Torquay Flog It!


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Torquay

Paul Martin and the Flog It team are valuing antiques and collectibles on Torquay's English Riviera. Paul is joined by experts Philip Serrell and David Fletcher.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Torquay. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Today, "Flog It!" is coming from the English Riviera.

0:00:040:00:07

Yes, we're down on the Devon Coast - a magnet for holidaymakers,

0:00:070:00:11

and home to England's biggest fishing port.

0:00:110:00:13

So will we land a prize catch? Let's go and see.

0:00:130:00:16

The English Riviera

0:00:370:00:39

is the name given to this stunning area of coastline

0:00:390:00:42

which comprises three towns - Torquay, Brixham and Paignton.

0:00:420:00:45

Historically all three were fishing ports, but today only Brixham remains in action.

0:00:450:00:50

Later on, I'll be going sailing on an old fishing trawler

0:00:500:00:54

which helped put the fishing industry of Brixham on the map.

0:00:540:00:58

But before we go all fishy, let sail across the bay to Torquay where our experts Philip Searle

0:00:580:01:03

and new boy David Fletcher are trawling the "Flog It!" queue outside the Palace Hotel.

0:01:030:01:09

Will they net a valuable catch?

0:01:090:01:11

I could have been one of the Three Musketeers!

0:01:110:01:13

Let's get inside and find out.

0:01:130:01:15

The people of Torquay have turned out in droves

0:01:170:01:21

and Philip has the first catch of the day with Helen's Dinky toys.

0:01:210:01:26

-Helen, how are you doing?

-Fine, thank you. Are you a Devonian? No, I'm a Midlander.

0:01:260:01:30

-Where from?

-West Bromwich initially.

0:01:300:01:32

-West Bromwich?

-Aldridge, Walsall way.

0:01:320:01:34

Coming down here on the M5,

0:01:340:01:37

the number of caravans was unbelievable

0:01:370:01:39

and, as we're in Torquay, I thought "We've got to do a caravan, haven't we?"

0:01:390:01:43

So I picked up this little beauty here which is a Dinky's toy,

0:01:430:01:47

four-berth, model number 188, complete with a little opening door here, which I think is great.

0:01:470:01:55

And then we've got two Corgi toys.

0:01:550:01:57

We got a Mercedes-Benz 220 SE coupe,

0:01:570:02:02

complete with spare wheel and a little suitcase ready packed for our holidays.

0:02:020:02:07

And I love this. This is a Mark 1 Cortina.

0:02:070:02:11

I remember Dad bought one of these, brand new, a Mark 1 Cortina, 1960-something or other.

0:02:110:02:17

-Why do you want to sell them?

-They're just sitting in my cupboard doing nothing.

-Really?

-Yes.

0:02:170:02:23

-Are these yours?

-Yes. I used to love playing with them as a child.

0:02:230:02:27

I have to say you were very good.

0:02:270:02:29

-You played with both these?

-Oh, I did a lot, yes.

0:02:290:02:32

The thing about toys is they've got to be mint and boxed, and these are mint and boxed.

0:02:320:02:36

-I always put everything away.

-You were careful with your toys.

-Yeah.

0:02:360:02:39

I'm intrigued as to why a pretty girl goes and plays with boys' toys as a child.

0:02:390:02:43

-I had a Sindy doll as well, which I loved just as much.

-I'll let you off.

0:02:430:02:47

Anyway, down to value. We'll sell them as one lot.

0:02:470:02:50

I think if we put a £40 to £60 estimate on them, right?

0:02:500:02:55

-Right.

-With a £30 reserve, how does that sound?

0:02:550:02:58

-Low!

-Low?!

0:02:580:03:02

-Go on, what do you reckon?

-I just thought...

0:03:020:03:05

I don't know, I would have thought they would be about £40 each.

0:03:050:03:09

-We need to protect your interests with a reserve.

-All right.

0:03:090:03:13

If you want to put a slightly higher reserve on them, I don't mind.

0:03:130:03:16

But here's an expression I always use -

0:03:160:03:19

a reserve is a price below which you will not sell the item.

0:03:190:03:24

-It's not what you think it will make.

-No.

-OK?

-Yes.

0:03:240:03:28

This hasn't got the box.

0:03:280:03:30

50 to 80, call it 60 to 90.

0:03:300:03:32

If you want to reserve them between 30 and sort of £40, £45, I don't have a problem with that.

0:03:320:03:38

-OK.

-So what do you want to do, boss?

0:03:380:03:40

-£40 reserve?

-£40 reserve.

0:03:400:03:42

I'll put a 50 to 80 estimate on them.

0:03:420:03:44

-Great, yeah.

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, absolutely.

-I don't want to be told off!

0:03:440:03:48

-Would I dare?

-Oh, I don't know(!) You're a star.

0:03:480:03:51

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:03:510:03:53

WHIRRING

0:03:560:03:58

Now, this, Isabel, is a most striking thing.

0:03:580:04:00

How long have you owned it?

0:04:000:04:02

-All my life.

-You've owned it all your life, have you?

0:04:020:04:04

-Yes.

-Did it belong to your parents?

-It did, yeah.

0:04:040:04:07

What it is we're discussing

0:04:070:04:11

is a cold-painted, Austrian bronze.

0:04:110:04:16

The nature of the decoration is such that it's applied to a bronze figure

0:04:160:04:21

without firing, hence the expression cold-painted.

0:04:210:04:26

The result is that you get this rather attractive matte finish.

0:04:260:04:31

It's by a very well-known sculptor,

0:04:310:04:35

name of Franz Bergmann, who was born in the 1860s and lived until the 1930s.

0:04:350:04:42

It is actually marked on the back with a B.

0:04:420:04:46

I've never noticed that.

0:04:460:04:48

That is actually impressed, or moulded I should say,

0:04:480:04:52

into the cast that was taken from the mould.

0:04:520:04:56

-Yeah.

-It depicts, doesn't it, a noble warrior who seemingly died

0:04:560:05:04

in one of those North African colonial wars or skirmishes - that's a good word for it.

0:05:040:05:11

What I think is so amazing about it, really, is its dignity.

0:05:110:05:16

I mean, the dignity that you can sometimes find in death - beautifully, beautifully moulded.

