Wilmslow Flog It!


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Wilmslow

Paul Martin and the team visit Wilmslow. Jewellery, toys, porcelain and a Georgian tea table all go under the hammer, and Paul visits Manchester's Victoria Baths.


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Welcome to Flog It!, the show where our team of experts value your antiques and collectibles.

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-Would you be happy to sell them at that?

-Yes.

-You'd be delighted to sell them at that.

-Yes, I would.

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And if you like what you hear then we'll whisk you and your items off to auction.

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-What are you going to do with all of that?

-Spend.

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-Spend, spend, spend.

-In a word, spend it.

-That's what I like.

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Today, Flog It! is in the northwest county of Cheshire just south of Manchester.

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We're in an area known as the Golden Triangle, made up of three

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affluent towns, Alderley Edge, Prestbury, and Wilmslow.

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And the area is well known for its famous footballers

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and TV soap stars for local residents.

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And of course with locals like that around it's no wonder the area is

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peppered with fabulous bars, restaurants, and boutiques.

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I'm keeping my fingers crossed today that some of the rich and famous may turn up at the valuation day.

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We may even see a Ming vase or a Faberge egg.

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And this is where we're hunting for treasures today, the Wilmslow Leisure Centre.

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Helping me out are our two experts,

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Anita Manning and James Lewis, working hard already.

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I've got a great crowd around me here, all hoping

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they've got something worth, well, possibly half a million. Have they?

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We don't know, we'll find out.

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If you're happy with the valuations these guys are going to give you, what are you going to do?

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-ALL:

-Flog It!

-Exactly.

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Well, my watch now says 9:30; your clock says, oh, 6:00!

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But I think it's time we got everyone to the blue tablecloth and let's see what we've got.

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Now everybody's seated inside,

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we can get the show under way and it looks like James has already spotted something.

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Let's take a closer look.

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I think St Bernard dogs are famous for going and rescuing people in the wet and windy weather, aren't they?

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-Yes.

-And the cold. Unfortunately they haven't got a nice big keg of rum around their neck.

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They are St Bernards, aren't they?

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Well, I've always they were, yes.

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Are they something that's been in the family a long time?

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Yes, they used to belong to my grandmother.

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Ever since... oh, probably five or six year old,

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I always remember them and always saying that I wanted them.

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-Yeah.

-Well, she passed away when I was about 13 or 14.

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They then went on to my parents who then have given them to me.

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Well, nobody particularly likes them in the family except for myself,

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so they're always stuck up in the loft wrapped away.

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-You're allowed something out of you like, surely?

-No.

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-Dust gatherers, I'm told. So...

-It's a hard life.

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So I've brought them along because you always wonder whether they are

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worth anything or are they just cheap porcelain dogs that people used to buy.

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Well, let's have a look for you, see what we can find out.

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These would have been made in Staffordshire between 1850 and 1880, something around there.

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The coats are moulded, and if we have a look down the centre of the dog

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you see a mould line, and that's where the dog has been made in a mould

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and the two halves have been put together.

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The eyes have been...

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set in, they're glass eyes,

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and they're similar to the little eyes that you had on dolls of the same period.

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The decoration is sprayed on rather than hand painted, which gives this quite a soft look.

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When we're talking about pairs of Staffordshire dogs,

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the ones we think about are the pairs of Staffordshire spaniels

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that my grandmother, my great-aunt in Wales,

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all had them on the hearth, and they're worth very little.

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These, they were cheaply produced in their day

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and they're not hugely valuable now.

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I've got a suspicion that you don't actually want to sell these, do you?

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No, not really. But my partner, she just doesn't like them.

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Wouldn't she like them, having been shown all over 30 countries all over the world, millions of people?

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-I would hope so.

-They'd be the famous family dogs then.

-They would be. Yes.

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I'm thinking about coming at this from a slightly different perspective.

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I think they're worth £30 to £50.

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-So if they sold for 60, they've done really, really well and they've made more than they're worth.

-Yes.

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So the theory is if they sell for £60 then great, they've done really well.

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-If they don't sell at £60, then great because you've got them back.

-Yep.

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And hopefully, having been on telly, she'll allow you to put them out.

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They will be on the hearth then for everybody to see.

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-So we'll have to put 60 to 100 on them.

-OK.

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At this rate, they might make 200 and make me look really silly.

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One would hope so, yes.

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Welcome to Flog It!, and it's an absolute delight to see this

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smashing Victorian Albert and pocket watch.

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Where did you get them?

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It was left to me by an elderly gentleman that I was very close to,

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and I believe that it belonged to his father.

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-Right. And you've brought a photograph along today.

-That's correct, yes.

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-Do you wear these when you're going on a night out, Bill?

-Certainly not, no.

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Not your style? Not your style, though they are very desirable.

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-This watch here is what we call a half hunter.

-Right.

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And that's because the front plate here has the inner half removed

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and the little glass panel put in,

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and it means that you can tell the time without opening your watch.

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-Yeah, just the glass.

-It's very simple, it's just an easy device.

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This is what we call an Albert, which is a watch chain,

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and as we can see in the photograph,

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this would be attached to a buttonhole.

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We have two clips here, one possibly for your watch and another one for a little fob.

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-Here, this little fob here looks like a football medal, Bill.

-Hmm.

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Do you know anything about that, did this gentleman have anything to do with football?

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Only that he was an ardent fan of Bolton Wanderers,

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and did go watching them an awful lot.

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And there is a little trophy on the coin there,

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and Bolton Wanderers first won the FA Cup in the '20s.

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-Yes. So this would be a commemorative fob for that time.

-I would think so, yes.

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Because this Albert would date from maybe the 1880s

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right up to 1910, 1920.

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In the '30s, pocket watches went out of fashion and were replaced by wristwatches.

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So we've got a very nice item here, it's in very good condition and the weight is good.

