Loughborough Flog It!


Loughborough

A piece of sheet music signed by Glenn Miller is one of the treasures that turn up at Loughborough Town Hall, and a Clarice Cliff tea service wows the sale room.


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Transcript


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Today I'm in a town that's played a surprising part in the history of travel.

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Welcome to "Flog It!" from the market town of Loughborough.

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In July 1841, the holiday operator Thomas Cook ran his first tour

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but it wasn't to Spain - it was to the market town of Loughborough.

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Cook was a Baptist and a follower of the Temperance movement,

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which meant he was a teetotaller,

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and the idea for his company came about when he set up a trip, by train,

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for 500 other Temperance supporters to travel from Leicester to Loughborough.

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And this wasn't the only transport claim to fame in the area.

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Later, I'll be navigating one of the longest flights of locks

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in the English canal system.

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The design here at Foxton was so clever considering this was the age of horse and cart.

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There were no mechanical diggers.

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So you can imagine the blood, sweat and tears

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that went in to building this flight of locks.

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But first let's get over to today's venue...Loughborough's Town Hall.

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Getting to meet all the locals today are our two travelling experts -

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Mr Adam Partridge and Elizabeth Talbot.

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I tell you what, there's so many people - you've got your work cut out.

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-We certainly have.

-We'll cope.

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I don't know what's in those boxes, but are we gonna find out!

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It's time to get the doors open and get this queue inside. Are you ready everyone?

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ALL: Yes!

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And I think Adam's already found something he'd like to take home as a souvenir.

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-Welcome to "Flog It!" I'm Adam.

-Hello.

-You are?

-Susan.

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Susan, very interesting item you've brought, a wonderful piece of music - The Moonlight Serenade.

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-Absolutely.

-Are you going to sing it for me?

-No way.

-Go on...

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-It's a lovely song, isn't it?

-Yeah, beautiful song.

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-Glenn Miller, the very famous Glenn Miller.

-Yup.

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And what we've got on here, "To Ron from... "

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-Glenn Miller.

-Glenn Miller. How did you come to own this?

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My father was a musician, he played with lots of big bands,

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and he saw Glenn Miller playing in Hyde Park

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-and one of his friends got that for him...

-Really?

-And he gave it to me.

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So, Susan, I presume this holds a few memories for you, does it?

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Yeah. Mainly because my father was in a band

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and he played a lot of that music.

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-It does hold memories.

-Happy memories?

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-Very happy memories.

-That's good.

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Was your father a saxophonist?

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-He was. Played the saxophone and clarinet.

-Did he?

-Yeah, and flute.

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I presume... Why are you selling it? Because you don't need it?

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Well, it just sits there on the shelf,

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so if somebody else could appreciate it, that would be nice.

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-I think there will be some interest in this.

-Cos it's very special.

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-Well, valuation isn't great, it's 20 to 40 in my opinion.

-That's OK.

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-There's always the chance it'll make more.

-Yeah.

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-Do you want to put a reserve to protect it?

-Yes, please.

-£20?

-Yeah.

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So if it doesn't make £20, it can go back.

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-And if the bidders are... In The Mood...

-Oh, very good. Yeah.

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..then hopefully it'll make more.

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It'll be A String Of Pearls.

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-Thanks for coming to "Flog It!"

-You're welcome.

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Right, Peter, you've brought a lovely, lovely watch here.

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I'd like to know some of the history about it, what can you tell me?

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Well, it was my father's.

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I've had it the last ten years

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and it's been in a drawer, never comes out.

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-Right.

-My father wore a watch every day

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because he wore a three-piece suit, which is unusual for a lot of people.

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-Uh-huh.

-He used to like nice things,

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and I've looked up a little bit on the internet

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but I can't find a lot out,

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but I know it's supposed to be a bit of a quality watch so, you know...

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-Come to find out more about it?

-Yeah...

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I thought I'd see if I found out some more.

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Well, the first thing I noticed,

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which is obvious when it's closed, is how very slender the watch is.

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I think it's a sign of quality that this little watch has got all the ingenuity of the movement,

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and it's all refined into such a flat case.

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The quality of the engraving

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and the decoration on the case

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is such that it belies the fact it was used so often and was in service for so many years.

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It looks as though it's been treasured and put away for all its life.

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It was used regularly, yes.

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Well, that's a great compliment to your father, how he looked after it.

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If we open the case here to reveal the movement,

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it's a Swiss watch made by Audemars brothers, Audemars Freres.

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The case is actually Continental gold, it's 14 karat,

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it's spelt with a 'k' so we know it's Continental,

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so obviously that ties in with its Genevan origins,

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and it's a very smart thing. So you don't wear it then?

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-No, I don't wear a waistcoat myself.

-Oh, do you not?

-No, no.

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Not everybody does, but it's just a good honest piece,

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and you're quite right, the quality of it as a watch

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will set it apart from many others from the late 19th, early 20th century.

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So having said all that, Peter,

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have you got a figure in mind for what it might be worth?

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-I've got no idea what it's worth...

-No?

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OK. Well, I think, given the positive elements we've discussed,

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there's a realistic chance it should make, in the region of,

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about £200, £250, maybe £300, but £200 to £300.

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But I'd advise a reserve on it of £150,

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-if you're comfortable with that.

-That's fine, thank you.

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In which case, it's time to see what it makes in the auction.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you for coming.

-Thank you very much.

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-Are you a photographer, Diana?

-Not at all.

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I know nothing about cameras

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and even less about the old cameras like the Leica.

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Fantastic camera, what can I say?

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Leica sort of pioneered the 35mm lens. So whose is it?

