Southend Flog It!


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There are hundreds of people here today.

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What a brilliant turnout and they've all come to ask that all-important question. Which is?

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What's it worth?

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If you're happy with the valuation, what are you going to do?

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Flog it!

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Today, Flog It! comes to you from the thriving seaside town of Southend-on-Sea, in Essex.

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This modern seaside resort developed from the ancient village

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of Prittlewell and was once just a handful of cottages.

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And it's this pretty suburb which provides our venue for today, Southend High School for Boys,

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and the people turned up in their hundreds.

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I'll need help to dig through all the wealth of bags and boxes,

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and on hand are our experts Thomas Plant

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and Will Axon.

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Well, judging by my watch it's now 9.30. I think we should get this massive crowd inside, don't you?

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-Yes!

-Let's do it.

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Later in the programme, I'll be finding out about the local man

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whose pioneering work helped catapult this sport into the Olympics.

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Well, that's all to come. Right now, I think Will has already spotted something.

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Let's take a closer look.

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-Well, Sally, thank you for coming along to Flog It! today.

-My pleasure.

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You've brought me a piece of furniture, thank you.

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It's obviously a chest of drawers, but it's not full size. What can you tell me about it?

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It was given to me by an elderly gentleman that I was companion to many years ago.

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He's passed away now. He was in a gas attack during the war.

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-Yes.

-And he could have registered blind, but didn't.

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And I used to read to him and I used to accompany him to operas or wherever he wanted to go.

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Amazing. But he never registered?

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No. And I did that until he died.

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-Really? But he passed on this to you as a sign of his gratitude?

-Yes.

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So you've had it how long?

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-I've had it 40 years.

-40 years?

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And he had it a few years...

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-You don't know?

-No. He already had it when I met him.

-Have you any ideas how old it is?

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-None whatsoever.

-I mean, looking at the style of the chest of drawers, the way this corner is panelled

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and the way this plinth is integrated with the bottom drawer,

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it's a typical Victorian chest of drawers.

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So we're probably thinking 1870, that sort of period, 1880.

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-Really?

-Yes. So it's got a good age.

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-It's quite old.

-Older than you and me put together.

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Looking at the front of it... I'll just tip it back.

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You've got a few little areas here.

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These are probably water stains.

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I see here, there's slight variations in the handles.

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Through the years some have broken. You don't have the key for them, do you?

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No, unfortunately, I've never had a key for it.

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-But I think, generally...

-With age.

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With age, exactly, it's in reasonable condition.

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Value-wise, have you thought what it could be worth?

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Never. I haven't got a clue.

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To be honest, I'm going to be frank and say this is a bit big for collectors of miniature furniture.

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I must admit it was bigger than I actually remembered it.

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-Really?

-I thought it was narrower.

-Did you?

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I really did. I was quite surprised how wide it was.

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When you put things away and rediscover them,

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-there's always a surprise.

-It's grown overnight!

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Looking at it, it's not so small that you can't utilise it for something.

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I've got little girls and I think they would love to put this into their bedroom.

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Probably better than the miniature because you can use it.

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-You are going to appeal to a wider audience.

-Yes. You can use it.

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-Two edges to each sword.

-Yes.

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So what I'm going to say to you is, estimate-wise, £50-£100. How do you feel about that?

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-Wonderful.

-Yes?

-Yes.

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-You're happy with that?

-What about a reserve?

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You don't want it back, do you?

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Not really, but I don't want it to go for nothing.

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-Shall we put a £30 reserve on it?

-OK.

-Yeah?

-Yes.

-It's got to be worth £30.

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-At least, yes.

-Cos it's a nice, genuine piece.

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I know it's not going to be a lot of money.

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Could potentially be 30, might be 100. What are you going to do with the money?

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-It's our silver wedding anniversary next year.

-Yours?

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-Yes.

-You don't look old enough.

-Second time around.

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-Second time around!

-My husband's already had one.

-So he's doing well.

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-And it's our silver wedding next year.

-Is it? Oh, wonderful.

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Whatever we get, we'll put the money towards that.

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-Good. Fingers crossed. £50-£100.

-That's wonderful.

-And we've agreed a £30 fixed reserve.

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-£30 fixed reserve.

-And see you on the day.

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Lovely. I look forward to it.

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-Les.

-Hello.

-You've brought along something quite fine. Do you know what it is?

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The only thing I know about it, it's a Chinese card counter.

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OK. I'm just going to rewind you and stop.

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-Right.

-Japanese.

-Japanese. Ah!

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Yeah, so we've got that far.

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Japanese card counter.

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-Or, as we like to call it, gaming counters.

-Oh, right.

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So it's not just for one game.

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-No.

-It's for lots of different types of games.

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I don't know all the card games it's associated with.

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-No.

-It's certainly made with very high-quality materials.

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-Yes.

-Do you know what those materials are?

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-Ivory, presumably, and mother of pearl are the only things I could say for sure.

-Absolutely.

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This is a rosewood base.

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-Rosewood, yes.

-With ivory lift-up counters and that lovely snap.

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-Listen. It's lovely, isn't it?

-Beautifully made.

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Beautifully made and, as you say, mother of pearl,

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green-stained jasper, probably, abalone and that's probably going to be mother of pearl there, as well.

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-Oh, right. So a good variety of materials then?

-Yeah, absolutely.

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-I was always curious about the gold inlay.

-That's not gold inlay.

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-No, the gold colouring.

-Gold colouring, yeah.

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On lacquerware, Japanese lacquerware, it's called raised sprinkled picture,

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which is Takamakiye or Hiramakiye, which is two Japanese words.

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But this isn't the same on rosewood.

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It's a raised gold leaf. So there would be a build-up of paint and then they would have put the gold on top.

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Straight on to paint, not metal?

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Yeah. Not on to metal. There'd be no metal in there.

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-That's certainly painted and therefore it's quite fragile.

-Yeah.

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-This is probably made in Tokyo, presumably, I'd say the date would be 1900, 1920s.

-Oh, as old as that.

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Yes, it's certainly got some age.

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I've always admired it, but it's not into my collecting kind of sphere.

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-I like bronzes more.

-You like...

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And how did you come by this?

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It was in an auction and I was looking at some jewellery in the case, but that caught my eye.

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-It looked so beautiful, I bid for it.

-Don't tell me what you paid for it.

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-No.

-I reckon we should put this in at £60-£100.

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-Right.

-With a discretionary reserve of around about £60, just to give the auctioneer a bit of leeway.

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-What did you pay for it?

-I paid 65, including the commission.

