 is nothing, is it?

-No.

0:19:000:19:02

Everybody needs a set to put their clothes in at home.

0:19:020:19:05

Why go to the high street and spend £150 on some MDF furniture

0:19:050:19:09

that is gonna fall apart when you can buy

0:19:090:19:12

an early Victorian piece like that for 50 quid!

0:19:120:19:16

Ooh, I love this little pewter bowl.

0:19:230:19:25

It's in the Art Nouveau style and it belongs to Bridget and David here.

0:19:250:19:28

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:19:280:19:30

I've been waiting for this moment and I'll tell you what, I love this.

0:19:300:19:34

I think it's a gorgeous little shape.

0:19:340:19:36

I know, James, you really like this. It's got a fixed reserve at £40.

0:19:360:19:40

I think it could do a lot more than that.

0:19:400:19:42

I'd like it to do a lot more than that. Any change of plans here?

0:19:420:19:46

£40, easy.

0:19:460:19:48

Let's hope it makes 100.

0:19:480:19:50

You've heard what James has got to say, you've heard what I think.

0:19:500:19:53

We know what you think.

0:19:530:19:54

I think it's down to the bidders now of Winchester.

0:19:540:19:57

So let's find out what they think.

0:19:570:19:59

Here we go. It's going under the hammer.

0:19:590:20:01

Lot 750 is a Liberty & Co jardiniere.

0:20:010:20:06

We have a number of commission bids here...

0:20:060:20:09

They like it! It's got the look!

0:20:090:20:10

Bidding at £110, commission bid, at £110...

0:20:100:20:13

I knew James was being a bit mean!

0:20:130:20:15

120 in the room? At £110 and selling...

0:20:150:20:19

120, 130, 140...

0:20:190:20:22

-That's extraordinary!

-140.

0:20:220:20:24

At £130 commission bid, then. At £130, if you're all done?

0:20:240:20:29

£130 for the last time.

0:20:290:20:31

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yes, it's sold! £130!

0:20:310:20:35

James, brilliant!

0:20:350:20:37

£130, what a great price.

0:20:370:20:39

I'm so pleased with that.

0:20:390:20:41

People loved it as much as I did and that's gonna go to a good home.

0:20:410:20:44

What do you think about that?

0:20:440:20:46

That's tremendous! Unbelievable.

0:20:460:20:49

I was happy with £40.

0:20:490:20:50

-Ah! But it had the look!

-That's three times.

0:20:500:20:53

It really did, it really did.

0:20:530:20:54

It attracted people to it, so I'm ever so pleased with that.

0:20:540:20:57

And I hope somebody enjoys it.

0:20:570:20:59

Love them or loathe them, but you can't live life without them,

0:21:040:21:08

that's for sure, but things don't always run that smoothly, do they?

0:21:080:21:12

Car trouble - it always happens when you least expect it.

0:21:120:21:16

I don't know much about engines, but I do know a man who does.

0:21:160:21:19

Many organisations were born out of the love of our four-wheeled friends

0:21:190:21:24

and have rescued us from roadsides over the years.

0:21:240:21:28

One that can trace its history right back to the beginning

0:21:280:21:31

of the car industry is the AA, the Automobile Association.

0:21:310:21:34

And its HQ is in Basingstoke.

0:21:340:21:36

They remain one of the largest,

0:21:360:21:39

and even as far back as the '70s, they had over five million members.

0:21:390:21:43

This was when they introduced a brand new Relay service.

0:21:430:21:47

-Hi. What's your name?

-Steve.

-Hi, Steve. It's Paul.

0:21:530:21:56

-This is fantastic.

-It's excellent.

0:21:560:21:58

-It's brilliant. Doesn't it look American-like?

-It does, yeah.

0:21:580:22:01

-Built in Luton, isn't it?

-Oh, yes.

-Not built in the USA.

0:22:010:22:04

-No, a genuine Bedford.

-It's typical '70s. Is it early '70s?

