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Ashbourne

Antiques series. Paul Martin and experts Will Axon and Michael Baggott visit Ashbourne in Derbyshire. Finds include a pearlware cow and an Asprey and Co's picnic set.


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This is Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School in Derbyshire.

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We're filming in the holidays, so the timetable's given over to Flog It!

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I think it's time this lot went back to school.

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Hopefully, our antiques experts

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will give lessons in the geography of the item, where it was made,

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the history, why it was made, and also the maths - what is it worth?

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Because they want to sell it.

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Viv here taught English at Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School.

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You're now retired, you loved your job here but, strangely enough,

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almost next to her is Andrew, who was your pupil!

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-What was he like?

-He was a nice little boy.

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-Did you put him in detention?

-No. Didn't have to!

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The bell has gone. Time to go back to school.

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'We have a learned team of experts to provide the valuations.

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'Top of the class here in Ashbourne are Michael Baggott,

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'who started collecting in primary school, with an old coin.'

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A lot of very good porcelain comes from Bavaria.

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'He's been hooked on antiques ever since, so he knows his stuff.'

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-Is that something you were thinking of selling?

-If it's worth selling.

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-Is it worth selling?

-I won't tell you a value.

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'And auctioneer and valuer, Will Axon,

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'who's worked his way up from the bottom,

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'and learnt a few tricks of the trade on his way.'

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London touch marks. See how it spins!

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Ooh!

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'Coming up, Michael spots a clue.'

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-Have you ever seen that?

-I just thought it was a mark.

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-Along with all the other dents and knocks?

-Yes.

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'And Will also turns detective.'

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I think, at some stage, she has had a haircut.

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-Was that down to you?

-No. I think that was my nan.

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'I wonder if that's true.

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'The start to the day gives me

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'the chance to chat to people.'

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-That's an interesting-looking copper kettle.

-Yes.

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It's supposed to be from

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-the First World War.

-It looks it.

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-A tad earlier, actually. I'd say around 1890.

-As early as that?

-Yes.

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-Was it black when you got it?

-It was filthy!

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Dad scrubbed it with lemon and salt.

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My dad was a painter. He nearly painted it. I'd have killed him!

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'Thank goodness he didn't!

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'Michael's first at the valuation tables with Val.'

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You brought this funny little jug in.

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-What can you tell me about it?

-It was left to me 43 years ago

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by my aunt, left in her will

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as a "silver cream jug".

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I don't know whether it is a cream jug, whether it's silver, or what.

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-I can't find a hallmark on it.

-Right.

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That's a challenge! 43 years of looking! Let's pick it up.

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First thing I can tell you is it is a cream jug and it's not English,

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with this roundel attachment to the handle,

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this curved ebonised handle

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and very low-bellied form.

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If you turn it over, an English one would have marks there.

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And an English one might have marks on the side.

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Nothing.

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-But, thankfully, have you ever seen that?

-I have.

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-I just thought it was a mark.

-Along with the other dents and marks?

-Yes.

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That is the town mark for Venice.

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Venice?

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Venice, Italy.

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And it was made between 1810 and about 1825.

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That's as far as I can narrow it down from that mark.

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It is slightly lower grade than ours but it is silver.

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-Mm-hm.

-The good news is...

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Venetian silver is not thick on the ground.

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Italians love to buy back their heritage.

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-I see.

-So, even though we've got one jug from what would have been

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a pretty fantastic coffee set,

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it's still quite an interesting and sought-after little piece of silver.

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You've had it 43 years. Why did you decide to bring it along today?

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I'm getting rid of things. Nobody in the family wants anything, so they're going.

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-So this has got to go?

-Yes.

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-I think we would be safe if we put an estimate of £100 to £150.

-Right.

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And a fixed reserve of £90.

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I think it would make that all day long.

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If we get two telephones, one in Rome, one in Venice...

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-Gosh!

-..and they both want a little Venetian jug,

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might make a couple of hundred.

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We probably won't see more Venetian silver on "Flog It!"

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-for ten or 20 years!

-I didn't know it was Venetian.

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'Gosh! He's good. Let's hope the Italians spot it on the internet!