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-We're there on the money.

-We're right there on the money.

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I'm quite pleased about that.

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I think it's a very nice thing and I look forward to seeing it at the auction.

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What a day we're having in Southend. I've just been joined by Pat,

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who's just produced the most amazing Louis Wain watercolour.

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We've seen some Louis Wain before.

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-Yes.

-Tell me all about it, Pat. How did you come by it?

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My father was given the picture by Louis Wain.

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He worked in a lunatic asylum.

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What was your father doing in a lunatic asylum?

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He lost his job as a designer in the '30s and he went to work

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in the lunatic asylum as a painter and decorator. And Louis Wain was in there.

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-Yeah.

-He was going mad and because they both talked about art, he painted this picture for my father.

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-What a lovely story. And this has been in the family ever since?

-Yes.

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-Who's responsible for it being crinkled up in a ball?

-Er, me.

-What happened there?

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I didn't know who Louis Wain was and the picture got put in the bottom drawer and left and forgotten about.

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It became creased, I'm afraid.

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Do you know what the great news about this is?

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-No.

-Not only is it signed by Louis Wain in the corner but, if we take this off,

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-as you know, on the back, signed by Louis Wain is a bit of poetry.

-Yes.

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What he's talking about is the picture on the reverse. He's talking about the flight of pheasants,

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which we've got up here, and he's talking about the blue kitten, which is hiding in the tree.

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I suppose it's sweet, but not really my taste.

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Do you know, he was tormented at school and his education suffered?

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He was depressed a lot as a young lad.

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Eventually, he got a job for The Sporting News.

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Worked in London, illustrating dogs mainly, and it wasn't until he met his wife, who was a cat lover...

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And because she was suffering from cancer at the time, he wanted to cheer her up,

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so he used to do little doodles and sketches of their black and white cat as a hobby for his wife.

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-And then it became an obsession.

-Exactly. I think he wanted to get inside the cat.

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And he wanted to draw the cat with all the characteristics that he understood that a cat had.

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-This is why he does these faces.

-Yes, exactly.

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And this cat is like a little boy climbing a tree, looking out and going, "Oh, look what I've seen."

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-I didn't realise he was that famous...

-Oh, yes.

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When I first received the picture.

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And his cats seem to be madder and wilder in later years.

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-That's right.

-Like normal cats.

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Then they became human cats and eventually, just kaleidoscopes of colour.

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-Mad cats.

-Mad cats, yeah.

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This is probably in the middle of his illness.

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-Yeah.

-The composition's very, very good. What do you think it's worth?

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-I've no idea.

-If this was in perfect condition and hadn't been screwed up

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-into a ball, we'd be looking at £1,000 straightaway.

-Oh!

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-But, because we've got the verse on the reverse side, that puts the value back up.

-Oh, good.

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So I'm going to pitch this at £800-£1,200, as a valuation, and I'm pretty sure we'll get the top end.

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But we need to start at a figure of around £800.

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-Yes.

-So we'll have discretion on the 800.

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-That would be wonderful.

-That OK?

-Yes. Perfect.

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I'll see you at the saleroom and I think this is going to go to a cat-loving home!

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So, Jasmine, thank you very much for coming and what a pretty name.

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It is lovely. Years ago you never heard of it, but...

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I'd love to call my children Jasmine or Rose, but I can't because of my surname.

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-I couldn't say Jasmine Plant.

-No.

-Everybody would laugh at it.

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But, we're here to talk about your vases.

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Now, tell me, how did you come by them?

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I worked for an elderly man a couple of doors away.

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He lost his wife and he wanted somebody he could trust to do a bit of housework for him.

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I offered and he was so pleased, cos he knew me.

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And he was going to throw them out.

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-Really?

-And he asked me if I'd like 'em.

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That's a very sweet gesture.

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These are really nice. Do you know what they are?

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-No.

-Do you know where they're from?

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-No.

-Well, the decoration is certainly Oriental. It's Asian.

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-Yeah, it's Oriental.

-The actual vases are pottery and they're

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British pottery and they're what we would call Staffordshire Prattware vases.

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And they're very nice. They're ovoid, aren't they?

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So when you had them, did you display them?

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-Yeah, I had them in me cabinet.

-Yeah.

-Had them on display for years.

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-Do you have an idea of how old they are?

-No, no idea.

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-They're about 1850s, 1860s.

-Are they?

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Some of it was quite domestic pottery, used to contain anchovy paste and gentlemen's relish.

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These vases are purely decorative.

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And these scenes here are just transfer-printed.

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There are lots of scenes on the Prattware which are very collectable,

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but this one here is particularly nice, there's a lot going on.

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Yes. My brother thought they were very pretty.

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Very pretty, very busy.

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I can't think of the pattern immediately, but I'm pretty sure

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it's something to do with the Cheongju River. I like the way the pattern goes all the way round.

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They are actually a pair, aren't they? I think they are.

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Course they're a pair. Absolutely. So, you've had them on display,

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you've enjoyed them, you've brought them to us today. Do you have an idea what they're worth?

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I did take them, about 15 years ago at Sotheby's.

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-Yeah.

-And they did value them at 250-300.

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Yeah. 15 years ago this stuff was very popular and selling extremely well.

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Now, they're doing just as well, but not so exciting.

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There is still a market there for them, but 15 years ago they were really hot property.

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Your £250 estimate is probably correct.

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I would like to put them in at £200-£300 with a fixed reserve of £200. How does that grab you?

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Yes, that sounds all right, yeah.

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And we're staying in Essex for today's sale.

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We've travelled north to Stacey's Auctioneers and Valuers in Rochford.

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This is where we're putting our valuations to the test.

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Fingers crossed we're on the money.

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So, here's a quick reminder of what we've brought with us.

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Will the bidders be tempted by Sally's Victorian chest of drawers?

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This is probably a bit big for collectors of miniature furniture.

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I must admit it was bigger, when I got it out, than I remembered.

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Really?

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Will valued it at £50-£100, but could the size put off the bidders?

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Les' impulse buy, this Japanese card counter, is returning to auction.

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Will he get his money back?

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And I love the signed Louis Wain watercolour belonging to Pat.

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I didn't know who Louis Wain was and the picture got put in the bottom drawer and left and forgotten about.

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Despite its hard life, I valued this cool cat at £800-£1,200.

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And finally, the pair of Staffordshire Prattware vases, given to Jasmine by an employer.

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-He was going to throw them out.

-Really?

-And he asked if I'd like them.

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That's a very sweet gesture.