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This is a good time to sell this type of item, Bill,

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because the gold metal price is high,

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and what that is doing is pulling up the price of items made of gold.

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-On your Albert and watch, I would put them as one lot.

-Uh-huh.

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-And I would estimate them £200 to £300.

-Right.

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-Would you be happy to sell them at that?

-I would, yeah.

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-Thank you for bringing them along, it's always nice to see good items.

-Thank you.

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-I'll see you at the auction.

-You certainly will.

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While our experts are busy at the tables,

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I'm sort of diving in and out of the queue and I've just bumped into somebody

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-who's carrying something rather interesting. What's your name?

-Tregony.

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-That's a place in Cornwall, isn't it?

-It is.

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-It is a little village.

-Yes, indeed.

-Where's this from then?

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Well, an old chap gave it to me.

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Knowing that I do a lot of animal rescue work, he thought it might come in handy.

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-I've always thought that it was something like a cat carrier but I don't know.

-It's not.

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-It's a First World War messenger pigeon carrier.

-Is it?

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Yes. It's a rare little thing and it's a bygone.

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-And this would have saved somebody's life, you never know.

-No.

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A few pigeons like this would have got a message across to somebody and

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hopefully done a bit for the war effort.

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I think you should hang on to this because to put it into auction,

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we've got to put a value on it of around £15 to £20.

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I don't think it's going to get that.

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-No.

-It's a bit too tatty.

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Yes, well my husband said it was a case of either flog it or bin it, but I think I'll keep hold of it.

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It's too good to bin, isn't it?

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-It's too good to bin. You could clean it up.

-Right.

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But I don't know how you could use it in the house.

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-Dried flowers sticking out of it?

-Yeah, you've got to be creative.

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You could put dried flowers, but isn't that fascinating?

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That's the great thing about valuation day, you never know what's going to turn up.

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-Thank you very much.

-Wonderful meeting you as well, and your lovely Cornish name.

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Sheila, about half an hour, 45 minutes ago, one of the off-screen valuers came over and said,

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"James look, some marbles, Victorian ones, they're interesting, aren't they?" I said, "Oh, yes."

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All I can tell you, they're marbles.

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I haven't got a clue what you do with them.

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The reason I got them out was because Paul Martin went to the Marble Museum in Devon.

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Martin! Paul Martin, where is he?

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-Marbles.

-You've been to a marble museum, I hear?

-Yes, I have.

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-I need to watch Flog It!, tell me about these.

-They're Victorian marbles, aren't they?

-Which ones?

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These swirly ones here.

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-What are these?

-They're slightly earlier, early 1800s.

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-So they're nearly 200 years old?

-Yeah, you've got a nice little collection there.

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-And there's three ways to flick a marble and I've forgotten which is which now.

-You must remember one.

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-Someone was doing this earlier.

-Yes. Yeah...

-How on earth does that work?

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I'm not sure, you flick it from...like that.

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Oh, I've not seen that before.

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Whoop... WHOOP!

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THEY LAUGH

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Oh, dear, it's gone.

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Well, I've learned something.

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I used to play things like shove penny at school, but never marbles.

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They're handmade but they're never spherical because there's a part of the top there,

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and a little pontil at the bottom, and where the pontil's snapped off,

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they're ground down, so do you see they're slightly off...

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off circular from that side.

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Yeah, they're flatter there than they are there.

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And there is a really good market for them.

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I have sold them at auction before and they always do quite well,

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but normally you would put them into a specialist toy sale.

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It's the toy buyers that tend to go for them rather than the glass buyers.

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-Have you ever played with them?

-No.

-Did you play with them as a kid?

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No, I bought them when my children were little from school fetes,

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and I liked them so much I thought it was a shame to play with them

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so they've been in the cupboard ever since.

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-Your kids never played with them?

-No.

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-You are mean.

-I know. They played with the ones that were ordinary ones like that.

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Did they know you had these?

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No.

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So, what are they worth...? Erm...

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if we look at how many of these we've got.

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OK, I reckon we've got £25-£30 worth there, another ten there, £35 to £45.

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-Very good.

-Is that all right?

-That's fine.

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What did it cost you at the school fete?

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-Pennies.

-Pennies.

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You've done all right.

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I have to say I wasn't expecting to be talking about marbles today.

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No, and I want to lose mine now!

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We've found some cracking items this morning and now it's time to put our valuations to the test,

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and this is where we're doing it, courtesy of Adam Partridge Auctioneers and Valuers,

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near Congleton, south of Wilmslow.

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The auction is about to start so I'm going to go inside and catch up with our owners

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cos they'll be feeling nervous, and leave you with a quick rundown of all the items

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we're putting under the hammer.

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Pete is sending his inherited St Bernard dogs off to auction as his partner isn't keen on them,

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but I don't think Pete will be crying if they don't sell.

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Will the bidders fall in love with Bill's Victorian half hunter watch and Albert chain?

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Anita thinks they could do well.

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And finally, Sheila bought her marbles from a school fete.

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I know these'll hit the spot. She's bound to get a good

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return for her money as she only paid pennies for them.

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And now it's time to find out, as Sheila's marbles are first to roll under the hammer,

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and auctioneer Adam Partridge is already in full swing.

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Someone who's definitely not losing their marbles is Sheila

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because she's selling them right now and right here.

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We've got a collection of Victorian marbles, haven't we, and we've put £30 to £50 on them.

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-Since the valuation day you've now put a reserve on them.

-Yes.

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You feel you didn't want them to go for nothing?

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-No.

-I don't blame you in a way, was James talking into no reserve?

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-Yes.

-That old auctioneer's trick?

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-I was trying.

-Fingers crossed anyway.

-What was the reserve?

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-We've got £25, haven't we, on these?

-Cor... Nah, should be fine, shouldn't it?

-It should roll away.