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'I'm next, with a nice family piece that Joan has brought in.'

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Joan, where did you come across this walking cane?

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It's been in my family all my life.

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I can remember it as a child.

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Yeah? Are you into horses?

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Not at all. I'm sure it belonged to my grandfather who WAS into horses.

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Right. Where did he get it from?

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-Well, he was a groom.

-Was he?

-Yes. At the Royal Hotel in Derby.

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Where has this been in the house? Lying around somewhere?

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-It was in my loft.

-Was it?

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-Absolutely.

-This is silver.

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Sterling silver, but I can't find the hallmarks.

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Sometimes, they are hidden away in the decorative work.

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See around the trees of this little hunting scene? It's the chase.

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-Thank goodness! Not the kill.

-No!

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See the way the horse has been modelled?

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See the deep relief of the silver

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and the way the hounds are running with extended long legs?

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-That is typical of the style from about the 1840s.

-Really?

-Hm.

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This has come off something else.

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-Oh.

-Possibly a very good quality riding crop or whip.

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It's been adapted to be used on the top of this walking cane.

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This is ash. You can see the wood, the grain of the ash.

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But it's been painted with a paint effect and then lacquered,

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which is typical of the 1880s.

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So I think this was put on around then.

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-Gosh.

-You can see, architecturally,

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it just doesn't sit right, does it?

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-That's been forced on around the collar.

-Yes.

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-That's where the value is.

-Is it?

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I'd imagine, if you wanted to sell this, and it does sell,

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that'll get taken off

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and put back on to a riding crop or whip.

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-Because that's just beautiful. Is it something you want to sell?

-Yes.

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It's been in the family for so long

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but I'm not particularly attached to it.

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I think it's worth in the region of around about £60 to £80,

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-purely for that part.

-OK. Yeah.

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-Reserve of 60. Don't give it away.

-All right.

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-Are you happy with that?

-I am.

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If it doesn't sell, everybody needs a stick of some sort.

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Even to retrieve something from under the cupboards!

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You always need a stick!

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'I'm always intrigued when things have been adapted over the years.

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'Will found something for the doll collectors.'

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-Is this yours, Kevin or Vicky?

-No.

-It was my nana's.

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It's come down through the family to yourself.

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Have you not got someone to pass it on to?

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I've got my daughter but she thinks it's freaky.

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Freaky? Does she? She's quite a sweet little doll,

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for the collectors of these types of things, who obviously do like them.

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Have you any idea where your nana got her from?

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She got her from her dad, who had a friend in Germany.

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It came from Germany.

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Interesting. Well, that's good.

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Because the best known maker of these bisque porcelain headed dolls

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was Armand Marseille, a German firm who were producing these

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in various quantities and qualities.

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One way to find out is on the back of the head, the maker's mark.

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Without taking off her hair, I couldn't look and it's a shame to pull off her hair.

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Though I think, at some stage, she has had a bit of a haircut.

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-Was that down to you?

-No. I think that was my nan.

-It does happen.

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Little girls get the scissors out from Mummy's dressing table.

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They give the doll a haircut

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and don't understand it's not going to grow back.

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That's an issue to the hardcore collector,

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where things like that do matter.

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These types of baby dolls are the "bebe" dolls.

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Generally, smaller, like this, with the angled arms and so on.

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Looking at the head itself, where a lot of the focus is for collectors.

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She's... You've got to appreciate that she's quite prettily painted.

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The mouth is another area where you can look at the quality.

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If they have just a solid mouth,

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they tend to be, shall we say, lower league quality pieces.

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Once you get open mouths and teeth,

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that's a bit more intricate, takes longer to make

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and, hence, is a better quality doll.

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As with most dolls, if I sit her up,

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this really will scare you!

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The eyes open and she comes alive!

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You said your daughter doesn't like it. She thinks it's freaky.

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-Are you the same?

-Yeah. I'm not really into it.

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-Doesn't make you feel broody?

-Not at all!

-No.

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If I said sort of around the £50 mark, how would you feel about that?

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-Would your mum be happy with that?

-I think so.

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-She's not upset you're selling it?

