Isle of Wight Flog It!


Isle of Wight

Flog It! is at the Cowes yacht club on the Isle of Wight, where presenter Paul Martin and experts Will Axon and Kate Bateman fish for some maritime treasures.


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Transcript


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This has got to be the perfect way to travel to a valuation day, on the famous Gypsy Moth IV.

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I'm going to tell you a bit more about this historic vessel later,

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but right now it's off to the marina, just over there.

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Welcome to Flog It! from the Isle of Wight!

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The waters around the Isle of Wight are a haven for water sports enthusiasts and beginners alike.

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Windsurfing, kayaking and kite surfing are just

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some of the popular sports that people flock to this island for.

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Then, of course, there's sailing.

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The regatta that takes place every year in Cowes now claims

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to be the biggest international yachting event in the world.

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And diving into the crowd today at our nautical location, the Cowes Yacht Haven, are our two experts,

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Kate Bateman and Will Axon, hoping to navigate their way to all

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the quality items and avoiding all the tat!

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Who do these belong to and why have you brought them along to us today?

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They belong to my partner, Clive.

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He's at work so he's asked us to come along.

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This is Eileen, Clive's mother.

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OK. So you brought the mother-in-law!

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-I did.

-You're both most welcome, and you've brought with you today some Matchbox Series toys.

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-These are things that your partner had as a child?

-Yes.

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They're in very good condition.

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He's had them boxed up, has he, in the loft?

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-They've been boxed up in my loft.

-Has he got his own loft to fill up?

-Yes.

-Be you let him fill yours up!

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I've still got all the rest of his toys boxed up in my loft.

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Let's go back to what you've brought in today.

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These are Lesney Matchbox Series.

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When you first think of, say, toys and die-cast cars particularly, you think of Dinky, don't you?

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That's the main manufacturer and they're the most collected.

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But Lesney was a firm that was set up in the late '40s, really in competition with Dinky.

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They really hit

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the sort of peak when they produced in 1952

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a scale model of the Coronation coach.

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It was such a success that it prompted them to bring out this series, the Matchbox Series.

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The whole idea was you've got miniature scale models and they were presented in these cardboard boxes.

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Have you any idea of value? Has your partner had them valued in the past?

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-No.

-You don't remember what you paid for them originally?

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No. Shillings and pence.

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Well, for this little group here...

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What have we got? We have the fire station in its box, which is nice.

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And the fire station itself looks to be in very good condition.

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You've got four various fire vehicles at the front, together with their four boxes,

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which again are in reasonable condition, fair condition.

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If I said to you I suspect they're going to

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be worth in the region of £60-£100 at auction, would that surprise you?

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Is that something you thought they might be worth?

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-Didn't think about it at all to be honest.

-Really?

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You just want them out of the loft, don't you?

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OK. Shall we reserve them at £50 just to protect them?

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-That would be good, yes.

-Let's reserve them at £50.

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Mike, it's good to see you. You look like a seafaring chap.

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Well, I was.

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-Living on land now?

-Living on land now.

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What have we got here?

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An aneroid barometer

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and a ship's clock.

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They were given

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to my godfather, who was Captain Angus George Brown.

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Right, OK.

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You have here his master's ticket, which is the equivalent of a...

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Driving licence. Yes.

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That's a copy of it.

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It's fairly unique because on the

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extreme left-hand side it also states that Captain Brown

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is entitled to act as the skipper of a square-rigged sailing vessel.

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Not only of a motor vessel but of a sailing vessel.

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-That's right.

-He was a good seaman.

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Fantastic.

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Excellent. This is dated 1913.

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That's when he got his ticket.

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Is it plausible that these two bulkhead instruments have come from...?

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Came from a yacht that he served on as a captain.

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-Which yacht, do you think?

-I suspect it was the Jeannette, owned by Sir Harry Livesey.

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What a lovely piece of history.

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Also, what quality instruments!

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Absolute quality. Let's look at the eight-day clock.

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Made by Negretti and Zambra of London.

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They started making these instruments around the 1850s.

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They were known back then in their catalogues as, "philosophical instruments".

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Obviously for the academic!

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They're beautiful instrument makers.

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Rich man's instruments.

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Very expensive in their day.

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-Renowned worldwide.

-Absolutely.

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How much have you spent on this? You had it restored.

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-97 quid.

-It means a lot to you.

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-Have you been using this as a clock in the house?

-Yes.

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It was on the boat and when I went ashore it's been my main timepiece.

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Aww, how lovely.

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Also, a matching size, a ship's barometer, bulkhead barometer.

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It's really nice to have the pair together.

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Are you sure you want to part with these?

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Yes, I do. I'm 80 now.

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Time is getting slightly shorter.

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I'd hate these just to go anywhere.

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I hope they stay on the island actually.

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-I hope they will.