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-It was my husband's.

-You were obviously this side of the camera - you're the model, basically.

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Well, no, he didn't actually photograph me, it was other things of interest.

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-He travelled quite a lot.

-And used this widely?

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Yes, he used it quite a lot when he had the time

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-because it isn't something you would take an instant picture.

-No.

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He bought it in 1988 and it cost about £225 from a dealer,

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I think, in Cambridge.

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-This camera dates back to 1925, basically.

-Really?

-Yes.

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-Yes.

-And he paid about the right amount of money for it.

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-You can use it today, that's the great thing about it.

-Yes.

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-I think you'll easily get your money back if we put this into auction.

-Good.

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My only concern is we're selling something with moving parts,

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and a lot of people tend to shy away

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from buying something like this in auction.

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-I'd like to put an auction price guide of £250 to £350.

-OK, yep.

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-With a reserve at £225.

-That's fine, yes.

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-Which is...

-What I paid for it, yes.

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Let's face it, the auctioneer's gonna give this full exposure.

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-Yes.

-It's gonna be in the catalogue, it's gonna be on the internet.

-Yep.

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Dealers and collectors will find this.

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People all over the world will want a camera like this.

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Because you can use it and it's still quality.

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-That's right. Well, thank you, that would be wonderful.

-Happy?

-Yes.

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Josie, thank you for bringing this wonderful book in.

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Now I know what's inside, but you tell me the story about it first.

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My mother had a second-hand furniture shop for many years

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and she would clear out houses.

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-Right.

-And then my father would toddle down to the shop

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and see what was interesting in the cupboards and the drawers,

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and take them home and squirrel them away into his cupboard.

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-Oh, OK.

-And when we cleared the house out a few years ago,

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-I found that in my father's cupboard.

-It's a book of maps,

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and when we open up these wonderful marbled boards to reveal what's inside,

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we find that it's a book of maps here - 33 of them in total.

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They were originally engraved on copper plates

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and they are designed for use in schools

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and this is rather nice,

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"And of gentlemen who make the ancient writers their delight or study,"

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which is just wonderful.

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And at the bottom we have the date here, which is 1796,

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and then we turn over to see some of the wonderful maps,

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which have been protected by these covers inside,

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and this one we'll recognise as the British Isles.

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And this book of maps really, to a certain extent,

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is almost covering the majority of Europe as it was seen then.

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What's special about this

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is the fact that you have the 33 original maps still in situ.

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Particularly during the late Victorian and early 20th century,

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map books were taken apart

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and the maps were then framed

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as individual hanging pictures to put on walls.

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It's lovely that they've survived as purely as this.

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-Now you've obviously enjoyed ownership of it.

-Yes.

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But you're now looking at selling?

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We've moved to a small bungalow

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and we just haven't got the room. So I'll be sad to see it go, but...

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-if it could go to somebody who will appreciate it...

-Yes.

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I think because of the subject matter, it will definitely be a collector of maps.

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In terms of value,

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I think that it will have a ready market at round about £150 to £250 at auction.

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So it should have a reserve to protect it at the lower end, £150 if you're comfortable.

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-Right.

-So we have a firm reserve, the auctioneer will work to that and we'll see how we do.

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-Lovely.

-Thank you very much.

-I will look forward to it.

-Thank you.

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You've just seen the gems our experts have chosen. Are their valuations right?

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We're gonna find out because it's time to up the tempo. We're making our way

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to the auction room and we're going to leave you with a little reminder of what we're taking.

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'Susan's signed Glenn Miller music brings back lots of happy family memories

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'and Adam thinks it might serenade the saleroom.'

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If the bidders are...In The Mood...

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-Oh, very good.

-..then hopefully it'll make more.

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Yes, it'll be A String Of Pearls.

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'Peter didn't inherit his dad's taste for three-piece suits,

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'so it's time to let go of the pocket watch.

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'I thought Diana's camera was in great condition, and I feel sure

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'she'll make her money back with an estimate of £250 to £350.'

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-Let's face it, the auctioneer's gonna give this full exposure.

-Yeah, yep.

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'And Josie is sad to sell her dad's book of maps,

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'but Elizabeth thinks it's a fantastic item for the collectors.'

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This is where we put our valuations to the test,

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courtesy of Gilding's Auction Rooms in Market Harborough.

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It's packed and hopefully this lot are gonna bid on our items.

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Are you gonna put your hands up?

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Whatever you do, don't go away because I think there's going to be one or two surprises today.

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-'And wielding the gavel here in Market Harborough is auctioneer Mark Gilding.'

-32.

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I love this next item, it's quality, it's a gorgeous Swiss pocket watch.

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It belongs to Peter and at £200 to £300, I think we're gonna sell this, Elizabeth.

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-I agree with the valuation.

-Thank you. I would hope so, it's in superb condition.

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I can't believe your father wore it virtually every day.

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-Yes.

-And you've got lots of memories of seeing photographs of him...

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-Oh, yes.

-Did you never fancy a waistcoat?

-No, no.

-It is quality.

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-It is.

-It's working. It's beautiful.

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Let's see what the bidders think. Here we go.

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285 is a slim pocket watch.

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It certainly is, and with engine-turned case

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marked 14K, 14 carat, the bids start here at 120, I am bid.

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120... are you all out at 120, at 130 now...at 140, £140 bid...

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-140.

-He's struggling.

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-Yes.

-150 bid... at 150 in the room, at 150...

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I'm selling at 150.

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-It's gone.

-It's OK.

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What will you put the money towards?

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-It's going towards a holiday.

-Oh, where?

-Lanzarote.

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Oh, well done. Get some sun.