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We're going to find out in just a moment, here it is now.

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Lovely lot now, lot number 40, around 79 marbles.

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Victorian and other marbles,

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and we've got a range of interest as well.

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-Ooh, ooh, ooh.

-I'm bid £35.

-Yay!

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-Straight in.

-45... 55, 60 bid...

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At £60, any more... five, 70...five,

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-80... £80...

-Fantastic.

-That's brilliant.

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£80 there... Only £1 each, £80...

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Any advance now, £80 and selling at £80.

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-Fantastic.

-That's good.

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-Didn't need that reserve, did we?

-No.

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Do you know that shows how important it is

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to put it into the right sale, he's got toys everywhere.

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-It is the best sale to put them in, they've done it brilliantly.

-Well, done, Sheila.

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Thank you.

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Wow, we've got off to a brilliant start and Sheila's made a fantastic return on her marbles.

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Now let's see if James can do as well with his valuation of Pete's St Bernard dogs.

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Well, so far so good, and now this brings us to the dogs, yes, the pottery dogs,

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the two St Bernard ones, which James valued but brought along here by Pete.

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Now you had your eye on these, didn't you, as a nipper?

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Yeah. Nobody else in the family likes them but me.

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So I've now decided to sell them.

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They are nice dogs, they're great dogs, obviously a lot cheaper than

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real St Bernards, we'll put it that way.

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-We had a deal, didn't we?

-We did.

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That if they don't sell, they've got to have them on display.

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-So in a way, we're hoping they won't sell.

-Yeah.

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Let's see if they go walkies.

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Next lot is number 303,

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pair of Victorian pottery models of St Bernard dogs.

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What do we say for those, £100...

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£50 then, £50 the St Bernards...

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-Bid me 50.

-Come on.

-Start with 50...

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£50, the St Bernard dogs.

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Who'll start me 30 then?

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30 I've got, £30... and five now, £35...

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and 40, and five...

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and 50...

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No, I'm afraid they're going to have to be passed.

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-They're going home.

-Well, done. Congratulations!

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-Brilliant news.

-I'm so pleased they're staying in the family.

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Really pleased, has he lost a bet? Excellent, well done.

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You've got to be pleased.

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Well, I am. I don't think the missus will be but that's another matter.

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Going under the hammer we've got a Victorian gold pocket watch with a fantastic Albert chain,

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-and I think the value's in this chain, Bill, don't you?

-Certainly.

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Let's hope we get your top end, Anita, because you loved this chain.

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The chain was good, a double Albert, and the people will like that.

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We'll find out exactly what this lot think right now cos it's going under the hammer, good luck.

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Next lot is 644, it's a 9-carat gold Albert chain,

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with a fob as well.

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Over 36 grams in weight here, it comes with a gold-plated

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half hunter watch and interest starts with 200...

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210, take 20... 220, 230... 240, 250... 260 bid, 260...

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Any advance, at £260...

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Are you all done at 260? Anyone else now?

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At 260, you're out on line we're selling in the room, at £260...

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All done now, and selling at 260.

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I think we're all smiling.

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-We're all smiling.

-Excellent.

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I'm so happy for you, it's such a good result.

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Well, that concludes our first visit to the auction room today,

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we are coming back later on in the show so don't go away because there will be one or two surprises.

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And later at the valuation day, we'll meet Linda, a lovely lady

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but, tut tut tut, I don't think she's been watching Flog It! often enough.

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-Me and my husband were tidying the house out.

-So this might have gone to the charity shop?

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Until this neighbour said it was Troika, and we're like, "Ooh, what's Troika?"

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Thank goodness Linda has antique-savvy friends to look out for her.

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But before I go back to the valuation day to join up with our experts

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to find some more antiques to go under the hammer,

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I'm popping in to nearby Manchester to check out the most glorious Edwardian building.

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We've all heard that phrase, haven't we, "they don't build them like they used to"?

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What I'm referring to is this magnificent, striking, Edwardian building, just look at it.

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What I love about this is the fact that its location

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is in a typical part of suburbia of Manchester -

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ordinary buildings, some new builds as well, but when you look at that facade,

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in it's brick and terracotta sort of fashion, you think "Wow, what was that built for?"

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We're about a mile and a half from the centre of Manchester and this extraordinary building

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is called Victoria Baths.

0:18:120:18:14

It was created with the intention of keeping the locals clean and fit.

0:18:140:18:18

It was built by Manchester Council and completed in 1906 at a cost of around £60,000,

0:18:180:18:24

which was a lot of money, today's equivalent is around £4 million.

0:18:240:18:28

I couldn't imagine a public swimming baths being built to this specification today, could you?

0:18:280:18:32

It's absolutely magnificent!

0:18:320:18:34

In its day, this build had no expense spared on it.

0:18:340:18:37

In fact the Lord Mayor at the opening ceremony of Victoria Baths actually said

0:18:370:18:42

this is a water palace that every citizen of Manchester could be proud of.

0:18:420:18:46

And do you know what, he was right, wasn't he?

0:18:460:18:49

Sadly, the baths aren't open to the public any more, they closed in 1993 due to spiralling running costs.

0:18:490:18:55

But the good news is a trust was set up to preserve this fine building,

0:18:550:18:59

and I've been told the inside is as sumptuous as the exterior

0:18:590:19:03

and I've been lucky enough to have my own private tour today by trust member Gill Wright,

0:19:030:19:08

so I'm going to get inside and soak up this architectural dream.

0:19:080:19:12

Gill, hello.

0:19:130:19:15

-Welcome to Victoria Baths.

-Thank you for inviting me.

0:19:150:19:18

I tell you what, the exterior facade is setting me up for I don't what, but I want a big surprise.

0:19:180:19:22

Well, you've come to a beautiful building.

0:19:220:19:25

-The first thing that strikes me is there's three entrances, why?

-That's right.

