Blackburn Flog It!


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We're in the northwest of England in a city famous for its textiles,

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its Premier League football club and for featuring in the lyrics of a Beatles' song, A Day In The Life.

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A very big welcome to a day in the life of "Flog It!" from Blackburn.

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The Lancashire town of Blackburn is located just 20 miles northwest of Manchester.

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A former mill town, it was amongst the first to be industrialised in the world.

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After a period of decline, the centre is currently receiving a multi-million pound investment

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thanks, in no small part, to its football heritage, which is still big today.

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The majority of Blackburn Rovers' footballing success was pre 1930s.

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The Premier League club is now based here, at Ewood Park stadium

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with a capacity crowd of 30,000 cheering supporters.

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The club's done a lot in recent years to promote the popularity of the town

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by winning the Premier League in 1995 and the League Cup in 2002.

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And talking of sporting successes, later on in the show

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I'll be taking a closer look at these fellas, the whippet,

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famous for hailing from the north of England.

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And helping us kick off proceedings today are our two experts, Adam Partridge and Michael Baggott.

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They'll be looking at items in the queue,

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picking the best ones, and we'll be putting them into auction later on in the show.

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Quite a healthy queue is gathering here

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outside our venue today, King George's Hall, and by my reckoning it's now 9.30.

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Time to get the doors open and get the show on the road.

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What are we going to do?

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-Flog It!

-Flog It!

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And as the crowds flood in, it looks like Adam wants to play toy trains.

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-Ken, how are you doing today?

-I'm fine, thank you.

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Good. So I'm presuming that you've had this for quite a while.

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-Yes, it was a Christmas present in 1953.

-Really?

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And you were a small boy, then?

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-I would be eight, then.

-You were eight.

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How was it unwrapping this as an eight year old?

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Difficult to remember. I'm sure I was pretty excited.

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-I bet you were.

-I had a clockwork train before this, but to get an electric train was quite something.

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Yeah, and these were quite popular then, weren't they, in the 50s?

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Oh, yes, yeah, yeah. I've got the catalogue here

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with all the information. That's the original one...

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-The original leaflet.

-This was 98 and sixpence. 98 shillings and sixpence.

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What does that equate to?

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-£4.92½ pence...

-Right.

-I would say.

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So it wasn't cheap then, was it?

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About half an average wage, I would say.

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Would it? Goodness me. When was the last time you played with it?

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I got it out yesterday to see if it worked and it did.

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A bit of oil on the engine and then it was fine.

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Really? So they don't make things that like they used to, as they say.

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I took it out about 30 years ago to see if my children would be interested,

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I've three boys, but none of them were into trains.

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-They preferred the Scalextric.

-Right.

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I see you've got a certificate as well, Ken.

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Oh, yes! So, this says that I joined the Hornby Railway Company in 1954,

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so that would be a couple of months after I bought the train.

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-You paid 10 pence, got a badge and were a member of the Railway Company.

-Excellent.

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-So you've got the Hornby Dublo electric train...

-Yeah.

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-..boxed with some accessories.

-Yes.

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So in 1953 value was?

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-98/6d.

-Yeah.

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-Yeah.

-2009 value?

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I don't know.

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-£50, I hope.

-I think you're along the right lines.

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£50 to £80, something like that.

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-Yeah.

-Shall we put a reserve on it at £50?

-That sounds great.

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If it doesn't make that then you may end up having it back again.

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-Running it around again!

-Yeah!

-Yeah. OK, then.

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-Well, let's hope for the best.

-I hope so.

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-Thanks very much.

-Thanks a lot.

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John, Rosalind, thank you for bringing this very impressive vase along.

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Can you tell me firstly what you know about it?

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-Susie Cooper.

-Susie Cooper.

-Susie Cooper, straight away!

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-Yeah.

-Where did it come from, is it something you've bought recently or...?

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-No, a friend of mine gave it to me about 20 years ago.

-Oh, what a lovely friend!

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-Yes.

-Because 20 years ago it wasn't everybody's taste...

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-No, no.

-To have a vase like this. Quite the reverse.

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We're going to turn it over because I'm just taking it on trust for the moment.

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There we go, Susie Cooper, England,

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you can't get much better than that, scratched into the base of the pot.

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This would have been made in about 1932,

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slightly later than that, 1934.

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That's when this eggshell finish started to come in and was used in the Stoke potteries.

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You see Keith Murray working for Wedgwood and designing, producing these finishes.

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You also see it at the other art potteries,

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at Ruskin and Pilkington's. They bring in this very austere,

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to our eyes now, austere single eggshell glaze.

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But the joy of this is all the incised decorations.

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And in an Art Deco interior that's going to have a lot of impact.

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-But it's lovely and we've got squirrels.

-Squirrels.

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-And they're red squirrels, not grey squirrels.

-I thought they were blue!

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Blue squirrels, but they're blue red squirrels,

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if that makes any sense. They're cavorting around.

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It's got a tremendous sense of fun,

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a tremendous sense of design to it, so it works in many levels.

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-Why have you decided to get rid of it after 20 years?

-It's not on show now.

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-It's not on show.

-Doesn't fit in with the...

-That's right.

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-It's worth more than 50 bob...

-We're frightened of it getting broke!

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-Worth more than 50 bob, is it?

-She thinks so!

-I'm lowering my valuations now.

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So, I can't say 49 bob for it, you wouldn't...? No.

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Well, I think it's probably going to be worth, in today's market,

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£300 to £500, but we'd protect it with a fixed reserve of 300,

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so hopefully that doesn't confound your expectations.

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-It's more than 50 bob, isn't it?

-It is.

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So if you're happy we'll put the vase in to the auction

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and hope that some squirrel enthusiasts with a penchant for 1930s' art pottery...

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Somebody with plenty of nuts!

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Two nutters and we'll be away at the sale. No...

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-We hope so!

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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And just take a look at what I've spotted in the crowd, something really unusual!

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-I like this, I gravitated toward this...