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-Yes.

-Not too far to go.

-Oh, no, no.

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Now it's my turn to be the expert, and in the frame

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we've got Diana here, who's looking radiant, and I love the colours.

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-Thank you, Paul.

-And it's that wonderful Leica camera.

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Precision personified, that is, in the original case.

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We need two collectors here that really understand the lenses.

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-Yes, exactly. Well, let's hope they're here.

-I do as well.

-Yes.

-Let's find out.

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Here we go.

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100, a Leica DRP camera with the original leather case.

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Lot number 100, bidding starts at 180...

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£200, £220 I am bid...

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220 bid here, all out at 220...

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I'll take 40 if you like, 240 on the telephone...

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240, 240 on the telephone. All out on the room...

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at 240 and selling now at £240.

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Yes, the hammer's gone down at £240.

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-Great.

-We just did it.

-I'm happy with that.

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-Fixed reserve at 225 so...phew!

-Yes, I'm relieved.

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It was bought by phone. If there was somebody else to push him, he may have gone the extra two or three.

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But we're never going to know that. That's the beauty of auction.

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I've just been joined by Josie with our expert here, Elizabeth.

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We've got something for the purist - an 18th-century book of maps.

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Absolutely fabulous, and the condition is perfect as well.

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Let's hope we get the top end of Elizabeth's valuation, we're looking for around £150 to £200.

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It's a stunning book and if you're interested in cartography, this is the one.

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A dealer might just split this up and sell them separately, we don't know.

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But we are on the right road here.

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-Well, I hope so.

-We're gonna find out. Good luck, Josie. This is it.

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210, Geographica Antiqua, being a complete set of maps

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printed in 1796, and bidding starting here at £120, 130...

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140, 150... 160, 170...

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180, 190 - the commissions are out.

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It's in the room at £200, 200...

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210, take 20 if you like, internet's out, 210...

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straight ahead at 210 and selling at 210...

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Brilliant! I hope the money comes in useful.

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I can have my TV up in my office now.

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Is that what you want, a TV in the office?

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-I like it, I like it.

-To watch "Flog It!".

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Now we've got an original valuation - a signed autograph from Glenn Miller, £20 to £40 from Adam.

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Had a chat to the auctioneer before the sale and he said they've revised the valuation.

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He's now put £100 to £150 on this.

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-Thinks it's very collectable.

-Right.

-Let's hope we hit the right notes.

-Hope it doesn't scare them off.

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-Oh, well done!

-And ends in a big crescendo.

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A musical score, Moonlight Serenade, pencil inscribed

0:15:460:15:52

"To Ron from Glenn Miller", £75 I am bid.

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75...85,

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-95... £100.

-He's done it.

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110 on the internet...

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-at 110, room's out now... internet's in at 110...

-115.

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115. 115, new bid in.

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115... I'll wait for you, internet, at 20 if you like, 115...

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in the room then, please be quick at 115...and selling...

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£115, the hammer's gone down.

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-Great!

-That was good.

-That's wonderful.

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That was really, really good.

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-Brilliant!

-'What a great result for Susan.

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'And there's more to come later when a "Flog It!" favourite gets rough treatment from its owner.'

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Were they bought like that? How did this damage occur?

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Someone opened the cabinet door and the whole tea set fell out.

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-You're covering for somebody.

-I am, but she'll kill me.

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'I've left the busy valuation day behind and taken to the towpath.

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'These days, we think of canals as a place for fun and relaxation, but at the end of the 18th century

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'these were the motorways of the Industrial Revolution,

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'vital for moving goods and raw materials in bulk across the country.

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'And situated just outside of Market Harborough,

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'this stretch of the canal network has a particularly interesting history.'

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I've come to Foxton Locks, one of the longest flights of locks in the English canal system

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to find out how engineers in past times ingeniously solved the age-old problem

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of moving water uphill.

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And how did they solve it? Well, by this -

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a staircase of locks, ten of them, a flight of them going up the side of the hill.

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Now the front gate of each lock created the back gate of the next one and so forth.

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And assisted by these ponds and reservoirs, that helped

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regulate the water flow as the narrow boats were passing through.

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Here at Foxton - that was a brilliant design, considering this was the age of horse and cart

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and pulley and tackle, no mechanical diggers.

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So you can imagine the blood, sweat and tears that went in to building this flight of locks.

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'Navigating the locks can be a challenge, even for the most experienced.

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'Bill Smith works on site here. This morning he's kindly offered to be my guide.'

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-Hi, Bill.

-Hiya.

-Pleased to meet you. What a lovely day.

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-Yes, it's fantastic.

-How long have you been lock-keeper here?

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-I've been here four years now.

-Gosh, what a lovely job, eh?

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Des res here, look, and what a view from the office!

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-Yeah, fantastic both ways, isn't it?

-When was this established?

0:18:320:18:36

The locks opened in 1814, the lock-keeper would have lived here

0:18:360:18:39

in the house and he wouldn't have got his two days off a week,

0:18:390:18:43

-he'd have just been here and that would have been his job working.

-24/7?

-Yeah.

0:18:430:18:47

I mean, it was the height of the Industrial Revolution and trade was flowing backwards and forwards.

0:18:470:18:52

-So what's the main difference today?

-The emphasis is more on leisure

0:18:520:18:55

and we're getting many people come here, some of the people we know.

0:18:550:18:59

One of the differences is that the working boaters would have been regular.

0:18:590:19:03

It would have been the same group of people

0:19:030:19:06

so the old-time lock-keepers would have probably known their customers

0:19:060:19:10

far better than we ever get the chance to, given the turnover we get now with the holiday boaters.