0:19:250:19:29

Well, Victoria Baths was built in three sections

0:19:290:19:31

and there's three distinct parts of the building with an entrance for the Males, First Class,

0:19:310:19:36

the Males, Second Class, and then the Females.

0:19:360:19:39

-When you say Males, First Class?

-That was the men and boys who could afford to pay more for their swim.

0:19:390:19:44

-They got a better size pool?

-They got the most ornate entrance hall, the one we're in now.

0:19:440:19:48

-They got the largest swimming pool, and we think they also got the freshest water as well.

-Did they?

0:19:480:19:53

It's said that the water was put into the first-class pool, pumped out, filtered, aerated

0:19:530:19:57

put into the second-class pool, pumped out, filtered, aerated and put into the females pool.

0:19:570:20:02

-No,

-really? That's what they say.

0:20:020:20:04

Gosh, I can't wait for my tour.

0:20:040:20:05

Do I have to pay to go through the turnstiles?

0:20:050:20:09

-Do you want to see the rest of the building?

-I'd love to.

0:20:090:20:12

I'll follow you, Gill.

0:20:120:20:14

It's got the wow factor.

0:20:140:20:16

Is it usual for every Edwardian public swimming pool to have this spec of build?

0:20:210:20:26

Well, councils were very proud of their public provision often,

0:20:260:20:30

in terms of things like baths and washhouses, because it was about improving public health.

0:20:300:20:34

But it was unusual to have a building so ornate as this.

0:20:340:20:37

You see in the level of opulence that was usually put into things like town halls,

0:20:370:20:41

here in a public baths, so it is a pretty unique building.

0:20:410:20:45

So where are we now, Gill?

0:20:470:20:48

-Originally this used to be the area that housed the First Class Males wash baths.

-OK.

0:20:480:20:54

So as you come in, there's rows and rows of baths along here?

0:20:580:21:01

That's right, separate cubicles, each one with their own bathtub.

0:21:010:21:05

I would come in here in the first-class bath.

0:21:050:21:07

-I could run my own bath, could I?

-That's right.

0:21:070:21:09

Unlike the second-class customers who had their water controlled by

0:21:090:21:13

the attendant, so you only got one fill and that was probably it.

0:21:130:21:16

Of course, providing baths was a really important function of the building.

0:21:160:21:20

We think of it as a swimming pool, and indeed it was for swimming, but providing ordinary private baths

0:21:200:21:25

was an important function at a time when hardly anyone had bathrooms in their own homes.

0:21:250:21:29

And even up to the 1960s, there were something like 20,000 houses in Manchester didn't have bathrooms

0:21:290:21:35

then, so it was still an important public facility in terms of bathing right up until the 1960s and '70s.

0:21:350:21:42

Can you imagine having a bath here in this room?

0:21:420:21:44

It would be very luxurious, better than you'd have in your own home.

0:21:440:21:47

Not just a physical cleansing, it'd be more of a spiritual one.

0:21:470:21:50

-I mean just look at the place, it's like a temple.

-Definitely.

0:21:500:21:54

So which pool is this?

0:22:010:22:02

This one's the Females pool.

0:22:020:22:04

This is quite a decent size.

0:22:040:22:06

Well, it is, actually. In 1906, it was quite unusual to give the women

0:22:060:22:10

and girls a full 25-yard pool, but that's what we've got here.

0:22:100:22:13

It is narrower than the second-class and the first-class, only 30-foot wide,

0:22:130:22:17

but it's the full competition length of 25 yards.

0:22:170:22:20

Not a well known fact but Britain lead the way in the development of competitive swimming

0:22:200:22:24

in the early 20th century, and here at Manchester, because we had a gala pool

0:22:240:22:28

with good spectator seating, it put Manchester in a position

0:22:280:22:31

where it could host very important national and international swimming events.

0:22:310:22:36

But also, in the winter months they would drain the gala pool and floor it over,

0:22:360:22:40

and it would be used as a venue for things such as dances.

0:22:400:22:42

-Dances were very popular here for many years.

-Oh, lovely!

0:22:420:22:45

And many people in Manchester still remember the dances that were held here in the early 1950s.

0:22:450:22:51

They also used the dance floor to play bowls on, indoor bowls.

0:22:530:22:57

Well, they certainly made great use of the space, didn't they?

0:22:570:23:00

I would imagine just coming here would feel like a really special event.

0:23:000:23:04

-You mentioned Turkish Baths, can we go have a look at those?

-Yes.

0:23:040:23:07

We're coming through into the Turkish Bath Suite.

0:23:150:23:18

The Turkish Baths has a suite of rooms and what's interesting to think is although we call

0:23:180:23:23

them Turkish Baths in Britain, technically they're Roman Baths.

0:23:230:23:26

They're heated with hot air and this is the tepidarium,

0:23:260:23:29

which is warm, then there's the caladarium, which is hot, and the laconicum, which is even hotter.

0:23:290:23:34

So it's rising levels of dry heat.

0:23:340:23:36

-So you swap between the three of them?

-You work your way up.

0:23:360:23:38

People have their own way of taking a Turkish bath but quite often you work your way up.

0:23:380:23:43

You certainly wouldn't go straight into the hot room.

0:23:430:23:45

-Yes, let's go there.

-Go and see the rest of the hot rooms?

0:23:450:23:48

So this is the rest room.

0:23:560:23:57

Yes, it's often the most ornate of the rooms, the most decorated

0:23:570:24:00

room of the Turkish Bath Suite, and certainly you can see that here.

0:24:000:24:04

What would it have been furnished with, reclining chairs?

0:24:040:24:08

Yes, or even beds. There were cubicles at the side with beds in,

0:24:080:24:11

because at the end of the session you come in here to cool off

0:24:110:24:14

and get your body used to normal temperatures again,

0:24:140:24:16

but you're in a really, really relaxed state.