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But just how sweet? Well, to find out I've caught up with today's

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auctioneering duo, brothers Mark and Paul Stacey. Congratulations.

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A family-run business. Great to see you again.

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-We've met before at your old auction rooms.

-That's right.

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So let's start with this lot.

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-What do you think?

-I'm not familiar with the Prattware pattern,

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but I believe it's called "the junk", for obvious reasons. I love the Oriental pattern.

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The actual moulding of the vases as well, fantastic. It's all there.

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I think we'll get a nice surprise on these, Paul.

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Oh! They could be in a bidding war.

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-That's what auctions are all about. That's what you guys love.

-Love it.

-Working them up.

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200-300 we've got on these. What do you think, Paul? Do you agree?

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Definitely, yes. I'd go one more than that and I think they might just tip the 400 mark, maybe.

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-Could we get a little more than 400?

-It depends on how deep the pockets of the collectors are.

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Well, we'll find out shortly, but first it's time to sell Thomas' other discovery.

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Going under the hammer we've got a Japanese card counter.

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It belongs to Les, standing next to me. Hi, Les. It's good to see you.

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-Hi there, Paul.

-Hopefully, we'll be counting the money after this lot.

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I think it's beautiful. The detail work in it is so interesting.

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-And you got it at auction?

-I did.

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-Not long ago?

-Not long ago.

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It was just a matter of interest. It looked so beautiful in the cabinet.

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Why are you selling this now then?

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Well, it's served its purpose. I've had it, I've felt it and I want to move on.

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Trade upwards. It caught our expert's eye.

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-Tommy, who's standing next to me.

-Hello, Paul.

-You liked this.

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I love these! I think they're really tactile.

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The ivory, the rosewood and the little animals inset.

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Hmm, beautiful, really beautiful.

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Fingers crossed it'll do the top end. It's going under the hammer now.

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The Japanese, rosewood card counter.

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With ivory markers. Where shall we be for this then?

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Start me up at about £30 on this lot then. 30 to start. 30 anywhere?

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30 I'm bid. Thank you. 32. 35.

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-38. 40.

-Come on. We need a bit more.

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42. 45. 48. 50.

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-55. 60. At £60 now...

-It's sold.

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Gentleman's bid, middle of the room.

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And I'm selling at £60.

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-We just made it!

-That was all right!

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What will you put the money towards?

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-There's commission to pay, don't forget.

-There's commission to pay,

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-but I'm looking for little bits of bronze still.

-Always trading.

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-Always trading.

-Always buying.

-I love it.

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Well, I've been waiting for this moment for a long time, ever since the valuation day.

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It's my turn to be the expert. You can guess what I'm talking about.

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That wonderful watercolour by Louis Wain

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with the poem on the back.

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And it belongs to Pat, who's right next to me now.

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Now, you've been away since I last saw you.

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-Yes.

-Where?

-South of France.

-Did you enjoy it?

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-I loved it, yes.

-Do you go there often?

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I go there every year for the jazz festivals, so, yes, but I was a bit late this year.

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Hopefully, you might be able to go back again

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next week with the proceeds of what we get for this!

0:16:470:16:51

-I hope so.

-I know there's a phone line booked on this.

0:16:510:16:54

I had a chat to the auctioneers yesterday...

0:16:540:16:56

both the brothers. They loved it.

0:16:560:16:59

It's unique to have the poem on the back. Hopefully, it will push the value up.

0:16:590:17:02

-Oh, I hope so.

-So do I.

0:17:020:17:04

Going to wave goodbye? Here it is.

0:17:040:17:06

Louis William Wain as catalogued. Lovely picture.

0:17:060:17:09

One, two, three bids I have and I'm clearing the book at £780.

0:17:090:17:14

The bid's here with me at £780.

0:17:140:17:15

Are we all done? Commission's at 780. 800 anywhere.

0:17:150:17:19

No bids? At 780. Last time then...

0:17:190:17:22

Selling at £780.

0:17:220:17:24

We just sold it under the reserve.

0:17:240:17:27

-That's not bad, is it?

-I thought it would do better than that, but there you go.

0:17:290:17:32

-I'm happy with that.

-Gosh, that was short and sweet.

0:17:320:17:35

-It was.

-Where were the bidders in the room?

0:17:350:17:37

I don't know, but that's... I'm happy.

0:17:370:17:39

Good. Good. You can go back to the south of France if you want.

0:17:390:17:42

At £90. 95. 100...

0:17:440:17:48

This next lot didn't arrive in a transit van or an estate car, like most chest of drawers.

0:17:480:17:52

Sally carried it in, didn't you?

0:17:520:17:54

-I did.

-And it's that wonderful little miniature one that Will, our expert, has put £50-£100 on.

0:17:540:17:59

-That's right.

-Why are you selling it?

0:17:590:18:01

Because I don't use it and it was full of rubbish.

0:18:010:18:04

-So it's got to go?

-It's got to go.

0:18:040:18:05

It was only sitting on the wardrobe doing absolutely nothing, just full of rubbish.

0:18:050:18:10

-You won't miss it at all then?

-No.

0:18:100:18:12

No. There you go.

0:18:120:18:14

That's the name of the game, flog it. Will we get that top end?

0:18:140:18:17

Like you say, with these chest of drawers, it's not like it's a high-collectors' piece.

0:18:170:18:21

-Or an apprentice piece.

-No.

0:18:210:18:23

It's not something for the miniature furniture collector.

0:18:230:18:26

You can use them, so in that sense, it's got a marketplace

0:18:260:18:28

in that it can be used, but it's not going to be that sort of high money that the collectors' pieces are.

0:18:280:18:33

But I'm confident we should get within estimate.

0:18:330:18:36

Nevertheless, it's a great piece of storage. Going under the hammer now. Good luck.

0:18:360:18:40

-Here we go.

-A Victorian, mahogany apprentice chest.

0:18:400:18:43

A nice little chest.

0:18:430:18:44

There we are. To clear the book, I must start the bidding at £50.

0:18:440:18:48

Straight in! Straight in.

0:18:480:18:50

AT £50. 55. 60. 65.

0:18:500:18:52

-70. 75.

-Oh, this is good.

0:18:520:18:55

At £80 now. On the book. Are we all done?

0:18:550:18:57

Make no mistake. Against you all at £80.

0:18:570:19:01

-Hammer's gone down.

-Yes.

-Sally, £80.

-That is lovely.

0:19:020:19:05

-That's a good result?

-Very.

-Good result.

0:19:050:19:07

-Better than I expected.

-A fair price.