0:19:100:19:15

-And you end up giving the novices lots of tips and helping them out?

-Yes.

0:19:150:19:19

-Beginners perhaps need a lot more instruction and a lot more time.

-A little bit of guidance.

0:19:190:19:24

-Bill, I think we should take to the water now and you can show me the ropes along the way.

-Great.

0:19:240:19:29

Paul, this is Terry and he'll help us take the boats through the locks.

0:19:370:19:41

-Hello, Paul.

-Pleased to meet you, Terry. Can I come aboard?

-Yes.

-Thanks.

0:19:410:19:45

Ever since the locks were completed, a huge variety of cargo, from coal and iron

0:19:490:19:55

to everyday items such as beer, flour, milk, and cabbages, have been transported through here.

0:19:550:20:01

At the canal's height, 50 or 60 working boats a day moved through the locks,

0:20:010:20:06

passing between the busy industrial Midlands, London and the South.

0:20:060:20:11

We're in position now, we're at the top of the lock staircase.

0:20:140:20:18

-You'll need one of these, which is a windlass.

-Shall I go this side?

0:20:180:20:22

Yeah, we both step off this side and take a walk on down there.

0:20:220:20:25

Right. OK, this is the first lock then for us, what do you want me to do?

0:20:270:20:33

These things here in front of us are called paddles,

0:20:330:20:35

and there are two paddles to operate at each lock. It's straightforward -

0:20:350:20:39

we wind the red one up and then we go back to the other side of the beam and wind the white one up.

0:20:390:20:44

So with the windlass, you start to wind it up.

0:20:440:20:48

Push the windlass onto the spindle, nice tight fit, and then turn it clockwise.

0:20:480:20:53

-OK.

-This one in particular you'll certainly need both hands to be able to wind it up.

0:20:530:20:58

When we wind this one up, it opens up a channel that connects

0:20:580:21:03

-the pond to our right to the lock below us.

-Yep.

0:21:030:21:05

We lift that up and the water starts coming to fill the lock ahead of us.

0:21:050:21:09

So this is a reservoir and they're dotted all the way down from each lock.

0:21:090:21:13

-Each lock has its own side pond.

-Ingenious, isn't it, really?

0:21:130:21:16

-We'll keep turning this till it won't go any further.

-That happens pretty fast, doesn't it?

0:21:160:21:21

-Yeah.

-You can hear the water gushing in. It's filling up.

0:21:210:21:24

What a lovely sound as well.

0:21:240:21:28

OK, Paul. Now it's time to do this one

0:21:310:21:34

and we're gonna do exactly the same. Do you want to turn that clockwise?

0:21:340:21:37

You probably need both hands.

0:21:370:21:39

Actually, it's a lot easier than it looks, it really is.

0:21:390:21:43

The one I did wasn't.

0:21:430:21:44

You're doing the easy one, I think.

0:21:440:21:47

-There you go.

-If you look behind you...

-Look at that!

0:21:470:21:49

And obviously that's now letting the water out and the boat is dropping quite rapidly down. Look at this.

0:21:490:21:56

That is so quick.

0:21:560:21:58

You can see the narrow boat is now almost level with my feet in about...eight seconds.

0:22:000:22:06

-Unlike lots of locks where the water travels through the gates, the water travels via the side ponds.

-Exactly.

0:22:070:22:14

It means we're going to take this boat all the way down the locks on one lock full of water.

0:22:140:22:19

Look at that, what a smooth operation.

0:22:300:22:32

It looks so easy in the sunshine but obviously in the middle of winter with the rain pouring down...

0:22:320:22:38

-It is a bit bleak up here then, yeah.

-In past times, this narrow boat full of coal or something

0:22:380:22:43

and horses everywhere, it would have been hard work. Hard work.

0:22:430:22:48

-What's next?

-Well, that was easy, Paul.

0:22:550:22:57

We've got another nine to go now, so on we go.

0:22:570:23:01

Should we get winding?

0:23:010:23:03

The journey through the locks takes a minimum of 45 minutes,

0:23:030:23:07

but when the canal gets busy, people can wait up to five hours.

0:23:070:23:11

In the late 1800s when working boats plied the canals, bottlenecks were affecting business

0:23:110:23:16

and competition from road and rail meant a more efficient way

0:23:160:23:20

to move boats up and down the hill had to be found.

0:23:200:23:23

So while Terry and Bill carry on down through the locks,

0:23:230:23:27

I'm off to see what an engineer called Gordon Cale Thomas came up with.

0:23:270:23:31

And this is it.

0:23:310:23:33

It's the site where the Foxton Inclined Plane once stood.

0:23:330:23:37

It was a brilliant piece of Victorian technology.

0:23:370:23:40

It was opened in 1900 and it was designed to take bigger boats more quickly and effectively up the hill.

0:23:400:23:47

Built by a workforce of 300 men, the lift had two tanks which carried boats suspended in water.

0:23:490:23:56

Each tank could carry two narrow boats or, for the first time, one widebeam barge.

0:23:560:24:02

The whole system was powered by an engine house at the top of the hill.

0:24:020:24:07

It's marvellous. You can just imagine what this would have looked like back then.

0:24:070:24:11

The inclined plane journey time was just 12 minutes - it was a vast improvement on the flight of locks.

0:24:110:24:18

And of course it was a lot greener as well because in the lock system,

0:24:180:24:23

when you let a narrow boat pass through, all the water was flowing downhill.

0:24:230:24:27

This way, you use the same amount of water in a large tank going up the hill

0:24:270:24:32

as you did coming down the hill, so it saved a lot of this vital resource.

