Bangor Flog It!


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Bangor

Paul Martin is joined by experts Mark Stacey and Adam Partridge in the university city of Bangor, north Wales. Mark finds a silver purse and Adam values a French violin.


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Transcript


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Today we're in one of the smallest cities in Britain.

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But it's said to have the longest high street in Wales,

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and its pier, Garth Pier, is 1,500 feet long.

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It's Wales' second largest pier. So where are we?

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Well, we're in North Wales

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in the small but perfectly formed city of Bangor.

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For such a small city I'm delighted to see such a large crowd

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gathering here outside Bangor University's Prichard-Jones Hall

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and I can't wait to see what's in some of these bags and boxes

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because, hopefully, there's going to be something really interesting

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that's going to bring some big results for our owners

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when we put them under the hammer later on in the show.

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'There are surprises in store for some of our owners.'

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Rather have the money than have them stuck in a drawer, wouldn't you?

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Or stuck in me!

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'And some of our experts.'

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Tell me a little about yourself first of all.

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Where do you come from?

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Gogerychwyrndrobwyll- llantysiliogogogoch.

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THEY LAUGH

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So, whose antique knowledge will we be testing here in Bangor?

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Heading the team, our Adam Partridge,

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who gave up his studies at Oxford because he found himself

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more often in an auction house than at a university lecture hall.

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If Mark sees that, he'll be really jealous!

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And Mark Stacey, whose enthusiasm for antiques

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and thirst for knowledge has given him an expertise

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now sought-after by the very top names in the business.

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-You really are a charmer, aren't you?

-I try to be.

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THEY LAUGH

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Let's start with Mark, who's with Margaret

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but he's not giving much away.

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-Hello.

-You've brought a charming little piece of silver in

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but we don't want to reveal what it is at the moment.

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Where did you get it from?

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From a very elderly lady who was with me when I was born.

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No. What do you mean with you? Your mother, you mean?

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She was with my mother when I was born.

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And what was she doing with your mother?

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She came in an emergency because she had just done her midwifery.

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-And did you stay friends all your life?

-All our lives.

-Fantastic.

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Yes. I moved away from this area

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but I came back and re-contacted with her.

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And you've ended up back in Bangor.

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Yes, back in Benllech in the promised land.

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Well, it is a lovely little thing. I think it's about time

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-we told everybody what it is.

-Yes.

-Silver, of course.

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-Yes, of course.

-And when we open it, it's a little purse.

-Yes.

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-And it's Victorian.

-Victorian.

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It's Victorian. The mark has unfortunately rubbed,

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-so we can't see the date mark.

-No.

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But it's got Victoria's head on there.

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-And I think it's around about 1880.

-I can't imagine where it came from.

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Well, you can imagine, can't you?

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A fashionable young Victorian lady going out for the evening,

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-she'd have her bag...

-To a ball.

-To a ball.

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And there she would have, in here, maybe a few half sovereigns.

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-Yes.

-To pay for her taxi cab.

-Or whatever.

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Well, horse-drawn cab, of course, in those days.

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But I think it's lovely, I just love that shape -

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it's so simple and yet so elegant, isn't it?

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Elegant is the word.

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-And what do you think it's worth?

-I have no idea whatsoever.

-£10, £20?

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Oh, no, I would think a little bit more than that!

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That's what they all say. That's what they all say.

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I do think it's worth a bit more than that.

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I don't think it's hugely valuable.

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No, I don't think I'm going to go sort of a lottery...

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No, I don't think so.

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But I would put it in - because it's such a charming piece,

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and I think it would catch on to people -

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-I would put it in at an estimate of £60-80.

-Yes.

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It might go a little higher on the day. I would put a reserve on it.

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I would put a reserve of £50 on it.

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-Yes. That would be...

-Would you be happy with that?

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I'd be very happy with that.

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But aren't you just a little bit sad to see it go?

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But I have a number of other things,

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particularly liked or used when she was alive.

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And I can see that you're quite a determined lady, Margaret -

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-once you've made a decision, that's it.

-Yes. That is very true.

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-I have been like that all my life.

-We have to be, don't we?

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-Yes, life puts that on you.

-Fantastic.

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An item like that just brings the Victorian era back to life.

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Adam kicks off with a couple whose names are easy to remember.

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Paul and my wife, Pauline.

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Paul and Pauline! That's a good start already, isn't it?

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-Corny but true.

-Easy to remember, yes.

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I was instantly attracted to this on a number of levels.

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But it's a wonderful shape, isn't it, that streamlined shape?

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-Very sporty.

-Beautiful.

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I could imagine a cad driving it.

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-Absolutely. Are you a motoring enthusiast?

-My goodness, yes.

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-Since I was probably about three, I should think.

-Right.

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I've been very lucky with cars.

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-I've had everything from a Mini to a Rolls-Royce.

-Have you? All sorts.

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What do you make of all this, Pauline?

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Well, he's very fortunate because he married a petrol-head wife, as well.

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-Really?

-Yes.

-So you share that passion?

-We do. Very much so.

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-That's wonderful.

-We have hundreds of model cars.

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A load of Dinkies, but one of the reasons I brought it in today

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was I've never seen anything made out of Bakelite.

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-You've never seen one of these before?

-No.

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That's really fortunate because I have. In fact,

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I've sold one in my auction rooms about three or four months ago.

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-Oh, brilliant.

-So I know quite a bit about it, which is quite unusual.

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-Well, you're the expert!

-Firstly, where did you get this one from?

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-Is it something you've bought recently?

-Absolutely not.

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It was a birthday present from my parents, I think

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-when I was about three.

-Right.

-There's a tiny hole in the front.

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Just trying to do my maths here... Was that in the '40s?

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About 1948, I think,

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and I used to pull it round the garden on a piece of string.

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But my parents were very poor.

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And one of the reasons I've brought it in today was I'm wondering

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whether it could be new in 1948 or whether it predates that.

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-I think it predates that. I think it predates that.

-Any idea?

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It looks 1930s.

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Typically 1930s. It's got that real Deco streamlined shape of the 1930s.

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-Beautiful.

-It's a wonderful shape.

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And on the back you've got the mark of CODEG, C-O-D-E-G.

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-Is that British or not?

-It is.

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It stands for Cowan de Groot and Co.

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Which they shortened into CODEG, and they were a British toy firm

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and, in fact, they still are retailers of toys now, I believe.

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They're still in the toy business

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but they're not called CODEG any more.

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They're back to Cowan de Groot, as they used to be.

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But that's why it's called a CODEG car. Made of brown Bakelite.

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They also did a cream model, as well,

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-which would've been pretty swish, as well.

-It would, wouldn't it?

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It's very Poirot, too. You could see him in it.

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That's right, yes. So, you want to know what the one I had made?

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Indeed I do.

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-And me!

-The one I had was damaged.

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But we only estimated £20-40 because of the damage but it made 95.

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-Goodness me.

-I mean, it's obviously worth £50-80.

-Sounds pretty good.

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There is a piece missing.

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I have dim a recollection there may have been a Perspex windscreen.

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The windscreen's missing. I think we go with a 50-80 estimate.

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-How does that sound?

-That sounds absolutely fine.

-Is that all right?

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-And a reserve of 50?

-Yes.

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Because you don't want it to be undersold, do you?

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That would be heartbreaking.

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It would, because you kept it all those years.

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Now, it's not a massive sum of money, £100.

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It's probably not even enough to fill up your Rolls-Royce, is it?

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Not these days!

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So I shan't be asking what you're going to do with the money.

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My wife always treated me, she's very good,

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so I'm going to treat her and put it towards a weekend in Paris, I think.

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Excellent.

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What a fun thing, and for Bakelite it's in pretty good condition.