0:05:160:05:22

You sometimes find that Bergmann signed these works with his surname spelt backwards.

0:05:220:05:30

-Right!

-Do you know why he did that?

-No.

0:05:300:05:33

Well, he did it because he was Jewish and he was concerned about being persecuted,

0:05:330:05:39

so you do sometimes find bronzes like this, signed Nam Greb - Bergmann backwards.

0:05:390:05:47

-Oh, right.

-I must say that objects like this are very collectible, really.

0:05:470:05:54

I think if we sold this at auction - WHEN we sell it at auction, I should say - we would expect it to make

0:05:540:06:01

between £300 and £500. And it could even make just a little bit more than that.

0:06:010:06:06

Do you like it as an object?

0:06:060:06:09

-I do, but I wouldn't have it out.

-No.

0:06:090:06:11

It beautiful thing, but I understand what you're saying about the subject matter, really.

0:06:110:06:16

Well, as I say, I think if we estimate it at 300 to 500

0:06:160:06:19

and put a reserve on it of £300, preferably with a little bit of discretion - say £280?

0:06:190:06:25

-OK.

-Would that be all right?

-Fine.

0:06:250:06:28

OK? We'll do our best for you.

0:06:280:06:30

-HUSKILY:

-We're having such a fabulous day here in Torquay.

0:06:400:06:42

Hundreds of people have turned up and I feel like I've probably spoken

0:06:420:06:46

to almost every single one of them. That's why I'm losing my voice.

0:06:460:06:49

But I have bumped into June here, who is looking absolutely fabulous.

0:06:490:06:53

I think you're clutching something quite valuable in there, aren't you?

0:06:530:06:56

Let's have a look inside your purse.

0:06:560:07:00

Oh, look at that. A wonderful amber necklace!

0:07:000:07:04

-Have you worn it much?

-I used to have hair that colour, Paul,

0:07:040:07:08

so I used to wear it then and it used to look pretty good.

0:07:080:07:12

But, as one gets older, one's hair colour changes.

0:07:120:07:15

-I think you'd look pretty good with this on still.

-You reckon?

0:07:150:07:18

Of course I do!

0:07:180:07:20

This is timeless. It's amber and it's millions of years old.

0:07:200:07:25

It really is.

0:07:250:07:26

It's fossilised tree sap, basically.

0:07:260:07:30

If you've got any insects trapped in it when it was a sticky liquid...

0:07:300:07:35

There might be something in there.

0:07:350:07:38

If you haven't got little insects,

0:07:380:07:40

then look for pine needles or bits of moss that get trapped in this liquid.

0:07:400:07:44

It's commonly found in the Baltic, the beaches of Poland, but it does get washed up in this country.

0:07:440:07:51

-Really?

-Yes, it does on Southwold beach!

0:07:510:07:53

I've been amber hunting and I actually interviewed a chap on "Flog It!"

0:07:530:07:57

who collected amber from the beach.

0:07:570:07:59

When it's washed up, it's sort of like

0:07:590:08:02

-a rough pebble.

-Yes.

0:08:020:08:05

A funny, little, odd-shaped pebble, but you have to polish it and cut into these facets like this.

0:08:050:08:12

But let's see what it looks like.

0:08:120:08:14

Shall we put it on? Yes, there we go! Look at that.

0:08:140:08:19

And it still looks fabulous, doesn't it? Give them a twirl!

0:08:190:08:22

THEY APPLAUD

0:08:220:08:25

-How much did you pay for that?

-It was about £200 about 20 years ago.

0:08:270:08:33

You'll get your £200 back.

0:08:330:08:34

I just think it's stunning.

0:08:340:08:37

I really think every woman would like to own that.

0:08:370:08:39

There you are - that's the way. The big one at the bottom.

0:08:390:08:41

Why don't we put it into auction with a value of...

0:08:410:08:45

-£200 to £400?

-Oh, excellent.

-You need two women who try it on

0:08:450:08:50

-and look as great as you do with it on.

-Oh, thank you!

0:08:500:08:53

I'm surprised you want to sell it.

0:08:530:08:55

I know, but it's sitting in the cupboard and I don't wear it any more.

0:08:550:08:58

-OK, see you at the auction.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:08:580:09:01

I look forward to it. Thank you.

0:09:010:09:03

-Barry and Malcolm, hello.

-Hello.

0:09:060:09:08

Welcome.

0:09:080:09:10

Now, you brought with you three silver spoons.

0:09:100:09:13

What can you tell me about them?

0:09:130:09:15

Not a great deal.

0:09:150:09:17

They have always been at our parents' house, just in the cutlery drawer.

0:09:170:09:21

-We used to use them every day.

-Really?

0:09:210:09:23

It was just part of the household cutlery.

0:09:230:09:27

Well, they are a bit worn.

0:09:270:09:28

They're silver, as I'm sure you know.

0:09:280:09:32

Two of them are relatively clearly marked,

0:09:340:09:37

although I must say it's difficult to distinguish the date letter.

0:09:370:09:41

I think these would have been manufactured in the 1730s or 1740s.

0:09:410:09:46

-As old as that?

-Indeed.

0:09:460:09:48

Assayed in London and made by a silversmith whose initials were JJ.

0:09:480:09:56

I think that stands for John Jacobs, who was active at that time.

0:09:560:10:01

The third spoon has even more indistinct marks

0:10:010:10:07

and I really can't attempt to give that a date or a manufacturer.

0:10:070:10:10

They're a typical Georgian pattern.

0:10:100:10:14

They have a dog-nose finial, which I think speaks for itself.

0:10:140:10:19

But the most significant thing about them is that they have been Victorianised.

0:10:190:10:24

Now, the Victorians believed that unless anything was highly decorated, it wasn't old,

0:10:240:10:30

and these would have been really quite plain.

0:10:300:10:34

So, not content with the fact that they were - let's say 1860 -

0:10:340:10:38

150 years old nearly, they wanted to make them look even older.

0:10:380:10:42

So they had a go at them and they've chased up the handles.

0:10:420:10:47

They've gilded the bowls and then repousse decorated them,

0:10:470:10:52

which means they've been hammered from behind

0:10:520:10:54

with images of a goddess, Ceres.