0:24:160:24:18

It was a case to lie down and people would often fall asleep, even in middle of the day.

0:24:180:24:23

But there'd also be attendants who would come and offer you tea and scones.

0:24:230:24:26

-Doesn't it sound wonderful?

-You're certainly being looked after when you take a Turkish Bath.

0:24:260:24:31

I love the stained-glass windows as well, it catches the light beautifully here.

0:24:310:24:35

They really are unique.

0:24:350:24:37

We were very lucky, the glass was very intact, so most of the glass you see is the original period glass

0:24:370:24:43

but they've been completely re-leaded and new window frames,

0:24:430:24:46

-and really brought them back to their former glory.

-You've done a terrific job.

0:24:460:24:50

We're really pleased with restoration phase one, and it makes us even more determined to go on

0:24:500:24:54

and restore the rest of the building and to get the Turkish Bath Suite back in public use.

0:24:540:24:59

And that's good because that was what the building was for,

0:24:590:25:01

wasn't it, for the public to enjoy it every day.

0:25:010:25:04

Absolutely, it was built for the public good and we want it restored for the public good.

0:25:040:25:08

Long may it continue, Gill, thank you so much.

0:25:080:25:10

-Thank you very much for coming.

-You've put a smile on my face.

0:25:100:25:13

Well, we're back at the valuation day here at the Wilmslow Leisure Centre,

0:25:250:25:29

and as you can see there's still hundreds of people down there.

0:25:290:25:32

There's no rest for our experts. Let's join up with them and see how they're getting on.

0:25:320:25:36

Linda, some people love Troika, some people hate it.

0:25:410:25:46

I love it and I'm delighted to see this collection here today.

0:25:460:25:51

Tell me, where did you get it?

0:25:510:25:54

It was my uncle's.

0:25:540:25:56

He died a couple of months ago and me and my husband were tidying the house out

0:25:560:26:01

and we didn't even know what Troika was until his next-door neighbour came in.

0:26:010:26:06

We were packaging it up to send to the Animal Shelter charity shop.

0:26:060:26:10

-So this might have gone to the charity shop?

-Mm-hm.

0:26:100:26:14

Until this neighbour said it was Troika, and we're like "Ooh, what's Troika?"

0:26:140:26:18

And then she came round and said you know it may be valuable or whatever, so we decided to keep it.

0:26:180:26:25

Excuse me for mentioning this but there's a smell of turpentine off that one!

0:26:250:26:32

Well, my husband was actually using that one to put the paintbrushes in to clean them each night.

0:26:320:26:40

So that's why it's got a smell to it.

0:26:400:26:41

-Don't tell me any more, don't tell me any more. I

-know.

0:26:410:26:45

Let's have a look at the objects because I love them and I find them very interesting.

0:26:450:26:50

Troika of course started in the 1960s, it was a sculptor, an architect, and a potter.

0:26:500:26:57

-They made these objects in St Ives in Cornwall.

-Right.

0:26:570:27:01

The pottery only produced items from 1963 to the early 1980s,

0:27:010:27:08

so it was a short period.

0:27:080:27:11

The first of the items made in St Ives were monochrome,

0:27:110:27:16

they were white, they were grey, they were black,

0:27:160:27:19

and they weren't too popular.

0:27:190:27:21

In the 1970s they moved to Newlyn.

0:27:210:27:24

-Right.

-And they started to sell in Heals, Selfridges, and Liberty's.

0:27:240:27:30

These were prestigious outlets and they started to develop

0:27:300:27:34

this colour range and it became very, very popular.

0:27:340:27:39

We have a variety of shapes here and if we look at them,

0:27:390:27:44

we have this Celtic cross here.

0:27:440:27:47

Now many of the Troika designs were based on Celtic myths, Celtic shapes,

0:27:470:27:52

-Celtic sculptures, and this is good example.

-Yes.

0:27:520:27:58

This one, it's called a slab vase, and if we look at it,

0:27:580:28:04

we see that's it's probably been influenced by the craggy landscapes

0:28:040:28:10

of Cornwall, the rocks, the gravels, the mines, and so on.

0:28:100:28:15

This one is a cube vase,

0:28:150:28:19

and this probably a little marmalade pot,

0:28:190:28:22

and we have an ashtray here.

0:28:220:28:25

It's quite a nice collection from the 1970's range and would have sold to the tourist.

0:28:250:28:31

I would put an estimate of them cumulatively between £200 and £300.

0:28:310:28:37

-Would you be happy to sell them at that?

-Yes.

0:28:370:28:39

You'd be delighted to sell them at that!

0:28:390:28:41

To sell them at that, yes, I would!

0:28:410:28:43

We'll put a reserve of say £150, they'll do better than that,

0:28:430:28:48

-the reserve's really only to protect them.

-Right, OK.

0:28:480:28:51

£200 to £300, reserve of 150,

0:28:510:28:56

-and you'll be glad to see them out of your house.

-I will!

0:28:560:29:00

-But thank you for bringing them along.

-You're welcome.

0:29:000:29:02

-because I love them.

-You buy them!

0:29:020:29:05

Fine tone for such a small body.

0:29:080:29:12

-Does it work?

-It does.

-Does it?

0:29:120:29:14

Well, we'll see what we can do.

0:29:140:29:17

Good luck today.

0:29:170:29:19

-Bill, great to see you.

-Thank you.

-This wasn't destined for Flog It?

0:29:210:29:24

-No.

-This was destined for somewhere else, are you going to admit where?

0:29:240:29:28

Yes, I admit I was going to take it to tip.

0:29:280:29:31

Why on earth would you take this to the tip?

0:29:310:29:34

Just got fed up with it and lost all interest in it.

0:29:340:29:38

Well, let's have a look at what it is.

0:29:380:29:41

It's a George IV, so that's 1820 to 1830, could be almost William IV 1830-1835, tea table.

