Dover Flog It!


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Dover

Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon join Paul Martin in Dover, where the finds include a Ludwig snare drum, three graduated Shelley jugs and a collection of Moorcroft vases.


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Today we're in a port town whose white cliffs have been immortalised in art, literature and song.

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Welcome to Flog It from Dover in Kent.

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The most famous song to feature Dover's white cliffs

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was the popular World War II tune

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"The White Cliffs of Dover", sung most memorably by Vera Lynn.

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The song was written to lift spirits during the Blitz,

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and the lyrics look forward to peace ruling over the iconic white cliffs.

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Dover had such a strong strategic position, and it played a major part in World War II.

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In fact, the military command centre was based under Dover, in a series of secret military tunnels.

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And I'll be taking a closer look at these later on in the show,

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and finding out how they became the nerve centre for the Allied forces' evacuation of Dunkirk.

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But first, it's time to head back above ground, and get over to the valuation day.

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And this is where we're hoping to unearth a few relics today,

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Dover Town Hall, where we've got a fabulous queue, and already probing all the bags and boxes that have been

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brought along are our two experts, Catherine Southon and Mark Stacey.

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So have you found anything of interest yet?

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-Yes, well I've got several things for the programme.

-Oh, he always has. And what about you, Catherine?

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Yes, I had a couple of beauties.

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Well, you'll have to keep looking inside, cos it's now 9.30,

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it's time to get the doors open and get everybody inside.

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Are you ready?

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-Yes!

-Yes! Let's go!

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Well, it's certainly a packed house today, in the very grand Dover Town Hall.

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And it looks as if Mark has found something incredibly eye-catching to get the ball rolling.

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-Hello, Margaret.

-Hello!

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-Now, I love you in your feline leopard print top there.

-Thank you.

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And I love this even more, I have to say.

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I spotted it in the queue, and it's such a wonderful-looking object,

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and it's coupled with an equally wonderful inscription, it's to a relative of yours.

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-Yes.

-Ex-inspector Cornelius Sexton, CID no less.

-Yes.

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On his retirement on the 27th of June 1909.

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How can you bear to part with it?

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Um, well, now I have two sons and neither, neither of them really want it.

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-None of the rotters are interested?

-No, no.

-Well, they don't want all of it now, do they?

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No, this is to travel. Yes, yeah.

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And one of them I believe is even a copper.

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-Yes, indeed!

-And he doesn't want it?

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-No.

-Well, I think it's a crying shame in some ways,

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-but I think you're going to make somebody very, very happy.

-Good.

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Cos what we're actually looking at is a silver-plated tea kettle,

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very much actually in the 18th-century style, in the sort of rococo style.

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Something like this, because it's so over the top.

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I mean everywhere you look is decorated with flowers

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and a lovely little Gothic mask here,

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-these wonderful legs that look as if it wants to sort of try walking away at all different angles.

-True.

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This wonderful bird of prey is the the little lid that opens up like that.

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So if that wasn't enough, we've got a little matching tea caddy

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or sugar box, I suppose you could say.

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-Well, whichever.

-One or the other, which is equally impressive, with Cornelius Sexton's initials on it.

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-Yes.

-And if we get a good, a really good price for you,

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are you going to treat the family or the grandchildren?

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Probably the grandchildren. My eldest grandson is 16, and he's saving up for a car, so...

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-Oh, what a lovely age to be, 16 again.

-Yes, oh, too true.

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Now, what are we going to put on it as an estimate?

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I, I've no idea really of the value.

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I think, sadly, I would love to say it was worth £500,

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but I just don't think it is, I think if it was in silver we would have been looking, you know...

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Oh, well, I can well imagine.

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Lots and lots of money. But I think we've got to be realistic, I love it, I think it will find a home,

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but I think we've got to be looking at an estimate of maybe, and I think

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-I might be being a bit mean here, but maybe £150 to £200.

-Yeah, yeah.

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-What do you think of that?

-Yeah, yeah, that sounds reasonable to me.

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Could we put a reserve on that?

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I think we should put a reserve on,

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and I would maybe suggest a reserve of £130, just to protect it at that.

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-My fingers are crossed.

-Yeah.

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My gut feeling tells me that there will be a lot of interest, and I would love it to make over £200.

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-Lovely.

-You know, because I think, to excuse the pun, I think it's such an arresting item.

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Lee, it's great to see a snare drum here at the valuation day.

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-I've played drums all my life.

-Ah, hence the interest.

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I am a big fan of drumming.

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Now, tell me a little bit about its history and how you've come by this Ludwig snare drum.

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Well, in about 1986 I was playing in a skiffle band, '85, '86, and we just wanted a snare, we'd been using

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a washboard and we just wanted to broaden the type of music we were playing, so we bought a snare.

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I went into a second-hand shop, and I said, "How much do you want for it?" He said 35 quid.

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-Did you know what you'd got at that stage?

-No, I didn't. It was just, it was something to bang.

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Something to bang, something to hit down the pub, basically, and just sort of play away.

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Well, what you've actually bought is something quite rare,

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and does come under the vintage and rare category of musical instruments.

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It is one of the pioneering Ludwig snare drums.

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It's got a brass shell, made in one piece, which has obviously been chromed.

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Cast hoops, eight lugs, tensioning lugs, that's something that Ludwig

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pioneered in the very early - we're talking sort of 1908, 1910.

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This drum is one of the first they ever made with a brass shell.

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This was available from 1920s to 1930s.

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After that it was superseded by the Ludwig 400,

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which was a very popular snare drum, again, 14 inches by five-inch depth,

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so it's called a 14 by five.

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John Bonham of Led Zeppelin used one of these, the drummer Ian Paice in Deep Purple, in fact every rock

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band you can think of used a Ludwig Super Sensitive, or the Ludwig 400,

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and this was prior to that 400.

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-Cor blimey.

-This was so early, and look how primitive the snare strainer is, nowadays you get these

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wonderful pieces of almost over-engineered apparatus stuck to the side...

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-It's quite simple.

-Which takes the snare off, releases the tension,

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so you have a batter head that doesn't buzz, it sounds like this.

