Stroud Flog It!


Stroud

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This is Gloucestershire, a county brimming with mystery.

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The Murder Of A King deals with the Tudors and a sham marriage, all that happened in this family home.

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I'll be coming back here later to reveal all.

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First, through the snow to Stroud to get straight down to business. Welcome to Flog It!

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By the mid-18th century, Stroud was riding high on the wealth of its woollen industry.

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The buoyant population needed somewhere to meet and a space for leisure and entertainment.

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So one of Stroud's landmark buildings hit the map - the Subscription Rooms.

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People have gathered for today's show

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and who better to entertain this lot than a pair of antique experts.

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Today's dynamic duo are Kate Bliss and James Lewis.

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They have already got stuck in as the room fills up with items of all shapes and sizes.

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I'm the first to uncover a fabulous piece of local history.

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Cathy and Ray, where do we start? Which album?

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Look at this.

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Condition is absolutely wonderful.

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Beautifully presented as well.

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-Whose are they?

-They belong to me.

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I found them in me dad's loft

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and I'm pretty sure that they belonged to my aunty, his sister.

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-So they have been in the family a long time?

-A long time.

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-Have you thumbed through these and had a look?

-Yes.

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-They're lovely.

-Quite impressive, aren't they?

-They are.

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They're local topographic scenes around Bristol, Weston-super-Mare,

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Stroud, Cheltenham, all over Gloucester which is great,

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because we're putting them into a local sale room. So bound to be lots of local interest.

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This is where we are sitting today, inside the Subscription Rooms.

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That is the canal tunnel.

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This is just down the road.

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Yes, down the road.

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And that is priceless to somebody that lives locally

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and wants to learn a little bit about their civic history.

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This one - slightly more commercial. It is not necessarily all on Stroud.

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They are greeting cards. There are photographs in the back.

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But we do get to some of Stroud at the very back.

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Stroud's Fire Brigade.

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You see, that one postcard might be worth somewhere in the region of £15.

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Fire Brigade memorabilia is big business, so is early police memorabilia.

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Let's have a look at this third one.

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These are slightly farther afield, they have gone to London.

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My aunty lived in London for a while.

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And Ireland.

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This one's lovely but not local.

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But those two are going to do the business for you.

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-Have you any idea of value?

-Not a clue.

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Look, on a good day, I don't want to get your hopes up,

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-but on a good day you could be look at £200 plus.

-Never.

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Blimey.

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I can't wait to find out what is going happen.

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Cathy, I always think when I see something like this, it just makes me think how times have changed.

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Our lifestyle today, how it rushes about,

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putting your butter and jam or marmalade on your toast as you are rushing out to get to work.

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Here we have a pair of solid silver butter dishes

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that would've graced a breakfast table around 100 years ago.

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-Can you imagine anybody using them today?

-No.

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-Neither can I.

-Certainly not me.

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But what a wonderful time it must have been to have the housekeepers

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coming and polishing your silver for you and laying out the butter

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and the jams, and what a relaxed lifestyle it must have been. I think they're great.

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They're in George III style with this fluted border,

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almost like a stylised honeysuckle blossom at the angles here.

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They are solid silver. If you turn it over, you have a clear set of hallmarks.

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The mark on the left is the maker's mark. The goldsmith.

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Then we have the Sheffield mark, the lion passant and the gothic T,

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which tells us it is 1911.

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So is this something that has been in the back of sideboard for years?

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No, it has been given to us by an elderly friend. I think it belonged to her mother-in-law,

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who would have been married just after the turn of the century.

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And we belong to the local choir.

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We raise money for charity.

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So the friend has given it to me to raise money for our charity for this year.

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So when it comes to value, they're not the most fashionable things...

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-I do understand.

-But they're in good condition.

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They are in a fitted, velvet-lined leather box,

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they have got their original knives - all things in its favour.

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I think we are still going to get somewhere between £60 and £100.

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-Oh, super.

-Yes, that is OK? It will help towards the charity.

-Yes.

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This is a really interesting architectural antique. Has it come from Stroud?

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As I understand it, it's come from a pub in east Bristol which was demolished, I believe...

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-in the late '50s, early '60s.

-How did you come by it?

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My father-in-law was in the pub trade

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and one of his customers said, "Would you like this pane? It's going to be chucked in the skip."

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So of course he said yes and it's been in his garage ever since. Or until three or four years ago

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when he said to me would I like it?

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What made you bring it along to sell today?

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Basically I can't do it justice.

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If I keep it, it's stuck in my garage and it needs to be on show somewhere.

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Well, it's great to see it.

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From a design point of view, it's a really interesting piece.