-You did.

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-Who am I talking to?

-Mandy, and this is my daughter Rebecca.

-Hi, Paul.

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Right, well, let's talk about this whale vertebra because...

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-it's great, it's a piece of sculpture.

-It is.

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There's a lot of people thinking I'm not keen on natural history objects.

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-You know, it's cruel, but let's face it, that was killed in the 19th century.

-Yeah.

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And that's been an educational tool for Victorian families for a long, long time.

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So, how did you come by it?

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-I bought it at a car boot sale.

-Recently?

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-About five years ago.

-OK, five years. Can I ask how much you paid for it?

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-65.

-65, OK.

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OK. Well, what do you think of this?

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I think it's brilliant. I mean, obviously people...

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It's a sort of wild thing, isn't it?

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It's like Marmite, you either love it or hate it, don't you? Yeah.

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Exactly. I bet I know where this has been, actually.

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If you've got a small house and you've got an open fireplace

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-that doesn't work, you put that in the fireplace.

-Yeah.

-It's a good space for it.

-It is.

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It's fantastic. That's what it should be used for.

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-It's a piece of sculpture now.

-It is, yeah.

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But, do you know, when it's up this high and you can walk around and you view sculpture from every angle,

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it's like being in Barbara Hepworth's Sculpture Garden down in St Ives.

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You can understand shape and form and can see different things

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from different angles, different shadows.

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-Yeah.

-That's the quality of good sculpture. This has it.

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This has it, although, you know, nobody made this.

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You know, God made this animal!

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But I love it, I think it's great.

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And I know the auctioneer is going to pick me up on this and have a go at me.

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He's going to say, "What have you brought to my saleroom!"

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But if we put this into auction, I think we put it in with a valuation of... What did you pay for it?

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-65.

-We put it in at 65.

-Yeah.

-With a valuation of £65 to £100.

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-Right.

-We'll get your money back and hopefully we'll get the top end of my valuation.

-Excellent.

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-A little bit more on a good day.

-Fantastic.

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-Happy?

-Yes, happy with that.

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But I can't wait to see the auctioneer's face with this one.

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Norma, how are you today?

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-I'm fine, thank you.

-Good. Now, where did you get this little piggy from?

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It belonged to my mother-in-law...

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-Right.

-And she bought it at a jumble sale.

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Never!

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-Really?

-Yes.

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-How long ago?

-About four years ago.

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No! How much was it?

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-50p.

-She bought it because she liked it or because she knew it was Wemyss Ware?

-Because she liked it.

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-Really? That's the best reason to buy something.

-Yes.

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So, has she passed it on to you or...?

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No, it's still my mother-in-law's.

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-Do you know anything about it yourself?

-Not really, no.

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So you brought it along to "Flog It!" to see if it's owt or nowt.

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-Yes.

-OK. Well, it's... It's owt!

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Hmm. Good!

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-It's a good thing.

-Yeah.

-It's a Wemyss pig, made in Scotland.

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-Right.

-Wemyss was started at the end of the 19th century.

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They made loads of pigs with varying designs.

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-This one has obviously got your shamrock design on it.

-Yeah, yeah.

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And very collectable things in their own right. And it's always clearly marked.

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There you've got the Wemyss stamp

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and this oval printed mark is the retailer's, Thomas Goode & Co.

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who were a firm in London that retailed all the Wemyss pottery.

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We've got a good markings on it and the condition appears to be excellent as well,

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which is also quite unusual because these are very prone to damage, particularly around the ears.

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-Yeah.

-And the trotters.

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-Yeah.

-So, she's selling it because?

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Well, she has a lot of pottery and a lot of things, so she's just selling it...

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OK, it's just one ornament out of many on the shelf.

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-Yeah. Yes, it is, yeah.

-So any idea what it's worth?

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I have no idea really, no.

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Well, Wemyss is pretty highly prized at auction.

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If I was to be very realistic I'd put £200 to £300, but I think...

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-Really, I think it'll make more than that.

-Yeah.

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-Brilliant.

-How does that sound?

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-Fantastic.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-Good, she's smiling! Yeah, excellent.

-Yeah.

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Well, I would say we put a reserve on it, £200 fixed,

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-so whatever happens it shouldn't sell for less.

-Right.

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Do you think there'll be a little bit for Norma for bringing it along?

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-Maybe, maybe.

-Let's hope so.

-I hope so.

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-Well, let's hope she's watching.

-I know.

-What's her name?

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-Olive.

-Olive. Hi, Olive.

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Nice pig, good find.

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See you at the auction. Thanks.

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We've found our first items to take to auction. This is where it gets exciting

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because we're about to put those valuations to the test.

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So while we make our way over to the auction room, here's a quick rundown of what's going under the hammer.

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A gift from a friend 20 years ago, Rosalind and John know they have a rather special piece of pottery.

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Can you tell me firstly what you know about it?

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-Susie Cooper.

-Susie Cooper.

-Susie Cooper, straight away!

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Ken received his Hornby train set in the 1950s, but will it pull in a good price in the saleroom?

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And this whale bone wasn't found at the bottom of the ocean, but unbelievably at a car boot sale!

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Adam can't believe that Norma's mother-in-law found this Wemyss pig in such a humble location.

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-She bought it at a jumble sale.

-Never!

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-How long ago?

-About four years ago.

-No! How much was it?

-50p.

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Now, surely we should be able to make a profit on that lot!

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For the time being we're leaving Blackburn behind

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and heading north to Halifax, the location of today's auction.

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In charge of the proceedings is Ian Peace.

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I'm keen to find out what he makes of our Susie Cooper vase.

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A big name in studio pottery, Susie Cooper.

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We've got £300 to £500 on this and it belongs to Rosalind and Ian.

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A good size, a good pattern, a squirrel pattern.

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My only reservation is that... Two things,

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-it's plain...

-It is for Susie Cooper, isn't it?

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Yes, it is. And in this region Susie Cooper's slightly waned.