0:10:540:10:59

And she holds the cornucopia containing fruit.

0:10:590:11:03

That's significant because they are fruit spoons

0:11:030:11:07

and that's why the bowls have been gilded,

0:11:070:11:09

because the acid in the fruit juice would have caused the silver to corrode.

0:11:090:11:16

Why are you thinking of selling them?

0:11:160:11:19

Well, we were musicians about 30 years ago and we've started writing

0:11:190:11:25

and we're going to book some studio time, so hopefully...

0:11:250:11:29

-You'll put this towards your expense?

-Yeah, we're selling a few items and going for a studio.

0:11:290:11:34

So you're making a comeback?

0:11:340:11:36

-Yeah.

-You haven't thought of using them and playing them perhaps?

0:11:360:11:41

Well, we used to play them!

0:11:410:11:43

There were six originally!

0:11:430:11:45

I've never actually met anyone before who played the spoons, but there is some potential there.

0:11:450:11:50

They're not going to make the earth.

0:11:500:11:52

They're not fabulously expensive, it must be said, and I think you have to bear in mind

0:11:520:11:58

that in some people's eyes they've been damaged by the fact they've been Victorianised.

0:11:580:12:03

I would have thought each one was perhaps worth about £15,

0:12:030:12:07

-and I would estimate them at £40 to £60.

-OK.

0:12:070:12:13

And we'll put a reserve of...

0:12:130:12:15

Shall we sell them without a reserve?

0:12:150:12:18

-Are you happy with that?

-Well, we can do, yes.

0:12:180:12:20

Every little bit will help towards your comeback, isn't it?

0:12:200:12:23

We've seen our first batch of items and now it's time to head west

0:12:240:12:28

from Torquay along the Devon coast to the naval town of Plymouth for today's auction.

0:12:280:12:35

And this is where all the action is taking place today - Eldreds Auctioneers & Valuers.

0:12:350:12:40

The room's filling up. The auctioneer's just about to start.

0:12:400:12:43

But before he kicks off, here's a quick reminder of all the items we're hoping to sell.

0:12:430:12:47

Philip was surprised by Helen's minted and boxed Dinky toys.

0:12:470:12:51

I'm intrigued as to why a pretty girl goes and plays with boys' toys as a child.

0:12:510:12:55

I had a Sindy doll as well, which I loved just as much.

0:12:550:12:57

David was impressed with Isabel's Austrian bronze warrior figure,

0:12:570:13:00

but she just keeps it in a drawer so it's time to find it a new home.

0:13:000:13:05

Shall we put it on? Yeah.

0:13:050:13:07

'I absolutely loved June's amber necklace and it seemed I wasn't the only one.'

0:13:070:13:11

Give them a twirl!

0:13:110:13:14

Barry and Malcolm are hoping to raise funds towards their musical comeback

0:13:140:13:19

by selling their Georgian silver spoons. Will they be successful?

0:13:190:13:22

Let's find out as the spoons are the first of our items going under the hammer,

0:13:220:13:27

and the boys are pinning their hopes on auctioneer Anthony Eldred, who's on the rostrum.

0:13:270:13:32

Next up, Barry and Malcolm's three silver spoons.

0:13:320:13:35

There are a couple of choice ones here - the London ones.

0:13:350:13:37

-I really liked those. They were Mum's?

-Our mother used to use them.

0:13:370:13:41

We used to use them in our house, for dishing the jelly out, etc.

0:13:410:13:46

Next, three Georgian dessert spoons.

0:13:470:13:51

Dishing the jelly - I like that!

0:13:510:13:53

£30 bid for them. Against you all at 30. At £30.

0:13:530:13:56

Two if you want them.

0:13:560:13:58

At 32, 35, 38, 40...

0:13:580:14:00

42, 5, 8... At £48 now in the room.

0:14:000:14:04

Quite sure at 48, then?

0:14:040:14:08

Well done, a good valuation.

0:14:080:14:11

So a little bit towards the studio time, guys,

0:14:110:14:14

because I know that's what you're putting the money towards. Doing some recording?

0:14:140:14:18

Half an hour or something!

0:14:180:14:19

330 at the back.

0:14:220:14:25

Next up, some Dinky toys and something for all you caravan lovers.

0:14:260:14:30

Well, you either love them or you loathe them.

0:14:300:14:34

-You don't want to be stuck behind one, that's for sure.

-No, no.

0:14:340:14:37

-Especially not that one.

-Let's talk value. Some Dinky toys fly through the roof.

0:14:370:14:41

I've never valued a caravan.

0:14:410:14:43

No, I haven't, and it was a bit of a sort of a suck-and-see job,

0:14:430:14:46

but I just thought they'll appeal to the collector and, you know, fingers crossed.

0:14:460:14:51

I mean, the car's even got the little suitcase and spare wheel and everything inside it, so...

0:14:510:14:57

It's ready to go. Let's find out. This is it.

0:14:570:15:01

Next are three Dinky toys. There they are.

0:15:010:15:03

-A caravan in that lot. Several bidders.

-Oh, good.

0:15:030:15:05

I am bid £65.

0:15:050:15:07

Against you all in the room at 65.

0:15:070:15:09

Eight anywhere? You finished at 65?

0:15:090:15:11

68 and 70?

0:15:110:15:13

Five. And 80?

0:15:130:15:16

Five. And 90?

0:15:160:15:18

At £90, then.

0:15:180:15:21

Brilliant. Absolutely brilliant.

0:15:210:15:24

Well done, Helen, £90!

0:15:240:15:26

That proved to be a very good investment over the years.

0:15:260:15:29

Yeah. I played with it a lot as well, so I got the enjoyment out of it.

0:15:290:15:33

Gosh. You see, the power of the caravans.

0:15:330:15:37

I'm really pleased with that. I think that's a good price.

0:15:370:15:39

-That's good, I'm pleased with that.

-Thank you.

0:15:390:15:42

Right, and now for our next lot. Unfortunately, Isabel can't be with us today,

0:15:480:15:52

but we do have the cold-painted bronze and our expert David.

0:15:520:15:55

We've got a valuation of £300 to £500 on this.

0:15:550:15:59

What I want to know is, is he dead or is he asleep?