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Obviously, it could be seen as an advertising panel, if you like,

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with the name of the brewery, Georges and Co, across the front.

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But also, for somebody interested in glass,

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it shows lots of different techniques incorporated in this panel.

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We have got something similar to what's called hobnail cutting, but of course this is moulded.

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We have got a Tudor Rose here,

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balanced in the centre and on your side,

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and we have got little faceted glass medallions.

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Almost like jewels.

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All incorporated in these lead borders and that in itself

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is a technique which goes back hundreds of years, used in churches of course.

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So it is a really interesting piece of design.

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Date wise - it is difficult to pinpoint it.

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I think it could be anything from late 19th century, 1880 through to 1920s or 1930s.

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It is unique.

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Do you have any idea of values?

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I guess it's what someone's prepared to pay for it.

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I think that is a sensible and realistic attitude to have.

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Because you're right, things at auction, it depends whether the right person is there on the day.

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I am going put an estimate of about £150 to £250 on it.

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-Where will you find another one? That's what excites me.

-Absolutely right.

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-Thank you for bringing it along.

-My pleasure. Thank you.

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John, what I'd like you to do is take yourself back 200 years

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and imagine you're an 18th century gentleman, somebody of title, of the middle classes,

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and you want to impress your neighbours and your friends.

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In exactly the same way as today we would have a 52-inch plasma screen, an iPod, all the technology,

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things were no different in the 18th century.

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But in the 18th century, it was porcelain.

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This was made in the first 30 years of porcelain manufacture in the UK.

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It was made in the Derby factory around 1775.

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So this is cutting edge technology of its day.

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Only the very rich could afford it.

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So is this something that's been in the family for many years?

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No, it was given to me about 30 years ago as a Christmas present and I've treasured it since.

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This was originally one of a pair.

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Almost all the 18th century porcelain figures were made in pairs. Gentleman and a lady

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and they would have been a perfect match.

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On a piece of porcelain that has been around over 200 years,

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it is bound to have little knocks and scuffs and possibly more serious breakages.

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If we look at the extremities like that, the corners of the tricorne hat

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and the flowers and have a nibble.

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You can tell the difference between restored and original parts

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because the restored parts are soft and the original parts are hard.

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So if we check the hand here.

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And that is soft.

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So that's been restored.

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And yes, the edges of that hat, that has been done as well.

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So it has had some restoration but it's been done really well.

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I think you ought to put an auction estimate of £150 to £200 and protect it with a reserve of £150.

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-Is that OK?

-That's fantastic.

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-Far more than I expected.

-Is it?

-Yes.

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-What did you think?

-£50, £60.

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Blimey, I could have been much meaner, couldn't I?

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Well, I have seen quite a few tea sets today.

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But this is a bit different.

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Is this a family piece, where did it come from?

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It belonged to my mother, who is no longer with us with unfortunately.

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We found it in a box when we were clearing out the house.

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-I thought it was rather pretty and so I thought I'd bring it along.

-Is it something you are looking to sell?

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Well, maybe if the price is right.

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-I don't want to sell it if it's not really going to make anything.

-Is it something you like?

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Yes, I like it. It is really pretty.

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What intrigues me is we have this bamboo effect

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to the handles and spout of the teapot.

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-It is quite a dinky little pot.

-Yes.

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It is certainly a tea for one, or tea for two at the most.

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Almost what you might call a bachelor's set and they have all got these stylised bamboo handles.

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But when you look at the engraved decoration on all three pieces,

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you have got something very English, because I can see butterflies

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and a bird which I would say, with that forked tail, is a swallow.

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The sign of a very English summer, isn't it?

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-Yes, we get swallows in the barn where I work.

-Do you?

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-Every year, they come back every year.

-To the same place?

-Yeah.

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That decoration not only makes it just a bit different,

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-but I think it makes it quite pretty.

-Yes, it does.

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And I would say at auction, I can see it making between £100 and £150, perhaps £200 on a good day.

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-That's good.

-Is that a nice surprise?

-Yes, I thought maybe 80 at the most.

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I would suggest putting a reserve at the lower end of the estimate, so at £100. And it should do that.

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Do you think your mother would be pleased?

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Yes, I think she would, yes.

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-She used to watch Flog It! too.

-Did she?

-Yes.

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It is time for me to go west to the small town of Berkeley in Gloucestershire

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and reveal all about that unique family home I mentioned earlier.

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In the 11th century, Roger de Berkeley built a wooden fortress on this mound

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overlooking the River Severn, to stand guard against attack from across the border in Wales.

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His descendants established this Norman keep in the 12th century.