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I'm mad about wood, so it's hardly surprising

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that Sandra's piece of treen has caught my eye in the queue.

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-What's the story? How did you come by this?

-Erm...

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We had to clear out my mother's house 18 months ago.

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I wonder if you can guess what that is.

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It's a nice bit of turned lignum vitae.

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It's an exceptionally hard word.

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You know what it is, obviously, don't you? Have you used this?

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That's where the handle is. There's the mechanism. That screws back on.

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Ready? Is there anything in it?

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Remnants of something inside.

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-It's all gone over your clothes!

-We thought they were coffee beans?

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They would have been coffee beans, yes. This is to grind coffee down.

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-It is.

-Yeah.

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If I had to stick my neck out, I'd say this is Continental.

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-Really?

-Yes, possibly French. About 1820.

-Really?

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This is a lovely bit of table treen.

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It's called treen because it's obviously made from the tree.

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-Look at this lovely ambiguous grain. Can you see that?

-It is nice.

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-Beautiful. Absolutely beautiful.

-I like the knot.

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There's a knot in the wood.

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-Yes, there.

-And a knot at the bottom, as well.

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-Yes, lots of heart and soul.

-Yes.

-Isn't that lovely?

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Would you like to put it into auction?

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I think it's worth around £100-150. I don't know what you thought.

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-I had no idea. No idea.

-OK.

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There's a bit of damage to it, just there, but you can see

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that is so early, it softened up, it's not as if it was done last week

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-and it's got a brittle edge.

-Indeed. It's a long...

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-Long time.

-Let's put it into auction with the old auctioneer's cliche,

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-£80-120.

-OK.

-OK? Happy?

-Yes.

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And I'm just rather hoping it'll do the sort of 120-150 mark.

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-That would be nice.

-Yeah?

-Yeah. Lovely.

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It's got to feel right, and if it feels right, someone in the auction

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will pick that up and go, "Oh, oh, that is so tactile, I love that,"

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caress it, not want to put it down. They're going to want to own that.

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And, hopefully, they'll put their hand up and buy it.

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-See you on the day.

-Lovely.

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What a nice thing. I love early pieces of treen.

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Next, Adam's extensive knowledge comes in handy with some

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mystery objects brought in by Jill.

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Well, Jill, these are fantastic little items you've brought

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-along here today.

-Thank you.

-Do you know what they are?

-No idea.

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-Where did you get them from?

-My mum.

-Does she live in the countryside?

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I think probably they came from her father originally.

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Or her grandfather. He was in the farming industry.

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Well, that helps, really.

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They are Georgian, early 19th century, and they are fleams.

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-Fleams.

-Fleams, which are blood-letting instruments.

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-Oh, right.

-Yes.

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So, we've got a little group of people behind us

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and I thought we could do a demonstration.

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They're blood-letting instruments

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and three blades there, and this one is stamped Borwick,

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Borwick was quite a well-known fleam maker.

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He was in Sheffield.

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Roger Borwick. And he started about 1790 until 1860,

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so I would think that's early 19th century.

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They're horn handles, both similar things,

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and there are collectors of medical apparatus,

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medical instruments out there.

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-But more veterinary than human.

-I think so.

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-Quality, aren't they?

-Yeah.

-Nice quality.

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They usually make £20 each, something like that.

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I'd be tempted to put an estimate of 30-50 to be realistic.

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-Yes. Each, or...?

-For the two. I would put 30-50, realistically.

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-OK.

-Would you have them back if they didn't make a certain price?

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Oh, I don't know.

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-No, I don't think so.

-Oh, there's some input there. "Let them go!"

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-Let them go.

-Let them go.

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Really, it's not a lot of money, but they're interesting objects.

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There'll be a lot of people watching this

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that have no idea what they are and what they're for.

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-Well, I didn't know what they were until I brought them today.

-Good.

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I've managed to teach someone something. That's wonderful.

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Hopefully there'll be people watching this at home saying,

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"We've got one of them. I never knew what it was for."

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So, a quick reminder of the first few items which will be

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up for sale at auction.

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Mark's find was first - the little silver purse.

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What a glorious reminder of bygone elegance.

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Adam picked out the Bakelite car

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because he's recently sold one in his own auction house.

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The treen coffee grinder was my choice.

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The wood is superb and it has a wonderfully worn quality.

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It caught my eye and I don't think I'll be the only one.

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Adam unravelled the mystery of Jill's fleams,

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the blood-letting instruments,

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and once again they give us a glimpse into the past.

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These little pieces of history haven't got far to go.

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They are being sold at Rogers Jones and Co Auctioneers & Valuers

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in Colwyn Bay.

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It's looking busy, which is always a good sign.

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We're kicking off with Jill

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and her husband, Peter, with their pair of fleams.

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We haven't seen these on the show before -

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this is a first for "Flog It!" Fleams, I believe, Jill and Peter.

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-Correct.

-Hope they were never used!

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LAUGHTER

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-Well, they were at one time!

-They were only for veterinary use, these.

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So how did you come across them?

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-Found them amongst my mother's things.

-Oh, did you?

-Yes.

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-Not a lot of money, £30-40.

-No.

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It's the kind of thing not a lot of people would want to buy.

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At a fair, you'd have to give 30 or 40 each for them,

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and sometimes a touch more, so I think we should be about right.

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-Good.

-That's positive. Happy?

-Yes.

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-Rather have the money than have them stuck in a drawer.

-Or stuck in me!

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SHE LAUGHS

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Two bone-backed, three-bladed fleams, one marked Borwick,

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the other indistinct.

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Bid me. £50 for two fleams.

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£30.

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20, thank you, sir.

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20 I'm bid. 20. 442, 25.

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30. 35.

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40. 45.

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45 I'm bid. Is there 50? At £45.

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Everybody done now? Any further? At £45 and going.

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Yes! £45.

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We nearly did it. That's not bad. A really good result, isn't it?

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-£45. Happy?

-Yes. Very happy.

-They could easily have been discarded.

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-Oh, yes.

-The type of thing you wouldn't look at twice.

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That's the great thing about antiques - classic recycling!

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You can't get anything greener than antiques.

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A spot-on valuation by our expert.

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Next up, it's the Pauls - me, Paul and Pauline and their Bakelite car.

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I've just read in my notes, this was your birthday present

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when you were three years old. Oh, you can't sell something like that!

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Would you sell something that you were given

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-when you were three?

-I'm very sentimental, so probably not.

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Nor would I! I really wouldn't.

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-My mum would go absolutely mad.

-I've got that many cars.

-Have you?

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All over the house and in the loft.

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-This was unusual. I thought it might appeal to you.

-It did. I love it.

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It was a gorgeous shape. Here we go. Good luck, you two.

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Paul, Paul and Pauline, how about that?

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-I feel a bit out of place!

-You do, don't you?

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A Bakelite CODEG open tourer sports car.

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-Marvellous thing.

-It's got the look.

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Doesn't need taxing, doesn't need insurance.

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It don't need petrol.

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It starts with me at £80. At 80 I'm bid.

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The bid is on the book here at 80. 80 bid.

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A typical piece of that period Bakelite, wonderful. 85? 90?

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-Show us your money!

-£90.

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95. 100 with me.

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At £100. 5 again. 5. 110.

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110. 110 bid.

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My bid on the book.

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At £110.

0:15:460:15:47

Coming back at £110.

0:15:470:15:50

All done?

0:15:500:15:51

Well done, auctioneer. Yes, £110.

0:15:510:15:54

Paul looked like he really enjoyed himself then, just...

0:15:540:15:57

Teasing the extra money out of the bidders. Yeah.

0:15:580:16:01

I promised her a treat, so I'll have to do it now, won't I?

0:16:010:16:04

-What's it going to be?

-Paris.

-Ooh, very nice!

