Liverpool Flog It!


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Liverpool

Paul Martin and the experts delve into Liverpool's musical heritage, from the classical to the Fab Four.


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Still buzzing from its richly deserved success as the former

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European capital of culture, welcome to Flog It!

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from the city of Liverpool.

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Liverpool is more than just a place with a big reputation.

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In 2004, it was designated a world heritage city,

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placing its city's waterfront alongside Stonehenge and

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the Great Wall Of China as one of the world's most important places.

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With its success in football, the arts and music, Liverpool is universally admired.

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The only English city outside London with a collection of national museums and galleries.

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It also has more listed buildings than any other, outside the capital.

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And one of those fine listed buildings is this one,

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St George's Hall, with these magnificent fluted columns, rising up to the heavens.

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It also houses the third largest organ in the country and later,

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I'll be finding out how it gets from this...to this.

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Up until 25 years ago, it was home to the crown and civil law courts

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and a lot of people do say it's possibly the only building

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where you can get tried for murder, have a ball or attend a concert,

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all under one roof.

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And on top of that, it's also doubling up as today's Flog It! venue.

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Talking of multitasking, here are today's experts, Kate Bateman

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and Mark Stacey, eager to see what's in all those bags and boxes.

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Well, they don't have to wait any longer because it's 9.30, it's time

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to get the doors open and get this wonderful Liverpudlian queue inside.

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CHEERING

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So as the crowd gathers in the magnificent Great Hall, Mark is keen

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to make a start with an Art Deco lamp.

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-Ruth, Margaret, hello.

-Hello.

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Now, you've brought a rather risque lady in to show us, haven't you?

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-Looks like it.

-Yes.

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Has this been in your house, or are you going to tell us

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-where you got it from?

-No. It's been donated to our charity.

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-Oh, right.

-We're here on behalf of an animal rescue based in Merseyside.

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-Right.

-Animals In Need.

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We have very loyal supporters and they donated this for us to sell

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-but we're often unaware of the value of them.

-What we've really got here

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is a rather nice piece and unfortunately, it's not bronze.

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-No.

-And when we look at this type of Art Deco figure,

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we really want bronze and ivory and marble.

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What we've actually got is spelter and alabaster.

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And this is a spelter body which has then been coated

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in the sort of bronzed finish. Having said that, it is period.

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I mean, it is from the 1920s and she's actually quite well done.

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There's a lot of detail in the face here and in the hair.

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And, of course, the bonus is that she is not wearing anything,

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-or very little.

-Right.

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Cos that's what collectors of this type of figure like.

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The more you show, the higher the value.

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-Right.

-It's like life generally, I'm sure.

-We'll remember that.

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-And of course, she's missing the globe lamp, here.

-Yes.

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But I think she's rather nice. Now, how much is she worth?

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If it had been bronze, it would have been worth

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quite a lot of money. It's still worth some money,

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and I would probably suggest something around £80-£100.

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-Lovely.

-Right. Yes.

-And maybe put it with a reserve at 50 or 60,

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something like that. How would you feel about that?

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-Yes. That sounds fine.

-Yes.

-Are you happy to put it in?

-Yes.

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She's a bit dirty.

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You might think that. I couldn't possibly comment, Margaret.

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Whenever we come to a valuation day in different regions,

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we're always looking for something that little bit special that belongs

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to the area and I think I've found something here, today.

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It belongs to Carole. It certainly belongs to the hearts of Liverpool,

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-doesn't it?

-Yes. I think so.

-It does. How lucky are you?

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-I know.

-The Fab Four, all on one piece of paper.

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-All signed by the band.

-Yes.

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Now, it says...

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"To Carol from the Beatles."

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And it says, "George Harrison." So, obviously, George wrote that.

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-Yes, he did. Yes.

-Did you get these autographs?

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No. A friend of mine who I used to work with.

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She was a friend of the Beatles, her and her husband.

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And I think they spent quite a lot of time with them.

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And you said to your friend... "Go on, get me their autographs."

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I did. And she came in on the Monday morning with it.

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Obviously, she got them all to sign

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there and then on that day with the same black pen.