0:22:040:22:07

-It is. This one is 1974.

-Right, OK.

0:22:070:22:10

-But Relay actually came into force in '73.

-Oh, only a year before?

0:22:100:22:13

Only the year before, and we had 15 of these and this was one of the very early ones that we took on.

0:22:130:22:18

Gosh! Do you know, I thought they'd been around since the '60s!

0:22:180:22:21

-No. We didn't do a Relay in the '60s. I mean then people...

-You couldn't tow people?

0:22:210:22:25

No. We didn't do much in the way of towing.

0:22:250:22:27

People never went very far then, cars weren't reliable and there was no motorway,

0:22:270:22:31

so everyone was pretty much local to where they lived, so it wasn't until later on that we started

0:22:310:22:36

towing long distances and that's when we started up the Relay.

0:22:360:22:39

And this was the standard issue, was it?

0:22:390:22:41

-Yes, one of the first ones.

-Good old Bedford pick-up?

-Yes, very noisy.

0:22:410:22:44

-Incredible!

-Slow, smelly, but...

0:22:440:22:46

-But I love it. It's in great condition.

-Oh, yes, yeah.

0:22:460:22:49

-Who's restored this, then?

-This was just restored by a patrol.

0:22:490:22:52

I mean all of our vintage vehicles have been restored and looked after by patrols.

0:22:520:22:56

They do it in their own time, so we use them for different events,

0:22:560:22:59

-charity runs.

-Have you got many more examples back at the depot?

0:22:590:23:02

-Yes, we've a few for you to see, from different eras.

-I'll tell you what then.

0:23:020:23:06

We'll load my car up, get it on the back and I'll ride in the cab with you.

0:23:060:23:10

-Yeah, that will be great.

-We can have a look.

-OK.

0:23:100:23:12

The AA was formed back in 1905 by a group of motoring enthusiasts.

0:23:170:23:22

Their aim was not to offer roadside assistance, but to get around the law.

0:23:220:23:28

These driving pioneers were constantly

0:23:280:23:30

being prosecuted for speeding by the police so patrolmen were sent out to warn members about speed traps.

0:23:300:23:36

From those early stages, the AA changed and adapted,

0:23:360:23:40

eventually swapping the pushbike for more mechanised forms of transport.

0:23:400:23:44

I love it! Hi there, hello.

0:23:500:23:52

-Hello.

-What's your name?

-Shaun.

0:23:520:23:53

Shaun, hi Shaun. I like the uniform, as well.

0:23:530:23:56

-That's a BSA, isn't it?

-This is.

0:23:560:23:58

It's the BSA M21.

0:23:580:24:00

And how many of these were on the road?

0:24:000:24:02

By 1923 we had 273 of these but we still have a couple of hundred

0:24:020:24:06

patrols still on pushbikes, as well, so we had a mixture of the two.

0:24:060:24:09

From the '50s, we started using the M21, because they came improved

0:24:090:24:13

-with the sidebox, which...

-You could get the kit in?

0:24:130:24:16

-Exactly, yes.

-That's brilliant.

0:24:160:24:17

It made them more versatile. They'd have had spanners, screwdrivers...

0:24:170:24:20

-Jacks...

-Yeah, jacks, water, first aid kits, petrol, yes.

0:24:200:24:25

I mean petrol was, you know, there wasn't many garages about in those days,

0:24:250:24:29

so it was quite a common thing for people to run out of petrol, so we carried that.

0:24:290:24:32

Shaun, this is in fantastic condition.

0:24:320:24:35

-Terrific.

-Absolutely unbelievable. It still goes like a dream, I gather.

0:24:350:24:39

This one we actually drove from John O'Groats to Lands End on a charity run and the only thing

0:24:390:24:44

that went wrong with it was the headlight fell out,

0:24:440:24:47

-so you can't knock that, can you!

-No, you can't, you really can't. How lovely.

0:24:470:24:51

So many people can remember these, you know the old bike and sidecar.