0:16:040:16:07

What a good result.

0:16:080:16:09

You can remember the 19th-century coffee grinder

0:16:120:16:15

that I valued at 80-120 belonging to Sandra.

0:16:150:16:18

Well, we've got that going under the hammer now.

0:16:180:16:20

Unfortunately, Sandra can't be with us

0:16:200:16:22

but we do have her daughter, Joanne. It's good to see you. It really is.

0:16:220:16:26

Now, since the valuation day, the family have been in touch

0:16:260:16:29

with the saleroom and they've now put the reserve up to £600.

0:16:290:16:33

-That's a great big quantum leap in value.

-It is.

-It really is.

0:16:330:16:38

It says to me, really, that somebody in the family

0:16:380:16:41

-doesn't really want this to go.

-Yes.

0:16:410:16:44

They've done a little bit of research into it and, like you say,

0:16:440:16:47

it's sentimental, it was my grandmother's.

0:16:470:16:50

-It's hard to let things go.

-Yeah, it is, isn't it?

0:16:500:16:53

Anyway, let's find out what happens because, you know, it's interesting.

0:16:530:16:56

-It is.

-And this is what auctions are all about.

0:16:560:16:58

-That's right. You never know.

-You just never know. Good luck, Joanne.

0:16:580:17:01

Here we go.

0:17:010:17:02

The 19th-century lignum coffee grinder. Bid me 500.

0:17:020:17:07

Early piece of treen. 400.

0:17:080:17:11

200, I'm bid at 200. At 200 on the book. Where is 50? At 200.

0:17:130:17:19

50 anywhere? At £200. Is there 50?

0:17:190:17:22

At £200. 50 I'll take.

0:17:220:17:25

Everybody done?

0:17:250:17:26

At £200. Afraid this is a nonstarter, at £200.

0:17:260:17:31

Everybody done?

0:17:310:17:32

-Well, it's good, it's going home.

-It's going home.

0:17:320:17:35

It's not meant to be sold, is it?

0:17:350:17:37

She's looking down on us, she's saying, "Don't sell that."

0:17:370:17:40

-Yeah, and you've got kids, you've got a little boy.

-I have, yes.

0:17:400:17:43

-That'll be his one day.

-You're right.

-Yeah? Don't ever sell it.

0:17:430:17:47

Shouldn't really, should we?

0:17:470:17:49

Oh, well, we've all learned our lesson there, haven't we?

0:17:490:17:52

Next we have Margaret and her charming Victorian silver purse.

0:17:540:17:57

Well, we do say condition is everything in this game

0:17:580:18:01

and this lot has the lot. It's got the look, the condition, as well.

0:18:010:18:05

It belongs to Margaret. It's that lovely Victorian shell-shaped purse.

0:18:050:18:09

It's not a lot of money and I expect this to fly out the room. Oh, I do!

0:18:090:18:13

-Has it just been in a drawer?

-Yeah.

-Not on display?

-Not on display.

0:18:130:18:17

It's a lovely-looking thing. It caught Mark's eye.

0:18:170:18:19

It's a charming little bit of Victoriana, Edwardiana.

0:18:190:18:22

I mean, it's something that nobody would use today

0:18:220:18:25

but you can imagine a lady going to the ball,

0:18:250:18:27

keeping a sovereign there for the carriage on the way home.

0:18:270:18:31

-Yes, that's right.

-Keeping a little dance card in there.

0:18:310:18:34

-It's just wonderful. And it should sell well.

-Fingers crossed.

0:18:340:18:37

It's going to go to a collector who's right here in this room.

0:18:370:18:40

The Victorian silver shell coin purse. It's a little beaut.

0:18:410:18:46

-It starts with me at 80. 80 I'm bid.

-He's good!

-It's gorgeous, isn't it?

0:18:460:18:51

-You see, they love it.

-90 anywhere? £80 with me. 90.

0:18:510:18:55

90 I'm bid. 90.

0:18:550:18:57

£90 only. Leave the gate open at 95.

0:18:570:19:00

-Is that 100? 100. £100.

-Yes!

0:19:000:19:03

And again now. 100.

0:19:030:19:04

This is good.

0:19:040:19:06

Get it up to £100. Yes!

0:19:060:19:08

You see, straight in at 80. Quality...

0:19:080:19:11

Quality always sells, that's what we keep saying -

0:19:110:19:14

if you're going to invest in antiques,

0:19:140:19:15

make sure it's great condition.

0:19:150:19:17

-It was lovely, wasn't it?

-It was very nice.

0:19:170:19:20

A good result for a good thing.

0:19:200:19:23

And, when we return later, Adam has a bright idea of how antiques

0:19:230:19:26

could help the financial health of the country.

0:19:260:19:29

It's been up in the loft now for 20-odd years.

0:19:290:19:33

If we could clear every loft in the land,

0:19:330:19:35

I think we'd solve the economy.

0:19:350:19:37

I've crossed the Menai Strait to the Isle of Anglesey to visit

0:19:450:19:48

Plas Newydd, one of Britain's superb country houses.

0:19:480:19:52

And, like so many of these fine establishments,

0:19:520:19:54

it was given over to the National Trust,

0:19:540:19:57

which has maintained it since 1976.

0:19:570:20:00

Well, there's plenty of history here -

0:20:010:20:03

parts of this magnificent house date back to 1470.

0:20:030:20:06

But today I've come to look at something relatively more modern

0:20:060:20:10

and that's the 20th-century work of artist Rex Whistler.

0:20:100:20:13

In 1936, when the sixth Marquess of Anglesey had architects to remodel

0:20:130:20:18

the complete wing of this part of the house, he commissioned

0:20:180:20:21

Rex Whistler to paint a mural on his recently created dining room wall.

0:20:210:20:25

At the time, Rex Whistler was an extremely fashionable choice.

0:20:270:20:30

He was highly versatile. Not only did he paint

0:20:300:20:33

but he also turned his hand to book illustration and theatre design.

0:20:330:20:37

He was an absolutely delightful chap,

0:20:410:20:44

very popular with the country house set in heady interwar years

0:20:440:20:47

and he became personal friends with many of the families who commissioned his work.

0:20:470:20:51

And today I'm lucky enough to talk to the present Lord Anglesey,

0:20:510:20:55

who still resides here in this magnificent house,

0:20:550:20:58

Plas Newydd, and he's going to talk me through the mural

0:20:580:21:00

and share some of his personal memories of Rex Whistler.

0:21:000:21:04

Lord Anglesey, how did the commission come about

0:21:090:21:12

and what was the brief?

0:21:120:21:13

Ah, well, it's very interesting, that, because when my father

0:21:130:21:18

made this room specially for him, other people asked that.

0:21:180:21:24

And the answer was, he had just become THE fashionable painter.

0:21:240:21:29

-Did the family have a say in what was going on in the mural?

-Oh, yes.

0:21:290:21:32

He discussed it with us all the whole time.

0:21:320:21:35

How old were you when Rex was here painting then?

0:21:350:21:37

I was... When he first started, I was about 15, 16.

0:21:370:21:42

Yeah. Did you take a liking to him? Was he a fun, artistic chap to know?

0:21:420:21:47

He became for all of us, including my five sisters,

0:21:470:21:50

an absolutely adorable friend.

0:21:500:21:53

He loved children. He used to allow us at all stages,

0:21:530:21:57

-when it was just charcoal on canvas, to paint in.

-Have a little scribble.

0:21:570:22:02

How long did it take him to do?

0:22:020:22:04

In good summer weather, he would come and stay here for a fortnight.

0:22:040:22:09

Trouble was that, as he was a very, very fast worker,

0:22:090:22:13

-if the sun was shining we often found him not at it.

-Oh, really?

0:22:130:22:18

-He was sunbathing, was he?