0:19:070:19:09

-Don't forget there is commission to pay.

-Yes.

0:19:090:19:12

-They'll put a cheque in the post and you'll get that in a few weeks.

-I look forward to it.

0:19:120:19:16

Is it still going towards the anniversary?

0:19:160:19:18

-Our silver wedding anniversary.

-I was about to ask.

0:19:180:19:21

-Yes, our anniversary next year.

-What's your husband's name?

0:19:210:19:24

-Tony.

-Tony, look after her on the big day, won't you?

0:19:240:19:27

Oh, these are nice. I like this next lot.

0:19:320:19:35

We've got a pair of Prattware vases.

0:19:350:19:37

We've got £200-£300.

0:19:370:19:39

They belong to Jasmine. Who have you brought along for support?

0:19:390:19:42

-Daughter, Lorraine.

-Lorraine, pleased to meet you.

0:19:420:19:45

-Looking after Mum today?

-Yes, I am.

0:19:450:19:46

-Why are you selling them?

-I've got to clear out, she said.

0:19:460:19:49

She? Under orders. Got to clear out.

0:19:490:19:52

-Yes.

-This could be your inheritance!

0:19:520:19:54

I wouldn't know. I'd bin it all.

0:19:540:19:56

-She would've thrown it all away.

-Would she?

0:19:560:19:58

Yeah. Thrown it all away.

0:19:580:20:00

There's a bit of value there. The auctioneer liked them.

0:20:000:20:02

-Yeah, a lot of interest. So, Thomas...

-Yes, Paul.

0:20:020:20:05

We could get the top end of your valuation.

0:20:050:20:08

I'd be really pleased if we got the top end for you, Jasmine.

0:20:080:20:11

-We could certainly get mid-estimate.

-Yeah.

0:20:110:20:13

Very good. And what's wonderful is they are in lovely condition.

0:20:130:20:17

They are. Not chipped or nothing, are they?

0:20:170:20:19

-No.

-They've been looked after. That's all credit to you.

0:20:190:20:22

The pair of Staffordshire-ware, Prattware vases.

0:20:220:20:25

A little bit of interest and I'm clearing the book at £160.

0:20:250:20:28

Bid's with me at 160. 170 anywhere?

0:20:280:20:30

Are we all done then at 160? 170. 180.

0:20:300:20:33

Thank goodness, a phone line booked.

0:20:330:20:35

190. 200. Against you.

0:20:350:20:38

At £200. Here with me, commissions, at £200.

0:20:380:20:41

Coming on the phones. 210.

0:20:410:20:43

-On the phone again.

-£210 now.

0:20:430:20:45

On the phone at £210. Are we all done?

0:20:450:20:48

I'm selling at £210. Last time.

0:20:480:20:53

Yes, we've done it! £210! Got to be happy with that.

0:20:530:20:57

Thomas was spot on with his estimate. Happy?

0:20:570:20:59

-Yeah.

-You going to split the money up?

-Yeah.

0:20:590:21:01

I thought you might say that.

0:21:010:21:03

And later, we'll be heading back to our Southend location

0:21:050:21:09

to see our experts pull three more lots out of the crowd.

0:21:090:21:13

A car-boot bargain, ceramics from overseas and an heirloom that's been in one family for over 100 years.

0:21:140:21:21

First, I'm heading to the nearby town of Brentwood,

0:21:260:21:28

the place where one local man launched an exciting sport.

0:21:280:21:32

Jumping up and down on a piece of stretched fabric or animal skin, in order to fly

0:21:330:21:38

in the air, is an age-old pastime. Up until the 1930s

0:21:380:21:42

you'd probably find that in a travelling circus or fair.

0:21:420:21:45

But when local man, Ted Blake, got involved, his pioneering efforts, here in Brentwood, Essex,

0:21:480:21:55

catapulted trampolining towards the Olympic sport we know today.

0:21:550:22:00

After excelling at sport in the Army Physical Corps,

0:22:000:22:03

Ted took his talents to teaching at a local Essex school.

0:22:030:22:06

He introduced a purpose-built trampoline to his gym class and pretty soon

0:22:060:22:10

his squad were giving high-profile demonstrations of what was then called "rebound tumbling".

0:22:100:22:17

Ted was soon hired by an American chap called George Nissen, who shared his passion for the sport.

0:22:190:22:25

And after developing modern trampolines in the States in the 1930s,

0:22:250:22:29

George crossed the Atlantic and set up in a factory in nearby Hainault.

0:22:290:22:33

Once on board, Ted set about putting trampolining on the map.

0:22:330:22:38

Ted sadly passed away in 1998, two years before trampolining was showcased in the Sydney Olympics,

0:22:380:22:45

but he can be credited with introducing the modern trampoline to Europe

0:22:450:22:49

and developing it as an international sport.

0:22:490:22:52

Brentwood is still the hub of trampolining activity.

0:22:520:22:55

One of its three clubs train here at Brentwood School.

0:22:550:22:58

But before I see them in action, I've come to the library to find out more about Ted's pioneering work.

0:22:580:23:04

And who better to talk to than his son, Tim.

0:23:040:23:08

Do you share your dad's passion for trampolining?

0:23:090:23:13

Well, almost.

0:23:130:23:14

I worked for the Nissen Trampoline Company in Brentwood some years ago.

0:23:140:23:18

I'm currently helping Dave Kingaby, of the Brentwood Trampoline Club, compile a history of the sport.

0:23:180:23:23

What can you tell me about those early days, when Ted joined forces with George Nissen?

0:23:230:23:27

Well, that started in 1956 when Ted took on an office in Hainault.

0:23:270:23:32

He was lucky in that the factory next door could actually manufacture

0:23:320:23:35

the trampolines to Nissen's specifications.

0:23:350:23:39

In 1957, the national press took an interest when they heard that Ted's daughter... my sister, Debbie...

0:23:390:23:45

had been jumping on a trampoline in his backyard.

0:23:450:23:47

They wanted to take some pictures and see what the trampoline was all about.

0:23:470:23:51

-Good exposure really?

-Great exposure for him.

0:23:510:23:54

He went out to promote the business and the trampoline.

0:23:540:23:57

He used to take his demonstration trampoline around the country on the roof of his car.

0:23:570:24:02

He used to unload it at schools and educational establishments...

0:24:020:24:06

The military were interested, even circuses.

0:24:060:24:08

..Do a performance on the trampoline, show them the benefits,

0:24:080:24:11

and then move on to the next one.

0:24:110:24:13

-Simple really!

-It sounds simple, doesn't it?