0:29:410:29:49

They often came in pairs; one was baize-lined for playing cards,

0:29:490:29:54

the other one, if you open it up,

0:29:540:29:57

plain mahogany for drinking tea.

0:29:570:30:00

Although it's not in the best of conditions at the moment, it's still, in my opinion, worth restoring.

0:30:000:30:06

We've got this quite a deep frieze and here is the bracket carved in the form of an acanthus leaf.

0:30:060:30:13

Then look at the quality of the veneer going down here, it's rich, it's wonderfully tight grain,

0:30:130:30:20

and it's quality mahogany you'd get on the back of a violin, so often called fiddle-back mahogany.

0:30:200:30:27

Then we have this rectangular dished sockle

0:30:270:30:31

and these wonderful hairy paw feet, I think they're lovely.

0:30:310:30:37

So this is a piece of furniture that has been around for almost 200 years

0:30:370:30:42

and for me, it would be a crying shame to see it on the tip.

0:30:420:30:45

What did you pay for it 40 years ago, do you remember?

0:30:450:30:48

£45.

0:30:480:30:50

-Did you? That was a lot of money then, that was a week or two's wages, wasn't it?

-Yeah.

0:30:500:30:54

I don't think you'll get an average week or two's wages for it today.

0:30:540:30:57

The top is suffering from what we call smiling.

0:30:570:31:02

It's warped and buckled, but if that was steamed

0:31:020:31:07

with a big heavy weight, you clamp it in the middle,

0:31:070:31:12

-that could be put back.

-Right.

-You've got bits of veneer missing from the corners,

0:31:120:31:16

and it isn't as saleable and as fashionable as it once was, but these things come back.

0:31:160:31:23

I always say that if something's out of fashion, it's just about to come back.

0:31:230:31:27

-Yes.

-And this, I think, will be a fashionable object again very soon.

0:31:270:31:30

But at the moment,

0:31:300:31:33

£100 to £150, something like that,

0:31:330:31:37

but goodness me, it's better than on a skip, isn't it?

0:31:370:31:40

It is, yes, a lot better.

0:31:400:31:41

-You don't want it back do you?

-No.

-So zero reserve, let's just sell it.

0:31:410:31:45

-Yep.

-See how it goes.

0:31:450:31:47

Welcome to Flog It, and you've brought an interesting

0:31:570:32:01

wee lot of silver objects for us to look at today.

0:32:010:32:04

Tell me, where did you get them?

0:32:040:32:06

These two are my husband's and he inherited them from his father

0:32:060:32:09

when he died, and that I inherited from my mum,

0:32:090:32:13

and it belonged either to my grandmother or my great-aunt.

0:32:130:32:18

-So it's come from two separate sides of the family?

-Yes.

0:32:180:32:21

I think this is a sort of feminine thing,

0:32:210:32:23

and I think these boxes are a wee bit masculine.

0:32:230:32:26

Absolutely, I agree with you there.

0:32:260:32:28

Let's look at what we have.

0:32:280:32:30

We have two vesta boxes, and a vesta box is a container for matches

0:32:300:32:36

-and often has an abrasive strip to strike your matches.

-Right.

0:32:360:32:41

This one here was made in Birmingham, 1902,

0:32:410:32:46

and on the front here we have the Bond of Empire,

0:32:460:32:50

which may have had something to do with Chamberlain

0:32:500:32:55

-and what was happening at the time.

-Ah, right.

0:32:550:32:59

This one here quite different,

0:32:590:33:01

it's Continental and quite possibly French, it does have a French feel,

0:33:010:33:07

where we have two little cherubs in a garden,

0:33:070:33:11

but my favourite piece is this silver Art Deco compact.

0:33:110:33:18

Again it was made in Birmingham, and it's from 1921, which was

0:33:180:33:24

-just at the beginning of the Art Deco period.

-Right.

0:33:240:33:29

It's machined silver with this wonderful Art Deco geometric motif,

0:33:290:33:36

and it reminds me of cinema, the Odeon, America,

0:33:360:33:41

glamour, and so on and so forth.

0:33:410:33:45

So it's quite a varied but an exciting wee lot.

0:33:450:33:49

Tell me, have you any idea of value on these little boxes?

0:33:490:33:53

I have no idea, but at a guess I would think these

0:33:530:33:56

would be worth about £10 a piece and that one maybe £20 to £25.

0:33:560:34:01

You're not bad at this!

0:34:010:34:04

Don't think I'll make a living at it.

0:34:040:34:07

Auction valuation I would say perhaps, if we put it in at...

0:34:070:34:13

50 to 80, would you be happy to sell them at that?

0:34:130:34:18

Yes, very happy.

0:34:180:34:20

Very happy?

0:34:200:34:21

Well, let's hope we get the higher estimate.

0:34:210:34:24

-That would be good.

-Thank you so much for bringing them along.

0:34:240:34:28

I love these objects, particularly that compact, and I'm sure they'll do very well at the auction.

0:34:280:34:35

Well, thank you for helping me value them!

0:34:350:34:38

'It's now time for our final trip to the auction room but before we see our items go under the hammer,

0:34:380:34:44

'I caught up with Adam Partridge, today's auctioneer,

0:34:440:34:47

'to see what he thought about Anita's valuation of the Troika collection,

0:34:470:34:51

'which we saw just a few minutes ago.'

0:34:510:34:53

OK, we've got some Troika brought in by Linda.

0:34:530:34:57

It belonged to her uncle and she wants to sell this,

0:34:570:35:00

and it was originally valued at £200 to £300 for the whole lot, but I know you've split them.

0:35:000:35:05

Yes. Well, of course, I've split them into three, being that one, that one, and that one.

0:35:050:35:11

Yeah, and that's a good little starter's level really.

0:35:110:35:13

-Entry-level collection.