-Sunbathing, yes.

0:22:180:22:20

This is absolutely beautiful.

0:22:200:22:23

Will you walk me through the story?

0:22:230:22:26

First of all, there is him as the gardener.

0:22:260:22:28

I don't think he'd ever got a weed out of anywhere.

0:22:280:22:32

Isn't that a wonderful perspective?

0:22:320:22:34

-You feel like you can walk right through those arches.

-Absolutely.

0:22:340:22:37

Well, that was what he was a particular master of - perspective.

0:22:370:22:41

He got those arches exactly right.

0:22:410:22:44

-That's perfect.

-Quite beautiful.

-Yeah. Show me how the story unfolds.

0:22:440:22:48

-Shall we start here?

-OK.

-First of all, here are three dogs.

0:22:480:22:54

The one on the cushion always wore the best real pearls.

0:22:540:22:58

-Really?!

-She was very spoilt.

0:22:580:23:01

This is my favourite house of the whole thing.

0:23:010:23:05

This Gothic bit here.

0:23:050:23:06

Perfect symmetry he's captured.

0:23:060:23:08

It's almost like the work of an architect, isn't it?

0:23:080:23:10

Well, he had this extraordinary memory.

0:23:100:23:13

If he'd seen that building in reality ten years earlier...

0:23:130:23:18

-He could capture it and remember it?

-No, but more than that.

0:23:180:23:21

-He could tell you exactly how many windows there were.

-Really?

0:23:210:23:24

Exactly how many panes there were in the windows and how many doors

0:23:240:23:28

and everything else. He could remember it absolutely.

0:23:280:23:31

The water looks like it's moving.

0:23:310:23:34

Yes, absolutely.

0:23:340:23:35

But I remember as he was leaving and had to leave it unfinished, he said,

0:23:350:23:40

"Of course I should have made this water calm inside here."

0:23:400:23:44

Yes, it's in the harbour, isn't it?

0:23:440:23:47

This was a ship he painted out. I think you can see it.

0:23:470:23:52

I can. You can just see the mast.

0:23:520:23:53

-That's right.

-Why did he do that?

0:23:530:23:55

Because he said one day, "There are too many ships here."

0:23:550:23:58

Big brush, out it goes.

0:23:580:24:00

Next day, it's finished.

0:24:000:24:02

Amazing speed.

0:24:020:24:04

There's my father's pre-First World War yacht.

0:24:050:24:08

Those were the days when we were rich.

0:24:080:24:11

HE LAUGHS

0:24:110:24:12

You said with a big smile!

0:24:120:24:15

Then this is very fascinating

0:24:150:24:17

because one evening we were all rather drunk

0:24:170:24:21

and about to go to bed, and Rex said,

0:24:210:24:24

"There's a ship here which I want to take out, too."

0:24:240:24:28

In the morning we came down and here was this.

0:24:280:24:31

This wonderful island.

0:24:310:24:34

He did that overnight, did he?

0:24:340:24:35

He did it overnight and finished it off in the course of that day.

0:24:350:24:39

It must have been great for you to get up as a teenager

0:24:390:24:42

and come downstairs, wander through here and say,

0:24:420:24:45

-"I wonder what Rex has done next."

-Absolutely right.

0:24:450:24:48

That happened often. Now the most important historical thing is...

0:24:480:24:52

-Hey, look at the footprints.

-We've got footprints. Why are they there?

0:24:520:24:55

Whose are they?

0:24:550:24:57

Someone's just come out of the water.

0:24:570:24:59

-Or like Neptune.

-Neptune! You're quite right.

0:24:590:25:03

There is his crown and his coral sceptre with a golden tip.

0:25:030:25:07

He was a master at doing this rigging.

0:25:080:25:13

My father, who knew about rigging, was amazed.

0:25:130:25:16

-The detail is very good, isn't it?

-It is.

0:25:160:25:18

It's as if he spent time at sea to understand that.

0:25:180:25:21

Well, he hadn't at all.

0:25:210:25:22

He'd merely observed, but he'd seen them.

0:25:220:25:25

He was always observing. My father said,

0:25:250:25:28

"It's incredible! You've got them almost exactly right."

0:25:280:25:32

-Nice, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:25:320:25:33

I don't know who that is, but it's probably my twin sister, Kitty.

0:25:350:25:38

Ah, she's holding a little doll.

0:25:380:25:41

Yes, you're right. I've never noticed it before.

0:25:410:25:44

Thank you very much. Yes, thank you.

0:25:440:25:46

Here is this great town. It's full of all sorts of things.

0:25:480:25:53

Here is an amazing...

0:25:530:25:56

-It's like a little helter-skelter.

-Helter-skelter!

0:25:560:26:00

And a fair going on there, which is nice, isn't it?

0:26:000:26:03

-Yeah.

-How about that?

0:26:030:26:05

Look at that as a backdrop.

0:26:050:26:06

-A wonderful mountain range.

-Yeah. Here is my father...

-Oh?

0:26:060:26:11

..as the creator of all this.

0:26:110:26:13

-Was your father really happy with this mural?

-Oh, amazingly happy.

0:26:130:26:17

-We all were.

-Beautiful, isn't it?

0:26:170:26:19

Here, I long to know what happens up there.

0:26:190:26:22

So what happened when Rex finished the mural?

0:26:250:26:28

-Did he come back and stay often?

-No, because the war came, you see?

0:26:280:26:32

He didn't finish it, as I've shown.

0:26:320:26:34

He then became an officer in the Welsh Guards.

0:26:340:26:37

He wanted to go over and fight.

0:26:370:26:39

"I want to go and get killed."

0:26:390:26:41

And he did, as well, didn't he, at the age of 39?

0:26:410:26:43

Then he got killed before he saw a suspicion of a German.

0:26:430:26:46

It was a mortar, wasn't it, in Normandy that got him?

0:26:460:26:49

It was indeed.

0:26:490:26:51

-Terrible.

-Tragic.

0:26:510:26:53

Oh, I was in Italy at that time

0:26:530:26:57

fighting the Nazis, too, when I heard the news,

0:26:570:27:00

and my first reaction was...

0:27:000:27:02

"Oh! He was so incompetent at anything

0:27:030:27:07

"except painting and drawing."

0:27:070:27:09

I was...

0:27:100:27:13

So, there you are, Rex Whistler's marvellous 18-metre mural.

0:27:180:27:22

Wasn't that a real eye-opener?!

0:27:220:27:25

I just think it acts as a time capsule, really.

0:27:250:27:27

It gives us a glimpse into the past in the 1930s with all the glitz

0:27:270:27:30

and the glamour that the privileged had living in houses like this.

0:27:300:27:35

A last flowering of life, if you like,

0:27:350:27:37

before it was cruelly swept away for ever by the Second World War.

0:27:370:27:41

At the Prichard-Jones Hall in Bangor,

0:27:470:27:49

there's still plenty to be examined.

0:27:490:27:51

Our team of experts are at full tilt,

0:27:510:27:53

working their way through the crowd.

0:27:530:27:55

Adam is in his element.

0:27:550:27:57

He's with Edwina and Ivor,

0:27:570:27:59

and they have a violin case on the table.

0:27:590:28:02

-I'm always excited to see a violin case.

-Oh, right.

0:28:020:28:04

It's one of my areas, violins. It is one of the things I know about.

0:28:040:28:07

So, tell me a bit about yourselves. Where do you come from?

0:28:070:28:10

We live in

0:28:100:28:12

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrn- drobwllllantysiliogogogoch.

0:28:120:28:15

LAUGHTER

0:28:150:28:17

-Do you really?

-Yeah, we do.

-Can you say that, Edwina?

-I can.

0:28:170:28:20

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrn- drobwllllantysiliogogogoch.

0:28:200:28:24

-OK.