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Put the snare tension on, and

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all of a sudden you have that crisp snare sound, which is...

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-Sounds lovely, doesn't it?

-Are you sure you want to sell this, because this is very collectable?

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I'd need it to go to a good owner, because I don't play it any more.

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I'd like someone to benefit from it.

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What would you put the money towards, more percussion instruments, or...

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Possibly, I've got a pretty poorly car at the moment, so unfortunately

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-it may have to go to something I don't want it to go to.

-OK. Let's talk about the price first.

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-More than £35, hopefully.

-How about we stick a nought in, £350?

-That'd be good!

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I'd like to put it into auction with a value of £300 to £400.

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That'd be great.

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-With a, with a reserve, with a bit of discretion at the £300, if that's OK.

-Yeah, that'd be fine.

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So Trevor, welcome to Flog It.

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-Thank you.

-You've brought along this rather charming ormolu garniture,

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comprising a lovely clock here, and the matching candlesticks. Now tell me, where did you get this from?

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It's been handed down through my family from my grandmother.

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It was over her mantelpiece in her living room.

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-So you remember it.

-Yes, yes, as a child, yes.

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Then my uncle inherited it, and then my mother, and down to me.

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-That's rather nice, cos, cos it's French, I don't know if you know that.

-Yes, that's right, yes.

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And it's quite sort of classical in style. We've got these lovely acanthus leaves on there.

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What I really like about it is the actual enamel work in this,

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I actually think I prefer that more than the clock itself, actually.

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The clock face, the enamel dial in particular is absolutely beautiful.

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It's really quite exquisite.

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-I know, it's lovely.

-The detail here in the centre of the dial,

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you can see a telescope that's been painted, and some books, and I think that's probably a sword, there.

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-Unfortunately, there is a little bit of damage there.

-I know, yes.

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I don't know if you know but one of these panels here at the front has actually cracked, which is a shame.

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Also on this one here,

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if you can see there I would have thought there would have been

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a matching sort of scroll on this side, cos there is one on this candlestick here.

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-Yes.

-Nevertheless, it's a very striking piece.

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-Yes, that's right.

-Very nice piece. I have taken it apart, and I notice it has got the name of the maker

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on there, which is J Ferrer, which is really nice that we've got the name stamped on the back there.

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-As you can see I tried to clean the upper bit, and I...

-Right.

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I probably shouldn't have done, but do you think it's worth cleaning up

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at all, getting the movement going?

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No. You could do more harm than good. I think leave it in this sort of state,

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I think leave it to the professionals, leave it to somebody that's going to buy it.

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-Now...it's been in your family quite some time.

-Yes.

-You're happy to sell it?

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Certainly. I just feel that it, in this day and age I would prefer it to go to somebody

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who would appreciate it, probably restore it back to its...

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-Absolutely.

-As it was, you know, maybe a hundred, over a hundred years ago.

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Do you have any idea of how much that it's worth?

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-I've got a rough idea.

-Right.

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Can we expand on that?

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It's, it runs into the low thousands.

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I don't think it's quite worth that amount of money, the reason being

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this maker you do see coming up time and time again at auction.

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I don't think it quite makes the thousand pound mark.

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And also, although it is a very nice piece there is a bit of damage.

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I would be happier with an estimate of about £400 to £600.

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-We'll put a £400 reserve on, if that's OK with you.

-OK, yes, fine.

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-OK?

-Yeah, great!

-I'll see you at the auction.

-Thank you.

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And I hope I'm proved wrong.

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-Hello, Aileen.

-Hello.

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-Nice to meet you.

-You too.

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What are you doing with such a lot of boys' toys?

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They were my brother's, and I've brought them on his behalf.

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Oh, that's... And he had these in his childhood, did he?

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-He has, yes.

-And have you helped him play with them?

-We used to play together, yes.

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Well, they're in remarkably good condition, you must have been very careful children.

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Yes, he was especially.

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We've got quite a few more, but we haven't brought every one out.

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We've brought a little random selection of the better ones, like this rather wonderful horse box

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-which you could hire from British Railways there, which is rather nice.

-Yes.

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And this Dinky delivery service transport vehicle.

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And my favourite is this rather weird helicopter.

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Which one was your favourite?

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-This one.

-Oh, was it?

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Did you use to fill it with the little cars as well?

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-I did.

-And pretend you were...

-But I don't know where the little cars are now unfortunately.

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They've been in a loft for the last 20 years or so, have they?

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My parents had them in their house till they died six years ago, and we cleared out their possessions,

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and my brother asked me to look after them, so I've had them in the loft ever since, yes.

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And I guess that's the reason why you've decided actually they will

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-go to someone who will appreciate them more now.

-That's right.

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With them just gathering dust in the loft.

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It seemed pointless just sitting up there, and we saw Flog It was coming, so...

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There's a big market for these now, there's a lot of collectors for them,

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-and we're off to a good sale room that'll catalogue them well.

-Yes.

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And I would put them in as a little mixed lot,

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so put them all together, as some of the boxes are a little bit broken.

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-Yes.

-Generally, it's always good to have the boxes.

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Obviously the better condition, the better the value of them.

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-Yes.

-But I think looking at it as a whole, we're probably looking

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-at somewhere in the region of sort of £200 to £300.

-That's very good.

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Would you be, you and your brother be happy with that?

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-We would, yes.

-Oh, fantastic. And I think they might just fly.

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-Or take off, in the case of the helicopter.

-Let's hope so.

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Well, we're now halfway through our day, which means it's time for our first visit to the auction room.

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We've found some cracking items so far, but will we get top prices?

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Well, we're just about to find out. While we make our way over to Canterbury to the sale room,

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we're going to leave you with a quick reminder of all the items going under the hammer.

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We're selling Margaret's impressive inherited silver-plated tea kettle

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and stand with sugar box, and Mark is flabbergasted that Margaret's sons don't want to keep it in the family.

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-And none of the rotters are interested?

-No, no.

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They don't want all of it now, do they?

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Trevor has had a go at cleaning up his late 19th-century French clock

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and candlesticks, tut tut.