0:24:510:24:55

I mean this is a real iconic picture of the AA in the early days.

0:24:550:24:58

The number of cars on the road doubled in the 1950s and doubled again in the '60s.

0:24:580:25:02

With more cars on the road, the bikes were deemed unsafe and in 1961, a new vehicle came along.

0:25:020:25:10

It would make the world of the patrol man a drier and more comfortable place.

0:25:100:25:15

I love it! I had one of these.

0:25:150:25:17

-Did you?

-A bright red one. It must have been ex-Post Office!

0:25:170:25:22

-Isn't this lovely!

-It is, yes.

0:25:220:25:23

-Can we have a look inside?

-Certainly.

0:25:230:25:25

-Look at that! Even a yellow jack!

-Yes.

0:25:280:25:31

All original tools that we've managed to get from the patrols that have retired over the years and been

0:25:310:25:37

in the garage, that's an original tool box from the same era.

0:25:370:25:40

The fuel cans are original so we've tried to keep it as much original as possible.

0:25:400:25:45

-You're passionate about this one, aren't you?

-Yes, yes, we've been renovating it...

0:25:450:25:50

We, meaning you and a friend?

0:25:500:25:52

Another patrolman, Nick, he helps me as well.

0:25:520:25:55

He's a Mini fanatic as well so we've spent many a winter's night in the garage, stripping this one down.

0:25:550:26:00

Oh, it's absolutely gorgeous.

0:26:000:26:03

You know I remember the times that I've broken down, and it's always been a sort of a flat battery

0:26:030:26:08

or condensation in the distributor cap and damp leads and things like that. Is that the usual case today?

0:26:080:26:13

We still get flat batteries - our most common breakdown.

0:26:130:26:16

Leads and distributor caps are pretty much a thing of the past.

0:26:160:26:20

It's more hi-tech now, we've got diagnostic laptops for engine management systems,

0:26:200:26:25

so it's a different world to what we used to work on when we were driving these around.

0:26:250:26:29

I think it's brilliant that you've restored these old vehicles,

0:26:290:26:32

because this is what the AA was all about, you know. It's nostalgia.

0:26:320:26:36

You know, kids can see what I appreciated when I was young.

0:26:360:26:40

Well, I thoroughly enjoyed my little trip to the headquarters of the AA.

0:26:520:26:56

It's all very nostalgic.

0:26:560:26:58

It's like taking a journey back into the bygone days of classic motoring.

0:26:580:27:02

Absolutely love it! Now I know most of us can't afford a vintage vehicle like these stunning examples,

0:27:020:27:08

but the AA and other motoring associations do have memorabilia we can invest in that is affordable -

0:27:080:27:14

things like caps, badges and handbooks, so keep your

0:27:140:27:17

eyes open because the rarer it is, the more valuable it's going to be.

0:27:170:27:21

Well, back at the Anvil now and people are still queuing outside, so we'd better get cracking.

0:27:280:27:33

Roger, welcome to Flog It!

0:27:340:27:36

-Thank you.

-You've brought along this rather smart refracting telescope, nice pocket telescope there with

0:27:360:27:43

three drawers, made from brass with this nice wooden section at the base and a good lens cap.

0:27:430:27:50

Now tell me, where did you get this from?

0:27:500:27:52

Well, I was given it when I was a young child, about 55 years ago,

0:27:520:27:57

I was given it as a Christmas present by a family friend.

0:27:570:28:01

-It's a rather generous Christmas present!

-Very generous, yes.

0:28:010:28:04

Very kind. Why is it that you're wanting to sell it?

0:28:040:28:07

Well, it's something that I used when I first had it

0:28:070:28:10

for a few years along with my father in competition,

0:28:100:28:13

he always wanted to borrow it.

0:28:130:28:14

-Oh, really!

-But over the years, things have progressed and I've

0:28:140:28:19

got binoculars now and that just sits in the cupboard.

0:28:190:28:22

I mean you say that you used it, but it is in lovely condition.