-Then you get interested, you learn a bit more about the artist.

0:35:130:35:18

Yeah, and you trade those in to get one of those.

0:35:180:35:20

Exactly, that's what it's all about, always trade upwards. I like this a lot.

0:35:200:35:24

This is the rare piece, the Celtic Cross design.

0:35:240:35:26

I've sold so much Troika over the years, you've seen a lot of it,

0:35:260:35:29

-have you seen one of these before?

-No.

0:35:290:35:32

-OK, it's that rare.

-I think it's going to make £300 to £500 probably.

0:35:320:35:35

This is the next best, smooth-sided slab vase, so that one I've put in 60 to 80,

0:35:350:35:40

-because that makes that the 200 to 300 already.

-Sure.

-But I think it'll make more than that.

0:35:400:35:44

Yeah, that'll do about 140, won't it?

0:35:440:35:46

Yeah, should do over 100, and then these should do 100.

0:35:460:35:50

-Easily.

-Your common one's there, the cube planter with no feet, the ashtray, and the marmalade pot.

0:35:500:35:55

I'm very excited about these, it reminds me of home.

0:35:560:35:59

I think you should get on the rostrum now and, as they say where I come from,

0:35:590:36:03

-do a proper job, my handsome.

-D'rectly.

-D'rectly, yeah you've got it!

0:36:030:36:06

'I think Adam was right to split Linda's Troika into three lots,

0:36:060:36:09

'and we'll soon see if they stir up any interest

0:36:090:36:11

'in the auction room later on.

0:36:110:36:12

'Joining Linda's Troika is Jan's collection of inherited silver,

0:36:120:36:17

'two vesta cases and a compact.

0:36:170:36:19

'And finally, Bill's tea table is going under the hammer.

0:36:190:36:22

'James convinced Bill to put it into the sale with no reserve,

0:36:220:36:26

'but anything it makes will be a bonus,

0:36:260:36:28

'because it was heading for the tip.

0:36:280:36:29

'Let's find out now how it fares.'

0:36:290:36:32

-Well, good luck, Bill, that's all I can say. You deserve it.

-Thank you.

0:36:340:36:37

I've just been having a chat to Bill and we've been saying the whole world right now is going on about

0:36:370:36:42

recycling, you know, but the antiques trade have been doing this all their lives.

0:36:420:36:46

There's nothing greener, is there, than buying and selling antiques,

0:36:460:36:50

especially wood because you can't grow the trees fast enough.

0:36:500:36:53

-You can't.

-So good on you.

0:36:530:36:54

You bought this table 40-odd years ago, it's early Victorian, it's Cuban mahogany.

0:36:540:36:59

-It's going to sell, we've got a value of £100 to £150 on it, and I know you've got no reserve.

-No.

0:36:590:37:04

-Because you were going to throw it.

-Throw away.

0:37:040:37:06

But someone else would have picked that out of the skip and got it for nothing,

0:37:060:37:10

so at least you're making them pay for it today. OK, good luck.

0:37:100:37:14

75 is a Victorian mahogany tea table with a rectangular swivel top,

0:37:140:37:17

the usual type Victorian mahogany tea table, I am bid £100 in...

0:37:170:37:21

take ten on £100, take ten now on £100...

0:37:210:37:23

any advance on the tea table at £100, ten...

0:37:230:37:27

120, 130... no, 120 here...

0:37:270:37:30

-selling now 120, all done 120... I need 130, 140... 150.

-Late legs.

0:37:300:37:35

160... 170, one more it's yours...

0:37:350:37:38

160 here, he's going to think I've run him up, bid another one,

0:37:380:37:42

160 here, 170 if you want...

0:37:420:37:44

at 160, cos he accused me when he left the bid, at 170...

0:37:440:37:47

thank you very much, I'm very grateful

0:37:470:37:50

and so are our contributors, 170 right at the back now...

0:37:500:37:53

170 and we sell.

0:37:530:37:54

You won't regret it.

0:37:540:37:56

-Great.

-£170.

0:37:560:37:58

That's a good result, and a good estimate, James.

0:37:580:38:01

Yeah, I'm very pleased with that.

0:38:010:38:02

That's a lot of mahogany, you couldn't make that table for probably £1,500 today.

0:38:020:38:07

Great value.

0:38:070:38:08

-Well done.

-Thank you.

-Well done, go and buy some more antiques now.

0:38:080:38:12

Right now it's Janet's turn,

0:38:200:38:21

and we've got a small collection of silver just about to go under the hammer.

0:38:210:38:25

There's three little items in this lot, a couple of vestas

0:38:250:38:28

and a powder compact, which Anita put a value on of £50 to £80.

0:38:280:38:31

It's a great time right now to sell precious metal, silver or gold,

0:38:310:38:35

the prices are well up at the moment, it's just over £9 an ounce scrap value.

0:38:350:38:41

-Not bad.

-So it puts the price of the antiques up as well,

0:38:410:38:43

and I there's a lot of silver bids today so good luck.

0:38:430:38:46

Lot 510 is an Art Deco-style silver compact,

0:38:460:38:49

also an Edwardian vesta case and a Continental vesta case.

0:38:490:38:53

Three in the lot, 510 is the number.

0:38:530:38:55

Start me £50... £50 this lot, 30 bid...

0:38:550:38:59

five now, at £9... five, 40...

0:38:590:39:02

five, 50... 45, take 50 somewhere...

0:39:020:39:04

at 45, 50 anywhere...

0:39:040:39:07

at 45.

0:39:070:39:09

-Come on.

-Take a 50 surely.

0:39:090:39:12

45 it is then... at 45, well there's the trouble with a fixed reserve.

0:39:140:39:19

I can't believe that it didn't sell.

0:39:190:39:21

Do you know, we were £5 short,

0:39:210:39:22

-because with a fixed, you put a fixed £50 reserve.