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It got to the stage when they were world superstars, they were probably

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quite fed up of people badgering them for autographs, and I do know

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on certain occasions, the roadies, who looked after the equipment,

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would take something from the young girls waiting backstage, take their

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notebook and pencil, run into the dressing room and instead of

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actually getting one of the guys to sign it, they'd scribble it down

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-themselves and run back out.

-Yes.

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That's how there's lots of fakes around, with people thinking...

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"I actually got it, I was there outside and someone went in and got

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-"it for me."

-Yes.

-They're the ones that you've got to look out for.

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-I think this is genuine.

-I think it is, as well,

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-because there's no reason to fake something in 1963.

-No.

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So, that's the real McCoy.

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What does devalue yours is the fact that it's signed "to Carol".

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-I know. Personalised. Yeah.

-You never know.

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A Carol might like to buy them but it's got to be Carol without an "e".

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And I'm very adamant about my "e".

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-You're a Carole with an "e", aren't you?

-Yeah.

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-So George got that wrong, didn't he?

-He did, unfortunately. Yeah.

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Value. This is the all-important question, what you want to know,

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-isn't it, really?

-I'd like to.

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OK. I think we'll put a fixed reserve on this.

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This is not going to be given away. Fixed reserve of £2,000.

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-Right.

-And a value of two to three.

-Lovely.

-See what happens.

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-Lovely. Thank you very much. Yes.

-I hope this is going to be

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pick of the pops and a smash hit later on,

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-when we get to the auction.

-OK.

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-Oh, dear, Sue. It wouldn't be the same without Troika, would it?

-No.

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I think we've relaunched the factory so many times over the years, haven't we?

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-I'm sure.

-I think all us experts are really fed up with Troika

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-But it keeps surprising us.

-It keeps selling.

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We keep getting interesting shapes in and you've brought yet another

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version of one of their sort of slab-type vases.

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This time with quite nice decoration again. The horseshoe design and the

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sparse blocks of colour, with this typical sgraffito decoration to it.

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Tell me, I bet it's been in pride of place in your china cabinet?

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-No. It hasn't.

-Where's it been?

-It's been in my downstairs loo.

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Well, downstairs cloakroom, but it is a loo.

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And what's it doing in your downstairs toilet?

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-It has some flowers in it.

-Good. You haven't put the loo brush...

-No. No.

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It was after one of your programmes that my friend said...

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"I'm sure that vase in your toilet is Troika,"

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so we got it out and looked at it. It was, and I thought next time

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Flog It! ever comes to Liverpool, I'm bringing it.

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Quite right, too. And that's why I said yes, I'll film that with Sue.

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I thought if she's rescued it from her toilet, then it deserves to be

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-on the show.

-Yes. Yes.

-But where did you get it from, originally?

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Originally, it belonged to my late brother who collected everything,

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and I don't like it but I thought, "Well, it was his and I'll keep it." I've got much nicer

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things which I do display in very prominent positions. But this has

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-been in the downstairs loo until today.

-Poor Troika in that case!

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Now, in terms of value, I think an estimate of maybe 100 to 150.

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-That's very good. Excellent!

-With maybe an £80 reserve?

-Good.

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-Happy with that? Very happy.

-Hopefully, there are two collectors

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who will want it and we'll will push it up to the £100 mark.

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It'll be lovely for the family to know that something of his

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actually got an auction on Flog It! which I'm sure he would have loved.

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It's amazing, all sorts of generations like Flog It!

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They get hooked on it. The combination of seeing

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-the value and then seeing it go in an auction.

-Yes.

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-It's wonderful.

-Yes.

-It's lovely to see all the different reactions.

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-And they'll start collecting, themselves, I hope.

-Probably Troika.

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Peter, welcome to Flog It!

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You've bought in these five tiles. What do you know about them?

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Well, they were on a hat stand or hall stand.

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Given to me by a Jewish lady, and like the fool I am,

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I threw the whole stand away and just kept those, you see.

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-So they appeal to you. You couldn't throw these away?

-No. No.

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Do you know much about them? Do you know the age of them?

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Somebody said the artist was 1843, MS. I thought it was Marks & Spencer!