0:15:590:16:03

-Because I don't know.

-In my view, he's dead. I think he's very dead.

0:16:030:16:08

Anthony had described him as being sleeping, probably to make it a bit more commercial, I suspect.

0:16:080:16:13

-I think so.

-But anyway, he's been immortalised, so whether he's dead or asleep, he will live forever.

0:16:130:16:20

But he has been in Isabel's drawer for a long, long time.

0:16:200:16:22

She wants to sell him and I think we've got the perfect market - a packed auction room,

0:16:220:16:27

people are waving like mad, bidding on everything, so this should fly away, shouldn't it?

0:16:270:16:31

-Absolutely.

-It's going under the hammer now.

0:16:310:16:34

Lot 132, the Austrian cold-painted bronze after Bergmann...

0:16:340:16:39

Fingers crossed for Isabel.

0:16:390:16:41

North African warrior, £240 starts that. At £240, 50 if you want it?

0:16:410:16:46

At 240, 250, 260,

0:16:460:16:48

70, five, 280.

0:16:480:16:51

At £280 now, £290, £300, and 10?

0:16:510:16:56

320, 330, 340.

0:16:560:16:59

At £340, still seated.

0:16:590:17:01

At 340, then.

0:17:010:17:03

-Yes, spot on, David.

-Well, I'm pleased.

0:17:030:17:06

I'm pretty sure she will be.

0:17:060:17:08

-Good.

-You've got to get on the phone and give her a call.

-I will do.

0:17:080:17:11

Remember the amber necklace?

0:17:170:17:19

Well it's just about to go under the hammer, and here's June.

0:17:190:17:23

You can also remember the round of applause she got because that was great, wasn't it?

0:17:230:17:26

-Everyone was going, "Yeah!"

-It was so embarrassing.

0:17:260:17:28

-But you looked fantastic, and you do today as well.

-Thank you very much.

0:17:280:17:31

If you like amber, this lot's for you. We've got £200 to £400 on this.

0:17:310:17:37

I don't know what the feeling is in the room,

0:17:370:17:39

I haven't talked to anybody, I haven't seen it viewed at all.

0:17:390:17:43

So fingers crossed. That's all I can say.

0:17:430:17:45

-Absolutely.

-We're going to find out.

0:17:450:17:47

I don't think we can talk about it any more, can we?

0:17:470:17:49

-It is down to this lot.

-Wait and see.

0:17:490:17:51

On next to lot 489, which is a long necklace of 45 graduated, faceted

0:17:510:17:59

orange and amber beads, and I'm bid £200 for them. Five, if you like.

0:17:590:18:05

At 205, anywhere? And five. 210.

0:18:050:18:07

15, 220? Five.

0:18:070:18:10

At 225, 230, 240,

0:18:100:18:14

250, 260, 270,

0:18:140:18:18

280, 290, 300.

0:18:180:18:22

And 10? 320, 330.

0:18:220:18:28

At £330 on the telephone against you in the room. At £330.

0:18:280:18:34

-That's a sold sound. £330.

-Not bad.

-Not bad?

0:18:340:18:40

-I'm quite happy with that.

-Not bad at all.

-Very happy with that.

0:18:400:18:43

-We were hoping for that.

-Well...

-And we got it.

0:18:430:18:46

Thank you. I'm very happy about that.

0:18:460:18:48

And your husband is really pleased as well.

0:18:480:18:52

There is commission to pay.

0:18:520:18:54

He thinks he's going to spend some of that, you know?

0:18:540:18:56

Does he? Oh, he's got another think coming, hasn't he?

0:18:560:18:59

I think we'll have a bit of fun with that, anyway.

0:18:590:19:01

I bet you will. You look like a fun sort of girl, that's for sure.

0:19:010:19:05

Well, there we are. Some great results so far.

0:19:100:19:13

We are coming back to the auction for some more action later on in the show,

0:19:130:19:17

when we'll be selling another of Philip's finds. But what is it?

0:19:170:19:20

Now I know that you know what it is.

0:19:200:19:23

-Yes.

-But I'm willing to bet that a lot of people at home don't know what it is.

0:19:230:19:27

Well, you've got about ten minutes to figure out what it might be.

0:19:270:19:32

Right now I'm heading back to the fishing port of Brixham to find out a bit more about its chief industry.

0:19:320:19:39

Brixham is the biggest fishing port in England, and the fishing industry

0:19:540:19:58

has been at the heart of its economy for hundreds of years.

0:19:580:20:01

Now, a staggering £18.5 million worth of fish is traded each year

0:20:010:20:05

from that busy fish market over there.

0:20:050:20:08

Now, not only does Brixham hold the accolade for the largest fishing port, it's also built its reputation

0:20:080:20:13

on developing pioneering fishing techniques which have been adopted by the industry the world over -

0:20:130:20:19

hence its nickname, the mother of trawling.

0:20:190:20:22

It was over 400 years ago when Brixham first started the fishing method of beam trawling.

0:20:280:20:34

This is when a fishing net is attached to a beam, which then drags in the water behind the boat.

0:20:340:20:39

The technique was first used on wooden sailing boats

0:20:390:20:42

and later adopted by motorised commercial fishing vessels.

0:20:420:20:47

And to find out more about beam trawlers, I've come to talk

0:20:470:20:51

to Bill Wakeman, who was a fisherman for 42 years, and now he's involved in a heritage project

0:20:510:20:56

to bring these wonderful wooden vessels back to the town and restore them to their former glory.

0:20:560:21:01

What better way to learn about fishing? I can't wait to hop aboard.

0:21:010:21:05

-Bill.

-Hello, Paul.

0:21:050:21:06

Lovely to meet you. Welcome aboard.

0:21:060:21:08

What a beautiful vessel!

0:21:080:21:09

-Ah, she's beautiful, ain't she?

-Can I get aboard?

-Course you can.

0:21:090:21:13

This is the Vigilance. She's a 78 foot sailing ketch,

0:21:320:21:37

and she's one of the last wooden fishing vessels built in Brixham.

0:21:370:21:40

In her heyday, she'd have had a beam for fishing.

0:21:400:21:43

Now that's gone. Today she sails the seas to give visitors a taste of Brixham's fishing history.