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But what makes this castle so unique today, is that despite being touched

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by almost every major event throughout the last millennium, the Berkeley family still live here.

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The Berkeley history is a colourful tale of skulduggery, vanity and murder.

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A story that could easily have ended quite differently for the Berkeley family.

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I'm going take you on a whistle stop tour through history,

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stopping at a few important dates on which the Berkeley family nearly lost this grand home.

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Let's start in 1327 with a plot to kill King Edward II, led by his wife, Queen Isabella.

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She became angered by her husband's influential friends.

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She gathered strong allies against him and Edward was

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forced to renounce the throne, with their son taking over as king.

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But Isabella didn't stop there.

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Edward was imprisoned in this little room that I am just about to go into

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and her plan was for him to be ill-treated so eventually he'd meet his untimely end.

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Her plan had a deathly odour.

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Animal carcasses were thrown into this dungeon and left to rot.

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The hope was that disease would then fill the air

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and fatally infect Edward, who was imprisoned next door.

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But Edward was made of strong stuff and the rotting carcasses had no effect.

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What happened next is the cause of much debate.

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Isabella needed Edward to disappear

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and it is widely believed he was murdered here in this room by a red hot poker.

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But many others believe Edward escaped with the help of Lord Berkeley.

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At his trial, Lord Berkeley claimed he was away at the time of Edward's murder

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so he managed to escape prison and remained in residence at the castle.

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So the charge of murder failed to separate the Berkeleys from the castle.

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But by the time of the Tudors, it was the Berkeleys' vanity

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that again nearly lost them this castle for good.

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In the 1400s, William, Baron Berkeley,

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fancied an upgrade on his title

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and he struck a deal with the crown to become a marquis

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on the condition that, upon his death, the castle be handed over to the Tudors.

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Henry VIII took advantage of his country home and left his mark.

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The Berkeley family were separated from the castle for 80 years

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until Henry's daughter Mary became Queen and returned their family home.

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They soon became earls and kept a firm hold on their castle.

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But after 200 years, the Berkeley family's world was rocked by yet another scandal,

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this one thick with love and lies.

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This is a portrait of the 5th earl,

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a handsome and distinguished looking chap. In the 18th century, he fell in love with this beautiful woman.

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Mary Cole, the daughter of a tradesman.

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He was so smitten, they tied the knot in a discreet ceremony and even started a family.

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After all, they were married.

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Or so she thought. A rumour emerged that her marriage was a sham.

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Mary challenged the earl and it turned out to be true.

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The consequences were long-lasting.

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The earl did the decent thing and an official wedding did take place.

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The eldest son and heir born before that wedding was declared illegitimate.

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He could no longer inherit the title, only the castle.

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The next legitimate son to be born became the sixth earl.

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But when he left the castle, the earldom left with him.

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After 100 years, the title did return fleetingly to the castle.

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Randall Malbury Berkeley was the eighth and the last earl

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to take up residence here as he died without male issue.

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In his time at the castle, Randall Malbury Berkeley undertook much

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of the restoration that has created the medieval castle you see today.

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The earldom may have left the castle, but, amazingly,

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after a rocky 900 years, the Berkeley family still call this castle home.

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Charles, it is a real pleasure to meet you.

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I can't believe I'm talking to you, considering what your relatives and your ancestors have gone through.

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You must be the luckiest man alive.

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I wake up every morning and it's incredible.

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You are going to be the 28th generation to take over the family home.

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Yes, and when you look at it like that, there have been all these other generations of Berkeleys

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who have lived here, grown up here, who have defended the castle,

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it is quite daunting, but it is a wonderful privilege to still be here.

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Looking forward, what immediate challenges are there for you?

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I would like to bring the castle more alive at certain times.

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We have got a wonderful castle, we have wonderful guides who tell the story in a fabulous way.

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I would like to get more children enthused about coming in and looking and seeing what we have.

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Being able to learn about what it was like living here

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in medieval times, Tudor times, just to bring it alive a bit more.

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That is my plan and to make it more accessible to everyone.

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I am sure you will do that.

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Charles, thank you so much for meeting up with me today.

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I thoroughly enjoyed looking around and I know you are going to succeed.

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-So good luck for the next 1,000 years!

-Thank you.

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So off to auction goes

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Terry's stained glass window that came out of a Bristol pub.

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Kate has certainly raised the bar.

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I'm going to put an estimate of about £150 to £250 on it.

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Where will you find another one?

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He will be joined by John who is cashing in his Christmas present, that charming figure.

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And Kate spotted that bamboo and swallow decorated tea set belonging to Debbie.

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I would say at auction, I can see it making between £150, perhaps £250 on a good day.