-Value.

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Can we put them into auction as a pair with the ticket, copy of the ticket, with a value of £200-£300?

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-Yep.

-Fixed reserve at 200.

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-Fixed reserve.

-Yes? I know you've spent a bit recently.

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Spent exactly half that.

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So £200-£300, fixed reserve at £200.

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Whoever buys them will get a bit of provenance because we know what vessel they came off.

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And both instruments are still working perfectly.

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All credit to such a good maker.

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So, David and Judith, you've brought me a sweet little piece of Clarice Cliff.

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What's its history?

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Well, it was my mother and father's.

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They kept it under the stairs.

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What?!

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I was working away at the time and one day Judith called in on them when they were preparing to move.

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She just had it in her hand and she said, "D'you want this?

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"Otherwise it's going in the bin."

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I thought, "I'm sure that's Clarice Cliff."

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Looked at the bottom and it said it was?

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Yes, so we've had it for 25 years.

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-Do you use it?

-I don't like it.

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It must run in the family!

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Well, I quite like it.

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There are plenty of collectors that do.

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Let's just take the lid off.

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It's a sugar bowl, with sugar nips for your sugar lumps.

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It's quite strange to have metal on top of the ceramic.

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You'd think it would damage it but it doesn't seem to have made a lot of difference.

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There are a few chips on the rim, but that's more to do with the thickness of the paint.

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It tended to always be very thick and chip anyway.

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So we see this on pieces that haven't got metal on.

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It's quite a sweet little thing.

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Obviously on the bottom you've got the Clarice Cliff marks.

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"Bizarre Fantasque", which is the series for Newport Pottery.

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The design is hand-painted.

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It's the oranges and lemons pattern.

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For an estimate, I'd probably say somewhere between £80 and £120.

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Is that the sort of figure you'd be happy to get?

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I wouldn't like to see it go for less than 100.

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You could reserve at 100 and put an estimate at £100-£150, if you like.

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That means obviously if it doesn't reach £100, it's not sold.

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-You'd be happy with that?

-Yes.

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-We'll put it into the sale. Ever been to an auction before?

-No.

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First-timers - brilliant!

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It'll be exciting anyway, whether it goes or not.

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I think it should go, so I'll see you there.

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Looking forward to it. Thank you.

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Well, Miriam, thank you for coming along today to Flog It! here on the Isle of Wight.

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Tell me, are these both yours? Have you been engaged twice, perhaps?

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No. This one is my mother's engagement ring

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and she unfortunately died many years ago.

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This is my engagement ring.

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But unfortunately my fingers have got somewhat fat

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and I don't carry it. The idea is that my two nieces will inherit the rings,

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but really and truly, they're not that interested.

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They've got their own rings. Now, if we can do it this way,

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I can just split the whole thing and they get whatever there is each.

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Well, that's quite a sensible way to do it, isn't it?

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Because, I suppose value-wise they're going to be in a similar ballpark figure as rings.

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I'll just get my loop out of my pocket here so I can have a closer look.

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-Let's take this one. This is the one that belonged to your mother.

-Yes.

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So, if we have a look at this. This is a nice sort of flower-set

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diamond ring, of course, as you probably know.

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These look like nice clean stones in this flowerhead setting.

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And the ring itself is gold.

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So if I have a look here for the hallmark,

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it should tell me that it's 18 carat gold.

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And your mother's engagement date was...?

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1929.

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Got the receipt to prove it.

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Of course, you've brought along the original receipt for that ring.

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This is from a jewellers in London and we can see 10 and five paid in 1929.

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I was really pleased to find that, actually.

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Was it something you just came across?

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It was amongst all their papers when we cleared them out after they died.

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And then we move on to yours.

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-And you were engaged in...?

-1959.

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This is now a solitaire diamond, this one here, in a claw setting

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with these sort of pierced shoulders there. And it's platinum.

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It's on a platinum ring.

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Quite different, though they are both diamond rings.

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Have you got an idea of what you think they might be worth?

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Well, for insurance purposes, they were valued at £500 each.

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But I'm quite sure that they're probably nearer £150-200.

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-Something like that.

-I think you're spot on.

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I mean, I could have handed it over to you from the start.

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I think around £150 each is about right.

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-You want them to sell, don't you?

-Yes.

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So if you put them at £200-300 for the two, I think they're

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bound to find buyers and hopefully £300 plus would be the plan.

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Sort of money you would be happy to sell them at, do you think?

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-Yes, I think so.

-See you on the day and fingers crossed, Miriam.

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For today's sale, we've headed south on a very breezy day to Island Auctioneers in Shanklin.

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And with our auctioneer, Warren Riches already on the rostrum,

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it's time to see what will happen to the sugar bowl that nobody loved.