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-Has it?

-Yes.

-We've got £300 to £500 riding on this. Will it do it?

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I believe...

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this may struggle because in the last week

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the vendors have phoned me and pushed the reserve up by £50.

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-Have they?

-Yeah.

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Why... Why did they do that, because it's not a lot more money, is it?

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I know. I did advise them to leave it where it was.

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I explained that Susie Cooper has slightly levelled out in this area,

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but they...they are adamant. But it's a good size

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and I will give it my best shot and I've assured them I will.

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So, will this popular name get a bumpy ride?

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Find out in a few minutes' time. First up is the Hornby train set.

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Moving along nicely, we're on the right tracks, it belongs to Ken

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and we've got a value of around £50 to £80, which I think is pretty good.

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Hopefully, we'll get that top end, Adam.

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-But this was a Christmas present in 1953.

-It was, yes.

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Paint the picture! Can you remember?

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Not exactly, no, but I built it up over the years after that.

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-It's not been played with for over 50 years.

-And the kids don't want this?

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My three boys were all interested in something more competitive. Not really interested in trains.

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-My grandchildren are all girls, so it's been in the loft for a long time.

-So it's time to go.

-Oh, yes.

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Bring it along to a valuation day, if you've anything like that we want to see it.

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478, a Hornby Dublo boxed train set.

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478 is the lot. Who'd like to open me at £50 for this lot? 40, then?

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40? 30? £30 I'm bid. £30. And five.

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At 35. 40. £40. At 45 there.

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45. Do I make it 50? At £45. 50. Gentleman right at the back at 50.

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Five anywhere? At £50.

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Are you all done at £50?

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All finished at 50? At £50 then, back of the room.

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-Well, done.

-Right.

-£50, so it's OK.

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-That's fine.

-It's gone.

-One less box to go in the loft!

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Exactly!

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Rosalind and John, great to see you.

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We've got the Susie Cooper vase which Michael's valued at £300 to £500.

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I know you've had a chat with Ian the auctioneer and upped the reserve slightly, another £50.

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We had a chat about that.

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I do feel... Ian has sort of suggested, the auctioneer has suggested,

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that it might just frighten the bidders off and you might be stuck with it, just might be.

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But you don't know. This is an auction, anything can happen.

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We need two people to love this and it could still do the top end.

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There we are, a good-looking piece there. 514 is the lot.

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Right, open me at 300. I have £200 to start on it. £200.

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At £200. At £200. At 220. At 240.

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At £240.

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Any further bids? At £240?

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At £240. Are we quite finished at 240?

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Susie Cooper vase, we're not quite there at 240. Are you all done?

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A great name in studio pottery, but it's not doing it here today.

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He said it has peaked in this area,

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all his collector's don't seem to want Susie Cooper any more.

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-It didn't matter about the 50 quid.

-No.

-I said it wouldn't.

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-No, you...

-I didn't mean it that way!

-No, you didn't!

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I think, in retrospect people will look back at this auction

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in a couple of months' time and think, "I should have bought that vase."

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That really was disappointing, but let's see how we get on

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with our next lot, another piece of pottery with a popular name.

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Now we've got a little Wemyss pig going under the hammer

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and I've just been joined by Norma and Adam, our expert. We've got £200 to £300 on this.

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We've seen Wemyss do well before. They're an old "Flog It!" favourite.

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They're so collectable, especially little pigs.

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Yeah. It's nice with shamrocks.

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Let's find out what the bidders think. Here we go.

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The Wemyss model of a pig and may I say 150?

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I'm opening this at £100.

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The Wemyss pig at 100. I have £100.

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120. 120. 140. At £140.

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At 140. 160. At 180 here. £180.

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-The Wemyss pig at 180. At £200.

-Yes!

-Gentleman at the back of the room.

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I have £200. We're in the market.

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210 if you like. With...

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At £200. The gentleman's bid at the back of the room at 200.

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Any further bids for the Wemyss pig?

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First and last time.

0:17:460:17:48

Well, it's gone. £200, Norma.

0:17:480:17:51

It was a bit deflated towards the end, wasn't it?

0:17:510:17:53

-Expecting that top end.

-Yeah.

-Yes.

0:17:530:17:55

-But it's gone.

-Good.

0:17:550:17:57

I guess only one person wanted a piece of Wemyss today.

0:17:570:18:00

If somebody else had pushed that bidder it would have gone up.

0:18:000:18:03

-Yeah. Shame.

-Got to be happy, though.

-Yeah.

0:18:030:18:05

-It was within estimate.

-Yeah.

0:18:050:18:07

Can you remember that whale vertebrae?

0:18:120:18:14

It's about to go under the hammer and I'm joined by Mandy, its present owner.

0:18:140:18:18

-I'm saying present because I'm hoping it's going to sell well today.

-Yeah.

0:18:180:18:22

I can remember the valuation day saying, "I can't wait to see the auctioneer's face

0:18:220:18:26

"when he sees this and unwraps the bubble wrap from the courier and goes..."

0:18:260:18:30

And he did and Ian's face was a picture when I saw him this morning.

0:18:300:18:34

He said, "I knew that was you, I knew you'd picked that!"

0:18:340:18:37

-Yeah.

-But he didn't give any clues away, so it's fingers crossed.

-Yeah.

0:18:370:18:41

We've pitched it to sell, haven't we?

0:18:410:18:43

-Yes.

-£65 to £100.

-Yes.

-Something like that. I'm just wondering what this lot will make of it.

0:18:430:18:48

Well, we're going to find out right now. Good luck. Here we go.

0:18:480:18:52

466 is the whale bone vertebra sculpture on stand.

0:18:520:18:58

-There we are.

-And I think it looks fab, I really do.

0:18:580:19:02

In fact, I'm opening this at £40.

0:19:020:19:05

And five. 50. And five. 60.

0:19:050:19:08

And five. At £65.

0:19:080:19:10

At 65. And 70. And five.

0:19:100:19:14

80.