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Not so rare, but very stylish are Kathleen's butter dishes.

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James is confident this silver twin set will spread some joy.

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And lastly those beautiful postcards.

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Cathy and Ray are hoping they have mass appeal. Will they be right?

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Here we are at today's auction room, Moore, Allen and Innocent, just outside of Cirencester

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and I can't wait to get inside and join in with all the action.

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And helping us on the rostrum today is auctioneer Philip Alwood.

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Hopefully we can spread some good news for Kathleen's charity.

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That is where the money is going on these silver butter dishes.

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And they're quality, dated 1911. Tell us a bit about the charity, where's the money going to?

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It is through our choir, the village choir, Alveston Singers - I must get that in! -

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and it's to the Alzheimer's Society and Great Western Air Ambulance.

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All our monies go to charity.

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Two good charities.

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James, the pressure's on.

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But I'm not feeling it today.

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-They're gonna sell.

-Yes.

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And silver is up in value. It is the thing to invest in now.

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-Great!

-So hopefully someone will invest.

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-What is the choir called?

-Alveston Singers.

-You heard it here!

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But let's see what sort of noise we can make with the auction.

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The silver butter dishes in the case here.

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We've got the phone booked on these. Yes, we have the phone

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and we can start at £60. At 60 I have.

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And 5 if you like now.

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At £60. At 5, 70,

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5, 80, 5, 90,

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5, 100, at 100. 110 if you like.

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At 100. 10. 110.

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120.

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120, 130.

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130, if you like, on the phone.

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130 on the phone. At 130. At 130.

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140 now anywhere?

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130 on the phone.

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At 130 you are all sure?

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-Yes! £130.

-That's wonderful.

-Isn't that brilliant? Yes.

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-I am thrilled to bits.

-I am as well.

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There was no reserve on this, they had to go.

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That is excellent, I'm really pleased.

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I love this next lot, it is something I would buy.

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It needs to have a creative mind behind it.

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It's a stained glass window, belongs to Terry and made by Georges and Co.

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But it's finding the right space to put this into.

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Or the right commercial setting. There are plenty of businesses called George.

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This is such an individual thing that it's either going to fly, or miss it completely.

0:22:100:22:16

This is the kind of thing that I would go and buy.

0:22:160:22:20

I'd think, "One day, I'm going to find the right place for it," and it never really happens.

0:22:200:22:26

That's right, it didn't happen and justice needs to be done to it.

0:22:260:22:30

Hopefully someone here will have that wall in mind. Let's find out, shall we?

0:22:300:22:36

Lot 354, the leaded glazed window.

0:22:360:22:39

Good condition.

0:22:390:22:41

Who'll start me? Should be 200 really.

0:22:410:22:45

Start me at 100. At 100 I'm bid.

0:22:450:22:48

At 100, 110, 120, 130,

0:22:480:22:53

140, 150, 160 if you like.

0:22:530:22:58

At 150. At 150. At 160. 170.

0:22:580:23:03

At 160, I thought it may make more.

0:23:030:23:07

I want it, I want it.

0:23:070:23:09

Just £160. It is better than being in the garage

0:23:090:23:14

where it could get damaged.

0:23:140:23:16

-It's a reasonable result.

-It is reasonable, yes.

0:23:160:23:20

Given to John 30-odd years ago, it is a Derby figure and we have got a value of £150 to £200.

0:23:240:23:31

-That is a cracking present.

-Isn't it wonderful?

0:23:310:23:35

Why have you decided to sell it now?

0:23:350:23:37

It has been sitting in my garage for five years and I thought it was time to de-clutter a bit.

0:23:370:23:42

-Can you remember who gave it to you?

-Yes, I can.

0:23:420:23:44

I wonder if they will be watching.

0:23:440:23:47

-I hope not.

-You have the best expert here, because James Lewis is based in Derby. You like this.

0:23:470:23:53

It is a fantastic figure, great period, it's the height of the Derby porcelain factory's figure making.

0:23:530:23:58

-It is great.

-Good collector's piece and it is a purist's piece.

0:23:580:24:02

Nice date to it.

0:24:020:24:03

1775 is ideal for figures so I think it will do well.

0:24:030:24:07

It's one of the oldest things in today's sale. So I know that's exciting.

0:24:070:24:11

-Apart from you!

-Apart from me.

-I wasn't going say that.

0:24:110:24:14

Let's find out what the bidders of Cirencester think. It's going under the hammer now.

0:24:140:24:18

The Derby porcelain figure.

0:24:180:24:20

Showing on our left here, hopefully.

0:24:200:24:23

Can I start you here at £85 on the book.