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Judith and David are our next two owners and possibly

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not for long because going under the hammer right now,

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it's that all-time Flog It! favourite, Clarice Cliff.

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I think it's here to sell, do you know that? £100-150 now.

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Are you a Clarice Cliff fan?

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Would you have it at home?

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I'm not. I love it to go into a sale-room, but it's just not for me.

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-I don't like that kind of thing myself.

-Nor me.

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-But you like Troika.

-Yeah.

-Oh, I like Troika.

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Chacun a son gout.

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Each to his own.

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It would be boring if we all collected the same stuff.

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But there's lots of collectors who like it.

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Millions of people love Clarice Cliff, and hopefully we've got

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half a dozen here because it's about to go under the hammer.

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Clarice Cliff bizarre patterned sugar bowl with plated lid.

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Showing at the back there.

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Good condition. Someone start me at 75. 75 with Tim. 80, can I say?

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80. And five. 90. And five. And 100.

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And five.

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It's 100. 100 at the back.

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All done at 100?

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A bid of £100 at the back of the room. All done and selling.

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Just got it away.

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Clarice didn't let us down once again. We're all happy with that.

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It's found a new owner. Someone's going to love it.

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What are you going to do with £100?

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Enjoy!

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55 and 60 and five.

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And 70.

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Going under the hammer right now, two engagement rings.

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They belonged to Miriam. One was yours and one was Mother's.

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That's correct, yes. Mum's ring, I used to try it on as a child.

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Did you? Dressing up?

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And I always swore it was going to be mine.

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And then she had the effrontery to have it enlarged, so it didn't fit me anymore, as a child.

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Hey, that's clever. We've got £200-300 on the rings.

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That's right. There's two rings.

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One's platinum, the other 18 carat solitaire diamond, decent sized stone.

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-Sounds good value.

-Exactly.

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Solitaire diamond ring, over a quarter of a carat, together with

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-a nine stone cluster ring in an 18 carat setting.

-Here we go, Miriam.

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130. 130.

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140 anywhere?

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130, 140, 150.

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160. 160. 170. 170, 180.

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-Yes!

-190.

-There's someone in the room, Miriam.

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180. 190 anywhere? 180 then.

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All done at 180. Selling at 180...

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190 behind.

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195? 190 then with the gentleman.

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At 190, all done and selling at 190?

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Yes, well, they've gone. We just got them away.

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-Well done, Will. Within estimate.

-Yeah, just.

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That's all right. I'm quite happy with that.

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Right, it's my turn to be the expert now and next up is the nautical clock and barometer.

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Michael, thank you for bringing it along. £200-300.

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Fingers crossed we're going to get the top end of that because they are quality.

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So hopefully they won't leave the island and they'll be re-used again.

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-Even better.

-Here we go. Look.

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It's going under the hammer now.

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Negretti and Zambra eight day ship's clock

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with separate second hand, together with a matching

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compensated barometer.

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And it's also with a certificate of competency.

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Nice lot. Someone start me at...?

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-110.

-110 here. 120 anywhere? 120.

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130. 140. 150. 160.

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-170. 180.

-More!

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190. And 200.

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210.

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It's 200 on the stairs.

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210 anywhere? Selling at 200, on the stairs.

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That's £200, less commission of course, but what will you

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put the money towards?

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-Grandchildren I suppose.

-Lovely. How many have you got?

-Five.

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-Wow!

-How many have you got?

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-None!

-Time yet.

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Next up, we've got the Matchbox fire station and trucks. We've got that in the sale.

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We've also got Eileen here, but unfortunately Fiona's missing.

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-Where is she?

-She's working today.

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-She couldn't get the day off.

-No.

-At least you can make it.

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We've got Will, our expert. We're looking at £60-100.

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That's right. You brought them in on the valuation day.

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They belong to your son, I believe, didn't they?

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Fairly good condition, so let's give them a go.

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Matchbox series fire station, together with

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the fire chief's car, his truck, another truck

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and the chief's new model.

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-Someone start me at £50.

-30.

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30 here. And five. 40. And five. 50. And five. 60. And five. 70.

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70 behind.

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70 in your new place. And five.

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80. And five. 90. And five.

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100. 110. 120. 130.

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-140. 150.

-Hey, this is good!

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Selling at 150.

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-£150.

-Fantastic!

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That's good news, isn't it?

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And you're definitely going to keep that then!

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Well, listen, that was a really good price.

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They've done really well here. They've got a few other toys in which is good.

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Always brings the buyers in, but that's a great price.

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-Really well done.

-I never expected that. That's terrific.

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-Makes the rest left in your loft worth a bit more now, doesn't it?

-Thank you very much.

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Well, how about that? So far so good.

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That concludes our first visit to the auction room.

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Before I head back to the valuation day to find some more antiques to put under the hammer,

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I'm going to need one of these because I'm going to take a trip on a very special boat.