-And I'm not Welsh.

-You're not Welsh?

0:28:240:28:26

Well, you did very well there. And you brought a violin, too.

0:28:260:28:29

-Can't get much better. Now, the case looks a bit tatty.

-It does.

0:28:290:28:33

Where did you get it from?

0:28:330:28:34

It belongs to my son-in-law, Peter.

0:28:340:28:37

-Does he know you've got it?

-He does.

0:28:370:28:39

Last night, he said, "I've got a violin in my attic.

0:28:390:28:42

"Would you like to take that along?"

0:28:420:28:44

And how has it come to be in his attic?

0:28:440:28:47

Well, he doesn't play it. And neither do the grandchildren.

0:28:470:28:50

How did he get it? Where did he get it from?

0:28:500:28:53

It belonged to his grandfather.

0:28:530:28:55

Peter played this in a youth orchestra.

0:28:550:28:57

-But he doesn't play it any more.

-Shall we have a look at it?

0:28:570:29:00

You can do.

0:29:000:29:01

There we go. Now then,

0:29:030:29:05

let's get the instrument.

0:29:050:29:07

That bridge has fallen off, but that's not a major problem there.

0:29:070:29:10

That can be put back up.

0:29:100:29:11

You're lucky that you haven't got all the strings on it,

0:29:110:29:13

otherwise I'd be playing it.

0:29:130:29:15

Then we'd clear that hall pretty quickly.

0:29:150:29:18

It's got a one-piece back there.

0:29:180:29:19

Sometimes they have a two-piece back, or a one-piece back.

0:29:190:29:23

This is a one-piece back made from maple.

0:29:230:29:25

And on the front there, we call that the table,

0:29:250:29:28

the violin people, rather than the front.

0:29:280:29:31

That is made from pine.

0:29:310:29:32

Inside, there's a label.

0:29:320:29:34

I can just glimpse a label there.

0:29:340:29:36

It says M Costelli, Paris.

0:29:360:29:39

Luthier Artistique, 1895.

0:29:390:29:42

-So it's French.

-It's French.

-Oh, right.

0:29:420:29:44

-She's smart, isn't she?

-Oh, yeah.

0:29:440:29:47

This Costelli sounds like an Italian name.

0:29:470:29:51

The Italians were very well known for the finest violins.

0:29:510:29:55

French violins are also quite highly regarded, and then usually

0:29:550:29:59

another step down to the German violins,

0:29:590:30:01

which were more mass produced.

0:30:010:30:03

This is in pretty good condition.

0:30:030:30:04

People will think, "Oh, it is no good, it's got no strings."

0:30:040:30:07

-But it really doesn't matter.

-It can be restrung.

0:30:070:30:10

It can be restrung for £60, something like that. Not a lot.

0:30:100:30:13

Under £100 you can get that into a playable condition.

0:30:130:30:16

There's no cracks, which is the major thing.

0:30:160:30:19

He was obviously quite enthusiastic, Grandad,

0:30:190:30:21

because he's managed to knock a corner off there.

0:30:210:30:23

That's from really enjoying it with a bow

0:30:230:30:26

and maybe just caught that as he's been playing it.

0:30:260:30:29

Really enjoying himself, bang, off goes the corner.

0:30:310:30:34

But that's just a cosmetic thing again. That can be sorted.

0:30:340:30:36

Now, we always check the bows, as well,

0:30:360:30:39

because, sometimes, the bow can be worth more than the instrument.

0:30:390:30:41

Oh, right.

0:30:410:30:43

Let's have a quick look at that one.

0:30:430:30:45

-What is this? Horsehair?

-Horsehair, yes.

0:30:450:30:47

That's right. You haven't got any

0:30:470:30:49

special individual value with the bows.

0:30:490:30:52

So, what do you think your broken violin

0:30:520:30:54

in a tatty old case is worth, then?

0:30:540:30:57

-Haven't got a clue.

-Not a clue.

0:30:570:30:58

-No?

-Know nothing about violins.

0:30:580:31:00

-No guesses?

-Not at all.

-50 quid?

-No idea.

0:31:000:31:03

-Would you take that?

-No idea.

-I think it's more than that.

0:31:030:31:06

I mean, French violins can make a few hundred pounds.

0:31:060:31:09

The most famous ones can make even more than that.

0:31:090:31:11

-Early thousands.

-Oh, right.

0:31:110:31:13

This Costelli isn't a very well-known or highly regarded maker.

0:31:130:31:17

So I'd go on the cautious end and I'd put 100-200 estimate.

0:31:170:31:21

-Right.

-And put a reserve of 100.

0:31:210:31:23

-Definitely worth £100, whatever happens.

-Is it?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:31:230:31:26

All day long. If it doesn't make £100,

0:31:260:31:28

-then it's not worth selling it.

-No.

0:31:280:31:30

So, I would try that.

0:31:300:31:31

Put 100 reserve. If it doesn't sell,

0:31:310:31:33

you'll have to take it up and learn it.

0:31:330:31:36

I could give you some lessons.

0:31:360:31:37

LAUGHTER

0:31:370:31:39

Nice idea, but I don't think they'll be taking up the violin.

0:31:400:31:43

I think it will sell.

0:31:430:31:45

Dora, why are you selling such a pretty-looking vase?

0:31:470:31:50

Well, it's only stuck in the cupboard.

0:31:500:31:52

Only stuck in the cupboard, is it? It's charming, isn't it?

0:31:520:31:55

-It is, I like it.

-It is lovely colours. Really spring colours.

0:31:550:32:00

These very delicate oranges and greens.

0:32:000:32:02

-Yes, that took my eye when I saw it.

-It is. And is it a family piece?

-No.

0:32:020:32:06

-You bought it?

-Yes.

-When?

0:32:060:32:08

It must be 18 years ago.

0:32:080:32:10

-Gosh! And what did you pay for it 18 years ago?

-Half a crown.

0:32:100:32:13

-Half a crown? 25 pence, isn't it?

-25 pence now, yes.

0:32:130:32:17

-And is it a bargain, do you think?

-Oh, yes.

0:32:170:32:20

-And have you used it to put flowers and things in?

-I did, yes.

0:32:200:32:23

-When we had the cats and dog, I said no.

-I think it is lovely.

0:32:230:32:27

You've looked after it, you haven't damaged it,

0:32:270:32:29

which is the main thing.

0:32:290:32:31

It's a really, really nice piece. I don't need, actually...

0:32:310:32:33

We will look at the mark, but I won't need to look at the mark,

0:32:330:32:36

cos I know who designed this vase.

0:32:360:32:38

Very typical of her work and

0:32:380:32:40

we've filmed a lot of things of hers on the show.

0:32:400:32:43

It's not Clarice Cliff,

0:32:430:32:45

it's the other well-known Art Deco design, Charlotte Rhead.

0:32:450:32:47

And we know technically, straightaway,

0:32:470:32:50

with this lovely two blind decoration.

0:32:500:32:52

And I love the shaped, ribbed body.

0:32:520:32:55

We will just have a look at the mark.

0:32:550:32:58

And there we've got C Rhead, Crown Ducal,

0:32:580:33:01

which is one of the firms she worked for.

0:33:010:33:03

And then a shape number, as well.

0:33:030:33:05

But it really is quite typical of the 1930s, that mottled glaze,

0:33:050:33:09

that lovely decoration.

0:33:090:33:11

And you've had it a long time. Why have you decided to sell it today?

0:33:110:33:16

18 years, I think I've had it.

0:33:160:33:17

I'm getting older, nobody wants it.

0:33:170:33:20

Nobody wants it? It's a bygone era, isn't it, now?

0:33:200:33:25

Well, I think it's a lovely item.