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It's an artist called Moya Smith, who designed for the Minton factory.

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-And the hall stand must have been the same age?

-Yeah.

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You're talking early Victorian, so it was probably an oak hall stand,

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but that's long gone. So what we're left with is these tiles.

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You can see where they were put in the piece of furniture.

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You've taken them out. They're not brilliant condition.

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You have a few little nicks and problems with the glaze on them,

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but they're very attractive, and stylistically quite collectable.

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Moya Smith did lots of these biblical scenes

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and this is what you've got here. You've got Adam and Eve being

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-thrown out of the Garden of Eden.

-Abraham...

-Abraham offering his son.

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In terms of value, because they're taken out of a piece of furniture,

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they're not particularly saleable but should make between £40 and £50 at auction.

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Would you want to put them into a sale for that figure?

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-Yes, fine by me.

-Would you want to put any kind of a reserve on them?

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-No. Just let them go.

-No reserve means they might just make £10.

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If that's all, are you happy with that?

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-Take a chance.

-It should make between 40 and 50.

-I think they'll go cos

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-they're so nice.

-We'll hope somebody likes them as much as you do.

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-All right, thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

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Well, we've been working flat out all morning and I don't

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know about you, but I think we've found some real gems.

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So right now, let's put those values to the test.

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We're going to make our way over to the auction room in Mold.

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We'll leave you with a quick recap of all the items that are going under the hammer.

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Ruth and Margaret are keen to see

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what their naked Art Deco lamp base will reveal in the saleroom.

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-She's a bit dirty.

-You might think that,

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I couldn't possibly comment, Margaret.

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Will Sue's Troika leave her flush with success?

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I bet it's been in pride of place in your china cabinet.

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-No. It hasn't.

-Where's it been?

-It's been in my downstairs loo.

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Can Peter's Minton ceramics produce enough

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for a night on the tiles?

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And finally, Carole is hoping that her

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autographs from the Fab Four will top the bidding charts.

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-How lucky are you!

-I know.

-The Fab Four, all on one piece of paper,

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-all signed by the band.

-Yes.

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And now for my favourite part of the show.

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This is where it gets exciting.

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We're going to up the tempo so whatever you do, don't go away.

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It's now auction time. We've come to Dodds, in the heart of Mold,

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to put our valuations to the test. Fingers crossed, we're on the money.

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Auctioneer Anthony Parry is raring to go. First up, Sue's Troika vase.

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85. 90.

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I love Troika but I'm from Cornwall, really, and this is decorated by

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Ann Lewis, so it's a nice piece. But if it wasn't for Hilary here,

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who's just joined us, you wouldn't be here, would you?

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No. Not at all. You said, "That vase in your downstairs loo is a Troika,"

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and I said, "Is it?" We picked it up, looked at the bottom and yes, it was a Troika.

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I'm glad they didn't keep the toilet brush in it!

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No. No. We didn't. We did keep flowers in it.

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It's the right shape, actually!

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-But it is a lovely one, it's nice and crisp.

-Yes.

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Fingers crossed, it's going to travel well and the people

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of Mold will love this... and put it to many uses.

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It's going under the hammer now.

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251. A rectangular vase.

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A Troika one. 50, thank you. 50.

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Five. 60. Five. 70. Five. Thank you.

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80. £80. 80. Five. 90.

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Five. 100. 10. 120. 130.

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130. All done at... Five.

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140. 140. 140. Five, is there?

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All done at 140, then?

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-£140!

-That's marvellous. Thank you very much.

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It doesn't let us down, does it?

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Good spot, Hilary, as well.

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-The money's going to the grandchildren.

-That's lovely.

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-You'll have to buy Hilary a drink.

-Yes.

-A coffee.

-Buy her lunch.

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-Good luck, Peter.

-Thank you.

-We're just about to put the five

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-Minton tiles under the hammer. We did have a valuation of...30 to?

-40 to 50.

-£40 to £50,

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-but you've changed the reserve.

-Right.

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We had no reserve. It was a come and buy me.

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-But now you want to a fixed reserve of 25, or is it £30?

-£30.

-£30. OK.