0:24:320:24:37

Sadly, the lift wasn't operating for long.

0:24:390:24:42

After just ten years, it was closed

0:24:420:24:44

and in 1928, it was demolished and sold for scrap.

0:24:440:24:48

A team of fundraisers here at Foxton is now at work to restore it.

0:24:480:24:53

Well, until it's back in operation, and let's hope that's soon,

0:24:530:24:57

the only way to travel through this stretch of canal is via the historic lock system.

0:24:570:25:02

And I've had a great time this morning travelling through it with Bill and Terry.

0:25:020:25:07

Our journey's almost come to an end, we've got one more lock to go through.

0:25:070:25:11

Terry, thanks very much!

0:25:190:25:21

-Bill, it's been a pleasure.

-Cheers, Paul.

0:25:210:25:23

Thank you. I'm gonna jump off now before I end up in Leicester.

0:25:230:25:26

Welcome back to the valuation day. The queue is still going down the road.

0:25:360:25:40

The house is still full. Plenty more antiques to see.

0:25:400:25:43

So let's now catch up with our experts.

0:25:430:25:46

And it looks like Adam is about to launch into some more boating history.

0:25:480:25:52

Well, Tony, I can feel an interesting story ahead.

0:25:530:25:57

What can you tell me about these objects?

0:25:570:26:00

Well, this was a silver salver

0:26:000:26:02

presented to Mrs Blott, the owner of the Essex Maid, built at Colchester.

0:26:020:26:10

Obviously John Blott Esq of Essex was quite an important chap, what do you know about him?

0:26:100:26:17

-Well, he was my wife's aunt's husband.

-Wife's...aunt's... OK.

0:26:170:26:23

He was a businessman and he loved ships and boats

0:26:230:26:27

and he had boats all his life, really.

0:26:270:26:30

So here's an album of the construction of the Essex Maid.

0:26:300:26:34

From the stocks right till she was launched, which was just prior to the war starting.

0:26:340:26:41

How nice to have it documented like this all the way through, every week, isn't it?

0:26:410:26:45

-They took a photo every week.

-The ship was acquisitioned by the Government for work with the Navy.

0:26:450:26:53

It served as a minesweeper throughout the war.

0:26:530:26:58

-Throughout the war?

-Yes.

-Well, this is interesting.

0:26:580:27:01

Yes. The ship went on then to serve through the war.

0:27:010:27:05

-So it never got damaged?

-It came through unscathed.

-Really?

-Yeah, not a scratch,

0:27:050:27:09

apart from the Navy giving it a bit of a beating up.

0:27:090:27:13

-Wear and tear.

-And when it came back, it wasn't to the standard that it had left, obviously,

0:27:130:27:19

and he decided that he would take the money from the Government.

0:27:190:27:24

The Government then, apparently, sold this on to an Arab sheikh

0:27:240:27:28

-who had it converted to a real luxury...

-Luxury cruiser.

0:27:280:27:34

..which he sailed for a few months, apparently,

0:27:340:27:39

and then he ran it aground on a large rock

0:27:390:27:42

in the Red Sea and the Essex Maid folded away.

0:27:420:27:47

-So it survived World War II as a minesweeper.

-The whole of World War II,

0:27:470:27:51

and then finished up at the bottom of the Red Sea.

0:27:510:27:54

Well, what an interesting life!

0:27:540:27:56

So why have you decided to sell it then, Tony?

0:27:560:27:59

Well, I'm getting older and it's not something that you put on display a lot,

0:27:590:28:03

in case the burglars look through the window, and we wouldn't use this.

0:28:030:28:08

But there must be people out there with interest of this sort of thing.

0:28:080:28:13

-That's right, oh, definitely. Maritime is a strong field for collectors.

-Yep.

0:28:130:28:17

And this is a nice object in its own right, this silver salver

0:28:170:28:22

with the engraving of the Essex Maid,

0:28:220:28:23

that's got to be worth £200 on its own.

0:28:230:28:26

Often when things are engraved, they detract from the value,

0:28:260:28:30

but this adds to it, bearing in mind the album as well.

0:28:300:28:33

With that, together with the interest there,

0:28:330:28:37

it must be worth £250-300, at least.

0:28:370:28:40

So hopefully we'll do that and more.

0:28:400:28:42

If it makes £300, would you put that towards anything particular or not?

0:28:420:28:47

A nice golfing weekend would be very handy, but I don't know whether the wife would agree with that.

0:28:470:28:52

Well, we're going to put it in the auction. I hope it sails away.

0:28:520:28:57

"Sails away"!

0:28:570:28:58

I know, sorry. I've got to stop doing that, it's an illness.

0:28:580:29:01

And we'll see you at the SAIL.

0:29:010:29:03

-I've done it again.

-Done it again.

0:29:030:29:06

Yvonne, I'm so pleased you've come today

0:29:150:29:17

with this wonderful little group of items.

0:29:170:29:20

Tell me what you know about them.

0:29:200:29:22

Most of them belonged to my relatives.

0:29:220:29:25

My aunt is the receiver of most of these

0:29:250:29:28

and they've been handed down to me over the years.

0:29:280:29:32

The scent bottles I've had since I was a child.

0:29:320:29:34

-Right.

-My aunt...

0:29:340:29:36

was a lady who went to Paris to the fashion shows,

0:29:360:29:42

draw sketches of the clothes, and she would come home

0:29:420:29:47

and redesign the things for the normal market.

0:29:470:29:50

Oh, really? So she translated what she'd seen on the catwalk...

0:29:500:29:55

-Yes, into saleable items for the clothing industry of England.

-How fascinating!