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On 28 May 1967 Sir Francis Chichester, aged 65,

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cruised into the history books, when he sailed into Plymouth Docks on Gipsy Moth IV.

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He had just become the first person to sail solo around the world with only one port of call.

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As well as breaking many records, this achievement turned him into a national hero.

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Sir Francis Chichester had a history of daring solo adventures.

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As a young man, he crossed continents by plane as a pioneering aviator.

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His interests moved from the sky to the sea and soon he was claiming many solo sailing records.

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But it wasn't until he neared retirement that he set off

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to circumnavigate the world solo in this very special boat.

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The Gipsy Moth IV now resides in the Cowes Marina and that's where I caught up with Richard,

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an experienced sailing instructor, who had sailed the Gipsy Moth many times.

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Hi, Richard. Pleased to meet you.

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-Can I come on board?

-Yeah, come on.

0:18:530:18:54

Before we could set sail, Richard was keen to fill me in on the amazing life of this unique vessel

0:18:540:19:01

and how she could have ended up as scrap.

0:19:010:19:03

So, what was the story? How did she arrive here?

0:19:030:19:07

Well, when Sir Francis Chichester finished his round the world trip,

0:19:070:19:10

he donated the boat to the country, to the nation.

0:19:100:19:13

And she was then based in London, next to the Cutty Sark.

0:19:130:19:15

I saw her with my dad at Greenwich.

0:19:150:19:17

And she just fell into disrepair a bit and the trust that owned it

0:19:170:19:23

were looking for somebody to take the boat on, so we bought the boat from them for £1 and a gin and tonic.

0:19:230:19:31

-She must have been bad.

-She was.

0:19:320:19:35

There was a hell of lot of rot.

0:19:350:19:37

You could pretty much stand here and see the ground underneath, right the way down through the boat.

0:19:370:19:42

Because she'd been sat there for a long time.

0:19:420:19:44

We spent about 300,000 on her to get her restored over six months.

0:19:440:19:48

Sir Francis had Gipsy Moth IV designed

0:19:480:19:52

specifically for the challenge, and she was built in Gosport.

0:19:520:19:55

She's an iconic yacht, using pioneering construction techniques available in the 1960s, combining

0:19:550:20:01

traditional materials of wood with the newest materials of the time, aluminium and plastic.

0:20:010:20:06

After four years of preparations, Gipsy Moth IV was ready to set sail.

0:20:060:20:12

Shall we take this opportunity to look at his living quarters?

0:20:120:20:16

Yeah, absolutely.

0:20:160:20:17

The boat today still has many of the original features

0:20:170:20:21

that allowed this large vessel to be sailed single-handedly.

0:20:210:20:24

So he'd have read all his charts here?

0:20:240:20:27

Yeah. This is the chart table area, so what we have here

0:20:270:20:31

is a lot of the original instruments that he had on-board.

0:20:310:20:35

This is his radio that he used to communicate with the rest of world.

0:20:350:20:38

So he would report in with that.

0:20:380:20:41

But there's a bit of a cheat in that we have a lot of modern equipment hidden away in here.

0:20:410:20:46

Now you've got GPS!

0:20:460:20:48

So we've got the GPS and all the mod cons. So, yeah,

0:20:480:20:53

this is a VHF radio which does a similar thing to what this does.

0:20:530:20:59

Well, it is a decent sized galley. I mean, you could see yourself cooking here.

0:20:590:21:02

-I like the fact everything is on a gimble.

-It has to be at sea.

0:21:020:21:07

This is a good size.

0:21:070:21:08

There's quite a lot of room in here. For one person.

0:21:080:21:12

There's a lot of original features here.

0:21:120:21:15

This is the original Primus stove that runs off paraffin.

0:21:150:21:18

The galley layout is exactly the same.

0:21:200:21:23

These are all the original taps.

0:21:230:21:24

There's an interesting bit about this whole area here.

0:21:240:21:28

That wasn't there when we took the boat over.

0:21:280:21:30

What he actually had was a chair that he sat in and it gimbled like this,

0:21:300:21:34

so he could sit there with a little table and he had a barrel of beer underneath the floor.

0:21:340:21:39

-He made it home, didn't he?

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:21:390:21:42

Well, she's not just a floating museum. You use her.

0:21:420:21:45

-What for?

-Absolutely. We use her all time.

0:21:450:21:47

She's based here at the UKSA and what we do is we do personal development through maritime training.

0:21:470:21:55

-It's an academy for sailing.

-We do a lot of youth work.

0:21:550:22:00

The main use for the Gipsy Moth was to go and take her around the world

0:22:000:22:03

with some of these younger people to experience the Sir Francis Chichester experience, which is now completed.

0:22:030:22:10

She's now based back in Cowes and we take her out chartering.