0:33:250:33:27

It's not going to be worth a huge amount,

0:33:270:33:29

because it's quite a small piece by Charlotte Rhead.

0:33:290:33:32

The things that make a lot of money are the big decorative chargers.

0:33:320:33:35

But I think, if we were putting that vase in for auction,

0:33:350:33:38

we'd be looking at around £40-50.

0:33:380:33:41

Would you be happy with that?

0:33:410:33:43

-Yes...

-Ish?

-Ish. And more.

0:33:430:33:46

Well, we all want more, don't we?

0:33:460:33:49

I think we've got to be sensible.

0:33:490:33:50

It is a nice little piece, but if we put 40 to 50 on it,

0:33:500:33:54

we might then hit the £50 or £60 mark.

0:33:540:33:56

And we'll put a reserve of 35, is that all right?

0:33:560:33:59

-Yes.

-Fantastic.

0:33:590:34:00

Dora certainly got a bargain there.

0:34:010:34:04

Next, Adam has spotted some quality decanters.

0:34:050:34:09

-Steve, welcome to "Flog It!"

-Thank you.

-How are you doing?

0:34:090:34:11

-All right.

-Good. You've got a nice thing here.

0:34:110:34:14

-Yes, it is very precious.

-Is it?

0:34:140:34:17

-I hope so.

-Well, is it precious to you sentimentally?

-In a way, yes.

0:34:170:34:21

But it's been up in the loft now for 20-odd years,

0:34:210:34:25

doing nothing, so...

0:34:250:34:27

If we could clear every loft in the land, I think

0:34:270:34:30

we'd solve the economy.

0:34:300:34:31

LAUGHTER

0:34:310:34:33

The amount of stuff people have in their loft. Where was it before?

0:34:330:34:37

How did it come to be in your family's possession?

0:34:370:34:40

My grandfather and granny and my mother worked in a hall in Formby.

0:34:400:34:45

-So they were in service?

-In service, yes.

0:34:450:34:47

You know, last of the upstairs and downstairs people.

0:34:470:34:50

My granny was the cook and my grandfather was the butler

0:34:500:34:53

and my mother was a maid.

0:34:530:34:55

-And where was that?

-That was in Formby Hall.

-OK, Merseyside?

0:34:550:34:58

-Yeah, Merseyside.

-Excellent.

0:34:580:35:00

And so, how do you think they got these?

0:35:000:35:03

-Do think they were given them by...

-I think they were given to them.

0:35:030:35:06

As a sort of thank-you gift? Or retirement gift or something?

0:35:060:35:09

Could have been.

0:35:090:35:11

It's a very posh thing, this.

0:35:110:35:13

It's made out of... Look at the thickness of the wood, as well.

0:35:130:35:16

It's made out of coromandel, which is an exotic

0:35:160:35:19

and expensive timber that was mainly used to make small things.

0:35:190:35:22

You don't see much furniture made out of it. It was all boxes and

0:35:220:35:26

small things like this.

0:35:260:35:28

It's fitted with two really nice-quality decanters.

0:35:280:35:31

-Was it English made, do you think?

-Yes, it is.

0:35:310:35:34

Definitely English made. And another sign of quality...

0:35:340:35:36

Well, you've also got the key, which is quite unusual.

0:35:360:35:39

-Most of these have lost their keys by now.

-Yeah.

0:35:390:35:41

-And you've got this special type of lock on here.

-Yeah.

0:35:410:35:44

-Bramah patent lock.

-Oh, yeah.

0:35:440:35:46

Well, these locks are a special, secure lock.

0:35:460:35:50

I remember you saying, before we started, you said,

0:35:500:35:52

-"Don't shut it, because it's a terrible thing to open!"

-Yeah.

0:35:520:35:55

-That's because of this lock.

-Oh, I see.

0:35:550:35:57

It's a patent lock and it's wonderful quality. Bramah's patent.

0:35:570:36:01

-And you only see it on fine things.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:36:010:36:03

So it's also another sign of quality.

0:36:030:36:05

-That's why it took us ages to open, then.

-Yeah!

0:36:050:36:08

They used to use that for...

0:36:080:36:09

as they were travelling along, in carriages and things?

0:36:090:36:12

In a carriage or, yes, if you're travelling out

0:36:120:36:15

and, rather than take your liquor just in a bottle,

0:36:150:36:18

the more refined people would take them in decanters,

0:36:180:36:21

in a fitted coromandel case,

0:36:210:36:23

with a flush brass carrying handle on the top, as well.

0:36:230:36:25

It's just all lovely quality, really.

0:36:250:36:28

Now, of course, it is, what, 1850s or so,

0:36:280:36:31

-so it's been around 150 years plus.

-150 years plus.

0:36:310:36:35

It's had a few...bit of a hard life in places, hasn't it?

0:36:350:36:38

-It's not too bad but...

-A few little nicks in it.

0:36:380:36:40

With these things here,

0:36:400:36:41

they're always nice on the front and on the top

0:36:410:36:44

-but then they were cheaper on the sides and back.

-Yeah.

0:36:440:36:47

And then, if you see on the side there, you've got a bit of damage.

0:36:470:36:50

And, on the back, it's not nearly as posh as it is on the front, is it?

0:36:500:36:53

No, no, that's right.

0:36:530:36:55

So that's often the way with these things. It's a nice thing.

0:36:550:36:59

-What do you think it might be worth?

-What do you think it's worth?

0:36:590:37:02

I don't know, I haven't a clue, really, to be honest with you.

0:37:020:37:04

Realistically, in that order,

0:37:040:37:06

because the glass isn't perfect, either.

0:37:060:37:08

-There's few little minor grazes, aren't there?

-Yeah.

0:37:080:37:11

But I would have thought

0:37:110:37:13

between £100 and £200 is your likely realised price.

0:37:130:37:16

-Sounds all right.

-Maybe a touch more,

0:37:160:37:18

but I think that's probably fairly realistic.

0:37:180:37:20

-I would put a reserve of 100.

-Yeah.

0:37:200:37:22

And if doesn't make 100,

0:37:220:37:24

maybe give it 10% leeway just in case,

0:37:240:37:26

if that's all right with you?

0:37:260:37:27

-If it doesn't make 90 quid, £100, then keep it.

-Yeah.

0:37:270:37:30

But all in all, a good-quality object.

0:37:300:37:32

If it makes 150 quid, what will you do with it?

0:37:320:37:35

-Finish my kitchen off.

-Oh, really?

0:37:350:37:37

Now that's a story I've heard before.

0:37:390:37:41

Next, Mark meets Valerie, who's brought in a little family heirloom.

0:37:410:37:46

Now we've got a little bit of a savoury item coming up here,

0:37:460:37:49

-haven't we, Val?

-Yes.

-This lovely period set.

0:37:490:37:52

What do you do with such a grand-looking object?

0:37:520:37:54

It was my father's, possibly my grandmother's

0:37:540:37:58

-and, when my father died, I kind of took it on.

-You took it on.

0:37:580:38:01

You've got a bit of a Scottish accent there, haven't you?

0:38:010:38:03

-I have, yes.

-And we see that there's a Dundee name there, as well.

-Yes.

0:38:030:38:07

So it's all indicating that it might be Scottish, actually.

0:38:070:38:10

-Oh, good.

-So is it something you use on a regular basis?

0:38:100:38:13

No, I'm afraid not.

0:38:130:38:14

I'm more the kind of plastic tub of salt and a mustard jar.

0:38:140:38:17

You can wash it up easily, without all the polishing.

0:38:170:38:19

-Absolutely, yes.

-It's really rather nice.

0:38:190:38:21

What we've basically got is two little pepperettes,

0:38:210:38:23

two little table salts and the little mustard

0:38:230:38:26

with the spoons, as well, which is rather nice, actually.