0:21:430:21:50

We're lucky enough to have a sizable crew, but when the Vigilance used to work as a beam trawler,

0:21:500:21:54

she would most likely have had a crew of just three men and one boy.

0:21:540:22:00

And today it looks like I'm the boy!

0:22:000:22:02

That's good for your stomach muscles.

0:22:060:22:08

Just let the jib out now, so that's gonna catch the wind, it's gonna turn us around and off we go.

0:22:100:22:17

How fantastic is this?!

0:22:170:22:20

What's her top speed?

0:22:340:22:36

I should say you should be able to get about 10 knots out of her when it's really going.

0:22:360:22:39

That's some going.

0:22:390:22:41

-That's shifting along.

-That really is, isn't it?

0:22:410:22:43

So what year does beam trawling date back to?

0:22:430:22:46

The earliest records, I think, is the early 1600s.

0:22:460:22:50

Folklore has it that beam trawling first started by accident

0:22:500:22:54

when a fishing boat from Brixham got caught in an awful storm off the coast of Grimsby.

0:22:540:22:58

The captain dropped the sail into the sea to try to stabilise the vessel.

0:22:580:23:03

There was that much wind, they were dragging the trawl back and they were fishing at the same time.

0:23:030:23:08

Which is... which is how it all started, really, isn't it? That's beam trawling, in a way?

0:23:080:23:12

-And when they did haul it up, they were full of Dover soles.

-Wow.

0:23:120:23:16

And the people in Grimsby wanted them to try it again, they did it

0:23:160:23:20

two or three times, and that's how Grimsby started, and Hull.

0:23:200:23:23

What a lovely story.

0:23:230:23:25

Brixham's fishermen went on to perfect this method, which has become part of the town's history.

0:23:250:23:32

-It was an ideal place with the tide here to be able to tow a beam.

-Yeah.

0:23:320:23:36

And they spread the beam trawl with these old sailing trawlers right the way around England.

0:23:360:23:41

And that's basically the birth of commercial fishing, in a way?

0:23:410:23:45

Yeah. Cos every little port would have their own little fleet of boats just to supply the local demand.

0:23:450:23:52

There was that much fish being landed with these type of boats that, like you say, it became commercial.

0:23:520:24:00

And with Brixham, once the railway came here, the fleet increased tenfold.

0:24:000:24:05

On a personal note, you were a fisherman.

0:24:050:24:08

I mean, that's a hard grafting job, isn't it?

0:24:080:24:11

It sounds romantic on days like this, but it's dangerous work.

0:24:110:24:15

Fishing's a strange thing. The amount of times that I was gonna pack it in the next day, or when you got in...

0:24:150:24:20

If anything was ever gonna go wrong in fishing it would be about

0:24:200:24:22

two o'clock in the morning, blowing a gale, sleet, that sort of thing.

0:24:220:24:27

You'd think to yourself... You've smashed the trawler up, you're on deck, mending the net,

0:24:270:24:31

freezing cold hands, you'd think, "I've had enough of this, that's it."

0:24:310:24:34

Next morning, sun comes up, cup of tea in your hand,

0:24:340:24:38

nothing to beat it.

0:24:380:24:40

But that's the way it is. Fishermen are literally the last hunter-gatherers.

0:24:410:24:46

It's the only job where you've got to go out and hunt for what you get.

0:24:460:24:49

-And you don't know what you're gonna get, do you?

-You don't know what you're gonna get until you come back.

0:24:490:24:53

Get her round, get her round.

0:24:580:25:00

More, more.

0:25:000:25:01

What a day!

0:25:090:25:10

The tradition of beam trawling

0:25:100:25:11

continues to play a large part in the lives of the Brixham fisherman,

0:25:110:25:16

and contributes to the 10,000 tonnes of fresh fish and crustaceans that land on Brixham's quay annually.

0:25:160:25:22

So the lifeblood of the fishing industry doesn't just end, does it, with catching the fish?

0:25:220:25:27

-It's got to be sold?

-Yeah. Yeah. You've got a fish market here.

0:25:270:25:30

You had the old fish market here years ago, in the days of the sailing trawlers.

0:25:300:25:34

They had to move it because of hygiene.

0:25:340:25:36

It's a newish building on the end of the quay, and they're operating all the time.

0:25:360:25:40

What time does it open in the morning?

0:25:400:25:42

In the mornings, for auctioning the fish, it's anything from six o'clock to seven o'clock.

0:25:420:25:47

You say auctioning the fish, it's actually auctioned off, is it?

0:25:470:25:50

There's no set price?

0:25:500:25:52

No. Its price on demand, sort of thing. If it's in demand, it'll make good money.

0:25:520:25:57

It's the same as any ordinary auction, like yourself, your sort of thing.

0:25:570:26:02

And the guy with the deepest pockets wins, at the end of the day?

0:26:020:26:04

The one with the biggest demand. If he's got an hotel or big supplier

0:26:040:26:08

up in London or one of the big cities that's got to have fish,

0:26:080:26:11

they'll really push it, even if they break even on selling it.

0:26:110:26:14

Well, Brixham's been a fishing town for centuries, really, and I hope it carries on to be.

0:26:140:26:19

-Can you see that happening?

-There'll always be fishing here.

0:26:190:26:21

Like you say, it's been here for centuries.

0:26:210:26:23

The first recorded thing on paper was around about the 1200s, when there was fish being landed here.

0:26:230:26:29

But fishing goes up and down.

0:26:290:26:31

Cuttlefish years ago, you used to put it through the scuppers and dump it over the side, nobody wanted it.

0:26:310:26:36

Then somebody found a market on the Continent, Mediterranean areas, you can't get enough of it now.

0:26:360:26:43

-Incredible, isn't it? It's fashions again.

-Yeah.

0:26:430:26:45

-Look, Bill, thank you so much.

-It's a pleasure.

-It's been a great

0:26:450:26:47

-insight into the life of a fisherman down here, especially taking out a beam trawler like this.

-Pleasure.

0:26:470:26:54

-And thank all the crew as well. Bye, guys!

-Bye, Paul!

0:26:540:26:57

It's still a packed house back at the Palace Hotel in Torquay, and a mystery box has caught Philip's eye.