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Let's hope his attempts won't put the bidders off.

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And I'm not 100% sure that Lee's Ludwig brass shell snare drum

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will sell at a fine art auction in Canterbury.

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But regardless, I'm still glad he brought it in as it's certainly brightened up my day.

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And finally, Aileen brought in her brother's collection of Dinky toys,

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which she can remember playing with as a child.

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Let's hope they will now provide a new owner with some great memories.

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For today's sale we've left Dover and we've headed inland to the Canterbury Auction Galleries.

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And I think we've brought a couple of seagulls along with us, squawking up there.

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The sale is just about to start.

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On the rostrum is auctioneer Cliona Kilroy, so let's get inside before we miss all the action.

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And Cliona is already in full swing, and the first of our items

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under the spotlight is Trevor's mantel clock and candlesticks.

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Trevor, this is a great looking clock. I'm in love with this clock.

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What I want to know is, Trevor, why are you selling this?

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We thought that if we sold it off that we'd be able to put the money to, I'd be able

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to sort of buy some cigarette cards and pass those down to my grandsons.

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Is that what you want to do?

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-Well, I've got a small little collection at home.

-It's going under the hammer now.

-Lovely.

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Lot number 469 is a 19th-century

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French gilt, brass and porcelain mounted mantle clock.

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The clock by Jacques Ferrer, and the garniture.

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For 469, who'll start me at £200?

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£200, there's someone, £200 I'm bid.

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-Who's in at £210? £210, £220, £230, £240, £250, £260.

-Climbing.

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-Yes.

-£270.

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-Who's in at £270?

-Come on.

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£270, £280, £290. £300, and 20?

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£340, £360...

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-£380, £400.

-Come on, come on!

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-Yes.

-Bidding war.

-Anybody at £400? £400, and 20. £440. £460.

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£480. Anybody at £480? No.

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-The phone's out.

-The bid is standing at £460 then, and selling at £460,

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if we're all done at £460.

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-Yes.

-That's it, yes.

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That's good, that's good.

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-I'm happy with that.

-I thought it wasn't going to sell for a minute.

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-No.

-And there is commission to pay, don't forget.

-Yes, yes, I know about that.

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-But there you go, you've got some spending money.

-I certainly have.

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-Lovely.

-Thank you.

-It's been wonderful. Thanks, Paul.

-Go and buy those cigarette cards!

-I will.

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Well, it certainly is good to see you again, Margaret, and this item

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was a bit of fun. We're talking about the police memorabilia.

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-Well, kind of, isn't it, really?

-Well, it is, yeah.

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The tea kettle and stand. Lovely, absolutely lovely.

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I just adore it, I just fell in love with that name, Cornelius Sexton.

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It's going under the hammer right now.

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Number 201 is the early 20th-century tea kettle and stand, lot 201.

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Who'll start me at £100, lot 201.

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-Oh, come on, it must do.

-£100 I'm bid.

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£110, anybody at £110 now.

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-Come on.

-£110 I'm looking for. No? £110 I have. £120, £130,

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£140, £150, £160, £170, £180.

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Who's in at £180?

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Interest at £180? The bid stands at £170 now, any further offer,

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if not I'm selling at £170.

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-That's OK.

-It's over the reserve.

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-Yes, yes.

-It's over the reserve.

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Yes, yes. Which is super. Just, just, just right.

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OK, now I am feeling nervous because it's my turn to be the expert.

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Can you remember that lovely Ludwig snare drum, the one I valued earlier?

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Well, it's just about to go under the hammer, and I've been joined by Lee, who used to own this, hopefully!

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-Yes.

-Used to own it. Now I'm feeling positive, I still believe it's worth £300 and all the rest.

-Yes, please.

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The question is, will it sell here today in a fine art auction room?

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Lot number 409 is the Ludwig snare drum with the chromium-plated body,

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lot 409. Who'll start me at £200?

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-Lot 409, £200.

-Come on, online.

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-Any interest at £200?

-No, she's going to, she's going to pass this.

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Any interest at £200? Let's start it at £150 then, let's get it going

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-at £150, lot 409, the drum.

-Oh, no!

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Any interest at £150? Any bids? At £150, no bids?

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-No.

-No bid I'm afraid, we have to pass it.

-Oh!

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At the end of the day I didn't actually bring it down to sell it.

0:18:130:18:17

I brought it down to, for a valuation, and...

0:18:170:18:19

-And I talked you into getting it on TV!

-So I'm not disappointed at all.

0:18:190:18:25

Right, something for the boys now, boys' toys.

0:18:290:18:32

We've got a big collection, we've got Triang, we've got some Hornby,

0:18:320:18:36

we've got Dinky cars, soldiers, we've got the lot.

0:18:360:18:39

And I'm joined by Aileen, but this is not your kind of stuff, is it, but it's your brother's?

0:18:390:18:43

-That's right, yes.

-So you're selling them on his behalf.

-I am, yes.

0:18:430:18:46

All right. Happy with the valuation?

0:18:460:18:47

-Yes, very.

-I thought it was spot on as well. Well done, Mark.

-Should be all right.

-There's a lot there.

0:18:470:18:53

-It appeals across the board to the collectors, hopefully.

-You've done the right thing not splitting them.

0:18:530:18:57

-Yes.

-Well, good luck, there's lots of family memories here, it's going under the hammer now.

0:18:570:19:01

As per your catalogue, lot 350.

0:19:010:19:04

Who'll start me at £100?

0:19:040:19:06

£100 I'm bid, who's in at £110?

0:19:060:19:09

£110? £110.

0:19:090:19:11

£120, £130, £140...

0:19:110:19:14

-That's more like it.

-£150.

-We're on the right track now.

-£150?

0:19:140:19:16

£160. £170. £180. £190.

0:19:160:19:22

£200, £210. £220, £230. £240, £250.

0:19:220:19:29

-Halfway there.

-£260, £270.

0:19:290:19:33

-£280, £290.

-Oh, this is great!

0:19:330:19:36

£290...

0:19:360:19:38

£300, £320.

0:19:380:19:43

£340, £360.