0:24:230:24:26

At 85, I'll take 90 now,

0:24:260:24:29

At 85, 90, thank you, 5, 100, and 5

0:24:290:24:33

110, 120, 130, 140, 150,

0:24:330:24:37

lady at 150, 160 now.

0:24:370:24:38

At 150 on my left, here. 160 now. Selling on my left at 150.

0:24:380:24:43

150. The hammer's going down at the low end.

0:24:430:24:46

At £150 are you all done?

0:24:460:24:48

It's going, John.

0:24:480:24:50

It's gone down 150. It's sold.

0:24:500:24:54

That is a good result. In estimate.

0:24:540:24:56

What's the money going towards?

0:24:560:24:58

Well, I think it's time to have a holiday, put the money into a holiday fund.

0:24:580:25:02

-Where?

-Somewhere that's got some sunshine, that would be nice.

0:25:020:25:06

The collection of postcards is just about to go under hammer and they belong to Cathy and Ray.

0:25:100:25:16

We have a value of £200 which we talked about.

0:25:160:25:19

Lots of social history captured here and hopefully the collectors are in the room.

0:25:190:25:25

You have lots more mementos from great aunt, so you don't mind selling these.

0:25:250:25:30

Up in the loft, out of sight.

0:25:300:25:32

Now they're going to be out of mind. Here they go under hammer.

0:25:320:25:36

Lot No 284 is the three early 20th-century postcard albums.

0:25:360:25:42

A lot of Gloucestershire.

0:25:420:25:44

Who will start me? Start me at 100?

0:25:440:25:47

100 I'm bid. At 110 if you like.

0:25:470:25:51

110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, the book's out.

0:25:510:25:57

-180, 190. 200. 210, 220, 230, 240...

-This is more like it!

0:25:570:26:05

250, 260, 270, 280, 290, 300, 320, 340,

0:26:050:26:11

360, 380. On my left now at 400.

0:26:110:26:17

420 if you like. At 400, are you all sure?

0:26:170:26:23

£400 for that. How about that?

0:26:230:26:27

-Fantastic.

-That was great.

0:26:270:26:30

-I love it. I love it, there was a tear in your eye.

-There was.

0:26:300:26:33

That was worth it.

0:26:330:26:35

Well, I've just been joined by Debbie who has a change of heart.

0:26:390:26:43

She doesn't want to sell her silver teapot set with the bamboo decoration which Kate valued. Oh no.

0:26:430:26:50

We had a value of £100 to £150 on this,

0:26:500:26:53

and I know you have come along in the meantime and put the reserve up.

0:26:530:26:59

-Yes, 120.

-At 120.

0:26:590:27:01

Showing now is the tea set.

0:27:010:27:03

Aesthetic style piece, London 1879 by Martin Hall and Co.

0:27:030:27:07

and I can start you at...

0:27:070:27:09

at 240...

0:27:090:27:11

-Oh, my goodness!

-Straight away!

0:27:110:27:14

..280, 300, 320,

0:27:140:27:17

340, 360, 400.

0:27:170:27:20

At 400. We are going to go to 410.

0:27:200:27:23

At 410. 420 if you like.

0:27:230:27:26

At 410. At 410. At £410...

0:27:260:27:31

420, 440 at 440.

0:27:310:27:33

Oh, Debbie!

0:27:330:27:34

At 440, 460, can I say now?

0:27:340:27:37

At 440, you are sure now? At 440.

0:27:370:27:40

Hammer's gone down.

0:27:430:27:44

-What a wonderful result.

-I'm really surprised.

0:27:440:27:48

All that change of heart going on.

0:27:480:27:49

I know my mum would be really pleased, wouldn't she?

0:27:490:27:52

"Oh, I didn't want to sell it", and you've done it! £440.

0:27:520:27:55

-It goes to show...

-..Quality always sells.

0:27:550:27:58

Thank you for joining us and I hope you have enjoyed today's show.

0:27:580:28:03

Sadly, that's all the time we have from Cirencester.

0:28:030:28:06

Until next time, there's gonna be plenty more surprises,

0:28:060:28:09

keep watching and you can now go and make that cup of tea. Cheerio from Cirencester.

0:28:090:28:13

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:28:200:28:23

Paul Martin brings Flog It! to the Subscription Rooms in Stroud along with trusted experts James Lewis and Kate Bliss, hoping to unearth great items.

James finds an 18th-century porcelain figurine and Paul uncovers an amazing collection of postcards. But it is Kate's keen eye that spots a silver tea set with a difference.

Paul also tells the story of nearby Berkeley Castle, home to the Berkeley family for some 900 years.


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