0:27:050:27:11

-How are you?

-Fine, thank you.

0:27:110:27:13

Do you know, people from Torquay have just turned out in droves. It's been marvellous, hasn't it?

0:27:130:27:17

-Yes, lovely, yes.

-Do know the thing I love about doing Flog It?

0:27:170:27:19

-What's that?

-Well, A, you meet different people...

0:27:190:27:21

-That's right.

-I've met people from Darlington, from all over today.

0:27:210:27:25

And then people bring something like this along, right?

0:27:250:27:28

And I've got no idea what's in there.

0:27:280:27:30

-No.

-And it's clearly a mahogany box,

0:27:300:27:33

and we've got a brass inlaid plaque there.

0:27:330:27:37

But the first thing that this tells you, this is a really

0:27:370:27:39

-lovely quality thing, cos if I just hold that up there, there are these dovetails down there.

-Oh, right.

0:27:390:27:45

And they are so beautifully made.

0:27:450:27:47

Now, you know what's in here, don't you?

0:27:470:27:50

-Yes.

-Shell we have a look?

0:27:500:27:52

That's marvellous.

0:27:520:27:55

And it's a set, isn't it, of measuring rulers for an architect or draughtsman to use.

0:27:550:27:59

Sometimes they're made out of bone, out of ivory.

0:27:590:28:02

These are made out of boxwood. They're actually...

0:28:020:28:04

Each one is a different scale.

0:28:040:28:07

You can see this one's marked 80.

0:28:070:28:09

-Right.

-And the next one is marked 60.

-Oh, yeah.

0:28:090:28:13

So each one of these will be a different scale, so that when you're in your office, drawing your really

0:28:130:28:19

-accurate plan, you would use these for different scales for drawings that you were producing.

-Right.

0:28:190:28:26

And, do you know, life's changed so much, you know?

0:28:260:28:28

Cos the computer will do all this for you with the right programme,

0:28:280:28:30

-so all these have become redundant.

-Yeah.

0:28:300:28:33

And they're actually quite collectible. Not hugely valuable...

0:28:330:28:38

-No.

-And I would think these date to end of the 19th, early part of the 20th century.

0:28:380:28:43

If we look here, this set is produced by Stanley's of London.

0:28:430:28:49

Now, these are boxwood rulers.

0:28:490:28:50

-And if we lift each one up, you can see it just says here, Stanley's.

-Yeah.

0:28:500:28:56

But I suspect they're probably not all by Stanley's.

0:28:560:28:59

You see, there's a foreigner.

0:28:590:29:02

-That one's made in New Street in Birmingham.

-Right.

0:29:020:29:04

Let's have a look here.

0:29:040:29:07

Here's another one from Birmingham.

0:29:090:29:12

And there's another one.

0:29:120:29:15

So what that tells us is it's a composite set,

0:29:150:29:18

because there are some missing, and these three have been added in.

0:29:180:29:22

And how long have they been in your possession?

0:29:220:29:23

Well, it was my dad's.

0:29:230:29:26

It was given to him by his boss, and they were the boss's dad's.

0:29:260:29:32

Was your dad a draughtsman?

0:29:320:29:34

No, my dad was a gardener.

0:29:340:29:36

-Gardener?!

-Mmm-hmm. And he worked for his boss for years.

0:29:360:29:41

And was he a draughtsman?

0:29:410:29:42

-No, but his father was.

-Oh, right.

0:29:420:29:45

-So that's where it originated.

-Yeah.

0:29:450:29:47

-I think if you put these into auction we can put a 30 to 50 estimate on them.

-Right.

0:29:470:29:53

We can perhaps reserve them at £25.

0:29:530:29:57

-Right.

-Where the strength of selling these today is the Internet.

0:29:570:30:02

And going through a good auction room, which we are, they'll put them on the Internet and you'll find from

0:30:020:30:07

that that you'll have collectors from all over who collect this sort of thing and they're out there.

0:30:070:30:12

But I think you've got to estimate them at about £30 to £50.

0:30:120:30:14

It'll create interest and when they go on the Net, they'll make what they're worth.

0:30:140:30:19

John, this is every schoolboy's dream, isn't it?

0:30:250:30:28

It is really.

0:30:280:30:29

We have in front of us a Hornby railway set

0:30:290:30:34

designed and manufactured to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of our present Queen in 1977.

0:30:340:30:41

It's dated 1976, so the Jubilee Year was a year later than the year of manufacture.

0:30:410:30:49

We'll start by taking off the box which is

0:30:490:30:54

a little bit damaged, frayed at the edges.

0:30:540:30:58

That reveals a liner inside

0:30:580:31:00

illustrating a diesel locomotive Isambard Kingdom Brunel

0:31:000:31:06

which is appropriate for this part of the world because he built the Great Western Railway,

0:31:060:31:11

which brought me here yesterday, or at least its successor did.

0:31:110:31:15

This is in much better condition.

0:31:150:31:17

But the next layer of the cake is even better.

0:31:170:31:21

It's true to say it's never been out of its box.

0:31:210:31:24

That's right.

0:31:240:31:25

I think what's fun about this is the fact that we obviously have a period diesel locomotive and we have

0:31:250:31:31

examples of the sort of advertising that was fashionable at the time. Why did you buy it?

0:31:310:31:38

We were going to set up a railway system in our loft for the children, but we never really got round to it.

0:31:380:31:44

I can see that.

0:31:440:31:46

Were you buying it for them or were you secretly buying it for yourself?

0:31:460:31:49

A bit of each. I have two boys and I was interested in trains.

0:31:490:31:56

Why are you selling it?

0:31:560:31:58

We're downsizing and we want to get a bungalow, so

0:31:580:32:01

we've got to get rid of some of the stuff that's stuck in our loft.

0:32:010:32:04

I think from the financial point of view the most amazing thing about this is the condition.

0:32:040:32:11

Can you remember how much you paid for it?

0:32:110:32:13

£68.

0:32:130:32:15

That's interesting because I don't think it's going to make a lot more than £68 today.

0:32:150:32:21

But to look on the bright side if you had spent £68 on a TV set in 1977, it'll be worth nothing today.