0:19:440:19:47

£380. £400.

0:19:470:19:50

£420, £440. £460.

0:19:500:19:52

£460!

0:19:520:19:54

-£480.

-Wow.

0:19:540:19:56

£500, £520.

0:19:560:19:59

£540, £560.

0:19:590:20:04

No? It's on my left at £540 now, any further offer, if not I'm selling at

0:20:050:20:09

£540, on my left at £540, no, selling at £540.

0:20:090:20:15

Yes, that's what we like to see, we were on the right track at the end.

0:20:150:20:19

-£540. So is he going to treat you for this errand?

-I hope so!

0:20:190:20:23

-Well, they should go halves though, Paul, because they've doubled the estimate.

-You never know.

0:20:230:20:27

Well, the Dinky toy collectors were definitely here today.

0:20:270:20:31

And when we return to the auction later on in the programme we're going to be in for some strong emotions.

0:20:310:20:37

Oh, my life!

0:20:370:20:39

But are these tears of joy or despair?

0:20:390:20:41

I'm back in Dover now, and I'm at this impressive fortification,

0:20:440:20:48

which looks down on the port town.

0:20:480:20:52

It's the location of Dover Castle which has secured its place in military history.

0:20:520:20:57

It's always been a very important defence point for Britain, because

0:20:570:21:01

it's the closest point to mainland Europe, which is over there.

0:21:010:21:03

In fact I can just see France.

0:21:030:21:07

Now that brings home how close it is.

0:21:070:21:10

And that's in part why I think this castle has seen unbroken active service for nine centuries.

0:21:100:21:16

That's from the time of the Norman Conquest right up to the Second World War.

0:21:160:21:19

The history of Dover Castle dates back to 1066,

0:21:190:21:24

when William the Conqueror built it following the Battle of Hastings.

0:21:240:21:27

Since its origins, Dover Castle has been rebuilt

0:21:270:21:30

and extended by successive kings,

0:21:300:21:32

transforming it into what we see now.

0:21:320:21:36

However it's not the history of the ancient castle I'm interested in today.

0:21:360:21:40

It's more let's say what's within living memory, and that's

0:21:400:21:43

the role the castle played during the Second World War.

0:21:430:21:46

It became a crucial command centre, which in turn led to being

0:21:460:21:50

the nerve centre of the Dunkirk evacuations in the spring of 1940.

0:21:500:21:55

Now these strategic plottings to rescue thousands of British and Allied troops from mainland France

0:21:550:22:01

didn't take place on ground level,

0:22:010:22:03

but instead they took place in a series of secret tunnels underneath the castle.

0:22:030:22:10

And the man who's going to take me underground is James Blencoe.

0:22:100:22:15

-Hi, James.

-Hello, Paul.

-Good to see you, thank you for taking me on a tour today.

0:22:150:22:20

Before we start, can you just explain a little bit how the tunnels came to be under the castle?

0:22:200:22:24

Yeah, absolutely. Well, what we're going to be looking at today is nearly a four-mile tunnel complex

0:22:240:22:29

that starts out nearly 200 years ago, so they started work in 1797

0:22:290:22:33

on the barracks down here, used throughout the Napoleonic Wars, and then during the Second World War,

0:22:330:22:38

the original level was reopened, and then they added two new levels, hospital level up at the top

0:22:380:22:43

and an extension to command HQ right down at the bottom.

0:22:430:22:46

-Four miles.

-Four miles, yeah.

0:22:460:22:48

-That is incredible, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:22:480:22:49

-Shall we head off? I can't wait actually.

-Yes, absolutely.

0:22:490:22:52

-Yeah, come with me.

-I'm looking forward to this.

0:22:550:22:58

So what was this room used for?

0:22:580:23:02

Well, this room's the anti-aircraft operations room, so on the tables

0:23:020:23:07

behind us here they plot the movements of all the aircraft coming through this area.

0:23:070:23:10

Information would've come from the brand new piece of technology behind the castle, the radar station.

0:23:100:23:15

They would have given them roughly ten minutes' warning of any aircraft approaching Dover.

0:23:150:23:20

From this room they would have been controlling the anti-aircraft guns,

0:23:200:23:24

but also from the telephones down here been liaising with the RAF to try and shoot down enemy aircraft.

0:23:240:23:29

What other rooms here have played a strategic part in the Second World War?

0:23:330:23:36

Well, we're right next to the coastal artillery operations room, so that room would have

0:23:360:23:42

been monitoring all the ships coming through this part of the Straits of Dover, but

0:23:420:23:47

importantly, controlling the guns located along the coastline here,

0:23:470:23:51

obviously the threat of invasion was very high from 1940,

0:23:510:23:55

so having a good coastal defence was highly important.

0:23:550:24:00

This was Vice Admiral Ramsay's headquarters for the Navy around the

0:24:000:24:03

Dover area, as well as having a large communication network.

0:24:030:24:06

In fact the GPO set up a major repeater station,

0:24:060:24:09

a large part of the telephone network down here,

0:24:090:24:13

just so, to make sure the command headquarters

0:24:130:24:16

-always had good communications with the outside world.

-Yes.

0:24:160:24:20

And of course the biggest operation to happen from these tunnels was the evacuation from Dunkirk.

0:24:200:24:25

It was a huge operation, codenamed Operation Dynamo.

0:24:250:24:29

Eventually in the early part of May and June of 1940

0:24:290:24:33

338,000 men of the British Army had to be rescued from the port of Dunkirk on the French coast.

0:24:330:24:39

It all started around the 10th of May when German forces pushed through Belgium and Holland,

0:24:390:24:46

and displaced British forces and their French and Belgian allies

0:24:460:24:50

from the border between France and Belgium.

0:24:500:24:52

So over two weeks or so they were pushed back to the port of Dunkirk and in desperate need of rescue.

0:24:520:24:57

So here in the tunnels Vice Admiral Ramsay, working from the next room along from where we are here

0:24:570:25:03

put together this rescue operation. And originally when they planned it,

0:25:030:25:06

it was planned to be a four-day operation, and in those four days,

0:25:060:25:09

they were hoping to rescue 45,000 men, they really thought that was all they would ever get out.