0:38:260:38:29

-So you've had it quite a long time?

-It was my dad's.

-Right.

0:38:290:38:33

And I've had it for ten years, since he died.

0:38:330:38:36

Living in a cupboard, not being looked at.

0:38:360:38:38

-Living in a cupboard, unfortunately, yes.

-It's a shame, isn't it?

0:38:380:38:41

It used to get put out, the mustard pot, when I was a child,

0:38:410:38:45

I remember seeing that. I don't remember the whole set.

0:38:450:38:48

Well, in fact, it is hallmarked.

0:38:480:38:50

Each piece is silver.

0:38:500:38:52

-But it's not Scottish.

-Oh!

0:38:520:38:55

-It's hallmarked in Birmingham.

-Right, OK.

0:38:550:38:57

1902. So it's Edwardian.

0:38:570:39:00

-Nice, nice.

-Just over 100 years old.

0:39:000:39:03

And it's very much in that Edwardian style.

0:39:030:39:05

It's sort of reminiscing - reviving, if you like -

0:39:050:39:08

the sort of Georgian period, where you had very neoclassical shapes.

0:39:080:39:12

-Yeah.

-With little festoons and things like that.

0:39:120:39:15

And this is very typical of a style which would have been sort of 1790.

0:39:150:39:19

-Right.

-But this is 1902.

0:39:190:39:22

But a jolly nice and I would say practical set,

0:39:220:39:25

except that we don't tend to use these sort of things.

0:39:250:39:28

We don't eat formally any more,

0:39:280:39:30

we don't have housekeepers to look after our silver cupboards.

0:39:300:39:33

If we were putting this into auction,

0:39:330:39:36

I would probably say somewhere around about the £100 mark.

0:39:360:39:39

-Oh, right.

-80-120.

-Yes, yes.

0:39:390:39:41

-And with a reserve of £80.

-Right.

0:39:410:39:44

I would probably say fixed reserve, actually,

0:39:440:39:47

-so we don't sell it under £80.

-Yes, yes.

0:39:470:39:49

But tell me, you've had it for at least ten years.

0:39:490:39:52

It's been in your family a long while before that.

0:39:520:39:54

Why have you decided to flog it today?

0:39:540:39:56

My father was quite grand

0:39:560:39:59

-and would have quite like to have seen it being used, really.

-Yes.

0:39:590:40:02

-And I never use it, so it seems silly...

-Time for it to go?

-Yes.

0:40:020:40:05

Someone else could maybe enjoy it and actually put it on a nice table

0:40:050:40:08

-and...

-Absolutely. Well, I think it will appeal to a private buyer

0:40:080:40:11

cos it's all there, in its case, which is always very nice.

0:40:110:40:14

-But also it will appeal to a trade buyer.

-Right, yes.

0:40:140:40:17

Someone who specialises in buying and selling silver.

0:40:170:40:19

Quite right.

0:40:190:40:21

No point leaving something so nice sitting in a cupboard.

0:40:210:40:24

Let's remind ourselves of the remaining items

0:40:240:40:26

to go under the hammer at auction.

0:40:260:40:28

I really don't think that Ivor and Edwina's son-in-law, Peter,

0:40:300:40:32

should worry - there won't be any problems selling his French violin.

0:40:320:40:36

And I think Dora will be getting a good return on her half a crown

0:40:380:40:41

when the Charlotte Rhead vase goes under the hammer.

0:40:410:40:45

Steve needs to get on with that kitchen,

0:40:450:40:47

so let's hope the sale of the decanters will help fund it.

0:40:470:40:50

And Valerie's cruet set caught Mark's eye,

0:40:510:40:53

so let's hope it does the same in the sale room

0:40:530:40:55

and the bidders like it.

0:40:550:40:57

There's a lively atmosphere at the auction house, so fingers crossed.

0:41:010:41:04

And first up are Steve's decanters.

0:41:040:41:06

His wife, Anne, has joined him,

0:41:060:41:08

probably because she's keen to get her kitchen finished, too.

0:41:080:41:12

-Fingers crossed, Anne and Steve, OK?

-Yeah.

0:41:120:41:14

I know you're feeling a bit nervous.

0:41:140:41:16

We're just about to sell the decanters.

0:41:160:41:17

-We are looking for about £100-200. OK?

-Yeah.

0:41:170:41:21

-Happy with that?

-Yeah, I think so. Yeah.

0:41:210:41:23

-Confident as ever. Cocky as ever.

-Yes, he is.

0:41:230:41:25

Let's hope we get the top end, OK?

0:41:250:41:28

Good luck, it's going under the hammer right now. This is it.

0:41:280:41:30

And the very nice amboyna decanter box, containing two decanters.

0:41:320:41:38

Nice, with mushroom stoppers.

0:41:380:41:40

Bids all over the book on this one.

0:41:400:41:42

453.

0:41:420:41:44

Whoa! Straight in.

0:41:440:41:46

-That's the lot number.

-That's the lot number!

0:41:460:41:48

THEY LAUGH

0:41:480:41:49

You got keep alert at auctions! Believe me!

0:41:490:41:52

70 if you like. At 170. 180?

0:41:520:41:56

180 bid. Is there 90? At 180.

0:41:560:41:59

90. 190.

0:41:590:42:01

Level money? At £190.

0:42:010:42:02

I'd better not fan, I might bid it.

0:42:020:42:04

Level money? At 190.

0:42:040:42:07

-That's a good result.

-Top end of estimate.

0:42:070:42:09

At £190.

0:42:090:42:11

We'll settle for that. I think that's drinks all round.

0:42:110:42:14

£190. Well done, Adam. Happy with that?

0:42:140:42:17

-It was our anniversary the other day.

-Was it?

0:42:170:42:19

I was just about to say,

0:42:190:42:20

-what would you put the money towards or spend on?

-46 years.

0:42:200:42:23

46 years together. Still in love, as well? Happy as ever?

0:42:230:42:26

-Just about, yeah.

-"Just about"!

0:42:260:42:29

Of course they are!

0:42:290:42:30

Next up, the pretty Charlotte Rhead vase.

0:42:300:42:32

It's a lovely little vase, valued by Mark, our expert.

0:42:350:42:37

-It belongs to Dora and I'm ever so jealous.

-Are you now?

0:42:370:42:40

Yes, because Dora lives in Anglesey.

0:42:400:42:42

I don't want the Charlotte Rhead vase,

0:42:420:42:43

but I'd love to live in Anglesey. Have you got a sea view?

0:42:430:42:46

-Yes!

-Oh, and a bit of land?

-All the way from Holyhead to the, um...

0:42:460:42:50

Point Lynas.

0:42:500:42:52

-And have you lived there all your life?

-No, 30 years.

-30 years.

0:42:520:42:55

-Where were you before that?

-Near Pwllheli. Between Nefyn and Pwllheli.

0:42:550:42:59

-North Wales, born and bred, then?

-Yeah.

0:42:590:43:02

-What a great part of the world, isn't it?

-It is.

0:43:020:43:04

You look so healthy, as well. It's all that sea air, isn't it?

0:43:040:43:07

-All the gardening.

-All the gardening! Do you like gardening?

-I do!

-Do you?

0:43:070:43:11

Hey, good luck with the Charlotte Rhead vase. Everyone will love this.

0:43:110:43:14

I had it for years before I found the name on it.

0:43:140:43:17

It is rather sweet, the design. Very typical of her.

0:43:170:43:20

The auctioneer liked this. The auctioneer liked this.

0:43:200:43:22

He said it would do well. And it's going under the hammer right now.

0:43:220:43:25

Lot 219, the very nice Crown Ducal wide-necked vase.

0:43:270:43:32

Charlotte Rhead.

0:43:320:43:33

Number 213 to the base. Start on the book... I've got book bids.