0:28:220:28:25

I mean sometimes you find that these are really badly rubbed and this is often dented, but this really

0:28:250:28:31

seems to be in rather nice condition, so although you used it, it seems that you actually cherished it.

0:28:310:28:36

Yes. I looked after it, yes.

0:28:360:28:38

Now quite often we find with refracting telescopes, particularly pocket

0:28:380:28:42

telescopes of this sort of period, late 19th century, we usually find a signature on this first drawer.

0:28:420:28:49

We'd be looking for a name such as Carey or Dolland.

0:28:490:28:53

Sadly, this one isn't signed which will make a difference to the price.

0:28:530:28:57

I was advised, when I was given it, that it was German from the First World War.

0:28:570:29:03

I would say that it's actually slightly earlier than that in date,

0:29:030:29:07

so I wouldn't say 1914, I'd say probably 1900s, perhaps

0:29:070:29:12

latest 1910, but certainly not German.

0:29:120:29:16

It's a very typical English telescope, so it would have been nice

0:29:160:29:19

to have the signature along the first drawer, which would have given us a higher estimate.

0:29:190:29:24

With that in mind, I'd probably put a conservative estimate of about

0:29:240:29:28

-£60 to £80 with a £50 reserve. How does that sound?

-Yeah, that's fine.

0:29:280:29:32

Are you happy to sell it at that?

0:29:320:29:33

-Yes.

-Well, let's hope we can flog it

0:29:330:29:35

-and thank you very much.

-Thanking you.

0:29:350:29:37

Lou, I have to say, Moorcroft is not something that is a rarity on the Flog It tables,

0:29:470:29:52

but I have to say, when I saw these two, we had to talk about them because they are fabulous examples.

0:29:520:29:58

They're Moorcroft really at its best.

0:29:580:30:01

This was a design known as the Orchid pattern that was originally designed by William Moorcroft himself in 1937

0:30:010:30:09

and it was a pattern that ran all the way through into the 1970s, so it was

0:30:090:30:14

one of the longest-running Moorcroft designs and really you can see why, because the colours work so well.

0:30:140:30:20

Moorcroft did some dodgy designs in the '60s and in the '50s where

0:30:200:30:24

they tried to mix orange with green and blue and really it didn't work, but this wonderful sort of moonlit

0:30:240:30:30

-blue background really does work, doesn't it?

-It's lovely.

0:30:300:30:34

Are these family things or have you discovered them somewhere exciting?

0:30:340:30:38

-They were given to me by my grandfather.

-Oh, were they?

0:30:380:30:41

And I used to try and draw the flowers and things, copy them, when I was little.

0:30:410:30:45

-Oh, really?

-Yeah, and he always said to me, "When you grow up, you can have them"

0:30:450:30:49

and he died and my grandmother, every time I went to visit, she used to say "take your vase and bowl"

0:30:490:30:53

but I would never bring it home because I used to travel on the train and I used to think

0:30:530:30:58

I'll get it broken or, you know, but my grandmother died this year so I had to bring them home.

0:30:580:31:03

-Oh, blimey!

-But unfortunately I've got two rather large dogs,

0:31:030:31:08

so I can't put them out on display, they're stuffed in the cupboard and I just think it's such a waste.

0:31:080:31:13

Somebody should have them out on display, because they're so lovely, really.

0:31:130:31:17

I think even small dogs do damage, don't they?

0:31:170:31:20

And they would get broken and it's a shame, really.

0:31:200:31:23

The good thing about these is also their condition, because if you hold this up high...

0:31:230:31:29

-Nice ting.

-Give it a ring, and Moorcroft is prone to internal

0:31:290:31:33

cracks, so even if you can't see it on the outside, you can

0:31:330:31:38

hear it when you give it a good ring and the interesting thing is also, you've got the "WM" mark there.

0:31:380:31:44

This is the sign that tells us that this is by Walter Moorcroft,

0:31:440:31:48

not William, so here we're looking at a piece probably in the 1950s/60s.