0:32:210:32:30

Let's hope you get your money back and to that end I'd suggest

0:32:300:32:34

an estimate of £60-100 and a reserve of £60. Are you happy with that?

0:32:340:32:41

I'd have thought a bit more.

0:32:410:32:44

-So you're a bit disappointed?

-I am, really.

0:32:440:32:46

All I can say is that things come in and out of fashion, tastes change.

0:32:460:32:53

I think today if you had £100 to spend on a model railway, you'd probably treat yourself

0:32:530:33:00

to a single locomotive that was a little bit earlier than this and invest your money in that.

0:33:000:33:06

Let's hope we have a pleasant surprise, who knows? We may do.

0:33:060:33:10

I hope that you do turn out to be satisfied in the end.

0:33:100:33:13

-We'll see what happens.

-We'll do our best for you. Thank you very much.

0:33:130:33:16

-Joanna, how are you?

-I'm very well.

0:33:220:33:24

I've been doing "Flog It!" for a long time now and you see all sorts

0:33:240:33:27

of things, but very occasionally you see something that really does excite you.

0:33:270:33:32

I know that you know what it is.

0:33:320:33:34

-Yes.

-I'm willing to bet that a lot of people at home don't know what it is.

0:33:340:33:39

Let's let you tell them.

0:33:390:33:41

OK, it's a cheese coaster.

0:33:410:33:44

You'd put a full cheese in here

0:33:440:33:46

and then you'd push it up and down, along the refectory table,

0:33:460:33:52

and people would help themselves to cheese as it goes up and down.

0:33:520:33:55

-Don't get too good here because I'm supposed to be the expert!

-Sorry.

0:33:550:34:00

You're spot on. It's a cheese coaster or a cheese truck.

0:34:000:34:04

It's made in mahogany.

0:34:040:34:05

A lot of these originated from the 18th century.

0:34:050:34:09

I think this is a little bit later than that and I think it's probably from around 1825-1835.

0:34:090:34:16

There are key signs as to why I think that. If you look here,

0:34:160:34:21

that's called a bell push moulding.

0:34:210:34:24

Because it looks just like a bell push.

0:34:240:34:27

-Absolutely.

-These columns here are called cluster columns.

0:34:270:34:33

If you think of that Regency period which is about 1810-1815,

0:34:330:34:38

we've got hairy paw feet.

0:34:380:34:40

Not you and I, but hairy paw feet are typical of that period.

0:34:400:34:45

A lot of these over the time split

0:34:470:34:50

and you can see just down here we can see a split running down there.

0:34:500:34:56

One reason is modern central heating.

0:34:560:34:58

If you're going to keep things like this at home, always put a bowl of water under a radiator,

0:34:580:35:03

because the water comes out of the bowl.

0:35:030:35:07

And the other reason is the shape of the thing.

0:35:070:35:10

It's almost under stress and pressure with

0:35:100:35:13

its arc shape. Can you see that split along there?

0:35:130:35:17

It was like that when we got it, of course.

0:35:170:35:19

Why do you want to sell it?

0:35:190:35:22

We've run out of cheese.

0:35:220:35:24

Do you know, that's a good answer. I like that.

0:35:250:35:29

Why do you want to sell it?

0:35:290:35:32

It's really hard to display in a house.

0:35:320:35:36

It's our golden wedding anniversary year, so we thought we'd

0:35:370:35:42

try and raise a few funds, go and visit our daughter in Australia

0:35:420:35:47

-for Christmas.

-Do you have any expectations?

0:35:470:35:50

Well, I hoped it would be about £200.

0:35:500:35:55

-Ten years ago, that would have been between £600 and £900.

-Wow!

0:35:550:35:59

I think today you can estimate it at £300 to £500.

0:35:590:36:05

We can put a reserve of £250 on it.

0:36:050:36:09

Give the auctioneer 10% discretion.

0:36:090:36:11

-But I think it's absolutely lovely. Are you happy with that?

-Very.

0:36:110:36:14

Thank you for bringing it. It won't get you all the way to Australia, but it'll get you on the way.

0:36:140:36:19

Thank you so much.

0:36:190:36:22

Time for our final trip to the auction where Jan's scale rules

0:36:220:36:26

will be going under the hammer and I think this is a wonderful lot.

0:36:260:36:29

John is downsizing, so his Hornby train set just has to go, which is a pity as he's never used it.

0:36:290:36:36

We were going to set up a railway system in our loft for the children, but we never really got round to it.

0:36:360:36:43

Joanna is selling her cheese coaster to raise funds to visit her daughter.

0:36:430:36:47

It's a fantastic piece, but will the damage let it down?

0:36:470:36:51

Before we see it sell, I'm going to find out

0:36:510:36:54

what our auctioneer thinks of the cheese coaster.

0:36:540:36:57

This is a cracking cheese coaster, one of the best I've seen.

0:37:000:37:04

It belongs to Joanna and she's selling it because she wants

0:37:040:37:07

to raise some money to visit her daughter in Australia.

0:37:070:37:11

We've got £300 to £500 on this.

0:37:110:37:14

George IV, it's a lovely example.

0:37:140:37:16

I think it's a very sensible estimate.

0:37:160:37:19

If it was in really tip-top order, it could be 800 to 1,200 even.

0:37:190:37:25

You might get halfway to Australia on that one, I think.

0:37:250:37:29

-Has there been any interest?

-We've had some interest in it.

0:37:290:37:32

With furniture and works of art often you don't know until the day of the auction.

0:37:320:37:36

-We're confident we'll be able to get it away within that estimate.

-OK.

0:37:360:37:41

We're working on the right lines now and next up we've got Jan's set of scale rules.

0:37:490:37:54

Beautifully presented in a lovely box, made by Stanley and we've got a value of £30 to £50.

0:37:540:38:00

Very, very nice.

0:38:000:38:03

Who was the draftsman?

0:38:030:38:05

It was my dad's boss's father.

0:38:050:38:08

-It goes right back.

-How long have you had them?

0:38:080:38:12

20 years. Dad died 20 years ago and they were passed down to us.

0:38:120:38:16

Such a useful thing to have.

0:38:160:38:19

They're redundant now, computers have replaced them.

0:38:190:38:21

Yes, I know, but isn't it nice to actually be hands on with something like a scale rule?