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So we're not giving these away. If they don't sell, I think you

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should take them home and utilise them, build them into something,

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cos they were originally in a hall stand which I know

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-you pulled apart, didn't you?

-That's right.

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-I'll have to buy a hall stand now.

-Or set them into a frame or something?

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-Have some faith. They might sell. Come on.

-I think they will sell.

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Let's see what the bidders of Mold think.

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148. Five glazed earthenware tiles. Biblical scenes. Adam and Eve.

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Abraham. Joseph.

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All sorts of people in the Bible.

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A £10 note. Ten. 12. 14.

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16. That's nice clear bidding. 18.

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20. 22. 24. 26. 28. 30.

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There's two people in the room.

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-Yeah.

-30. 32. 34.

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Are you bidding, Ian? 36. 38. 40.

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Two. 44. 46. 48.

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They love them.

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50. Five. 60. Five. 70.

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70. £70. 70. Missed anybody?

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75. A fresh bidder. 80.

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-85.

-Great.

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-His hand goes down.

-85.

-Oh, back up.

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90. 90. Another five?

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Sure? 90's over here, then.

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£90. All done at 90?

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That's what we like to see. Over the top end of the estimate.

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-A good result. Thank you so much for bringing them in.

-Thank you.

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-Didn't matter about the hall stand in the end?

-Ye of little faith!

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Margaret and Ruth have been working flat out for many

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years now for the animals charity, haven't you? It's Animals In Need?

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-That's right. Yes.

-All the money for this sort of bronzish-looking lamp,

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it's not bronze but it's spelter, of a near-naked female.

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Hopefully it's going to fetch lots of money for the animals and

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I guess you're both animal lovers. I bet you've got cats, haven't you?

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-Oh, don't even talk about it.

-Why, how many cats have you got?

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-I wouldn't like to say.

-Really.

-We've got quite a few.

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-They're coming and going all the time.

-How many?

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Three figures. Nearly 100, 150. Yes, we have.

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And this is in the charity in North Liverpool?

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It is in Melling. Yes.

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There's over 100 cats here that need homes.

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-And dogs. Over 200 animals are on the site. Yes.

-Good for you.

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Good for you, both of you, and I'm so pleased and proud and honoured

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-to try and raise some money to help.

-OK. Thank you very much.

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Pressure's on, Mark Stacey.

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Look, it is what it is. It's an Art Deco figurine lamp.

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It's not got its lovely globe shade, unfortunately, but she is revealing

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enough, I think, to tempt the bidders, here on a cold day in Mold.

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-And it's a really good-looking object.

-It's very nice.

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We've set the reserve very low at £50 because we wanted to get

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something that was kindly donated to the charity,

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so anything over 50 will be a bonus, really.

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It looks the part and the decorators will absolutely love this.

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Let's hope they're here, today, right now. Here we go. Good luck, everybody.

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133. An electric table lamp of a gilded spelter figure

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of a near-naked female. Right.

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And the proceeds for this are going to Animals In Need. Right.

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What shall we say for the lamp?

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20, I'm bid. £20. 20.

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20. Five. 30. Five.

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40. Thank you, Mr Ellis. 40. 45.

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Have another one.

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50. 55. It's going to charity. 50.

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£50. 50. And five, is it?

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52. 52. Here he is, here. 52.

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At 53. 53.

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54.

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No. Definitely no. 54.

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54. All done at £54, then?

0:18:010:18:05

-At £54.

-It should have been more.

-It all helps.

-It's something.

0:18:050:18:09

-It's all meant to help.

-It all helps.

-It really will.

-It does.

0:18:090:18:12

Let me give you £50 as well towards that. OK?

0:18:120:18:15

-I'll write a cheque for £50.

-Lovely.

-I was rather hoping for 100.

-Yes. I was, actually.

0:18:150:18:21

Coming up later, has Carole got a smash hit on her hands?

0:18:220:18:26

Right. What shall we say for them?

0:18:260:18:28

We're coming back here to meet up with Anthony Parry later on,

0:18:280:18:31

so fingers crossed, many more surprises, but right now,

0:18:310:18:34

I'm going back to that very impressive building in Liverpool's

0:18:340:18:38

St George's Hall, and it's going to be a lot quieter because

0:18:380:18:41

it's not the valuation day. I've got a little surprise for you.