-Yes.

0:29:550:30:00

-So she was a very elegant, well dressed lady with the accoutrements to go with it.

-Exactly.

0:30:000:30:05

And you obviously like them and treasure them.

0:30:050:30:08

I like them, but they've been in the cupboard for far too long.

0:30:080:30:13

So you're looking to sell, hopefully.

0:30:130:30:15

-Yes.

-And the money's being reinvested?

0:30:150:30:18

The money will be split four ways - a bit to each of my sons and a quarter to Cancer Research.

0:30:180:30:26

Cancer Research.

0:30:260:30:27

-Which I'm very into at the moment.

-Close to your heart.

0:30:270:30:30

-Close to my heart.

-OK, very good.

0:30:300:30:32

We'll see what we can do and I'll explain these.

0:30:320:30:34

What you have here, fundamentally,

0:30:340:30:37

is a little collection of silver items or silver-enhanced items

0:30:370:30:41

and I've put them on the table like this simply because, being purely sexist,

0:30:410:30:46

this one will appeal to the boys

0:30:460:30:48

and this one should appeal to the girls. Something for everyone.

0:30:480:30:53

Well, yes. That's a good idea, yes. I like that.

0:30:530:30:57

So what we have here, we have three little vesta cases,

0:30:570:31:01

would have been for carrying matches,

0:31:010:31:03

and I'd have thought a little group like that at auction

0:31:030:31:07

would average out at round about £20 each, give or take.

0:31:070:31:11

-Yes, that is fine.

-Now, moving on to the scent bottles. Interestingly,

0:31:110:31:16

they both retain their little scent stoppers inside made of glass.

0:31:160:31:21

So often, over the 100 or so years since these were first made,

0:31:210:31:24

they'd have been lost, so it's a treat

0:31:240:31:26

-to find TWO that have got their stoppers in.

-How sweet.

0:31:260:31:29

They were both assayed in Birmingham and we have 1897 and 1900 in date.

0:31:290:31:37

I've put them with this piece at the front - a powder compact,

0:31:370:31:42

which is actually Continental silver, it's stamped 925 and I think it's possibly French.

0:31:420:31:47

The little group together, I think, in the current market, should fetch

0:31:470:31:51

in the region of about 70 to 100.

0:31:510:31:54

Again, they may make a little more, but I think we need to be realistic.

0:31:540:31:58

-Be sensible, yes.

-I would suggest a reserve of £70 for those.

0:31:580:32:03

So a fitting tribute to your aunt and your previous family.

0:32:030:32:07

Thank you very much.

0:32:070:32:09

-Ivan, welcome to "Flog It!".

-Thank you very much.

0:32:150:32:18

-You are Ivan, aren't you?

-I am.

0:32:180:32:19

-Ivan...

-The Terrible.

-Ah yeah! I enjoyed meeting you earlier

0:32:190:32:24

when you showed me this Clarice Cliff tea service,

0:32:240:32:27

because you haven't got high expectations.

0:32:270:32:30

-No, not really, because there's slight damage.

-Yes.

0:32:300:32:35

-That piece is damaged.

-Yes, there's a crack there.

0:32:350:32:37

Yeah. That's damaged.

0:32:370:32:39

-There's a chip there.

-And the plate has got a...

0:32:390:32:41

There's a crack there as well.

0:32:410:32:43

Now, were they bought like that? How did this damage occur?

0:32:430:32:47

No, actually they were kept in a cabinet

0:32:470:32:50

and someone opened the cabinet door.

0:32:500:32:52

-Someone?

-And the whole set fell out.

0:32:520:32:54

-The whole of it?

-Yeah.

-Really?

0:32:540:32:56

-All of it, yeah.

-Someone with an aversion to Clarice Cliff?

0:32:560:32:59

-It must have been.

-And who was that someone?

0:32:590:33:02

Me.

0:33:020:33:04

-That's not true, is it?

-No.

-You're covering for someone.

0:33:040:33:07

I am, yes, but she'll kill me.

0:33:070:33:09

OK. So how did you come to own it in the first place?

0:33:090:33:13

Well, actually I'm an obsessive Art Deco collector.

0:33:130:33:17

So you know what you're doing.

0:33:170:33:18

Pretty well, yeah, on the china side. But I collect other Art Deco -

0:33:180:33:23

-anything I can find.

-Have you got other Clarice?

-No, this is it now.

0:33:230:33:28

It's a good set despite the damage because of course we've got a good shape, triangular handles.

0:33:280:33:33

-Is that the Bon Jour shape, this?

-Yes.

0:33:330:33:36

The pattern's Rodanthe, mid-1930s.

0:33:360:33:38

Very good example of Clarice Cliff and the Art Deco period with that shape.

0:33:380:33:43

-Now in good condition, it's £1,000 worth.

-Yeah.

0:33:430:33:47

Maybe a bit more.

0:33:470:33:49

Because you've got a bit of damage, I would be tempted to put £500 to £700 with a reserve of £500.

0:33:490:33:55

Yeah, I'll go with that.

0:33:550:33:57

And then it gives you every chance of making hopefully £700 or £800,

0:33:570:34:02

-which is somewhere probably more along the lines of what you want to get.

-Yeah.

0:34:020:34:06

I once met one of the paintresses of Clarice Cliff called Rene Dale and she was a great character.

0:34:060:34:11

She told me lots and lots about Clarice Cliff.

0:34:110:34:14

And she also told me one of my favourite stories -

0:34:140:34:17

-she went to see Clarice Cliff for a pay rise, otherwise she was going to work for Susie Cooper.

-Right.