0:22:100:22:15

And we also use her with kids.

0:22:150:22:19

That's so exciting.

0:22:190:22:20

-You must feel really proud of this vessel?

-Absolutely.

0:22:200:22:22

I know we can't put her on to sail today as it's a bit blowy, but can we at least have a potter?

0:22:220:22:27

Absolutely. I think what we'll do is just go out into the river

0:22:270:22:31

-and have a little cruise around and show you what she can do.

-OK.

0:22:310:22:34

We're under way.

0:22:400:22:41

-Do you want to have a steer?

-Yeah.

0:22:410:22:44

When Chichester neared retirement, he was diagnosed with cancer,

0:22:450:22:48

but that blow didn't dampen his adventurous spirit.

0:22:480:22:52

He began to plan a voyage of a lifetime.

0:22:520:22:55

To circumnavigate the world, single-handed.

0:22:550:22:58

Sir Francis Chichester set off from Plymouth on 27 August 1966.

0:22:580:23:05

Many thought he would fail.

0:23:050:23:07

In the 1960s, when it was almost unthinkable for anyone to sail solo around the world, Chichester

0:23:070:23:12

established the record for the fastest voyage around the world by any small vessel with just one stop.

0:23:120:23:20

After 226 days at sea, Gipsy Moth IV, with a defiant Chichester at the helm, sailed into Plymouth.

0:23:200:23:27

He'd done it!

0:23:270:23:29

Upon his return, Sir Francis Chichester was a national hero.

0:23:290:23:33

Newspaper reports from the day quote crowds of 250,000 turning up to welcome him home.

0:23:330:23:41

Sir Francis Chichester's epic voyage on Gipsy Moth IV

0:23:410:23:44

was a milestone in the history of world sailing

0:23:440:23:47

and definitely deserves a special place in all our hearts.

0:23:470:23:51

It's so fitting that Chichester's boat here still continues

0:23:510:23:55

to give future generations the experience on the sea, training sailors to follow where he led.

0:23:550:24:02

There's still plenty of action back on dry land at the Cowes Yacht Haven,

0:24:060:24:11

where Kate's getting carried away with the fairies.

0:24:110:24:14

Sue, tell me what you've brought in.

0:24:150:24:18

This is a piece of Wedgwood Fairyland Lustre.

0:24:180:24:21

-I bought it 10 years ago in a charity shop for 39p.

-39p!

0:24:210:24:27

That was a good buy!

0:24:270:24:29

-What possessed you?

-It was just so pretty and I'd never seen anything like it before.

0:24:290:24:34

It was just so unusual.

0:24:340:24:35

Yeah, it's fantastic. I mean it's the word of the moment.

0:24:350:24:39

Fairyland Lustre, Wedgwood is the main proponent of that,

0:24:390:24:42

and it's transfer-printed, hand-painted and decorated in gold and it's really sweet.

0:24:420:24:47

I mean, you've got all these pixies and elves and gnomes and goodness knows what all over it.

0:24:470:24:53

And on the bottom you've got the name and the patent number.

0:24:530:24:57

So, Wedgwood. It's actually designed by Daisy Makeig-Jones,

0:24:570:25:03

who did this particular pattern and she's one of the more collectable people.

0:25:030:25:07

So, you liked it. Bought it in a charity shop. Do your family like it?

0:25:070:25:14

Well, my daughter will be very upset

0:25:140:25:16

because she always thought I was going to leave it to her.

0:25:160:25:22

But I think it's too nice just to sit in a box.

0:25:220:25:25

-Is that what you do with it? You don't display it? What a shame.

-In a cupboard.

0:25:250:25:29

-So you're happy to sell it. Any idea of value?

-Absolutely not.

0:25:290:25:33

It's not a piece of rubbish, but I don't know what it's worth.

0:25:330:25:38

I've had a look at it and a couple of the other valuers

0:25:380:25:41

have had a look at it and we can't decide on a price either.

0:25:410:25:44

Because nothing really similar has sold.

0:25:440:25:47

I'm going to go with my really conservative estimate, which I think is between £100-150.

0:25:470:25:53

A reserve of perhaps £90, a bit of discretion for the auctioneer, so make it a discretionary reserve.

0:25:530:26:00

I'm hope I'm wrong and the other valuers are right, cos they value it a bit higher than I do.

0:26:000:26:05

But we'll let the auction decide. Are you happy to let it go?

0:26:050:26:09

-Not happy but...

-We'll wait and see. All right, fingers crossed.

0:26:090:26:14

Joan, what a wonderful selection you've brought in today to show us,

0:26:220:26:26

and I'm not going to pretend that I recognise these people that you've brought along,

0:26:260:26:31

but I do recognise one, and that's this chap here at the front. Now, that Norman Wisdom, isn't it?