0:31:480:31:54

What do you think they're worth? You've seen them on Flog It before, I'm sure!

0:31:540:31:58

I have, but I've never seen any this size.

0:31:580:32:00

Well, that's why I picked them.

0:32:000:32:02

-I would not like to sell them for less than £350, I really wouldn't.

-£350?

-Yeah.

0:32:020:32:06

I think we've been training you quite well, because the estimate that I'm going to put on these, £350 to £450.

0:32:060:32:12

-£350 reserve. Are you free to come to the sale?

-Yes.

0:32:120:32:15

We're going to go to Winchester. Ever been there?

0:32:150:32:18

-Yes.

-Fantastic place.

0:32:180:32:20

Should do well, fingers crossed.

0:32:200:32:22

-Hopefully!

-Good result on the day.

-Thank you.

-See you then.

0:32:220:32:25

Enid and Laurence, you've brought this charming pocket watch - nice half-Hunter, there.

0:32:280:32:32

Where did you get this from?

0:32:320:32:35

It belongs to my mother's side of the family.

0:32:350:32:37

Quite a few of the members of her family used to be in service

0:32:370:32:41

and I think possibly it was given to someone as a gift

0:32:410:32:44

and passed down through the family.

0:32:440:32:47

Well, you'll probably know that it is a half-Hunter pocket watch.

0:32:470:32:50

It's called half-Hunter because of this little window here and we open

0:32:500:32:55

this by pressing the button here and we can see the enamel dial which is in rather good condition.

0:32:550:33:01

So often these get cracked or damaged but it does look to be in

0:33:010:33:04

rather good condition and then we've got the subsidiary dial here, which is telling us the seconds.

0:33:040:33:12

So if we open the back here, we can see the movement.

0:33:120:33:16

It would have been nice to find a signature on the movement, but there doesn't appear to be

0:33:160:33:20

any sign of one there, and also it is quite a simple movement, so I don't

0:33:200:33:25

think the watch will command a huge price at auction, but nevertheless, it is 18 carat gold.

0:33:250:33:31

Do you have any idea of the date of it?

0:33:310:33:33

I think it's been in my family well over fifty years, I would imagine.

0:33:330:33:37

So take a stab. What sort of date would you say?

0:33:370:33:41

1920, '30s, something like that, I don't know.

0:33:410:33:46

-A lot earlier than that, 1907.

-Oh, gosh! As early as that! Oh, right, goodness.

0:33:460:33:50

It's hallmarked for that so we can say precisely 1907.

0:33:500:33:53

-Oh, right.

-100 years old.

0:33:530:33:55

It's got a nice chunky chain here as well and this lovely little propelling pencil at the end.

0:33:550:34:00

Is this something that you're not interested in, Laurence?

0:34:000:34:03

No. It's a bit of a watch, but I'm afraid it's not my sort of thing.

0:34:030:34:09

I'd never wear it, to be honest, and it's in a drawer, gathering dust.

0:34:090:34:12

So you never really look at it, or?

0:34:120:34:14

-No, not very often.

-Have you ever worn it?

-No, never.

0:34:140:34:17

The problem is today, these items aren't so fashionable.

0:34:170:34:20

You don't see men walking around in their three piece suits, so it's not

0:34:200:34:24

the kind of thing that men would wear. Have you any idea of how much it would be worth at auction?

0:34:240:34:29

-Not really, so.

-No idea whatsoever, no. No idea at all.

0:34:290:34:32

Well, the chain in itself is worth about £100 to £150

0:34:320:34:38

and then the watch, about £200, so I would suggest for the whole thing, round an auction

0:34:380:34:45

estimate of £350 to £450, and I would suggest putting a reserve on of £300.

0:34:450:34:50

How does that sound to you?

0:34:500:34:51

Fine. Could we make the reserve £350 if possible?