0:24:130:24:15

-I suspect it wasn't, in those days. It would have been hard work.

-Especially on the roof of the car.

0:24:150:24:20

Yeah. And with no motorways to contend with, it must have been difficult, but he got through it.

0:24:200:24:25

So as well as my sister being used to show the effects

0:24:250:24:28

of the trampoline, I was Nissen's crash-test dummy during the '60s and '70s.

0:24:280:24:32

-They used to lift me up and drop me on to the trampoline to see what broke.

-How old were you?

0:24:320:24:36

I was somewhere between 15 and 21, that's the sort of timescale.

0:24:360:24:40

And invariably it was me that broke, because the trampoline was so reliable.

0:24:400:24:44

So was there any sort of resistance?

0:24:440:24:46

What was the reaction? Was there any competition?

0:24:460:24:49

Initially, there wasn't any competition, certainly here.

0:24:490:24:52

In the States, there was a little bit.

0:24:520:24:54

As interest grew, more people produced trampolines, but mainly as toys.

0:24:540:24:58

They were things to be used in the garden.

0:24:580:25:00

No-one actually produced a trampoline like Nissen

0:25:000:25:02

-that had the performance required for competition.

-Why the move to Brentwood?

0:25:020:25:06

They had to move out of the existing premises in Hainault because it became too small.

0:25:060:25:11

Then they moved to Romford, on the Eastern Avenue, for a while.

0:25:110:25:14

Then in the mid-60s, they moved to Brentwood,

0:25:140:25:16

-where the factory was up until it closed in the mid-80s.

-Yeah.

0:25:160:25:20

I believe it's still very popular in Brentwood today.

0:25:200:25:23

Trampolining's really taken off. There are three major clubs...

0:25:230:25:26

the Brentwood Trampoline Club, the Recoil Twisters and Levitation, of which I believe the largest one

0:25:260:25:31

has over 300 members. So there's certainly potential for national, if not Olympic, champions.

0:25:310:25:37

It's very popular. So how much were you and your father

0:25:370:25:40

involved in getting trampolining recognised as an Olympic sport?

0:25:400:25:44

Me, not much. I worked for a separate division of the company. Ted Blake and George Nissen

0:25:440:25:49

always had a long-term ambition for trampoline to be in the Olympics.

0:25:490:25:52

Were they turned down at first?

0:25:520:25:53

They were. I think, to be honest, George Nissen pursued that

0:25:530:25:56

right up until the Year 2000, when it was there as a showcase for trampoline.

0:25:560:26:01

Tim, thank you so much for sharing a bit of history with me.

0:26:010:26:04

It's been fascinating cos, for me, that's where it all started.

0:26:040:26:07

I'm going to leave you and go down to the gym

0:26:070:26:09

and bring this right up to date and meet some Olympic hopefuls.

0:26:090:26:12

-You'll enjoy yourself.

-Thanks a lot.

0:26:120:26:14

Brentwood Trampoline Club was established in the late '80s.

0:26:240:26:28

It boasts a high-performance coach who works with talented juniors,

0:26:280:26:32

like 17-year-old Scott and 12-year-old Hannah.

0:26:320:26:36

Hannah, hi. It's Paul. Pleased to meet you.

0:26:450:26:49

That is fantastic.

0:26:490:26:50

-Jump down here, young man. Scott, you are brilliant.

-Cheers.

0:26:500:26:54

-Absolutely brilliant.

-Thank you.

0:26:540:26:57

Very scary stuff up there. How long have you been trampolining?

0:26:570:27:00

For about eight years.

0:27:000:27:02

-Eight years? And how many hours a day do you put in?

-Three hours a day

0:27:020:27:05

-and probably up to about 18 hours a week.

-A lot of dedication.

0:27:050:27:10

-What are your goals?

-2012 and '16.

0:27:100:27:12

Do you consider yourself to be the best in the country at your age?

0:27:120:27:15

Oh, I hope so, yeah. I do hope so.

0:27:150:27:17

-Hannah, how long have you been trampolining?

-About four years.

0:27:170:27:20

Yeah? Are you going to get as good as him?

0:27:200:27:22

I hope so.

0:27:220:27:24

-Have you won much so far?

-Yeah. I've won national championships twice.

0:27:240:27:28

-Have you really?

-Yeah.

-You've got to be good.

0:27:280:27:30

-Got to be good. Is it tough?

-Erm...

0:27:300:27:33

-it's OK.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-Ambitions?

-Er, to represent Great Britain one day.

0:27:330:27:38

Good for you! I know you've got some moves to show us and we haven't seen you yet.

0:27:380:27:42

So, come on, hop up. Let's have a look.

0:27:420:27:44

She's got the highest jumps at the moment, probably, for a 12-year-old.

0:27:490:27:53

Really?

0:27:530:27:55

Ted Blake's commitment and passion for trampolining has made this sport so fascinating and exciting.

0:28:080:28:14

And I tell you what, we've got some real talent here.

0:28:140:28:17

I've got high hopes for the 2012 Olympics, so watch this space.

0:28:170:28:21

It's time to jump right back to Southend High School for Boys,

0:28:250:28:28

where Will is trying to unlock the story from this young, budding dealer.

0:28:280:28:33

This is quite a display of keys you've brought along for us to have a look at, today.

0:28:340:28:39

Sally, Jack, who do these belong to?

0:28:390:28:41

-They're mine.

-Are they?

-Yeah.

0:28:410:28:43

Are these things you've collected over time or...

0:28:430:28:45

-No, I bought them altogether.

-From an auction, was it?

-No, it was a boot sale.

0:28:450:28:49

-You're a bit of a booter?

-Yeah.

-What attracted you to buying these?

0:28:490:28:53

I was at a boot sale with my mum and my dad and I just saw them

0:28:530:28:55

and thought I might me interested to see how much they were worth.

0:28:550:28:59

-OK. And do you mind me asking what you paid for them?

-I paid £2 for 'em.

0:28:590:29:03

That's not a lot. I haven't counted how many there are,

0:29:030:29:06

that's about 10p each?

0:29:060:29:07

-Or less?

-Yes.

-Have you done a bit of research since you bought them?

0:29:070:29:10

I have no idea about any of them really.

0:29:100:29:13

OK. There are one or two that I do recognise.

0:29:130:29:15

Now, the first ones, of course, that draw your attention are these larger ones here.

0:29:150:29:20

I had a closer look at those and just felt the weight,

0:29:200:29:22

and to me I think they're probably reproduction keys, for decorative purposes, that sort of thing.