0:26:310:26:36

-That's right.

-Who's this beautiful companion of his?

-That's me.

0:26:360:26:40

No! Really? That was you and Norman?

0:26:400:26:43

Yeah, in the '50s.

0:26:430:26:45

-You were obviously quite close there.

-We were at a party.

0:26:450:26:48

At a party, excellent, and what was your job working in the shows?

0:26:480:26:52

I was in the wardrobe, and I was a dresser.

0:26:520:26:55

Right, so you had access to all the sort of backstage

0:26:550:27:00

and all the sort of changing of costumes, which can be quite hectic.

0:27:000:27:04

-It is very hectic, yeah.

-Looking down here, you've got others of Norman here, and they're signed also.

0:27:040:27:10

Those at the front are from the ice show.

0:27:100:27:13

Oh, yes, look, they've got skates on as well,

0:27:130:27:15

and it's a camel on ice, and there's Norman at the front, look.

0:27:150:27:20

This one here as well, we move on to...

0:27:200:27:23

Well, after I went to the ice show, I got a job at the London Palladium,

0:27:230:27:27

and Norman Wisdom got me a job there, and did the variety shows, which was Johnnie Ray and...

0:27:270:27:35

That's where these programmes come from, this is a royal performance, variety show programme.

0:27:350:27:41

And again you've collected a pile of photographs which are nearly all signed, aren't they?

0:27:410:27:47

-Most of them are, yes.

-Most of them are signed in pen, which is what you want as a collector.

0:27:470:27:51

And then I move over to here, this is different.

0:27:510:27:54

This is from the Cunard liners, the Queen Elizabeth.

0:27:540:27:57

That's right, the first one.

0:27:570:27:59

-And this one here.

-Yes, my brother was a steward on the boats,

0:27:590:28:03

and he got the autographs from Elizabeth Taylor and Michael Todd.

0:28:030:28:09

Well, I saw here, Elizabeth Taylor I know, Michael Todd is...

0:28:090:28:12

She was married to him before she was married to Richard Burton.

0:28:120:28:17

And then we've got Bill Haley on that one.

0:28:170:28:20

Bill Haley, that's a very sought-after signature as well as Elizabeth Taylor.

0:28:200:28:25

-Yeah.

-I would thank, value-wise, if we put a figure on the whole collection of £200-300,

0:28:250:28:31

-would you be happy with that?

-Yes, I would.

0:28:310:28:34

-Yes?

-Yes, I would.

-Shall we put a reserve...on them?

-Yes, yes, please.

0:28:340:28:38

You'd like a reserve at that bottom figure - with a bit of discretion perhaps for the auctioneer?

0:28:380:28:43

So 200 with discretion.

0:28:430:28:45

-Martin!

-Yes, Kate.

0:28:500:28:52

This painting caught my eye. Tell me a bit about it.

0:28:520:28:55

Well, it's a painting which my grandfather purchased in about the mid-1930s.

0:28:550:29:03

It was then handed to my father, and then it was handed to me,

0:29:030:29:07

and it's a painting which has actually survived the last war.

0:29:070:29:11

Right. What happened to it? It was bombed or...?

0:29:110:29:14

It was stored in a wardrobe on the third floor of a house,

0:29:140:29:20

and then the property was bombed.

0:29:200:29:23

The wardrobe and the frame were destroyed, and the picture survived.

0:29:230:29:28

Ah-ha! So, yeah, it's come a long way, and you've brought it here today, and what else do we know?

0:29:280:29:34

-It's got a signature, William Banks.

-William Banks.

0:29:340:29:37

And also there's a label verso, so you can just about read that.

0:29:370:29:41

You can read on the back, "The hero of the encounter by William Banks from Edinburgh"

0:29:410:29:47

and it's about the late 1800s.

0:29:470:29:49

-Late, so 1890 something.

-1890, yes.

0:29:490:29:52

OK, and it's obviously these two cavaliers regaling this poor serving girl with their antics,

0:29:520:29:59

and he's drawn her a little picture about what's going on and how he defeated his enemy.

0:29:590:30:05

It's not great condition in the sense of the paintwork, there are some bubbling up bits.

0:30:050:30:10

But it also looks like it's been cleaned.

0:30:100:30:13

That's correct, yes. No, I had it professionally done.

0:30:130:30:16

It's a good job, I have to say, and if it's survived that long,

0:30:160:30:21

it's in pretty good shape for what's happened to it.

0:30:210:30:24

I mean, there's not very many areas of paint loss, it is just this area here with that raised section.

0:30:240:30:31

It's beautifully painted, if you look at the faces and the fabric

0:30:310:30:34

here, I mean, I love paintings, so this has really made my day.

0:30:340:30:39

Why do you want to sell it?

0:30:390:30:41

I have nowhere to put it, nowhere to display it properly.