0:34:510:34:54

Yep, that's no problem at all. We'll make a firm reserve then, cos it seems you are quite attached to it.

0:34:540:34:59

Well, we wouldn't like to give it away.

0:34:590:35:02

That's fair enough. I totally understand.

0:35:020:35:04

-We'll put a reserve of £350 and let's hope it does well at the auction. Thank you.

-That's lovely, thank you.

0:35:040:35:09

So before we head off to the sale room, here's a quick reminder of what we're taking with us.

0:35:090:35:14

Roger got this telescope for Christmas 55 years ago,

0:35:140:35:19

so let's hope the bidders focus on it today.

0:35:190:35:22

This is Moorcroft at its very best,

0:35:220:35:25

and far too good to be at the mercy of Lou's dogs.

0:35:250:35:28

And Enid and Laurence's elegant half-Hunter watch

0:35:280:35:31

is a hefty 18 carat gold, so I can see this doing really well.

0:35:310:35:36

Welcome back to this packed auction room.

0:35:380:35:41

Just before our next lots go under the hammer, I had a quick chat with

0:35:410:35:44

the auctioneer, Andrew Smith, and he gave me his thoughts on one of our little lots.

0:35:440:35:49

Enid and Laurence's half-Hunter, 18 carat pocket watch.

0:35:490:35:52

It's got lots of quality.

0:35:520:35:54

It's been in their family a long time, it's been passed down through the generations.

0:35:540:35:59

We've got £350 to £450 on this.

0:35:590:36:02

-There's a lot of gold there.

-There is an awful lot of gold.

0:36:020:36:07

We put rather more on because just in the fob chain itself,

0:36:070:36:13

there's £300 to £400 worth of scrap gold.

0:36:130:36:15

Yeah. We've seen that on Flog It a lot, actually.

0:36:150:36:18

You get a lot of broken watches, they're not working, the quality's

0:36:180:36:21

not that good and the watches themselves are worth sort of £80 to £120 but it's always the chain...

0:36:210:36:27

the fob chain's is always worth £200 to £300 and you can do a lot more with the chain, I guess, can't you?

0:36:270:36:32

Yeah. And here the Hunter is very nice in itself.

0:36:320:36:35

-Do you think we could get £600 for this, then?

-I very much hope so.

0:36:350:36:40

This is the sort of thing which, if we have enough interest in the room, it could go for quite a bit more.

0:36:400:36:44

Really? Fingers crossed, then.

0:36:440:36:47

-Fingers crossed, yes.

-Watch this space. Time is now up.

0:36:470:36:50

And James is still with us in spirit.

0:36:500:36:52

We'll be hearing his thoughts from his sale room in Derby and first up is the telescope.

0:36:520:36:59

Well, this next lot was a present to Roger at Christmas time,

0:36:590:37:04

55 years ago, a long time.

0:37:040:37:06

A long time to hang onto a little Christmas present.

0:37:060:37:08

-Obviously meant a lot to you?

-Yes.

0:37:080:37:10

-Little pocket telescope.

-I was a young man.

0:37:100:37:13

Did you sort of walk around the house using it, playing with it?

0:37:130:37:16

-Yes.

-Looking out the window?

-Yes.

0:37:160:37:18

And you got it out the box recently, brought it along to the valuation day, met up with Catherine.

0:37:180:37:23

What have we got on this, £40, £50, £60?

0:37:230:37:26

No. I think it should do £60 to £80, I would hope.

0:37:260:37:28

The condition is with it, isn't it?

0:37:280:37:30

Absolutely! It's in lovely condition.

0:37:300:37:32

Hopefully the bidders aren't sitting on their hands.

0:37:320:37:35

I think it's priced to go.

0:37:350:37:37

Let's hope so.

0:37:370:37:39

Here we go.

0:37:390:37:40

Lot 765 is a lacquered brass three drawer pocket telescope.

0:37:400:37:46

We have had interest in this, we have had a commission bid.

0:37:460:37:49

I shall start the bidding at £55...