0:25:090:25:15

But they had perfect conditions over the Channel at the time

0:25:150:25:18

and that meant they could send every single vessel across...

0:25:180:25:21

All the small fishing boats.

0:25:210:25:22

Anything that would get across to the coast of France, and 693 vessels in the end.

0:25:220:25:26

And also the German army didn't advance with the speed they thought they would in the first place,

0:25:260:25:30

so in the end it was a nine-day operation instead of four days, and 338,000 men instead of 45, so...

0:25:300:25:36

-That's just mind-blowing isn't it, really?

-Well, you can see why they called it the miracle of Dunkirk.

0:25:360:25:40

Yeah. So who was the most important visitor down these tunnels?

0:25:400:25:44

-Well, I think you've got to say...

-It's got to be!

0:25:440:25:46

It's got to be Winston Churchill, and we've got several photographs of Winston Churchill

0:25:460:25:51

out on the balcony with Vice Admiral Ramsay looking over to the coast of mainland France.

0:25:510:25:56

We've also got some photos of members of the German high command

0:25:560:25:58

stood on the cliffs over at Calais, and as you know yourself, you can see across the Straits of Dover

0:25:580:26:03

here fairly easily, so I always have this mental image of these two great forces looking across

0:26:030:26:07

20 miles of water, wondering what each one's going to do next.

0:26:070:26:10

Yeah. So what other roles did the tunnels play in the Second World War?

0:26:100:26:13

Well, as well as being a major command headquarters there was

0:26:130:26:16

also an underground hospital set up here in the war. Shall I show you?

0:26:160:26:20

I'll take you and we can have a look at the operating table.

0:26:200:26:24

OK. Well, here we are, James. It looks like time has stood still down here as well in the theatre.

0:26:360:26:41

It looks fully operational, did any operations get carried out here?

0:26:410:26:45

Oh, yes, certainly. I mean generally these would have been more emergency operations.

0:26:450:26:50

This place was designated as a dressing station, so ideally the best situation was that they would

0:26:500:26:55

get casualties in here, sort out their wounds, their immediate problems and then preferably

0:26:550:27:00

move them inland to safety and to one of the larger hospitals, usually around Canterbury or Ashford.

0:27:000:27:05

-Yeah, not too far to travel.

-Yeah.

0:27:050:27:07

What were the major drawbacks if you had to do an operation down here?

0:27:070:27:10

Well, one of the problems was that during the whole of WWII,

0:27:100:27:13

up to till just after the Normandy invasions, Dover was being heavily bombed and shelled,

0:27:130:27:17

-and the problem was interruptions to the power supply.

-Right, the whole thing would be going like...

0:27:170:27:21

Yeah, once you get bombs dropping nearby or near the sub-stations

0:27:210:27:25

there in town you could quite easily lose the lighting in here.

0:27:250:27:29

And even though you've got back-up power supplies, it would always take a few moments to kick in,

0:27:290:27:33

or if they had to get generators working, it's not like today

0:27:330:27:37

where they start up automatically, somebody would have had to head outside and crank the handle.

0:27:370:27:42

There were a lot of staff working here in that period,

0:27:420:27:44

not just in hospital wards, but obviously in the command centre.

0:27:440:27:47

What were the general conditions like for them at the time?

0:27:470:27:50

Well, generally the facilities here were very good.

0:27:500:27:52

In fact I can take you down and show you the mess hall.

0:27:520:27:55

# When all the skies are grey

0:28:030:28:06

# And it's a rainy day... #

0:28:060:28:09

Well, this is obviously where everybody came to eat,

0:28:090:28:13

the mess room. What other areas were down here?

0:28:130:28:17

They had a full range of facilities, in fact they were probably

0:28:170:28:20

better kitted out down here than most people in the outside world.

0:28:200:28:24

They'd have been provided with hot meals, this mess room they could take their breaks in,

0:28:250:28:31

eaten their meals, they've got hot and cold running water, even showers down at the far end.

0:28:310:28:36

And a lot of people who were working in the hospital and

0:28:360:28:39

also working down on the lower level that we saw earlier would

0:28:390:28:43

-have come and slept in the hospital here, in one of the dormitories.

-What about the lack of sunlight?

0:28:430:28:47

Well, even as early as the WWII they were well aware of the problems

0:28:470:28:51

of lack of sunlight, and in fact we know that some of the ATS girls down on the lower level

0:28:510:28:58

at times were sent out for ultraviolet treatments, so sent

0:28:580:29:02

to go and stand around sun lamps to kind of boost their sunlight levels.

0:29:020:29:05

Yeah, I can kind of believe it. I've only been down here a couple of hours

0:29:050:29:07

this morning with you, and already I'm starting to feel sort of hemmed in, lack of air, lack of sunlight.

0:29:070:29:12

-Gosh, it's nice, isn't it?

-Isn't it nice to be in the fresh air again!

0:29:140:29:18

And what happened to the tunnels after the Second World War?

0:29:180:29:21

The tunnels were decommissioned at the end of the war, but the story doesn't end there,

0:29:210:29:25

because in the early 1960s they reopened this, the lower level,

0:29:250:29:28

-as a regional seat of government, a local nuclear shelter.

-Really?

0:29:280:29:32

And the government were here, the last department didn't move out until 1984,

0:29:320:29:36

and then English Heritage opened these tunnels to the public in 1990.

0:29:360:29:39

And thank goodness they did as well.

0:29:390:29:40

Time has stood still down there and you're preserving a bit of our heritage, which is great.

0:29:400:29:45

-Absolutely, yes.

-Thank you so much for showing me around.

-You're welcome, Paul.

0:29:450:29:48

Welcome back to a busy valuation day here at the Town Hall in Dover.

0:29:550:29:59

As you can see, the room is still jam-packed full of people, all hoping they are the lucky

0:29:590:30:04

ones to go off to auction, and turn their unwanted antiques into cash.

0:30:040:30:08

Let's now join up with our experts, and find out who the lucky ones are.