0:43:330:43:36

It starts at 70.

0:43:360:43:37

-Oh, lovely, £70.

-Straight in. Top end.

0:43:370:43:40

At 70. 70 bid.

0:43:400:43:42

70. It's a little beaut.

0:43:420:43:44

5. 80. 80 bid.

0:43:440:43:46

5. 85. 90. £90.

0:43:460:43:49

Coming back? 90 with me.

0:43:490:43:52

Anybody else? At £90.

0:43:520:43:54

That's not bad, is it, £90?

0:43:540:43:56

Final call at £90. Level money would be nice.

0:43:560:43:59

-That's very good.

-Make no mistake.

0:43:590:44:02

Great result and good luck, good luck with the garden.

0:44:020:44:04

-I bet all the money's going on some more plants, is it?

-A bit of it!

0:44:040:44:08

And a bit of manual labour?

0:44:080:44:10

A strong young man in to sort of do some...?

0:44:100:44:13

No, it's all you.

0:44:130:44:14

THEY LAUGH

0:44:140:44:15

Now, that's the spirit, Dora!

0:44:180:44:19

So far, so good, which brings us to our next lot,

0:44:210:44:23

and it's been in the cupboard for about ten years.

0:44:230:44:25

Can you guess what I'm talking about?

0:44:250:44:27

Well, probably not, as most of our lots

0:44:270:44:29

have been kept in cupboards or drawers for about ten years.

0:44:290:44:32

But it's the five-piece cruet set belonging to Val.

0:44:320:44:34

Never, ever thought of using it?

0:44:340:44:36

-Well, I'm not really posh enough to have a silver cruet set...

-Oh!

0:44:360:44:38

..with the miniature teaspoons and...

0:44:380:44:41

You know, it's lovely but it's not something I would really use.

0:44:410:44:44

No, it's got all the bells and whistles, hasn't it?

0:44:440:44:46

-I mean, it's a showy piece.

-It is nice, it's a showy piece.

0:44:460:44:48

Yeah, and you'd think it would be worth an awful lot more

0:44:480:44:51

than sort of 80-120 but I guess nobody wants them?

0:44:510:44:53

No, I mean, we don't eat the same as we used to, Paul.

0:44:530:44:55

We now have, you know, much more informal dinner parties,

0:44:550:44:58

where we sit around the table with our friends,

0:44:580:45:00

swigging glasses of white, red...

0:45:000:45:02

Champagne and oysters in Mark's case, isn't it?

0:45:020:45:04

Well, I wouldn't like to comment. I do live near the sea!

0:45:040:45:07

THEY LAUGH

0:45:070:45:08

348, the cased five-piece silver cruet set with spoons.

0:45:090:45:13

Bristol blue glass liners.

0:45:130:45:16

Birmingham, 1902. Rather nice. £100?

0:45:160:45:19

100. 100 I'm bid. Thank you, sir.

0:45:190:45:21

-Oh, 100's bid.

-(Straight in.)

0:45:210:45:23

-20 anywhere?

-Mid-estimate.

-At 100.

0:45:230:45:25

100 bid. 120. 130. 140.

0:45:250:45:28

-150, 160...

-Hey, Val, this is very good.

0:45:280:45:31

170, 180. 190. 190 bid.

0:45:310:45:33

Out at the back also. Halfway down, the bid. Your bid, sir.

0:45:330:45:36

This could be going to a local hotel or something, couldn't it?

0:45:360:45:39

Anybody else coming in? At 190. 190. All done?

0:45:390:45:42

Gosh, what a surprise!

0:45:440:45:46

-There's us playing it down, saying no-one wants them.

-I know!

0:45:460:45:48

Well, you see, there's a lot of grand houses here.

0:45:480:45:50

-Posh houses in Colwyn Bay.

-A lot of posh, big Victorian houses.

0:45:500:45:53

A lot of guesthouses and a lot of hotels here.

0:45:530:45:56

-That's the market for it.

-Maybe they'll get us round for dinner!

0:45:560:45:59

THEY LAUGH

0:45:590:46:00

That's more like it. We like to see people go home happy.

0:46:020:46:05

Our final lot is the French violin

0:46:060:46:08

belonging to Ivor and Edwina's son-in-law, Peter.

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Edwina and Ivor, good luck with this one.

0:46:130:46:15

We're just about to put the violin under the hammer.

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And it's a good job Adam Partridge was on our valuation day

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cos he's the only expert that understands violins!

0:46:210:46:23

THEY LAUGH

0:46:230:46:24

We all go, "Ooh, this is nice.

0:46:240:46:26

"Unfortunately, Adam's not here today."

0:46:260:46:28

Because he doesn't do every single one.

0:46:280:46:30

We kind of pass the violin around.

0:46:300:46:32

Will this do a little more than 150?

0:46:320:46:34

It should make 200 or 300, really, I suppose.

0:46:340:46:37

But it has got a few condition issues, just the corners,

0:46:370:46:39

cosmetic things, which may put people off.

0:46:390:46:42

I think the estimate's about right.

0:46:420:46:44

I'd like to see it make a bit more, of course.

0:46:440:46:46

That would be nice for everyone.

0:46:460:46:47

Good luck. It's going under the hammer now.

0:46:470:46:49

Very, very nice violin. Had a lot of interest in it. Start me, £300.

0:46:510:46:55

Deathly silence.

0:46:550:46:57

-200?

-Come on, where are the hands?

0:46:570:46:59

Opening bid of 100.

0:46:590:47:00

-£100.

-I'm feeling nervous now.

-100 bid.

0:47:000:47:04

At 125, 150.

0:47:040:47:06

150?

0:47:060:47:08

150 bid.

0:47:080:47:09

That's good. That's what you wanted.

0:47:090:47:12

Is there 200? At 175.

0:47:120:47:15

200. A new bidder at 200.

0:47:150:47:18

25. 225 online.

0:47:180:47:21

-This is good.

-250 on the phone.

0:47:210:47:23

Now it's creeping up. Now they don't want to lose it.

0:47:230:47:26

275 online.

0:47:260:47:27

300 on the phone.

0:47:270:47:29

300 I'm bid.

0:47:290:47:31

25 online.

0:47:310:47:33

350 on the phone.

0:47:330:47:34

At 350. 75 online.

0:47:340:47:37

People find it everywhere now, don't they?

0:47:370:47:39

400 on the phone.

0:47:390:47:41

I'd like to be going 50s now.

0:47:410:47:43

425 online.

0:47:430:47:45

425, 450.

0:47:450:47:47

475 online.

0:47:480:47:50

-(475.)

-500 on the phone.

0:47:500:47:52

At £500. 525.

0:47:530:47:57

525 online. Final call.

0:47:580:48:02

PAUL LAUGHS

0:48:020:48:03

Slow down!

0:48:030:48:05

All done? No second thoughts?

0:48:060:48:08

-£525.

-Very good.

-I was a bit cautious.

0:48:100:48:14

-That ended in a crescendo, didn't it?

-It did!

0:48:140:48:16

What a wonderful moment, eh?

0:48:160:48:18

Fantastic.

0:48:180:48:19

You can find details of our next valuation days

0:48:210:48:23

by logging onto the internet and going to...

0:48:230:48:26

Click F for "Flog It!" and then follow the links

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to find the list of towns that we're coming to soon.

0:48:310:48:34

Paul Martin is joined in his search through the local antiques and collectibles in the university city of Bangor, north Wales, by a team of experts headed up by Mark Stacey and Adam Partridge. Mark finds a silver purse which brings back a bygone era, and Adam plays to his strengths when valuing a French violin.

Taking a break from the antiques, Paul travels across the Menai Straits to hear Lord Anglesey's memories of Rex Whistler painting the famous mural at Plas Newydd.