0:37:490:37:52

-Good.

-£55. Is there £60 in the room?

0:37:520:37:55

At £55, then.

0:37:550:37:56

At 55, 60, and five, 70?

0:37:560:38:00

At £65, any more? At £65 are you done?

0:38:000:38:03

At £65 then for the last time.

0:38:030:38:07

Yes, the hammer has gone down.

0:38:070:38:09

£65. Good result.

0:38:090:38:11

-I'm pleased with that.

-Good estimate. Happy, Roger?

-Thank you very much.

0:38:110:38:15

Right, this next lot has got the lot.

0:38:200:38:23

Whenever we say invest in antiques, we want you to invest in something that's quality,

0:38:230:38:27

that's signed, so it's got a maker's label you can identify it,

0:38:270:38:30

and it's got provenance.

0:38:300:38:32

-This has got the lot. It's Moorcroft.

-Yes.

0:38:320:38:34

-There's plenty of people collecting it, Lou, and you're flogging it.

-I hope so.

0:38:340:38:38

Why are you flogging it?

0:38:380:38:40

-I've got nowhere to put it.

-Oh, really!

-I've got really big dogs.

-Right.

0:38:400:38:43

Well, I know James fell in love with the Moorcroft at the valuation day.

0:38:430:38:48

We've put £350 to £450 on with James and I think that's spot-on.

0:38:480:38:53

Moorcroft is an old auction room favourite and it always sells well,

0:38:530:38:56

so £350, £400, something around there, I should think.

0:38:560:39:00

Well, we have got a fixed reserve now... £400...

0:39:010:39:03

because Lou doesn't want to take home a penny less, do you?

0:39:030:39:07

No. I found out the pattern is an Iris pattern, and that was my grandmother's name.

0:39:070:39:12

-So it tugged at the heart strings.

-Oh, dear!

0:39:120:39:15

-Because they've been in the family a long time.

-Yes.

0:39:150:39:17

You see this is what I find with all our owners they're

0:39:170:39:20

selling off their family heirlooms that have been in the same family for three or four generations.

0:39:200:39:25

But nobody wants them.

0:39:250:39:27

-My daughter wouldn't want them.

-I know she doesn't want

0:39:270:39:30

them now because she's possibly what, how old is she?

0:39:300:39:32

-20.

-20, yeah, but when she's 40...

0:39:320:39:35

-I've got more at home.

-Oh, you have?

0:39:350:39:37

Oh, well that's all right...

0:39:370:39:39

Problem solved. Let's flog it, let's get on with it.

0:39:390:39:42

They're going under the hammer, two lovely bits of Moorcroft.

0:39:420:39:45

Lot 400 is the Moorcroft Pottery shallow bowl.

0:39:450:39:49

We have a commission bid, so I'll start the bidding at £300.

0:39:490:39:52

Is there 20 in the room?

0:39:520:39:54

-At £300, 320...

-We need £400...

0:39:540:39:56

At 320, at £320. Any more?

0:39:560:39:58

£350 right at the back, 370.

0:39:580:40:02

-At £350. Any more?

-Come on, we're so close.

0:40:020:40:04

At £350. Last time at £350.

0:40:040:40:09

-£50 short.

-I don't mind.

0:40:090:40:12

-You fixed that reserve at £400.

-I did for a reason, really.

0:40:120:40:16

James would have sneaked it in at £350.

0:40:160:40:19

James is thinking "I told you so", aren't you?

0:40:190:40:22

Moorcroft is always easy to sell,

0:40:220:40:24

but with an increased reserve from £350 to £400,

0:40:240:40:26

that is gonna put all the pressure on the auctioneer,

0:40:260:40:29

so they're not doing themselves any favours increasing that reserve.

0:40:290:40:32

-It was your decision!

-I'll put it back in the wardrobe!

0:40:320:40:35

Put it back in the wardrobe!

0:40:350:40:37

-No, I won't.

-Well, you've got to get it away from the dogs.