0:19:140:19:16

And five.

0:19:160:19:18

90. And five.

0:19:180:19:20

100.

0:19:200:19:21

And five.

0:19:210:19:23

-110.

-Brilliant.

-Yeah.

0:19:240:19:27

-A bit of competition in the room.

-Yeah.

-£115. On my right, 115.

0:19:270:19:30

Are we...

0:19:300:19:32

-115. Brilliant, Mandy. That top end of the estimate.

-Yes.

0:19:320:19:36

-That's good.

-Very good.

-Pleased?

-Yeah, I am.

0:19:360:19:38

I was a bit dubious to start with, but it's gone!

0:19:380:19:41

I'm sure that's gone to a collector.

0:19:410:19:43

And later on in the show we find something that excites Michael.

0:19:460:19:49

You've made my day today by bringing in this wonderful children's book.

0:19:490:19:55

But will we see tears of sadness or tears of joy?

0:19:550:19:58

Oh, there's a tear in your eye now, isn't there?

0:19:580:20:01

Right now I'm going to meet some canines that have got a wonderful, interesting past.

0:20:020:20:07

Let's check it out.

0:20:070:20:09

The British coal industry has certainly had a chequered past.

0:20:120:20:16

This colliery here at Astley Green, in South Lancashire, was once part

0:20:160:20:20

of a thriving community, but with changes in demand for British coal

0:20:200:20:24

it was inevitable this place went to the dogs and closed in 1970. But today the dogs are back.

0:20:240:20:31

Come on, fellas! Come over here!

0:20:310:20:33

Look at these lovely whippets.

0:20:330:20:35

You're probably thinking, "What have these dogs got to do with coal mining?"

0:20:350:20:39

You're about to find out.

0:20:390:20:41

Dogs belonging to the greyhound group have often been bred along pure lines

0:20:410:20:45

and have been associated with the aristocracy and gentry.

0:20:450:20:48

But the one exception is the small English greyhound known as the whippet.

0:20:480:20:53

Although some mystery surrounds the origin of the breed, it's generally accepted that it's a cross

0:20:530:20:58

between the greyhound and a terrier, giving the breed a great combination of speed and intelligence.

0:20:580:21:05

It was first recognised by the Kennel Club in 1890.

0:21:050:21:08

And here's the connection. The whippet became the pet mostly preferred by the working classes.

0:21:120:21:17

The mill workers and the miners loved to race their dogs

0:21:170:21:20

in their spare time and of course they could catch the odd rabbit or two.

0:21:200:21:24

And it's because of this the breed became known as the poor man's greyhound or racehorse.

0:21:240:21:29

It's fair to say, whippet racing has been on the decline in recent years.

0:21:290:21:33

At one point there were around 70 clubs in the country, today there's about 20.

0:21:330:21:38

This is one of them, the Astley & Tyldesley Miners' Whippet and Dog Racing Club.

0:21:380:21:43

I tell you what, it's doing rather well.

0:21:430:21:45

Keith Woodward is the club chairman. It's partly down to him that this group is still thriving.

0:21:490:21:54

Keith, great to meet you and I can't wait to see the dogs later and see what they do.

0:21:560:22:01

-Yeah.

-I bet they're fast! Tell me a little bit about whippet racing, a little bit about the history.

0:22:010:22:06

Well, the history goes back to 1860 or so and everybody turned up and there might be 10, 12 dogs in a race.

0:22:060:22:13

-Yeah.

-And the first past the post was the winner. They came in all shapes and sizes.

0:22:130:22:17

-Really?

-Everything was called a whippet even if it was a collie or something else!

0:22:170:22:22

-And then late 20s, early 30s with what they call tape racing.

-Yeah.

0:22:220:22:27

-Which they put five lanes down by elastic tape with wooden stumps...

-Yeah.

0:22:270:22:32

-And the dogs had to stay in that lane.

-Right.

0:22:320:22:36

If a dog jumped over into the next lane

0:22:360:22:38

it was automatically disqualified and the race was rerun without it.

0:22:380:22:42

In the summer the dogs are raced on a straight grass track of 150 yards, whereas in winter,

0:22:430:22:50

when the ground is too hard the dogs are raced on an oval sand track

0:22:500:22:54

commonly referred to as "racing on the bends".

0:22:540:22:57

-Actually, bend racing is a lot quicker.

-I think it's fun as well.

0:22:570:23:00

You put your dog in the trap, you stand behind the trap,

0:23:000:23:03

-the hare comes round, the dogs run and they near enough finish where they started.

-Yes, exactly.

0:23:030:23:09

240 yards, a good whippet will do 15 seconds.

0:23:120:23:16

Yeah, it's quick, isn't it?

0:23:160:23:18

-Which do you prefer, racing on the straight or the bends?

-Any.

-Any.

-Any kind of whippet racing.

0:23:210:23:26

Vicky Harper and Mark Warren are great whippet-racing fans having just achieved their 20th champion.

0:23:260:23:34

They have an impressive track record.

0:23:340:23:36

Vicky and Mark, I've got to say, with all those champions you've had in the past and currently,

0:23:360:23:42

you must be the envy of a lot of these people here, but we'll keep that quiet, OK?

0:23:420:23:46

How many have you got?

0:23:460:23:48

-We've got 12 at home.

-Really?

-They're just really good pets, aren't they?

-Yeah.

0:23:480:23:53

-Do they live in the house?

-Yeah.

-Do they come on the bed at night?

0:23:530:23:56

-Oh, yeah. Under the duvet.

-Take it in turns?

-No, not all of them!

0:23:560:24:00

-Yeah.

-Not at once.

0:24:000:24:02

So, does it run in the family?

0:24:020:24:04

My granddad, he was an ex-miner, and he started breeding them for racing...

0:24:040:24:11

-Yeah.

-Years ago.

-And my dad's been doing it from 1967, 1968.

-Really?

0:24:110:24:16

-It's in the blood. They're passing the tips on to you.