0:18:410:18:44

ORGAN MUSIC

0:18:480:18:52

That is so loud.

0:19:070:19:09

It is such a full sound.

0:19:090:19:11

-It is, indeed. Yes.

-Ian Tracey, now, you are the Liverpool City organist.

0:19:110:19:14

-Yes.

-You're the best person to tell me about this amazing instrument

0:19:140:19:18

-and its association with this building.

-Yes.

0:19:180:19:21

The organ was put here as the great sort of feature of the building,

0:19:210:19:24

which was really built to house a music festival which went on

0:19:240:19:28

every three years, not even every year.

0:19:280:19:30

And the organ was central to that because thousands of schoolchildren

0:19:300:19:33

would sing to the organ accompaniment and Mr Best, who was

0:19:330:19:36

the first city organist, had a series of organ recitals here for a week,

0:19:360:19:40

which one finds from the city archives,

0:19:400:19:42

that were with packed audiences each time. He would literally play

0:19:420:19:46

all the great orchestral repertoires, single-handedly, on this instrument,

0:19:460:19:51

so he was just a one-man band.

0:19:510:19:53

-It is colossal!

-It is. It occupies the whole north end

0:19:530:19:57

-of the hall.

-How many pipes are there?

-7,737 pipes.

0:19:570:20:01

No two the same. They're all different and all handcrafted.

0:20:010:20:05

So what makes a Henry Willis organ so special?

0:20:050:20:08

There's an opulence in the sound, I think. And we have,

0:20:080:20:12

at the Anglican cathedral, the largest organ in the country

0:20:120:20:15

also Willis, and the second largest organ in the country,

0:20:150:20:18

at the Albert Hall in London, is also Willis. The city, obviously,

0:20:180:20:22

was quite opulent in those days and had plenty of money so we have two of the greatest in this one city.

0:20:220:20:27

Henry Willis & Sons were regarded as the leading organ builders of the Victorian age.

0:20:290:20:34

A time when civic and religious commitment led to the building

0:20:340:20:38

of many town halls, palaces, cathedrals and churches.

0:20:380:20:42

These days, the firm occupies a location in the centre of Liverpool

0:20:420:20:45

and the order books still remain full as the company continues to handle commissions worldwide.

0:20:450:20:52

Henry Willis is a family business, dating back to 1845.

0:20:520:20:56

Founded by Henry Willis, it went on to be run by three generations

0:20:560:21:00

of Henry's until 1997, when David Wyld took over the business.

0:21:000:21:05

How do you go about making one of the pipes?

0:21:070:21:09

Everything's done by hand, entirely by hand. We start off with

0:21:090:21:14

ingots of tin and lead. That's then cast into sheet on a stone bench.

0:21:140:21:19

The metal then has to be scraped.

0:21:190:21:22

And that does actually improve the way that the pipes speaks

0:21:230:21:27

cos it means that the waveform up the inside of the pipe,

0:21:270:21:30

is not going to be interrupted by the surface of the metal.

0:21:300:21:33

That's what I was trying to get at, if it was bouncing around.

0:21:330:21:37

-That's on the inside.

-OK.

0:21:370:21:39

We go from this to the rolling up of the body.

0:21:390:21:42

-So this is a set gauge, that you can work and form around.

-We have a set of steel mandrels.

0:21:420:21:48

These are ground steel mandrels. They're Victorian. They have always

0:21:480:21:52

been in the firm, as far as we're aware.

0:21:520:21:55

And we still have the original burnishers that actually go with the mandrels.

0:21:550:22:00

We start off just by forming it to the mandrel.

0:22:000:22:03

It's quite soft. There's a lot of lead content in that.

0:22:030:22:06

Lot of lead in that. That's about 40% tin so there's actually quite a lot

0:22:060:22:10

-more lead than tin in that.

-Yeah.

0:22:100:22:12

And then we take a burnisher and we can actually just smooth it out.

0:22:120:22:17

-So you just draw it along.

-Just draw it along and that

0:22:170:22:19

will actually form the shape.