0:30:410:30:44

-I would like to, but I have nowhere.

-It would go back in a wardrobe?

0:30:440:30:48

It would go in the wardrobe to store.

0:30:480:30:50

So what were your thoughts on price?

0:30:500:30:54

-About the...£250 for reserve and anything upwards.

-Upwards for that.

0:30:540:31:00

OK, so if we maybe put the estimate a little bit higher,

0:31:000:31:03

sort of £300-400 estimate and the reserve at 250 as a firm reserve, we'll try it at a sale.

0:31:030:31:08

-Yes, and we'll flog it.

-Brilliant!

0:31:080:31:12

But back at the saleroom, it's not all good news, as the auctioneer has spotted something.

0:31:140:31:19

I picked up on something your experts didn't.

0:31:190:31:22

There is a small hairline in it, so under normal circumstances I would have said

0:31:220:31:26

that the valuation was spot-on, but there's a hairline crack just there, if you can see it.

0:31:260:31:32

Oh, yeah, I can see it.

0:31:320:31:34

-And as you know, that's going to half the value, I should think.

-So have you told her?

0:31:340:31:39

I did, I rang her up and gave her the bad news,

0:31:390:31:42

but she's still going to get a good return on her 39p, so we're guiding it now at £50-80.

0:31:420:31:47

Right, OK, so fingers crossed we'll get that top end still and it's going to sell.

0:31:470:31:52

55 and 60 and five...

0:31:520:31:55

Right, time to break the news to Kate. Kate, at the valuation day,

0:31:550:31:59

we had a value of £100-150, and since there's been a detection of a hairline crack,

0:31:590:32:04

which has reduced the value, and I know the auctioneer's talked to you about this.

0:32:040:32:11

So now we've got a value of around about £50-80, but I still think

0:32:110:32:17

-this will do what you originally wanted, Kate.

-Well, I hope so.

0:32:170:32:21

It's nice to have a perfect piece, but it's still a rare pattern

0:32:210:32:24

and a great designer, so we'll wait and see.

0:32:240:32:27

Small Wedgwood Fairyland Lustre sugar bowl

0:32:270:32:31

designed by...Daisy Jones.

0:32:310:32:33

Someone start me at £40.

0:32:330:32:36

40 here, two can I say?

0:32:360:32:37

42, 44, 46, 48.

0:32:370:32:41

50, five...

0:32:410:32:43

55, 60, five. Nice piece of lustreware, 70...

0:32:430:32:47

Look, someone's holding their card up, they're not putting it down.

0:32:470:32:51

80, madam, and five, and 90...and five.

0:32:510:32:54

And 100, madam.

0:32:540:32:56

110, 120. One more, 120. 130, sir?

0:32:560:33:00

-Yes!

-140, madam. 150, 160, 170, 180.

0:33:000:33:05

-It's flying, isn't it?

-170, then.

0:33:050:33:08

180, new bidders, 180, 190, 200.

0:33:080:33:12

200 at the back, 210, 220. 230, 240.

0:33:120:33:17

250, 260.

0:33:170:33:20

270, 280. 290, 300.

0:33:200:33:24

310, 320? 320, yes, 330?

0:33:240:33:27

-I might need a taxi.

-It's right at the back with you, madam, at 320,

0:33:270:33:30

and selling at 320, all done?

0:33:300:33:32

At 320, all done.

0:33:320:33:34

-Wow!

-Yes! Fantastic, £320, Sue!

0:33:340:33:39

You see, we didn't need that revised estimate all along, did we?

0:33:390:33:43

Just imagine if it didn't have a crack.

0:33:430:33:45

-It was a good job by the auctioneer!

-It was, wasn't it?

-Unbelievable.

0:33:450:33:50

As you said, away with the fairies!

0:33:500:33:53

This next item about to go under the hammer is a cracking bit of memorabilia.

0:33:580:34:02

It's been collected by Joan, and you were a wardrobe dresser

0:34:020:34:05

-at the London Palladium.

-That's right.

0:34:050:34:08

Seen it all, heard it all, can tell us a few stories but not on camera.

0:34:080:34:13

But you met lots of stars, lots of autographs,

0:34:130:34:16

and we've also got the menu from the QE, the Queen Elizabeth I.

0:34:160:34:21

-And the Earl's Court ice show as well.

-Yes, with Norman Wisdom.

0:34:210:34:25

We've got £200-300. There's a lot there.

0:34:250:34:28

Autographs can sometimes be a little tricky to sell.

0:34:280:34:31

They need to be in the right sale with the right people, but I've seen autographs

0:34:310:34:35

make well into the hundreds.

0:34:350:34:37

Photographs from the Royal London Palladium and Earl's Court,

0:34:370:34:41

some signed, including Johnnie Ray and others.