0:38:210:38:26

And if you're planning something like jigging the bathroom around

0:38:260:38:30

or doing a bit of garden design and you can measure it out in feet and inches and you can use those scale

0:38:300:38:36

rules to scale it down on a piece of paper and be practical with them.

0:38:360:38:39

Next, a set of boxwood scales and rules all in a mahogany case.

0:38:390:38:44

-Let's hope the figures add up. Here we go.

-Several bidders.

0:38:440:38:48

I'm bid £30 for them.

0:38:480:38:52

-That's a good start.

-2, 5, 8.

0:38:520:38:55

At £40. Still against you all.

0:38:550:38:59

All done at 40.

0:38:590:39:02

Spot-on evaluation.

0:39:020:39:04

Not a lot of money unfortunately.

0:39:040:39:07

That's all right. We're going to put it towards my dad's plaque in the cemetery for renewal.

0:39:070:39:12

It all helps. Every little penny helps.

0:39:120:39:16

-Thank you, Jan.

-Thank you.

0:39:160:39:19

John is downsizing so the Hornby Railways set just has to go.

0:39:270:39:31

-It never made it up in the loft, did it?

-No.

0:39:310:39:33

One of those jobs that never gets done.

0:39:330:39:37

I've got a few ongoing jobs like that at home.

0:39:370:39:39

We've got a valuation of £60 - £100.

0:39:410:39:43

I hope it'll do well.

0:39:430:39:45

It's in superb condition, it's never been out of its box.

0:39:450:39:49

That's so important with something like this.

0:39:490:39:51

Condition is so important for the collectors.

0:39:510:39:54

Thanks to you it never got played with.

0:39:540:39:57

So if anything we should be getting top money right now.

0:39:570:40:00

Let's see how we do.

0:40:000:40:02

Next is the Silver Jubilee freight electric train set.

0:40:020:40:06

£50 starts that one. At 65.

0:40:060:40:09

Take eight.

0:40:090:40:11

At £65 at the back. 68, £70 and two.

0:40:110:40:16

At 72. In front of me.

0:40:160:40:19

All done at 72. Last chance?

0:40:190:40:21

Quite sure at 72?

0:40:210:40:23

That's a good result. Happy?

0:40:230:40:27

I'm happy with that. A good day out.

0:40:270:40:30

..Sell it.

0:40:360:40:37

Well, so far so good. You could say we're coasting along, which brings us nicely into our next item.

0:40:380:40:43

I've just been joined by Joanna and the Big Cheese!

0:40:430:40:47

Did you like that?

0:40:470:40:50

Not a smelly cheese.

0:40:500:40:52

But this coaster is beautiful.

0:40:520:40:55

It made Philip's day and mine, actually.

0:40:550:40:58

Why are you selling this now?

0:40:580:41:01

It's difficult to display in a house and we just had it poked under a table for years.

0:41:010:41:08

That's a shame because it should be viewed at table height.

0:41:080:41:11

Do you know what I'd do with it?

0:41:110:41:13

I know it's impractical to put cheese in it, but you could fill it full of fruit.

0:41:130:41:17

A quirky fruit bowl.

0:41:170:41:18

-We've tried all sorts of things and we love it, we're very fond of it.

-It didn't work for you.

-No.

-Right, OK.

0:41:180:41:25

You've got two people who would love to own it, but unfortunately we can't, but I know

0:41:250:41:30

there are plenty of people here in the room that are going to stick their hand up, so let's watch this.

0:41:300:41:34

On next to Lot 39, which is the George IV mahogany cheese coaster.

0:41:340:41:40

Quality.

0:41:400:41:43

I'm bid £260.

0:41:430:41:45

280, 300, 340,

0:41:450:41:49

360, 380, 400.

0:41:490:41:51

And 20. 440,

0:41:510:41:56

-460, 480...

-This is more like it!

0:41:560:42:00

500 and 20.

0:42:000:42:02

540, 560,

0:42:020:42:05

580, 600, and 20.

0:42:050:42:09

Not a Stinking Bishop, is it?

0:42:090:42:10

640, 660, 680, £700.

0:42:100:42:15

And 20.

0:42:150:42:17

740, 760, 780,

0:42:170:42:21

800 now...and 20.

0:42:210:42:25

At £820.

0:42:250:42:27

Any more at £820?

0:42:270:42:30

Yes, roll that out. £820.

0:42:300:42:34

Wonderful. Amazing.

0:42:340:42:36

-They absolutely loved it, Philip.

-I think the Philly was a bit light there.

0:42:360:42:41

What are you going to do with that? Don't forget, there's commission to pay.

0:42:410:42:45

Well, we're going to Australia for Christmas to see our daughter and grandchildren.

0:42:450:42:49

-What part of Australia?

-Northern New South Wales, Queensland.

0:42:490:42:53

We've been many times, but my husband is coming, too, and this will upgrade us from cattle class to cattle plus.

0:42:530:43:01

Travelling in style.

0:43:010:43:03

Thank you for bringing in such a quality item and quality always sells.

0:43:030:43:08

That's it. It's all over.

0:43:150:43:17

The auction has just finished, all our owners have gone home and the highlight for me had to be

0:43:170:43:22

the massive great big smile on Joanna's face.

0:43:220:43:25

The cheese coaster coasting its way to £820.

0:43:250:43:29

Quality always sells and I hope you've enjoyed the show.

0:43:290:43:33

We've loved making it, so until the next time, from Plymouth,

0:43:330:43:37

it's cheerio.

0:43:370:43:39

For more information about "Flog It!", including how the programme was made, visit the website at bbc.co.uk

0:43:500:43:58

Subtitling by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:580:44:01

E-mail [email protected]

0:44:010:44:04

Paul Martin and the Flog It team are valuing antiques and collectibles on Torquay's English Riviera. Paul is joined by old favourite Philip Serrell and new expert David Fletcher, and together they uncover a treasure trove of items.

Paul is wowed by a huge amber necklace and David finds an unusual Austrian bronze figure. But it's Philip who values the strangest item of the day - a cheese coaster. Paul also takes a trip on a heritage wooden sailing boat to find out what role the nearby port of Brixham played in the commercialisation of fishing.