0:34:170:34:22

So Clarice Cliff said to her, "No pay rise, Rene, back to work."

0:34:220:34:27

So at lunchtime, Rene went off to see Susie Cooper at the Crown Works in Burslem just down the road,

0:34:270:34:34

knocked on the door, and Susie Cooper was on the phone.

0:34:340:34:37

She put the phone down, she said, "You must be Rene.

0:34:370:34:40

"That was Clarice on the phone - get back to work!" So there was no headhunting in those days.

0:34:400:34:45

-So you said you need the money.

-Yeah.

-What for?

0:34:450:34:50

-I need a boat.

-It may be a Dinky Toy speedboat that you end up with.

-Or a canoe.

0:34:500:34:55

Yeah. But it's a good set, it's a great pattern, strong design

0:34:550:35:00

-and, hopefully, we'll make the £700 or £800.

-Fingers crossed.

0:35:000:35:03

Fingers crossed. Thanks for bringing it along today.

0:35:030:35:06

-No problem at all.

-See you at the auction.

-Thank you very much.

0:35:060:35:10

'So we have another batch of great items going off to the saleroom.

0:35:100:35:13

'Let's take another look.

0:35:130:35:15

'The boat The Essex Maid may be at the bottom of the sea,

0:35:150:35:18

'but the photo album and silver salver are still alive and well.'

0:35:180:35:22

We're gonna put it in the auction, I hope it sails away.

0:35:220:35:26

-"Sails away"!

-I know, sorry,

0:35:260:35:27

and we'll see you at the SAIL. Oh, I've done it again.

0:35:270:35:31

'Elizabeth divided Yvonne's items into lots for the boys and lots for the girls,

0:35:310:35:35

'so there should be something for everyone in the auction.

0:35:350:35:39

'And Ivan had his eye on a speedboat until Adam valued the Clarice Cliff tea set at £500 to £700.'

0:35:390:35:46

-It may be a Dinky Toy speedboat.

-Or a canoe.

-Yeah.

0:35:460:35:51

'Over at the auction room, Mark Gilding has taken more Essex-made items on board.'

0:35:520:35:59

-Now this is an interesting lot which has grown.

-Yes.

0:36:010:36:04

So you've got to do some explaining here.

0:36:040:36:06

We've got the silver salver and the photo album, which was left to Tony, and it is all about the Essex Maid,

0:36:060:36:12

which was originally owned by Mr and Mrs Blott.

0:36:120:36:16

We've got a valuation just on these two items

0:36:160:36:19

-of £250 to £300.

-OK.

-But since the valuation day, you've some news.

0:36:190:36:24

Yes, I have. The vendor has decided to include some extra items with a similar provenance.

0:36:240:36:30

We've got a silver inscribed cigarette box. It's fully hallmarked and in very good condition.

0:36:300:36:36

We've also got a Lloyds Register of Yachts, 1938.

0:36:360:36:39

And then another album here,

0:36:390:36:41

with more photographs and history of the travels to Gibraltar.

0:36:410:36:45

-We've also increased the estimate.

-To what?

-We hope it's now going to make £400 to £500.

0:36:450:36:51

Oh, it's got to do that, surely?

0:36:510:36:53

Yes, we've got some interest from the family.

0:36:530:36:56

It's their social history.

0:36:560:36:57

Yes, it is. It would be very good to see them being able to retain it.

0:36:570:37:02

So how's it going to do with its new valuation of £400 to £500?

0:37:020:37:05

Well, Tony's joined us and he's also been doing his homework.

0:37:050:37:10

-I did get in touch with a member of the Blott family.

-Oh, did you?

0:37:100:37:14

-And there's interest from South Africa.

-Which is really good news.

-Excellent.

0:37:140:37:19

Anyway, let's find out because it's going under the hammer right now.

0:37:190:37:23

Lot number 50 now,

0:37:230:37:25

hallmarked silver salver,

0:37:250:37:27

all relating to the Essex Maid, this lot,

0:37:270:37:30

and we've got a cigarette box

0:37:300:37:32

and albums of photographs.

0:37:320:37:34

Lot number 50 and lots of interest.

0:37:340:37:37

Bids start here £300...

0:37:370:37:40

At 300 bid here, at 300, 300 with me...320, 340 now, at 340...

0:37:400:37:44

Here at 340?

0:37:440:37:45

340 bid.

0:37:450:37:48

I'll take 60 if you like.

0:37:480:37:49

-360.

-360 bid then on the telephone, and I'm out at 360.

0:37:490:37:53

Telephone's in at 360...

0:37:530:37:55

They will sell. 360...

0:37:550:37:56

-All out in the room.

-He's taking discretion.

0:37:560:37:59

Telephone's in at 360 and away.

0:37:590:38:01

-Well, we got it away at the lower end.

-Yep.

0:38:010:38:04

-And hopefully it's gone back to the family members.

-That's right.

0:38:040:38:07

So there is commission to pay, what are you going to put the money towards?

0:38:070:38:11

It's going in the holiday pot.

0:38:110:38:13

We normally go to Arizona to my wife's brother and we called it off this year,

0:38:130:38:18

but we might go later on in the year now. We'll put that in the holiday fund.

0:38:180:38:23

Excellent. Have a good time.

0:38:230:38:25

And later we found out the Essex Maid items were bought by a member of the Blott family.

0:38:250:38:30

It's so nice to know they're all going home.

0:38:300:38:33

Yvonne, your vesta cases, there's three of them, they're just about to go under the hammer.

0:38:350:38:40

We've got a valuation put on by Elizabeth £50 to £70,

0:38:400:38:43

quite a bit of silver there, I think we should get these away.