0:29:220:29:28

Then looking through, I can see another one here which is a steel one.

0:29:280:29:33

Generally, the steel keys are earlier and they tend to date from around the 18th century.

0:29:330:29:38

So that's probably a George III key in steel.

0:29:380:29:42

And the other one that caught my eye... which I don't know a lot about,

0:29:420:29:46

-is this double-ended key. Now, that seems fascinating.

-Yeah.

0:29:460:29:49

Why they did double-enders I don't know. Two for the price of one?

0:29:490:29:52

There's an interesting variety of keys. You're not tempted...

0:29:520:29:56

any of these, they don't do anything for you?

0:29:560:29:59

-No, not really.

-No?

0:29:590:30:01

If these are worth more than £2, what's the money going to go towards?

0:30:010:30:04

I'm looking for driving lessons.

0:30:040:30:06

-Good, you've got to learn how to drive.

-Yeah.

0:30:060:30:09

None of these will start a car. I don't think any were designed for a car.

0:30:090:30:13

There's plenty for your money. A few, more interesting than others.

0:30:130:30:16

I would say, if you're happy at a valuation of around that sort of £50 mark...

0:30:160:30:20

Shall we say, £40-£60 for the lot? How do you feel about that?

0:30:200:30:24

-That's good.

-It's not a bad investment, is it?

-No.

0:30:240:30:27

-Are you going to want them back if they don't sell?

-Probably not.

0:30:270:30:31

Shall we put a reserve on at sort of £20?

0:30:310:30:33

-Half the bottom estimate.

-Yeah.

0:30:330:30:35

At least you've got something back. You're going to make something on your £2.

0:30:350:30:39

The key to selling these is a low estimate.

0:30:390:30:41

So £40-£60 with a reserve at 20.

0:30:410:30:43

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:30:430:30:45

-Happy?

-Yes.

-Mum, happy for him to go with that?

-Yeah.

0:30:450:30:47

Good. Well, we'll see you on the day. That's all that's left to say and good luck.

0:30:470:30:51

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:30:510:30:53

-Johann, nice to meet you.

-Thank you.

-Thank you for coming in.

0:30:580:31:01

-My pleasure.

-I want a brief history about you.

0:31:010:31:04

Well, I've been living in Holland since late 1973.

0:31:040:31:09

Being the youngest of a family of five. My parents moved to Holland.

0:31:090:31:12

-My mother being Dutch.

-How often do you come over?

0:31:120:31:15

Once a year to see my favourite sister, as it were.

0:31:150:31:18

-Oh, right.

-She rang me and said, "Johann, I know you love antiques.

0:31:180:31:21

-"I insist you bring something over to Flog It!"

-Tell me about this.

0:31:210:31:25

Well, that's going back ten years.

0:31:250:31:27

I went to a market and on one of the stalls I saw the bowl.

0:31:270:31:31

But when I saw "Wellington Inn", I thought, well, it seemed a bit quirky.

0:31:310:31:35

I thought, "Would they have had that kind of humour, straight after the Battle of Waterloo?"

0:31:350:31:40

When I saw the word "Shorthose", I knew Shorthose went bankrupt

0:31:400:31:44

or stopped producing in 1822. I said, "Well, this must be a contemporary."

0:31:440:31:48

So you bought it from this stall in Utrecht?

0:31:480:31:51

That's right. An elderly couple...

0:31:510:31:53

-They were selling it? They didn't know what it was?

-It wasn't a specialist, like you get in England.

0:31:530:31:58

I don't think they realised it was celebrating the Battle of Waterloo.

0:31:580:32:01

Well, it is, obviously this is Waterloo, the High Street

0:32:010:32:05

and the Wellington Hotel, which is still there, actually.

0:32:050:32:09

The bowl is dated from about 1817, just a couple of years after

0:32:090:32:13

-the Battle of Waterloo, which, as we know, is June 1815.

-Yeah.

0:32:130:32:18

It's a commemorative bowl, but it's a bit of a fun commemorative bowl.

0:32:180:32:23

It's not a picture of Wellington, which is strange. It's all about the place...

0:32:230:32:28

-Yeah.

-Rather than commemorating him as the great general.

0:32:280:32:31

As pieces of commemorative china go, it's quite a rare one.

0:32:310:32:36

I haven't seen one before. It's in very nice condition.

0:32:360:32:39

The only one very minor issue is just this very small hairline just here.

0:32:390:32:43

But going to value for sale, there are a lot of collectors out there

0:32:430:32:47

for Waterloo and Napoleonic china and collectables, Wellington especially.

0:32:470:32:52

I would say £500-£700 would be a very sensible estimate.

0:32:520:32:57

-I would have gone more if there wasn't that hairline.

-Yeah, which I never really picked up on.

0:32:570:33:02

Yeah, but it's an old hairline and, you know, these things happen and you can see it's stained, etc.

0:33:020:33:07

But as it is, it's in very nice condition for its age.

0:33:070:33:10

-Yeah.

-So £500-£700 with a fixed reserve of 500 and I can't wait to see it sell.

0:33:100:33:15

Well, Frank, I like the look of this impressive clock.

0:33:210:33:24

-It is lovely.

-Well, it's beautiful.

0:33:240:33:26

-And I probably don't need to tell you that it's a skeleton clock.

-Well, I called it a cathedral clock.

0:33:260:33:31

Yes, they do have that architectural look.

0:33:310:33:33

-Yeah.

-Frank, I'm going to lose the dome, so then you can have a proper look at the clock.

0:33:330:33:38

But before I do, I notice there's a bit of damage on this dome.

0:33:380:33:42

-That's been since year dot, that.

-Yeah.

0:33:420:33:44

It looks like it's been glued for a while. That will affect the value

0:33:440:33:48

when I come to give you a value, as these are very expensive to replace.

0:33:480:33:52

But let me get rid of that.

0:33:520:33:54

Now I'm going to be brave and put it on the floor next to me, so don't forget to remind me it's there.

0:33:540:34:00

Where's it been living at home? Is it on display?

0:34:000:34:02

Oh, yes. It's been on display all the time, 25 years I've had it.

0:34:020:34:06

You've had it 25 years?

0:34:060:34:07

Father died 25 years ago...

0:34:070:34:09

-And he had it before you?

-Yes.

0:34:090:34:12

And his father had it before him.

0:34:120:34:14

I suppose it's been in the family about 100-odd years, I suppose.

0:34:140:34:17

So there is a chance that maybe it was even bought new at the time.

0:34:170:34:22

-Yeah, possibly.