-That's how we got together.

0:24:160:24:20

-That's how you met?

-Yeah.

-Fantastic. A lovely story.

0:24:200:24:23

How many times a month do you come out here or...? All year round?

0:24:230:24:27

-We come here every week.

-We come here every Wednesday during the summer.

0:24:270:24:31

During the winter we go to Westhoughton greyhound track and race around bends.

0:24:310:24:35

This is just straight racing today?

0:24:350:24:38

-Straight racing.

-And we're going to see some of that.

0:24:380:24:40

Whippet racing now is purely for fun, it's a fun day out,

0:24:400:24:44

unlike greyhound racing where lots of money changes hands.

0:24:440:24:47

-Yeah.

-When did that rule come about, do you know?

0:24:470:24:49

-It was years ago when they did betting with whippet racing, weren't it?

-Yeah.

0:24:490:24:54

There's been no betting for a long time with whippet racing. It's just purely for fun.

0:24:540:24:58

Fun for all the family and a bit of fun for the dogs.

0:24:580:25:01

Do you have to get the dog used to the traps, Mark?

0:25:010:25:03

Yes, you've got to train them.

0:25:030:25:05

You start them off when they're about eight, nine months old and gradually get them trained.

0:25:050:25:11

Because they don't like that to start with, do they?

0:25:110:25:13

-It depends.

-If they're keen on the lure they just take it all in their stride. It doesn't bother them.

0:25:130:25:19

I can feel the tension rising. There's lots more people arriving,

0:25:190:25:23

we're getting surrounded by dogs, should we get your two out?

0:25:230:25:26

We'll meet up with Keith and see what he's got to say about his.

0:25:260:25:31

When not attending competitions, Vicky and Mark are often to be found

0:25:310:25:35

on the edge of the football field, putting the dogs through their paces.

0:25:350:25:39

It's certainly getting exciting. There's four dogs in this race.

0:26:000:26:05

I've got to pick a winner. I think the fairest way to do it

0:26:050:26:07

is to pick one of these bones from this bowl.

0:26:070:26:10

Now, each bone has a name tag on it relating to one of the dogs, so it's going to be a lucky dip for me.

0:26:100:26:16

-I'll probably go for this one, which is Mebs Rosie. Who's Mebs Rosie?

-Me.

0:26:160:26:21

Right, OK, Keith! This is my choice.

0:26:210:26:23

Hello!

0:26:230:26:25

That's a good start, it's got number one on it!

0:26:250:26:28

Right, the dogs are under starters orders and they're off!

0:26:370:26:40

But my dog's not come out of the trap!

0:26:400:26:42

Oh, my goodness, what's happened? Here he is!

0:26:420:26:45

I don't believe it!

0:26:530:26:55

Hey, hey, hey!

0:26:550:26:58

They're trying to throttle the thing they chase!

0:26:580:27:02

Oh, dear!

0:27:020:27:05

Oh, I don't know, guess where I came?

0:27:050:27:08

Last. I can't believe it.

0:27:080:27:10

The trap...

0:27:100:27:12

My trap didn't open!

0:27:120:27:14

Nevertheless, that was so exciting and I can see why all these people

0:27:140:27:18

get together every weekend to race these dogs because it is just great fun.

0:27:180:27:23

There's still plenty of action back at the valuation day

0:27:290:27:32

in Blackburn and time is certainly marching on for Michael.

0:27:320:27:36

-Ian, thank you for bringing in this lovely pocket watch.

-Right.

0:27:360:27:40

What can you tell me? Where's it from?

0:27:400:27:42

I've no idea where it originated, but when my father died about 15 years ago

0:27:420:27:47

it was part of a lot of stuff that was left over in the drawers.

0:27:470:27:51

Oh, right. Was he a watch collector or did he wear a watch at all?

0:27:510:27:56

He collected everything, coins, medals, watches.

0:27:560:28:00

-Anything that interested him, there was a little collection of it.

-Yes.

0:28:000:28:04

Well, this is certainly a lovely watch

0:28:040:28:06

and it's a lovely gentleman's open-face 18-carat-gold pocket watch.

0:28:060:28:12

And if we have a look at the back of the case we should have a full set of hallmarks,

0:28:120:28:16

which we do, and the nice thing there is they're for Chester.

0:28:160:28:21

So we've got the Chester town mark, which is three wheat sheaves and a dagger.

0:28:210:28:26

We've got the date letter, which is a Gothic H which is, let's see...

0:28:260:28:30

-for 1871.

-Good heavens, I didn't know it was that old.

0:28:300:28:34

So it's a good 130 years old.

0:28:340:28:36

Now if we can get into the inner case we might be able to find...

0:28:360:28:39

There we go, there's the movement.

0:28:390:28:42

And it is signed. Some were signed, some weren't.

0:28:420:28:46

If they were workaday watches you wouldn't get a signature.

0:28:460:28:50

But we've got William Batty, Market Street,

0:28:500:28:55

Manchester, so, you know, we're only up the road, really.

0:28:550:28:58

If we close that back up, it has got a very pretty dial

0:28:580:29:03

and it's got the original hands as well.

0:29:030:29:06

The only fault really against it is slight wear to the loop, there,

0:29:060:29:12

where it's been on a watch chain and it's just worn against it,

0:29:120:29:16

and because it's an 18 carat loop if it's on a nine carat swivel

0:29:160:29:22

that's twice as hard, it's got twice as much copper in it. It's a lovely thing.

0:29:220:29:26

So, why have you decided to sell it?

0:29:260:29:28

Well, they're a bit old-fashioned now, aren't they?

0:29:280:29:31

And I don't have a waistcoat and you've got to keep winding them up.

0:29:310:29:36

That's three good reasons!

0:29:360:29:38

Don't say those at the auction, we don't want to put anybody off!

0:29:380:29:41

But I think because it's an 18 carat open-face, we're quite safe

0:29:410:29:45

-at saying a reserve of £150.

-Right.