0:34:410:34:44

Someone start me at £100. 100 here with Tim, 110 anywhere?

0:34:440:34:47

100 here with Tim, 110 can I say?

0:34:470:34:52

It's at £100, then.

0:34:520:34:55

All done at 100? All done at 100.

0:34:550:34:57

I'm afraid that's not reached reserve.

0:34:570:35:00

It needs a specialist sale, really.

0:35:000:35:03

There are specialist auctioneers who just sell autograph material,

0:35:030:35:07

go on the internet, have a look at one of those and just contact them direct.

0:35:070:35:12

We thought about taking them to America, especially the Elizabeth Taylor one.

0:35:120:35:17

A different market, it's on their doorstep if you take them to them.

0:35:170:35:22

Oh, that's a shame, I was hoping for a new shed.

0:35:220:35:25

Oh, dear!

0:35:250:35:26

If you don't have any luck searching for the right auction,

0:35:260:35:29

get in contact and we'll help you find that auction.

0:35:290:35:32

Oh, right, fine, thank you very much.

0:35:320:35:34

Going under the hammer right now, a late Victorian painting by William Banks.

0:35:370:35:41

It belongs to Martin, and all the money is going towards little Sam. Tell us all about little Sam.

0:35:410:35:47

Little Sam is a rescue dog from the RSPCA,

0:35:470:35:51

and he was in a dogfight and he lost his leg.

0:35:510:35:56

Is he a little dog?

0:35:560:35:58

-He's a medium-sized dog, weighs about 10 or 15 kilos.

-What is he, then, a terrier or something?

0:35:580:36:03

He's a terrier cross, a black and tan terrier cross.

0:36:030:36:06

And it just goes towards his vet bills.

0:36:060:36:09

Well, thank goodness you've rescued him. You obviously love animals.

0:36:090:36:14

We've got £300-400 on this wonderful bit of artwork

0:36:140:36:18

with a fixed reserve of 250.

0:36:180:36:20

Yeah... It's a good example of late Victorian painting.

0:36:200:36:24

-I don't know if it's everybody's taste at the moment, but we'll wait and see.

-Well, hopefully.

0:36:240:36:28

We've got a packed auction room, I think this could sell.

0:36:280:36:31

Late 19th century oil on canvas.

0:36:310:36:34

Painting by William Banks.

0:36:340:36:37

Friend being served wine by housemaid.

0:36:370:36:40

Lot 100, we've got interest level.

0:36:400:36:42

150, we've got 150 here, 160 can I say? 150, 160, 170, 180?

0:36:420:36:48

180, 190, 200?

0:36:480:36:51

200, 210, 220, 230, 240.

0:36:510:36:56

-240, 250, 260...

-We've sold it.

0:36:560:36:58

270, 280, 280? Yes, 290, 300, 310.

0:36:580:37:05

-Yep.

-Yep, 320...

0:37:050:37:07

320, yes, 330, no. 320. On my left, 320, 330, phone bidder?

0:37:070:37:11

330.

0:37:110:37:14

330, yes, 340, 350.

0:37:140:37:18

350, yes, 360?

0:37:180:37:20

-Oh, brilliant.

-Keep going, phone bidder.

0:37:200:37:22

380? 390.

0:37:220:37:26

Yep, 390, 400, Bob.

0:37:260:37:29

410... 420.

0:37:290:37:31

430. 440.

0:37:310:37:37

440? Yep, 450. 450, 460. 470.

0:37:370:37:41

480. 490.

0:37:430:37:46

500. 500, yes, 520.

0:37:460:37:50

540. 560.

0:37:510:37:53

-This is great!

-580, 600.

0:37:530:37:57

620, 640.

0:37:570:37:59

660. No, he's out. It's 640 to the phone bidder.

0:38:010:38:05

£640 to the phone bidder, are we all done?

0:38:050:38:08

Selling to the phone at 640, all done?

0:38:080:38:11

Yes! How about that? £640!

0:38:110:38:15

Unbelievable! If little Sam was here right now, he'd be wagging his tail!

0:38:150:38:19

-What a great result! Happy?

-Yes.

-Great.

0:38:190:38:22

We've taken care of some vet bills.

0:38:220:38:24

Thank you for finding that, Kate. I hope you've enjoyed today's show.

0:38:240:38:28

There's plenty more to come on Flog It!, but from the Isle of Wight, it's cheerio.

0:38:280:38:33

Flog It! is at the Cowes yacht club on the Isle of Wight, where presenter Paul Martin and experts Will Axon and Kate Bateman fish among the bags and boxes in search of some maritime treasures. While Paul finds a ship's clock, it is Kate who spots a special painting that spent years in a wardrobe.

Paul also takes the helm of the famous Gypsy Moth 4 captained by Sir Francis Chichester in his successful solo trip round the world in 1967.


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