0:30:080:30:12

Peter, it's lovely to meet you, and I do like these graduated Shelley jugs.

0:30:120:30:17

-Yes.

-Now tell me a little bit about them, where did you get them from?

0:30:170:30:20

Well, my father saw them, I think it was before I was born.

0:30:200:30:23

He and my mother went into town in Darlington in County Durham,

0:30:230:30:27

and there was a sweet shop that was closing down, and he saw them, he was a very tall man,

0:30:270:30:32

and he saw them on a tall shelf, and asked the lady how much they were, and she said that she'd even

0:30:320:30:37

forgotten that they were up there, and if he could reach them he could have them for a pound each.

0:30:370:30:41

-Oh, fantastic.

-And he promptly bought them.

0:30:410:30:43

-So he didn't buy any sweets.

-No.

-He just bought the jugs.

0:30:430:30:45

-He just bought the jugs.

-Wonderful, what a lovely story.

0:30:450:30:47

And they've been on a shelf at home until a year ago when my mother

0:30:470:30:52

wanted me to have them, but I've nowhere to put them and I don't want them to go on a shelf,

0:30:520:30:56

so they should go to somebody who values this sort of thing.

0:30:560:31:00

Well, what I like about it is that, is that there's three, and they're graduated.

0:31:000:31:03

I really like the shape of them as well, this lovely octagonal shape,

0:31:030:31:09

which is, is based on the Mason's style.

0:31:090:31:12

And this lovely hydra figure as well, you see.

0:31:120:31:15

Ah, I thought it was a cat!

0:31:150:31:17

No, it does look a little bit, a bit like a cat.

0:31:170:31:20

But a sort of hydra figure that we find at the beginning of each handle.

0:31:200:31:23

I mean the pattern is quite, dare I say,

0:31:230:31:27

a little bit boring.

0:31:270:31:28

-Yes.

-But it's, I mean it appeals to me, this sort of chintzy,

0:31:280:31:33

chintzy feel, it's got the dragons on it, and a butterfly.

0:31:330:31:37

They have actually been transfer printed, a sheet pattern

0:31:370:31:41

which is what's been sort of wrapped around.

0:31:410:31:45

And we have got a bit of wear to them, you can see with the gilt rim,

0:31:450:31:50

it has been tarnished, a bit of wear there.

0:31:500:31:53

But nevertheless there's no chips, I can't really see any real chips or damage, which is lovely.

0:31:530:31:58

Shelley collectors often want real typical pieces of Shelley, like real art deco.

0:31:580:32:03

-You think of tea cups when you think of Shelley.

-Exactly, these don't match that, but might be something

0:32:030:32:09

-that a Shelley collector might be after.

-Right.

0:32:090:32:12

Shall we sort of put it, it's a cliche estimate I know, but shall we say £80 to £120?

0:32:120:32:16

-Sounds good.

-Happy with that?

-Very happy.

-£70 reserve?

0:32:160:32:19

Very good.

0:32:190:32:20

-Hello, Liz.

-Hi.

-You've brought a Flog It favourite,

0:32:250:32:28

haven't you, Moorcroft pottery. Now tell me all about them.

0:32:280:32:33

These were a gift to my grandmother, my mum thinks that they could have been wedding presents.

0:32:330:32:38

-And when were they married, do you know?

-I think they were probably married up in London, it would

0:32:380:32:42

-have been around early 1900s when they got married.

-Oh, that would fit in actually with the date.

0:32:420:32:49

Yeah. And then she happened to see this piece and because it matched she bought that as well.

0:32:490:32:53

And can you remember what she paid for this piece?

0:32:530:32:55

-No.

-But it was some time ago?

-Yeah, I was very young when my grandmother died, so...

0:32:550:32:59

Oh, right, OK, so how have you ended up with them?

0:32:590:33:01

Because my mum gave them to me.

0:33:010:33:03

Oh, right.

0:33:030:33:05

And they're in pride of place in your sitting room, are they?

0:33:050:33:07

They were until my husband and I got married a couple of years ago, and we got a gift of some large

0:33:070:33:12

-modern vases from our best friend Andy.

-Oh.

0:33:120:33:15

-And so unfortunately these have been relegated to the cellar.

-To the cellar!

0:33:150:33:20

-To the cellar.

-Oh, well that's not very fair is it, some wonderful quality objects like that.

0:33:200:33:23

Well, I will, I'll tell you a little bit about them!

0:33:230:33:25

They are wonderful examples of William Moorcroft's work.

0:33:250:33:28

William Moorcroft was an art nouveau designer who joined a factory called Macintyre in about 1897.

0:33:280:33:35

And basically he was given free rein in his department, and he was an artistic director if you like,

0:33:350:33:41

and to produce these art nouveau designs, under a brand name called Florian Ware.

0:33:410:33:45

-It is Florian.

-Florian Ware.

0:33:450:33:47

And he produced that, and then

0:33:470:33:49

in the early part of the 20th century he went his own way, but these are from that early period,

0:33:490:33:56

so they're not quite the 1890s period, they're more likely

0:33:560:33:59

to be 1910, 1915, somewhere around about that period.

0:33:590:34:02

And they are blue and red anemones really, the design.

0:34:020:34:05

-Right.

-Which are one of Moorcroft's favourite ways of decorating the vases.

0:34:050:34:10

But on these particular examples everything marries together very nicely.

0:34:100:34:13

We've got a very curvaceous art nouveau shape on the vases here.

0:34:130:34:18

-Yeah.

-I love these little minaret tube line decorations that go around

0:34:180:34:22

the main cartouche of the flowers,

0:34:220:34:24

and the use of these lovely colours, these subtle olive greens

0:34:240:34:28

and the dark and light blues, just to really create

0:34:280:34:32

that 3D effect, if you like.

0:34:320:34:35

And this one obviously, it's more inspired from the oriental designs,

0:34:350:34:39

-Right.

-It's almost like a gourd-shaped vase, with this little sort of knot neck there.

0:34:390:34:45

They're absolutely charming.

0:34:450:34:47

Well, I know you've brought the three items in as one lot,

0:34:470:34:50

but I think in fairness, to get the best possible price, we need to sell them in two lots.