-And an estimate of 150 to 250.

0:29:450:29:51

-OK.

-If you're happy with that...

-That's right, yes.

0:29:510:29:53

We'll put it into the sale and hope it ticks along to a profit.

0:29:530:29:56

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks for bringing it.

-Thanks a lot.

-Pleasure.

0:29:560:30:00

-Jennifer, welcome to "Flog It!".

-Thank you.

0:30:050:30:08

You've brought along a very interesting antique map here.

0:30:080:30:11

Where did you get that from?

0:30:110:30:13

Just left to me by my father along with many others.

0:30:130:30:17

-Just sat in a barn, so I brought it along.

-Really?

0:30:170:30:20

-So, here we've got the road from Bristol...

-Right.

0:30:200:30:24

-..to west Chester.

-Yes.

0:30:240:30:27

By John Ogilby. Now, Ogilby maps are quite desirable.

0:30:270:30:32

He was his Majesty's cosmographer, a very famous cartographer, mapmaker.

0:30:320:30:39

This will be late 17th century, so...

0:30:390:30:42

-Really?

-Yeah, it'll be just before the date of 1700, so it's been around quite a while.

-Yes.

0:30:420:30:49

Now it isn't obviously Chester itself, it's from the High Cross in Bristol

0:30:490:30:54

to Ault Ferry to Chepstow including the breadth of the river, to Monmouth to Hereford to Ludlow.

0:30:540:31:01

Of course, with something of this age, 300 years old, you're going to get a bit of condition problems.

0:31:010:31:07

Actually, the hand colouring is pretty vivid still...

0:31:070:31:10

-Yes.

-And all you've got is this sort of damp stains and damp spots, etc.

0:31:100:31:14

So, do you like it?

0:31:140:31:16

-Not particularly my thing.

-Really? What's your thing, Jennifer?

0:31:160:31:20

I've got quite a trendy house now, so it doesn't have a place in my home any more.

0:31:200:31:24

-I'm sure somebody will appreciate it.

-You have all modern stuff in your house?

-Yes.

0:31:240:31:29

-And that's why it's come to "Flog It!" today.

-Absolutely, yes.

0:31:290:31:32

-OK. Any idea what it's worth?

-Not a clue.

-Well, I think 150 to 250 would be a sensible estimate.

0:31:320:31:38

-Really? Oh, that's good.

-That was very convincing.

-Oh, that's good.

0:31:380:31:42

-I like that surprise there.

-Can I have the money now?

0:31:420:31:47

There's a very strong market, a lot of collectors of antique maps

0:31:470:31:50

and we get the two right people there we should hit £300.

0:31:500:31:53

-Right, excellent.

-In order to prevent it from underselling I suggest a reserve of 150.

0:31:530:31:57

Right, OK.

0:31:570:31:59

-So if it doesn't make that...

-Take it back to the barn.

0:31:590:32:02

-Yeah. Is the barn damp?

-It's a little bit. Do you think I ought to take better care of it?

0:32:020:32:06

-Find somewhere slightly less damp perhaps to store it.

-Right, OK.

0:32:060:32:10

Now, I know it's not a massive amount of money by today's standards,

0:32:100:32:13

-but if it does go well and makes £300 or more...

-Wow, yes.

0:32:130:32:16

What would you do with that?

0:32:160:32:18

Take my girlfriends to the races. I promised them a day out.

0:32:180:32:22

-That sounds good fun. Which races?

-Chester.

-Chester.

0:32:220:32:25

-Excellent.

-The money's going back to Chester.

0:32:250:32:27

-I might see you there.

-Yeah. Get the champagne in!

0:32:270:32:30

-Cheers, Jennifer.

-OK, thank you very much.

0:32:300:32:33

Marion, you've, I think made my day today by bringing in this wonderful children's book

0:32:390:32:45

-which we can see, is Peter Pan. Have you had this since a child?

-I've had it from childhood.

0:32:450:32:51

It was given to me by two very great and gracious ladies that lived across the way from us.

0:32:510:32:57

And during the war they turned their cellar into bunk beds,

0:32:570:33:03

for a few of the local children in the area, so we could stay all night in the safety.

0:33:030:33:09

And as such, they then gave me a birthday party

0:33:090:33:13

and that was the present they gave me at the birthday party.

0:33:130:33:17

-What a fantastic present.

-Yes.

-I've... I've never had a...

0:33:170:33:20

I don't want to do my parents down, I never had a present like this!

0:33:200:33:23

Like all children's books it has been read and enjoyed and used

0:33:230:33:28

and you can see, here,

0:33:280:33:30

it's had a slit where originally there would have been two silk ties

0:33:300:33:35

-and you can imagine when that's tied and untied that perishes.

-Yes.

0:33:350:33:39

But what we have got is we've got this lovely full vellum binding. So the most expensive way to do it.

0:33:390:33:45

Often you'll just have the spine done and the corners.

0:33:450:33:49

It was that expensive, but they've tooled, in gilt,

0:33:490:33:52

"Peter Pan", and there he is on the back of a...

0:33:520:33:55

of a fairly ferocious looking goat!

0:33:550:33:58

But that's the name we look for, illustrated by Arthur Rackham, who did those wonderful fairies.

0:33:580:34:03

-Oh, yes, yes.

-If we open it up there we have Peter Pan and what wonderful quality paper.

-Yes, yeah.

0:34:030:34:09

This, when it was produced, was the luxury edition, so you were a very wealthy and privileged little child

0:34:090:34:17

to get this. And that's wonderful.

0:34:170:34:20

"This edition is limited to 500 copies, numbered and signed

0:34:200:34:25

-"by the artist, of which this is number 111," so it's quite a low number.

-Yes, it's quite an early one.

0:34:250:34:31

And we've got Arthur Rackham's signature, there.

0:34:310:34:34

I think now people are beginning to regard his work less as children's illustrations and more as...

0:34:340:34:39

It was good skilful draughtsmanship. It's exquisite.