-Just, just. Yeah?

0:34:220:34:24

The actual skeleton clock itself, as a design of clocks, started in France in the mid-18th century, so 1750s.

0:34:240:34:31

It was really an excuse for the French clockmakers

0:34:310:34:33

to show off, to tell people, "Look how good I am.

0:34:330:34:36

"Look how complicated I can make my clock."

0:34:360:34:38

In England, we didn't get into manufacturing these until early 19th century,

0:34:380:34:42

-so you're talking 1810, 1820s.

-Yeah.

0:34:420:34:46

And sure enough, in 1851, the Great Exhibition, that's when a lot of them were displayed.

0:34:460:34:51

Because the public saw them, they thought, "I really want one of those.

0:34:510:34:54

-"I'd like one of those for my home."

-Yes.

-So after 1851, they started to be mass produced.

0:34:540:34:59

So I think, just looking at the work in it and the complicity of it, this

0:34:590:35:03

is a post-1851 skeleton clock, so one that has been produced from a factory for commercial purposes.

0:35:030:35:11

Let's have a look at the clock.

0:35:110:35:12

It's not over-complicated. It's got everything you'd expect.

0:35:120:35:16

You've got the fusee movement with the spring barrel, which releases the spring and turns the hands.

0:35:160:35:24

You've got this typical silvered dial at the front. That's fine.

0:35:240:35:27

I was looking at the movement and it looks quite clean inside.

0:35:270:35:30

-Have you had it serviced or cleaned?

-I had it serviced three months ago.

0:35:300:35:34

-So it really is ready to go.

-Yeah.

0:35:340:35:35

Now we come down to the question of value.

0:35:350:35:38

Now you took it in for a service.

0:35:380:35:40

Did you take it to a specialist clockmaker or a clock restorer?

0:35:400:35:43

Yeah, a clock repairer I think.

0:35:430:35:44

OK, clock repairer. And he gave an idea of value, did he?

0:35:440:35:47

I said to him, "What do you reckon it's worth?"

0:35:470:35:50

And he said, "To insure it would be worth about £2,000."

0:35:500:35:53

£2,000. Well, there's always going to be that discrepancy

0:35:530:35:57

between an insurance valuation and a sale valuation, shall we say?

0:35:570:36:00

-A big difference.

-You're right.

0:36:000:36:02

And with a £2,000 insurance valuation, I think he's come in a little punchy, to be honest.

0:36:020:36:07

This one I think, in the present market, I would say,

0:36:070:36:11

if you want to sell, and I'm trying to put the best price I can for you.

0:36:110:36:15

-I don't want to give it away.

-No, no.

0:36:150:36:16

An estimate of £300-£500.

0:36:160:36:18

-Yeah.

-Bearing in mind that it's not the Rolls-Royce of skeleton clocks,

0:36:180:36:24

but what I'm willing to do for you is reserve it fixed at that £300.

0:36:240:36:27

Now I'm usually a man who likes a no reserve, so I'm making an exception here.

0:36:270:36:31

We'll reserve it at £300 fixed. I'm confident that it will sell.

0:36:310:36:37

All we need is two people on the day and, hopefully, it will fly.

0:36:370:36:40

-Both millionaires.

-Ha-ha!

0:36:400:36:43

With Frank's clock on board, it's time to return to the auction and here's what's up for sale.

0:36:430:36:48

Jack's key collection only cost him £2, so if Will's valuation

0:36:480:36:52

of £40-£60 is on the money, this budding young dealer has got a great eye.

0:36:520:36:58

Johann travelled from Holland with strict instructions from his sister.

0:36:590:37:05

She rang me up and said, "Johann, I know you love antiques.

0:37:050:37:07

"I insist you bring something over to Flog It!"

0:37:070:37:12

So will the Waterloo bowl he packed, dating from 1817, go on to victory?

0:37:120:37:18

And finally, after 100 years in Frank's family, he's ready to let go of that marvellous skeleton clock.

0:37:180:37:25

He's hoping for the top end of the estimate to be divided between his five children.

0:37:250:37:29

But now with brother Mark Stacey ready with his gavel, let's join our next seller.

0:37:290:37:35

Going under the hammer we've a collection of Georgian keys.

0:37:350:37:38

These could open a few doors for some collectors and dealers

0:37:380:37:41

if they're here now and they're in a buying mood.

0:37:410:37:44

They belong to Sally and Jack.

0:37:440:37:46

-Hi, hello. Now, I know you got these in a car boot, didn't you?

-Yeah.

0:37:460:37:49

So do you do many car boots?

0:37:490:37:51

-Yeah, sometimes.

-Have you been lucky? Made a bit of money?

0:37:510:37:54

Yeah. Hopefully, this will do quite well.

0:37:540:37:57

-And I know the money today is going towards driving lessons, yeah?

-Yeah.

0:37:570:38:01

Are you teaching Jack already a little bit? Hmm?

0:38:010:38:04

Never! No. Are you going to?

0:38:040:38:06

-No.

-Why not?

0:38:060:38:08

I'm not that brave.

0:38:080:38:11

-Is Dad? Is Dad going to?

-He might, yeah.

0:38:110:38:14

-Get him some professional ones first.

-It is expensive.

0:38:140:38:17

-Yes.

-Fingers crossed we get the top end of the estimate. I'm pretty sure we will.

0:38:170:38:21

We haven't put them in at a lot of money.

0:38:210:38:23

They didn't cost you a lot and they're a quirky lot.

0:38:230:38:25

At the money we've put them in at, they've got to sell. A tidy profit.

0:38:250:38:29

We're going to find out right now. Let's open a few doors.

0:38:290:38:32

We have a box containing old keys, including a George III steel key.

0:38:320:38:36

A bit of interest here, on the book. Straight in at £30.

0:38:360:38:39

-Any advances on 30?

-A few bidders.

0:38:390:38:42

32. 35. 38. 40.

0:38:420:38:45

42. At £42 now. 45. 48.

0:38:450:38:47

At £48 now. Are we all done then?

0:38:470:38:50

50. Fresh bidder against you now.

0:38:500:38:52

-55. 60. 65.

-They're creeping up.

0:38:520:38:56

70. 75. At £75 now.

0:38:560:39:00

Still on my left and selling at £75.

0:39:000:39:04

-Yes! That was a good trade lot.

-Wow!

0:39:040:39:06

-That was a good trade lot.

-Good.

0:39:060:39:07

Someone will make use of those keys.

0:39:070:39:09

-They're going back in a nice piece of furniture.