0:40:370:40:40

Now I know it's an Iris pattern, I would, yeah.

0:40:400:40:43

-Yes, OK, hang onto it.

-Yeah.

0:40:430:40:45

Well, this next item has been in the family a long time, like many of our owners' antiques.

0:40:500:40:56

It's been passed through for many generations, but sadly

0:40:560:40:58

time is up for the half-Hunter gold pocket watch. Laurence, Enid,

0:40:580:41:03

are you feeling a little sad, right now?

0:41:030:41:06

Well, I'm not, but my wife might be!

0:41:060:41:09

-Aaah, but the money will come in very useful?

-Yes, yes.

0:41:090:41:11

And let's hope we get Catherine's top end.

0:41:110:41:14

-I hope so.

-It's a gorgeous watch.

-It is a nice watch.

0:41:140:41:17

I had a chat to the auctioneer just before the sale started.

0:41:170:41:20

He agrees with your estimate but it could do possibly £100 more.

0:41:200:41:24

-Ooh, let's hope so. That would be nice.

-It's working, it's 18 carat gold.

0:41:240:41:28

It's good quality, it should do well.

0:41:280:41:30

Precious metal is doing really well, right now, isn't it?

0:41:300:41:33

-It's the time to sell.

-Yes.

0:41:330:41:34

Lot 140 is the gentleman's gold half-Hunter pocket watch.

0:41:340:41:40

We have a commission bid and a telephone...

0:41:400:41:43

-Telephone...

-Lots of interest.

0:41:430:41:45

I'm going to start the bidding at £400. Is there 20 in the room?

0:41:450:41:49

At £400 and selling. 420, 450, 470, 500, 520, 550, 570...

0:41:490:41:56

-This is fantastic!

-600, 620.

0:41:560:42:00

At £600. 620? 650, 670,

0:42:000:42:07

690, 700.

0:42:070:42:10

Commission bid is out.

0:42:100:42:12

700 to the telephone. Is there 20?

0:42:120:42:14

-At £700 and selling...

-They love it!

0:42:140:42:18

At £700 and we are selling at £700, if you're all done.

0:42:180:42:22

-Yes!

-That's brilliant, thank you!

0:42:220:42:24

-Well done!

-That's fantastic!

0:42:240:42:26

-Thank you.

-Right, OK.

-Thank you.

0:42:260:42:29

-Big question.

-Thank you.

0:42:290:42:31

What are you gonna spend the money on?

0:42:310:42:33

-It's our 30th wedding anniversary next year.

-Congratulations!

0:42:330:42:36

And we thought we'd put that towards a break.

0:42:360:42:39

-Yeah, a holiday.

-Aaah!

-A special holiday.

0:42:390:42:41

-I think you should have a party now!

-Possibly, yes, as well.

0:42:410:42:44

-Oh, how lovely! How lovely!

-Oh, that's brilliant!

0:42:440:42:47

Well, the auction's still going on, but we're coming to the end of our day now.

0:42:520:42:55

It's been a brilliant day.

0:42:550:42:57

All our owners have gone home happy.

0:42:570:42:59

It's been a bit of a mixed bag, but I think the things that didn't sell

0:42:590:43:03

weren't meant to sell, so they're meant to be kept and cherished for a little while longer.

0:43:030:43:08

All credit to our experts, I think they've done us proud.

0:43:080:43:11

I hope you've enjoyed the show, so for now, it's cheerio from Winchester, until the next time.

0:43:110:43:16

For more information about Flog It, including how the programme was made, visit the website at bbc.co.uk

0:43:160:43:22

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:350:43:39

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:390:43:43

Flog It! comes from Basingstoke. Paul Martin is joined by antique experts Catherine Southon and James Lewis in the search for small objects of desire.

James is delighted to find a beautiful art nouveau bowl, while Catherine is bowled over by an 18-carat gold pocket watch. Paul jumps in his car and takes a nostalgic journey back to the early days of motoring.