0:34:500:34:55

The pair of vases, and the single vase. And I would put on these very pretty pair of vases £500 to £800,

0:34:550:35:01

and on this one I would put around £400 to £600.

0:35:010:35:05

And I would put the reserve at £450 and £350 respectively. Are you pleased with that?

0:35:050:35:08

-I am very pleased with that. Thank you.

-Jolly good. Now, the fateful question,

0:35:080:35:14

-what are you going to do with the cash?

-Spend it on our sick car.

-On your sick car, poor thing.

-Yes.

0:35:140:35:19

-Has it got a name, the sick car?

-He is, I'm afraid he's called Pierre.

-Pierre? Is he a French car?

0:35:190:35:25

-He's a Peugeot.

-He's a Peugeot, oh, Pierre the Peugeot, how lovely.

0:35:250:35:28

Frances, thank you for bringing along some lovely silverware.

0:35:330:35:36

I really love this.

0:35:360:35:38

Where did you get it from?

0:35:380:35:40

I inherited it from an aunt and uncle.

0:35:400:35:43

It had seen very active service until about 20 years ago.

0:35:430:35:49

But I've no use for it, we don't use it, just sits in a cupboard.

0:35:490:35:52

It's absolutely lovely. Really, I just love

0:35:520:35:56

this overlay of the silverware, sort of fretted silverware with this wonderful thistle design.

0:35:560:36:01

-I mean probably best to be sold in Scotland.

-Possibly.

0:36:010:36:05

With all the whisky drinkers up there, but it's such a nice thing and a really lovely shape as well.

0:36:050:36:09

And we can see here it's got the anchor mark on it that tells us

0:36:090:36:13

that it's Birmingham, and the letter here, the date letter is J, which dates it to 1933.

0:36:130:36:19

On the thistle there you can see that it has been engraved slightly.

0:36:190:36:22

And I just think it is quite simple, but I actually think it's a really nice piece of silver.

0:36:220:36:29

What's really nice about it as well,

0:36:290:36:31

it's got the name of the whisky maker down there, John Haig, which is lovely, really nice little touch.

0:36:310:36:36

So it's probably sold perhaps like a promotional decanter or something.

0:36:360:36:39

-Maybe, yes.

-Well, I'm just, I don't know,

0:36:390:36:42

if it were me I'd be quite reluctant to sell that, because I actually think that's quite a nice piece.

0:36:420:36:46

Yes, but we've nobody to pass it onto, it sits in the cabinet.

0:36:460:36:50

-Right. Now moving onto these, these are sort of quite, dare I say, run of the mill.

-Yes.

0:36:500:36:56

Silver salts and spoons. Again, let's just have a look at the...

0:36:560:37:02

again Birmingham, and the date on those is 1904.

0:37:020:37:08

I'd probably put those to one side and probably just

0:37:080:37:13

-put about £40 to £60 on those.

-Yeah.

0:37:130:37:16

So moving on to the decanter.

0:37:160:37:18

Shall we say about £60 to £80,

0:37:180:37:22

how does that sound?

0:37:220:37:24

Well, I'd certainly like to achieve the £80.

0:37:240:37:28

We can't put a reserve on higher than the low estimate,

0:37:280:37:31

if you get my drift, so I think with that in mind if you want £80 we need to put a fixed reserve

0:37:310:37:38

-of £80, and probably an estimate then of £80 - £120.

-That's lovely.

0:37:380:37:41

I wouldn't let it go if I was you!

0:37:410:37:44

It's now time for our final trip to the auction room, where we are selling Peter's

0:37:440:37:50

graduated Shelley jugs, which were rescued from a Darlington sweet shop.

0:37:500:37:54

Liz is hoping her grandmother's collection of Moorcroft vases will

0:37:540:37:57

fly away, as she needs the money to look after Pierre, her poorly car.

0:37:570:38:03

And of course we will also be selling Frances's fabulous John Haig whisky decanter, and pair of salts.

0:38:030:38:09

And these are the first items going under the hammer.

0:38:090:38:13

Well, things are going so well, and they could go even better right now.

0:38:150:38:18

I've been joined by Frances and Catherine, our expert.

0:38:180:38:20

We've got a couple of lots for you, one straight after the other, and first is that lovely decanter.

0:38:200:38:25

But first of all, who is this?

0:38:250:38:27

-Well, this is Reggie.

-Oh, Reggie, that's a great name.

0:38:270:38:29

And he's the reason I'm here, because I have an expensive hobby and I want to show him.

0:38:290:38:34

Oh, Reggie, oh, look at that.

0:38:340:38:37

Oh, he's gorgeous.

0:38:370:38:40

-Come on, Reggie.

-Here we go.

0:38:400:38:43

Lot number 173 is the silvery metal overlaid dimple Haig whisky bottle,

0:38:430:38:47

lot 173, who'll start me at £50?

0:38:470:38:50

Lot 173, the whisky bottle, any interest at £50, lot 173.

0:38:500:38:54

-£50 I'm bid, who's in at £60 now?

-We're looking at £80.

0:38:540:38:58

Anybody at £60? The bid is standing at £50, who's in at £60?

0:38:580:39:01

-Oh, come on.

-£60 I'm bid. £70?

0:39:010:39:04

-£80.

-We've done it.

0:39:040:39:06

£80, £90.

0:39:060:39:08

£90, bid at, you're bidding £90, the bid is at £90.

0:39:080:39:13

£100, £100 anywhere, it's at £90 now, and selling at £90.

0:39:130:39:18

Great, good valuation, and the second is my favourite,

0:39:180:39:21

I like the old English style to this, it's good.

0:39:210:39:23

Lot number 182 - pair of Edward VII silver ovoid two-handled salts

0:39:230:39:28

of Georgian design, lot number 182, who'll start me at £40?

0:39:280:39:33

£40 I'm bid, who's in at £50.

0:39:330:39:34

£50, £60, £70, £80.

0:39:340:39:37

-That's good!

-Anybody at £80? £80, £90, £100, £110, £120, anybody at £120, any interest at £120?