0:38:430:38:47

What have you got? What are you holding?

0:38:470:38:49

Well, this is the five sisters. The eldest sister brought up my mother,

0:38:490:38:54

and she's responsible for some of the items that you've got today.

0:38:540:38:58

Oh, right. She's a beautiful girl, isn't she?

0:38:580:39:01

-Oh, they were.

-Why are you selling these? There's a lot of history and sentiment, I can see it.

0:39:010:39:06

-Sadly, I have three sons...

-Ah.

0:39:060:39:08

-..who are...you know? Come on.

-Boys don't like that kind of thing.

-As sons are, yes.

0:39:080:39:13

Well, that's what we're here for, to put them into auction.

0:39:130:39:16

Let's find out what they make, it's now down to the bidders. Good luck, both of you.

0:39:160:39:20

230, silver vesta case and two others, starts the bidding at £40...

0:39:200:39:26

£50, £60?

0:39:260:39:28

-That's their scrap rate.

-Yes.

0:39:280:39:31

New bidding at 65 in the room, 65... 70, do I see, 65...

0:39:310:39:35

seated then at 65 and selling.

0:39:350:39:37

Brilliant, £65 and now our second lot -

0:39:370:39:40

two scent bottles and a powder compact,

0:39:400:39:42

-and we're looking for £70 to £100.

-Yes, this is the feminine lot, Paul.

0:39:420:39:47

-There is a lot of lot here.

-There is, yes. I'm hoping for a good price here.

0:39:470:39:51

-Hopefully well over the top end. Good luck.

-Fingers crossed.

-Here we go.

0:39:510:39:56

235, it's a Continental silver enamelled powder compact marked 925

0:39:560:40:01

and two glass scent bottles with hallmarked silver mounts,

0:40:010:40:05

masses of interest. 50...

0:40:050:40:06

60, 70...80, I am bid at £80...

0:40:060:40:11

80 all out, 90...100, 110...

0:40:110:40:13

115 on commission,

0:40:130:40:16

120... 125 at the back.

0:40:160:40:19

-Great.

-125, she's out there...125.

0:40:190:40:21

-You're joking!

-Selling at 125...

0:40:210:40:24

Yes, £125! That's not bad, is it?

0:40:240:40:30

That's absolutely fantastic.

0:40:300:40:31

Bizarrely enough, our next item rarely lets us down on "Flog It! " -

0:40:410:40:45

can you guess what it might be?

0:40:450:40:46

Yes, it's some Clarice Cliff.

0:40:460:40:48

It belongs to Ivan here, valued by Adam Partridge.

0:40:480:40:51

It's a tea set with six cups and only five saucers but we have got £500 to £700 on this.

0:40:510:40:56

So who broke the missing saucer?

0:40:560:40:58

My wife actually broke it. She opened the cabinet and it fell out.

0:40:580:41:02

I remember you telling me on the valuation day how clumsy and heavy handed she was, Ivan.

0:41:020:41:08

Oh, he's trying to name and shame.

0:41:080:41:10

I told you I broke it on the valuation day and you wheedled the truth out of me.

0:41:100:41:15

Is that why you've decided to sell?

0:41:150:41:17

-Well, yes.

-It's a little bit too delicate.

0:41:170:41:19

Yeah, we've had it 30, 40 years, something like that, you know.

0:41:190:41:24

So we've had our pleasure out of it.

0:41:240:41:26

We're gonna find out what the bidders think cos it's down to them.

0:41:260:41:29

Here we go, you guys, this is it.

0:41:290:41:31

Lot number 30, Clarice Cliff part tea set,

0:41:310:41:35

lots of bids here, starting at £550.

0:41:350:41:38

-Oooh!

-Get in there.

0:41:380:41:39

560...and I'm out at 560, all the commissions are out now at 560,

0:41:390:41:45

580 new bid in on the telephone...

0:41:450:41:47

600 bid, at 600...

0:41:470:41:49

I'll take 620 down here, 640, 660...

0:41:490:41:53

680...£700, 700...

0:41:530:41:57

720, 740 on the telephone...

0:41:570:42:02

-760...

-Blimey, we've done it!

0:42:020:42:04

-We have.

-760 telephone's out...

0:42:040:42:07

internet's out, 760 and away...

0:42:070:42:10

-Brilliant, £760. Perfect valuation.

-Good result.

0:42:100:42:15

You've got to be happy and the wife's going to be.

0:42:150:42:17

She'd better be or she's gone.

0:42:170:42:19

-You don't mean that, do you?

-I've got the money.

-She's gonna be watching this.

0:42:190:42:23

-No, it's for the holiday.

-Where are you going?

0:42:230:42:26

We're going down to Mexico first and then we fly up to Vegas, we've got 28 days.

0:42:260:42:31

So you're not going to buy the speedboat?

0:42:310:42:33

No!

0:42:330:42:36

Well, that's it. It's all over for our owners. As you can see, the auction's still in full swing.

0:42:460:42:51

But what a day we've had! Everyone's gone home happy

0:42:510:42:55

because we've sold everything. All credit to our experts. And I hope you've enjoyed today's show.

0:42:550:43:00

So from Market Harborough until the next time, it's cheerio.

0:43:000:43:03

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:230:43:26

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:260:43:29

A piece of sheet music signed by Glenn Miller is one of the treasures that turn up at Loughborough Town Hall. There is also a big Clarice Cliff tea service which, despite falling out of a cupboard, wows the sale room.

Presenter Paul Martin navigates his way up the famous Foxton Locks near Market Harborough and follows the route taken by 19th-century canal boats carrying goods north and south of the country.


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