0:34:390:34:43

-Carried away by the winds.

-Is that with the balloons? Yes.

0:34:430:34:47

-With the balloons. The balloon seller being taken away.

-Yes, that's it.

0:34:470:34:51

Crikey, I wouldn't want to part with this if this were mine.

0:34:510:34:54

Why now have you decided to part with this lovely book?

0:34:540:34:57

Well, there's... There's nobody...

0:34:570:34:59

I've got nobody that would appreciate the quality of that book.

0:34:590:35:02

It would just be another book...

0:35:020:35:05

-Another book.

-..as far as they were concerned.

0:35:050:35:07

And I'd like it to remain as a book by someone who would appreciate it.

0:35:070:35:11

Well, I think it's a children's book collector's dream...

0:35:110:35:15

-I would think so.

-Really. I mean, it is the luxury edition.

0:35:150:35:19

There are a few faults.

0:35:190:35:21

There's a little bit of wear to the gilt edging and the covers

0:35:210:35:25

have started to bow slightly, but I don't think they're major faults.

0:35:250:35:29

Well, it's 100 and odd years.

0:35:290:35:31

Well, 105 years going on for.

0:35:310:35:36

Question of value.

0:35:360:35:37

-Yes.

-Any idea what it might be worth?

0:35:370:35:40

No, no.

0:35:400:35:42

-I think we would be sensible to put it into auction with an attractive estimate of say £400 to £600.

-Yes.

0:35:420:35:49

We'll put a fixed reserve of £400 on it...

0:35:490:35:52

-Yes, yes, yes.

-..without question.

0:35:520:35:54

And if two people really got behind it,

0:35:540:35:57

who knows? We might be touching the four figures, but...

0:35:570:36:01

-That would be nice.

-That would be if Peter was flying overhead...

0:36:010:36:04

-Yes, yes, yes.

-..wishing us luck.

0:36:040:36:07

-We'll put it into the auction and hopefully it will fly away on the day.

-Lovely, lovely.

0:36:070:36:12

-Thank you very much indeed.

-You've made my day.

-Good. Thank you.

0:36:120:36:16

It's time to return to the auction room and here's what we're taking with us.

0:36:180:36:22

Ian is in no doubt as to why he wants to sell his father's old pocket watch.

0:36:220:36:27

They're a bit old-fashioned. I don't have a waistcoat

0:36:270:36:30

-and you've got to keep winding them up.

-That's three good reasons!

0:36:300:36:33

Jennifer has found her way to us with her father's antique map,

0:36:350:36:38

but can she find a new owner in the saleroom?

0:36:380:36:41

And, finally, Marion has brought in a very special copy of Peter Pan

0:36:410:36:46

given to her as a birthday present, as a child.

0:36:460:36:48

She now wants it to fly away to a new home.

0:36:480:36:51

Before we see the last of today's items sold

0:36:540:36:57

I want to know if auctioneer, Ian, shares my enthusiasm for Marion's Peter Pan book.

0:36:570:37:03

I absolutely love this.

0:37:030:37:05

The condition is fantastic, apart from a tiny bit of foxing.

0:37:050:37:08

It's Peter Pan by Barrie, but it's illustrated by Arthur Rackham who is fetching big money in his own right.

0:37:080:37:15

It's been signed by the illustrator.

0:37:150:37:17

Marion's had this since she was a little girl, it was a birthday present.

0:37:170:37:21

We've got 400 to 600 riding on this. I could see this doubling that.

0:37:210:37:25

Yeah. I was very excited when I saw this come in because I've sold them over the years,

0:37:250:37:31

but they come up very rarely and, as you say, the condition is wonderful,

0:37:310:37:34

the illustrations are vivid, hand cut pages, everything about it's nice.

0:37:340:37:40

-It's complete as well.

-Yeah. a marvellous long-term investment.

0:37:400:37:44

Has there been much interest?

0:37:440:37:46

I think the buyers are playing their cards very close to their chests

0:37:460:37:51

and I think there is interest.

0:37:510:37:53

-It's illustrated well on the internet.

-OK, fingers crossed, then.

0:37:530:37:57

Fingers crossed for twice the top end, that's what I'd like to see.

0:37:570:38:00

I know I'm tempting fate, but I think it's worth it, I really do.

0:38:000:38:04

We'll find out how the book gets on in a little while, but next under the hammer is Michael's other find.

0:38:040:38:10

Ian, there should be some local interest. We've got the open-faced pocket watch, made in Manchester.

0:38:100:38:16

-It's not too far away, is it?

-No.

0:38:160:38:19

And we're looking at £150 to £200, put on by Michael, our expert.

0:38:190:38:23

I think that's a "run and buy me" estimate!

0:38:230:38:25

I hope so. I was going to say time is up for your watch, because this one is not going home with you.

0:38:250:38:30

And what am I bid for this? £100 to open the bidding. £100.

0:38:320:38:35

At £100. Thank you. 110. 110.

0:38:350:38:39

110. £110. 110. 120.

0:38:390:38:41

-130. 140. 150. 160. 170.

-Yes, they're getting stuck in now.

0:38:410:38:48

-Yeah.

-190. 200. And 10.

0:38:480:38:51

-Quality always sells.

-230. 240. 250.

0:38:510:38:55

-260, sir. 270. 270 to the right.

-Smashed through the top.

0:38:550:38:59

-You did.

-290. 300.

0:38:590:39:01

This is fantastic, Ian.

0:39:010:39:03

-Yeah, it is.

-320. 330. 340. 350.

0:39:030:39:07

-360. 370. 380. 390. 400.

-Wow!

-Very hard to find!

0:39:070:39:13

In the blue jacket at £400.

0:39:130:39:15

Any further bids at 400?

0:39:150:39:17

Ian's ever so happy, £400!

0:39:190:39:21

-Your dad had a fabulous eye, didn't he?

-Brilliant.

0:39:210:39:24

-Pretty good.