-Really good.

0:39:090:39:12

-Well, done. Good luck.

-Thanks.

0:39:120:39:14

-And I hope you pass first time.

-Thanks.

0:39:140:39:16

He might be getting up early a few more times.

0:39:160:39:18

After a tidy profit like that, it's worth getting up!

0:39:180:39:21

New bidder. 110...

0:39:220:39:24

Let's hope this next lot doesn't get the boot,

0:39:260:39:29

because it's a bowl and it's celebrating Wellington's great victory

0:39:290:39:33

over Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo, in 1815, and it belongs to Johann.

0:39:330:39:37

-We've a lot of money riding on this... £500-£700.

-I know.

0:39:370:39:40

-It's really nice.

-I hope the best, otherwise it will be my Waterloo!

0:39:400:39:44

It will be, yes. Why are you selling this?

0:39:440:39:47

-When you collect, you have to part with things.

-Of course you do. And that's the way of trading up.

0:39:470:39:51

You have to sell some things to buy some more. Let's ask Thomas, our expert.

0:39:510:39:56

What do you think? You fell in love with this.

0:39:560:39:58

I did fall in love with it. It's lovely.

0:39:580:40:00

I must admit, I'm a little bit nervous about my valuation.

0:40:000:40:03

-I could have over-cooked it.

-Suspense!

0:40:030:40:06

-Well, we've got it right now. Good luck.

-I hope so.

-Here we go.

0:40:060:40:10

White-transfer, Shorthose bowl.

0:40:100:40:12

Wellington Hotel, Waterloo. That's a rare one, that one.

0:40:120:40:15

Where are we going to start? £300?

0:40:150:40:16

300. Let's get going at £300. 310. 320.

0:40:160:40:19

330. 340. 350.

0:40:190:40:21

At £350. 360, new bidder. 370. 380.

0:40:210:40:25

-Come on.

-390.

0:40:250:40:27

400. At £400. Any advance at £400?

0:40:270:40:31

-Come on.

-Are we all done?

0:40:310:40:32

Last time then. £400.

0:40:320:40:35

-Just failed there.

-We did meet our Waterloo, didn't we?

0:40:350:40:38

We did. Maybe we could break into the song.

0:40:380:40:41

Maybe too specialist, I think?

0:40:410:40:42

Yeah, there is another auction room on another day and, as you said,

0:40:420:40:46

you could put it into a fine art and antique sale.

0:40:460:40:48

-Yeah.

-Or hang on to it.

0:40:480:40:49

Maybe the time to sell it is in 2015, when anything to do with Wellington

0:40:490:40:55

and the anniversary of the battle, will fetch big money.

0:40:550:40:57

Maybe that's a date to hang on to it and then put it into the sale.

0:40:570:41:01

I'm trying to work out how old I am.

0:41:010:41:03

There's enough time yet, mate.

0:41:030:41:06

72...

0:41:070:41:09

OK, let's pick the bones out of this next lot, shall we?

0:41:100:41:13

It's an old skeleton clock and it belongs to Frank.

0:41:130:41:16

It's mid-Victorian. Frank, who have you brought along?

0:41:160:41:18

-My wife, Mavis.

-Hello, Mavis.

0:41:180:41:20

-Hello.

-I love the tan.

-Thank you.

0:41:200:41:22

-Have you been on holiday?

-Tunisia.

0:41:220:41:25

-Oh, nice for some, isn't it?

-It was nice, yes.

0:41:250:41:27

-That's why we're selling the clock.

-Is it? Ha!

0:41:270:41:30

We've got our work cut out then, haven't we?

0:41:300:41:32

Will, what can we do for them?

0:41:320:41:34

We had a bit of a haggle on the day about price again, the usual story.

0:41:340:41:38

We try and keep things realistic.

0:41:380:41:39

But £300-£500 is a sensible estimate for this type of skeleton clock.

0:41:390:41:43

It's got no hybrid parts on it, which is what the clock dealers

0:41:430:41:47

are looking for, so it's going to hold its value.

0:41:470:41:49

Should do. They're conversation bits, aren't they?

0:41:490:41:51

Someone sees them who's not used to seeing them, "What's that?

0:41:510:41:55

"How does it work?" You know, see how it's made.

0:41:550:41:57

That's the thing about skeleton clocks, all about how they were made.

0:41:570:42:00

A 19th-century, brass, skeleton clock, as catalogued.

0:42:000:42:04

Two bids I have and I'm clearing the book at £380.

0:42:040:42:08

380, straight in.

0:42:080:42:09

On commissions, here with me at £380. 390...

0:42:090:42:13

-I'm looking for another bidder.

-400.

0:42:130:42:15

410. 420. At £420 now.

0:42:150:42:18

Still here with me, commission bid, at £420. Are we all done?

0:42:180:42:23

-Yes! £420.

-That was good.

0:42:230:42:26

Well done, Will. Mid-estimate.

0:42:260:42:28

One of us can go.

0:42:280:42:30

-Right! A nice weekend, here you go.

-Yeah.

-You think? Yeah?

0:42:300:42:35

-Yeah.

-Where are you going? Where do you fancy? Where do you normally go?

0:42:350:42:39

-Sometimes Turkey or sometimes...

-No, a weekend.

0:42:390:42:42

-Locally? Bournemouth.

-Bournemouth.

0:42:420:42:44

-Get out to Bournemouth.

-Yes.

0:42:440:42:45

-Very nice. The Jurassic coastline down there.

-Lovely, yeah.

0:42:450:42:49

Poole, take in a bit of Poole.

0:42:490:42:50

-Yeah, Lulworth Cove.

-Yeah. Oh, congratulations. Have a nice time.

0:42:500:42:54

32. 35...

0:42:560:42:58

As you can see the auction's still going on, but it's all over

0:42:580:43:01

for our owners and I have to say, that wasn't a bad day!

0:43:010:43:05

Do join me again soon for many more surprises on Flog It! But until then, cheerio from Essex.

0:43:050:43:10

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:290:43:32

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:320:43:35

The team look for antiques on the Essex coast, as Paul Martin brings Flog It! to Southend-on-Sea. On hand to help Paul delve through the bags and boxes are experts Will Axon and Thomas Plant.

Paul thinks an original Louis Wain is the cat's whiskers, Thomas finds a fascinating Waterloo bowl, but its Will who wins the battle at auction when a 19th-century skeleton clock goes under the hammer. Paul meets the son of a local man who launched trampolining in Essex in the 1950s, and two Olympic hopefuls demonstrate the exciting sport it has become.


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