0:22:190:22:21

So here we are, Paul. This is where we do the soldering.

0:22:220:22:24

Before we can actually solder it, we have to size the edges

0:22:240:22:27

-which we paint on.

-And that's to keep it clean?

-Yeah.

0:22:270:22:30

It also stops the solder going where you don't want it to go.

0:22:300:22:34

-Are you going to start soldering now?

-Yes. So we take the iron

0:22:340:22:38

and we start by putting a tack on the joint.

0:22:380:22:41

-Right. Just to keep it together like a little stitch.

-Yeah.

0:22:410:22:45

-You'd be good at plumbing at home.

-I'm not good at plumbing at home.

0:22:480:22:52

That was very clever, very good. Then we start filling in.

0:22:520:22:55

-Perfect.

-A seam.

0:22:590:23:00

That's very clever.

0:23:000:23:02

We then go on to the next stage. Here's one I prepared earlier

0:23:020:23:06

where this is the foot of the pipe, the new pipe.

0:23:060:23:09

And the next thing is then, obviously, to solder on the body to the foot.

0:23:090:23:14

At this point, the metal hand would actually open a slot in the mouth to

0:23:140:23:18

make the mouth so that when it goes to the voicing shop from the metal shop, the voicer can actually get

0:23:180:23:24

the end of the knife in to cut the pipe up because we have to cut

0:23:240:23:28

the mouth up in order to make it speak.

0:23:280:23:30

We're getting there, aren't we? It's getting quite exciting.

0:23:300:23:33

So we're now in the voicing room. Show me how you make this speak.

0:23:370:23:41

This is a pipe we're going to voice and we would start by

0:23:410:23:44

marking where we're going to cut up the mouth to make the mouth higher.

0:23:440:23:48

-You've put these two little phalanges on.

-Those are called ears.

0:23:480:23:51

-OK.

-It actually strengthens the pipe, there.

0:23:510:23:53

-Cos you're weakening it by cutting the mouth.

-Yeah. This is the voicing

0:23:530:23:58

knife which is quite short and therefore quite strong.

0:23:580:24:01

It's very stiff. We put this in the chuck,

0:24:010:24:05

And we start just cutting away.

0:24:050:24:07

HE SOUNDS A NOTE

0:24:110:24:12

So do you know, at this stage, exactly what note that's going to be?

0:24:120:24:16

Yes, because when they come out of the metal shop, they would actually

0:24:160:24:19

be stamped with the note on them. And then, at the voicing stage, here,

0:24:190:24:24

we cut them to length to a predetermined rod.

0:24:240:24:27

-Right. So it's the length that gives you the note.

-Yes.

0:24:270:24:30

HE SOUNDS A NOTE

0:24:300:24:32

-Perfect.

-Not yet.

-Not yet?

-Now we have to move over

0:24:320:24:35

-to the voicing machine.

-It sounded a good note to me.

-It's fairly good.

0:24:350:24:40

HE PLAYS THE SAME NOTE

0:24:400:24:42

Are you happy with that note now?

0:24:430:24:44

I'm happy with that in the context of it being a single note.

0:24:440:24:48

If that were a complete stop, we'd now have to work on each note

0:24:480:24:52

next to every other note and make sure that the blend is right

0:24:520:24:55

-and the graduation of the tone is correct.

-Right.

0:24:550:24:59

The rest of the tonal finishing will be done once it's in the organ.

0:24:590:25:03

I'll leave you to do that. That's a lot of work.

0:25:030:25:05

-Thank you so much for showing me around.

-It's been a pleasure.

0:25:050:25:08

It's been a real eye-opener for me and it's been going for

0:25:080:25:11

-centuries and long may it continue, as well. What a tradition.

-Thank you very much.

0:25:110:25:14

Over at the auction house, the Beatles autographs

0:25:300:25:33

have left Anthony quite nostalgic.

0:25:330:25:36

OK. Well, were you a Beatles fan or a Rolling Stones fan?

0:25:360:25:39

-A Beatles fan and I remember them coming to Mold...

-Do you?

-Yes.

0:25:390:25:42

-Did they play here in Mold?