0:39:370:39:44

-Oh, Reggie, the price is going up!

-The bid is standing at £110 now, are we all done at £110?

0:39:440:39:50

-They deserve that.

-Excellent.

0:39:500:39:52

They were quality. That's £200 now for Reg, all for Reg, not for you.

0:39:520:39:56

Exactly!

0:39:560:39:59

Well, Catherine was on the money with those valuations.

0:39:590:40:02

Let's hope she can do just as well now with Peter's Shelley jugs.

0:40:020:40:05

-Well, good luck, Peter.

-Thank you.

0:40:050:40:08

Now's the moment of truth, just about to go under the hammer are three

0:40:080:40:11

graduating octagonal Shelley jugs, and we've got £80 to £120 on them.

0:40:110:40:15

Let's see what they do, here we go.

0:40:150:40:17

Lot number 22, the set of early 20th century Shelley pottery octagonal jugs, as on your screen, lot 22.

0:40:170:40:24

Who'll start me at £50? £50 I'm bid, who's in at £55 now,

0:40:240:40:28

any interest at £55...

0:40:280:40:30

on the telephone at £55. £60, £65.

0:40:320:40:35

£70, £75. £80, £85.

0:40:350:40:40

£90, £95.

0:40:400:40:42

Yeah, there's somebody in the room bidding.

0:40:420:40:44

-Yes.

-A good sign when the telephone comes in.

0:40:440:40:47

Looking for £100, if not I'm selling at £95, it's on the phone.

0:40:470:40:51

-Well, done, hammer's gone down now.

-Good, excellent.

0:40:510:40:55

-Very nice.

-£95. Within estimate.

-Within estimate.

0:40:550:40:57

-Very good.

-nice to have a bit more?

-Well, yes, but it'll pay for a very nice meal for mother and I.

0:40:570:41:01

-Oh, will it?

-Yes, it will.

-Good, good for you.

0:41:010:41:04

Right, now tension really is building.

0:41:070:41:10

I've just been joined by Liz, we've got two lots of Moorcroft going under the hammer, one following the other,

0:41:100:41:14

-the pair of vases to start with, £500 to £800.

-That's right, Paul.

0:41:140:41:17

It's all the money there, and the single vase, £400 to £600.

0:41:170:41:20

-That's right.

-Why are you selling these? ..Very good, very good.

-I've had to get a new car.

-Oh, have you?

0:41:200:41:25

-Yes.

-So they had to go.

-Yes, it's to finance that, I'm afraid.

0:41:250:41:29

Well, I guess it's better than being in too much debt, isn't it?

0:41:290:41:33

-Yeah, definitely.

-Let's see what we can do. Here they go.

0:41:330:41:35

Lot number 47, the pair of early 20th-century Macintyre Moorcroft pottery vases with the poppy design.

0:41:350:41:41

-Can I start at £880?

-Four bids, we're starting at £880.

0:41:410:41:45

-Ooh!

-Oh, my God!

-And I'm looking for a £900.

-Straight in.

-Phone at £900.

0:41:450:41:52

£920, £940.

0:41:520:41:53

-Hey.

-£960, £980.

0:41:530:41:56

£1,000, and 50?

0:41:560:41:58

-Oh, my life!

-£1,050, £1,100. £1,150.

0:41:580:42:03

£1,200, £1,250. £1,300, £1,350.

0:42:060:42:12

-£,1400, 1,450.

-Wow.

0:42:120:42:15

£1,500, £1,550.

0:42:150:42:17

£1,600, anybody at £1,600,

0:42:170:42:21

any interest at 1,600 online?

0:42:210:42:24

-Well, I never!

-In the room?

-Isn't that wonderful?

0:42:240:42:26

Bid is at £1,550 on the telephone, and selling at £1,550.

0:42:260:42:30

Yes, that's the first lot, £1,550.

0:42:300:42:33

OK, here's the single vase. Ready for this? We're going to add to it.

0:42:330:42:36

It's an early 20th-century Macintyre Moorcroft bulbous pottery vase with a poppy pattern.

0:42:360:42:41

-I think we might have a few bids.

-Four bids on the books, at £820.

0:42:410:42:44

Four bids, we're starting at £820.

0:42:440:42:45

-Oh, my God!

-£820 we're bid, who's in at £840, any interest at £840?

0:42:450:42:49

£840, £860, anybody at £860.

0:42:490:42:52

On the phone at £840 now, anybody at £860, any interest at £860?

0:42:520:42:57

-Gosh.

-If not I'm selling at £840, the bid is on the phone at £840.

0:42:570:43:01

Gosh, yes, straight in!

0:43:010:43:03

-Excellent.

-You were taken by surprise too.

0:43:030:43:05

-£840, that's £2,390.

-Excellent.

0:43:050:43:08

Has that paid for the car?

0:43:080:43:10

-The debts are going, the debts are going.

-They are.

-What a great thing!

0:43:100:43:14

-That's done the car, thank you.

-Oh, thank you so much.

0:43:140:43:16

-Oh, what a lovely feeling, isn't it?

-Yeah, it is.

0:43:160:43:18

Well done Liz, you've had a great day out, she's thoroughly enjoyed herself.

0:43:180:43:22

We've certainly, certainly been under a bit of stress here, but what a wonderful day,

0:43:220:43:27

and what a wonderful thing to end on as well.

0:43:270:43:30

You know, if you've got anything like that we'd love to see you

0:43:300:43:33

at a valuation day, so until the next time, from Canterbury, it's cheerio.

0:43:330:43:36

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:450:43:48

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:480:43:52

Presenter Paul Martin is joined by experts Mark Stacey and Catherine Southon in the port town of Dover. Paul happily relives his drumming days when he comes across a Ludwig snare drum, while Catherine finds three graduated Shelley jugs which were rescued from a sweet shop that was closing down. Finally Mark values some Flog It! favourites - a collection of Moorcroft vases - but will they be popular with the bidders at the auction in Canterbury?

Paul takes a break from the antiques as he heads underground to investigate some tunnels which played a fundamental part in the World War Two efforts and the evacuation of Dunkirk.