-Yes.

0:39:220:39:25

If you'd used a bit of discretion...

0:39:250:39:27

It would have gone, yes. Never mind.

0:39:270:39:30

But you wanted £50, didn't you?

0:39:300:39:32

I think it was probably worth that.

0:39:320:39:34

Ever so sorry, we tried our hardest.

0:39:350:39:38

You tried your hardest. Maybe we'll try it in another auction.

0:39:380:39:41

Yes, you could, or you could have a word with Adam afterwards and see

0:39:410:39:45

who the bidder was at £45 and if you do change your mind, he'll sell it at £45 for you.

0:39:450:39:49

-Oh, he can do that?

-Yes, he can.

0:39:490:39:52

'That was a disappointing result for Jan's collection of silver.

0:39:520:39:55

'Let's hope Anita has better luck with her valuation of Linda's Troika.'

0:39:550:40:00

Well, so far so good, but right now I feel like I'm back in Cornwall,

0:40:000:40:04

that's because I'm surrounded by Troika,

0:40:040:40:06

and I've just been joined by Linda who's brought in this fabulous collection.

0:40:060:40:10

Now originally we've had all these five items as one lot,

0:40:100:40:13

valued by Anita, but Adam has split them up into three lots.

0:40:130:40:17

I'm delighted with that. He is an auctioneer after my own heart.

0:40:170:40:21

Yes, which means more money for Linda, definitely!

0:40:210:40:27

And you didn't know what you had, did you?

0:40:270:40:30

-No, not at all.

-You'd never heard of Troika?

0:40:300:40:32

-No.

-And we've been banging on about it for the last nine years or so.

0:40:320:40:37

-Anyway, right OK, this is the good news. We do see a lot of it.

-Mmm.

0:40:370:40:42

-But we haven't seen the Celtic Cross ever before.

-Right.

0:40:420:40:46

Now that's quite rare, very unusual.

0:40:460:40:49

Let's find out what they think of it, shall we, in Cheshire.

0:40:490:40:52

Here we go, it's going under the hammer, good luck.

0:40:520:40:55

OK, we've got some Troika now,

0:40:550:40:57

245 is a Troika Pottery Celtic Cross vase.

0:40:570:41:01

Interesting and rare vase this one, Lot 245,

0:41:010:41:03

decorated by Simone Kilburn.

0:41:030:41:05

Will they want it?

0:41:050:41:07

Bidding starts here 180... 190, bid take 200...

0:41:070:41:10

at 190 bid, 190... 200, and ten...

0:41:100:41:11

220, 230... 240, 250... 260, your bid is at 270...

0:41:110:41:16

280, 290... 300, 320...

0:41:160:41:21

I like it, 340, 320 on the phone...

0:41:210:41:24

320, any advance on this cross vase here...

0:41:240:41:26

320, are you all finished now...

0:41:260:41:30

320, on the phone this time 320.

0:41:300:41:33

-Yes!

-OK, we're hoping at around £100 for the next lot,

0:41:330:41:37

that's the top end.

0:41:370:41:38

246 is a Troika Pottery slab vase this time, with smooth sides.

0:41:380:41:43

-This is very nice.

-Right.

0:41:430:41:44

I've got two bids of 90... is there 95.

0:41:440:41:47

I'd like to see this do 150, 160.

0:41:470:41:49

Take 100... 110, 120... 130, 140...

0:41:490:41:52

150, 160...

0:41:520:41:55

170, 180...

0:41:550:41:57

190, 180 on the phone... Any advance on this one 180, all done...

0:41:590:42:02

same buyer on the phone at £180.

0:42:020:42:04

Yes!

0:42:040:42:06

-I should be keeping count of all this.

-Isn't that wonderful?

0:42:090:42:12

This is a good little group as well.

0:42:120:42:13

We're looking for £100 on this group.

0:42:130:42:15

Three in the lot, Lot 247, and I've got 150...

0:42:170:42:20

160 here, is there 170? 16-... 170, 180... 190.

0:42:200:42:23

-Condition was so good on these pieces.

-200 on the phone...

0:42:230:42:26

£200 this time, 200 all done...

0:42:260:42:29

210, 220... 230, 240... 250, 260...

0:42:290:42:34

270.

0:42:340:42:36

This is the start of a very good collection for somebody.

0:42:360:42:39

-Would be, yeah.

-290...

0:42:390:42:40

I'm glad somebody will have the pleasure of it

0:42:400:42:43

-because I just didn't appreciate it really.

-300...

0:42:430:42:46

320, £300 on the phone now... 300 with the same buyer again, £300...

0:42:460:42:52

all done on these three pieces at £300.

0:42:520:42:55

Yes!

0:42:550:42:57

Well done that man on the rostrum, he did us proud.

0:42:570:42:59

Do you know everybody in Cornwall will be going,

0:42:590:43:02

proper job, Adam, proper job?

0:43:020:43:03

-Linda, guess how much that is.

-I don't know.

0:43:030:43:06

£800. £800 and hopefully all that will be going down to Cornwall.

0:43:060:43:13

-Oh, good.

-What will you do with all of that?

0:43:130:43:15

-Spend it!

-Spend, spend, spend.

0:43:150:43:17

-In a word, spend it.

-That's what I like.

0:43:170:43:19

I hope you've enjoyed watching the show, we've had a fabulous time here in Cheshire.

0:43:190:43:24

There are more surprises to come on Flog It so keep watching, won't you.

0:43:240:43:27

But until then, it's cheerio from all of us. Bye-bye.

0:43:270:43:30

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:470:43:49

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:490:43:51

Experts James Lewis and Anita Manning join Paul Martin in Wilmslow, Cheshire. Jewellery, toys, porcelain and a Georgian tea table all go under the hammer, and Paul visits the fantastically ornate Victoria Baths in Manchester.