-They played here in Mold.

0:25:420:25:46

-I was a big Beatles fan, as well.

-Yes.

-Really was. Yeah.

0:25:460:25:49

Carole came into the valuation day and she showed me this

0:25:490:25:52

-and I just went, "Wow!"

-Yeah.

0:25:520:25:54

All four signatures I've put £2,000-3,000 on this.

0:25:540:25:57

Yeah. I would err on the lower side. I've sold them before at £2,000.

0:25:570:26:03

We've got phone lines booked on it as well.

0:26:030:26:05

If there's two or three phone lines booked and they're all prepared

0:26:050:26:09

to pay the lower end, they might just...

0:26:090:26:11

-They might just creep up.

-Nudge each other up.

-We'll try.

0:26:110:26:14

I'll try and nudge them along a bit.

0:26:140:26:15

You're going to do your best. I can't wait for this.

0:26:150:26:18

Whatever you do, don't go away.

0:26:180:26:20

The Beatles are just about to go under the hammer.

0:26:200:26:23

I've just been joined by Carole and hopefully

0:26:290:26:32

-we're going to be top of the pops in a moment.

-We are.

0:26:320:26:34

The Beatles signatures are just about to go under the hammer.

0:26:340:26:37

We're looking for £2,000-3,000.

0:26:370:26:39

Love them, and I know you're a big Beatles fan.

0:26:390:26:42

-Hopefully, all the collectors are here.

-Hope so.

0:26:420:26:44

-Good luck, Carole.

-Thank you.

0:26:440:26:46

232. Who remembers them coming to Mold?

0:26:460:26:50

-Heard about it.

-No. You're too young, you are.

0:26:500:26:54

Right. Carole went to Llandudno where they appeared in the Odeon.

0:26:550:27:02

Right. What shall we say for them? Who's going to start me off?

0:27:020:27:06

Deadly silence. £1,000. Thank you. £1,000.

0:27:070:27:10

1,100. 1,200. 1,300. 1,400.

0:27:100:27:17

1,500. 1,500. Pardon?

0:27:170:27:19

-What did you say?

-£2,000.

-£2,000.

0:27:190:27:22

Cor, nice job.

0:27:220:27:25

Do you want your knee rubbing? 2,000. £2,000. 2,000. 2,100. 2,100.

0:27:250:27:31

-2,100. Are you coming back?

-2,200.

0:27:310:27:35

-Brilliant.

-2,200. 2,300.

0:27:350:27:38

2,400. 2,400.

0:27:380:27:40

-2,400.

-Are you shaking?

0:27:400:27:43

-Yeah.

-2,400. 2,450.

0:27:430:27:46

What about your client? 2,500.

0:27:460:27:48

2,500.

0:27:480:27:50

And 50, anywhere?

0:27:500:27:52

2,500. Is that all there's to be?

0:27:520:27:55

All done at 2,500, then?

0:27:550:27:58

Yes. Fantastic. You were right, weren't you?

0:27:590:28:02

£2,500 for the Beatles autographs.

0:28:020:28:05

-What a fantastic day we've had here.

-Thank you very much.

-Oh, the journey

0:28:050:28:09

just goes on for you, doesn't it? Now you can spend lots of money.

0:28:090:28:12

-I know.

-Thank goodness you saved it and kept it safe, though.

-Yeah.

0:28:120:28:16

-That's what it's all about, isn't it, really?

-Yeah.

0:28:160:28:19

-If we'd known then, what we know now.

-Yes.

-Really. Yeah.

0:28:190:28:22

Hang on to anything that's valuable for at least 30 or 40 years

0:28:220:28:27

and who knows, you know, you could get £2,500 as well.

0:28:270:28:30

Sadly, we've come to the end of our show today.

0:28:300:28:32

We've had a fantastic time here in Mold. All our owners have gone home happy, all credit to our experts.

0:28:320:28:37

We're coming to a town near you soon so look out for details

0:28:370:28:41

in your local press but for now, from Carole and myself, cheerio from Mold.

0:28:410:28:44

-Brilliant.

-Thank you.

-Absolutely brilliant.

0:28:440:28:48

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:28:550:28:58