-Yeah! There is commission to pay.

0:39:240:39:27

What will you put the money towards?

0:39:270:39:29

Probably half it up the middle with my brother...

0:39:290:39:32

-Right.

-..part of the settlements.

-Yeah.

0:39:320:39:35

And I may invest it in a decent wristwatch.

0:39:350:39:39

That's quite nice, you think of dad!

0:39:390:39:41

-Yeah.

-Yeah, do that.

0:39:410:39:43

I've been joined by Jennifer who wants to get smartened up and go to the races at Chester.

0:39:470:39:52

-I think you look perfect for the races now!

-Oh, thank you.

0:39:520:39:55

But we're in the Calder Valley so unfortunately that's got to wait.

0:39:550:39:58

We're going to put the antique map up with Adam's value of 150 to 250

0:39:580:40:03

and hopefully that will get you to Chester.

0:40:030:40:05

-And a couple of bottles of champagne.

-Got to do it in style, haven't you?

0:40:050:40:09

-Let's find out what the bidders think. Good luck.

-Oh, thank you.

0:40:090:40:12

Illustrating the road from Bristol to Chester.

0:40:120:40:16

Lot 611 is the lot. Right, who'd like to open me at £100?

0:40:160:40:19

100? 90?

0:40:190:40:22

£80 anywhere?

0:40:220:40:25

70, thank you, £70. At 80 anywhere?

0:40:250:40:27

At £70. At 70.

0:40:270:40:30

At £70. Do I see 80?

0:40:300:40:33

-At £70. No? There's no further bids.

-I don't believe it!

-Oh, never mind.

0:40:330:40:36

Early road maps like this should make 200 quid at least.

0:40:360:40:41

I can't believe that, Bristol to Chester.

0:40:410:40:43

-I think...

-Never mind.

0:40:430:40:45

Hey, look, nobody here wanted something from Bristol to Chester.

0:40:450:40:50

You've got to put it in a saleroom on that route somewhere, or take it to Chester

0:40:500:40:53

-or down to Bristol.

-Yeah.

-Or hang on to it.

0:40:530:40:56

I'll hang on to it. Back in the barn.

0:40:560:40:58

-Hang on to it, Jennifer. It's like Paul says, it's worth 200 quid.

-I know.

0:40:580:41:02

We all dream of a fairytale ending, don't we?

0:41:080:41:10

Could it be this time for Marion, hey, with that wonderful book,

0:41:100:41:14

the Peter Pan book illustrated by Arthur Rackham?

0:41:140:41:16

We've got £400 to £600 on this.

0:41:160:41:19

I had a chat to the auctioneer earlier, you know what he said.

0:41:190:41:23

-Michael was spot-on with the valuation.

-Well, done.

0:41:230:41:26

And we think, Michael, the signature will help this soar through.

0:41:260:41:31

I think being signed, being an early edition out of the 500...

0:41:310:41:35

-111, wasn't it?

-111. That all helps.

0:41:350:41:38

But all credit to you for looking after it.

0:41:380:41:41

Honestly, the condition is fantastic and that's what the collectors will love. Fingers crossed.

0:41:410:41:46

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:41:460:41:48

Let's hope we burst through the top end. Here it is.

0:41:480:41:51

The Peter Pan In Kensington Gardens with drawings by Arthur Rackham.

0:41:510:41:55

-It's a signed limited edition.

-It's wonderful.

0:41:550:41:58

Absolutely brilliant. Ever so excited about this.

0:41:580:42:01

Lovely example there and what am I bid?

0:42:010:42:05

As an opening bid shall we say £300?

0:42:050:42:07

I'm opening this at £200. £200.

0:42:070:42:09

225. 250. 250. 275. I've 300 here.

0:42:090:42:14

325. 350. 350.

0:42:140:42:15

-375...

-He's got a commission bid left on the book, he's looking down.

0:42:150:42:19

425. 450. 475. 500.

0:42:190:42:22

And 25. 550. 575.

0:42:220:42:25

At 575. And 600, madam. £600. 625.

0:42:250:42:29

-They've travelled specially, haven't they, today?

-675. 700.

0:42:290:42:33

And 25. 750. 75.

0:42:330:42:37

800. And 25.

0:42:370:42:39

-Oh, dear. Oh, dear!

-Oh, dear!

-850.

0:42:390:42:41

875. 900. And 25. 950. 975. 1,000.

0:42:410:42:48

And 25. 1,025.

0:42:480:42:50

This is exciting!

0:42:500:42:51

Are you all done at 1,025 for Peter Pan?

0:42:510:42:54

First and last time.

0:42:540:42:56

£1,025!

0:42:560:42:58

-Very exciting!

-Marion, fantastic.

0:42:580:43:00

-What a lot of money.

-That was exciting!

-Well, done!

0:43:000:43:02

-It was worth every penny.

-Oh, it was very nice, wasn't it?

0:43:020:43:05

-There's a tear in your eye now.

-Oh, yeah!

0:43:050:43:07

You wanted to see it through to the end. You've got a wonderful happy ending.

0:43:070:43:11

-What are you putting the money towards?

-I haven't thought about that!

0:43:110:43:15

Well, take your time, won't you?

0:43:150:43:17

-Yes.

-There's plenty to spend it on.

0:43:170:43:19

And that brings us to a very happy ending here in the Calder Valley.

0:43:190:43:22

I hope you've enjoyed today's show.

0:43:220:43:24

All credit to our experts and I think Marion is going home ever so happy.

0:43:240:43:27

Join us next time for more surprises. Until then, it's cheerio.

0:43:270:43:31

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:510:43:54

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:540:43:57

The Flog It! team head to Blackburn. Paul Martin is joined by experts Michael Baggott and Adam Partridge who uncover an assortment of treasures from this Lancashire town. Some of the more unusual discoveries are a Peter Pan book signed by the illustrator and a whale bone purchased from a car boot sale. Paul also checks out the history behind whippet racing as he visits a local whippet racing club.


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