-No. I asked permission first.

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You don't want her sitting with a cup of tea. "There's me doll!"

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She wouldn't want less than that.

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-So, £50 to £80. Discretionary reserve at £50.

-Yeah. Brilliant.

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-See you both at the sale.

-Thank you.

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'No, we wouldn't want Vicky's mum choking on her tea.

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'We like people to enjoy Flog It!'

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Jill, Bill, thank you for struggling in with this marvellous, huge pot today.

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It is a beast of a thing, isn't it? Where does it live at home?

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It's in the bedroom because I haven't got room for it.

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We often hear, "We haven't got room for it." This is one thing that might apply to as it is a whopper!

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-Where did it come from?

-Scotland.

-His parents lived in Scotland.

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-And they left it to you?

-They left it.

-Yes.

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-If we take this off, this is a super finial, isn't it?

-It is, yes.

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-This is modelled on a Chinese dog of Foo.

-Really?

-The whole thing is a Chinese shape.

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-But you know it's not Chinese, don't you?

-That's right.

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All here on the base for us - Carlton Ware, Rouge Royale, as if we needed to turn it over and find out.

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-That's right.

-I mean, Carlton Ware,

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from Stoke, a factory set up by Wiltshaw and Robinson,

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-producing Rouge Royale in the late '20s, early '30s.

-Yes.

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-But they then continued production on after the war.

-That's right.

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-And this piece probably dates to about 1945, 1950.

-Really?

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It's amongst their later wares, but it's a splendid pot

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-with all these...

-All the designs.

-..quite manic and fantastical Chinese scenes.

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-And these very vibrant, decadent colours.

-Colours.

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-But, it has to be said, sometimes size is everything.

-It is.

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And this is an absolute whopper.

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It's sadly dipped from the top of the market, but I still think

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if we put it in at £300 to £500, it's a good piece of Carlton Ware Rouge Royale for a collector.

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It might be the pinnacle in their collection.

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-And if we put a fixed reserve at 250...

-That's fine, isn't it?

-OK.

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-I hope it will do really well when it comes up.

-I hope so too.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Well, we'll have to wait and see how that whopper does.

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We often see people with their collections on the show,

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but the Cavendish family,

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the dukes and duchesses of Devonshire,

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have brought a whole new meaning to the word collection.

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For over 450 years, the Devonshire collection of artefacts

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has evolved and continues to grow,

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here in this magnificent setting of Chatsworth House.

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The house contains an extensive private art collection

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which includes a magnificent sculpture gallery,

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Old Master drawings and paintings, furniture and much, much more.

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The list is absolutely endless,

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so I'm going to focus on one particular part of the collection

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which, for me, fuses history, wealth, style

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and the forward-thinking attitude that has come to represent the family.

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And that's their personal portraits.

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Portraits are a method of recording and displaying family history

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and have long been a status symbol for the nobility.

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Faces of ancestors line the walls of many a stately home.

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But none more so than here at Chatsworth.

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I'm on the oak staircase, surrounded by portraits of the first,

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right through to the eleventh dukes,

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with some of their family and friends

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through the last 16 generations.

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The Cavendishes have kept up with the modern times

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by employing the best artists,

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using up-to-date technology, to capture their family portraits.

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The wife of the 5th Duke, Georgiana, the Duchess of Devonshire,

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commissioned portraits from some of the most famous artists of the day,

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including Gainsborough in around 1784

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and this one, by Sir Joshua Reynolds.

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As you can see, it's slightly unfinished

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on the shoulders and the upper part of the body.

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But I absolutely adore this portrait. She is so beautiful.

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And there's a confidence about Reynolds' work, his loose brushstroke. This is so feminine.

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This remained in Reynolds' studio right up until his death.

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They say it was left by his desk.

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Maybe he intended to finish it or he just liked looking at her.

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You can imagine him falling in love with her while he was painting this, can't you?

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It's just beautiful. And so was she.

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Georgina's son, the 6th Duke,

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was the first to have his photograph in around 1852,

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soon after the technique had been invented.

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In more recent times, the tradition of using eminent artists to capture family portraits

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has been continued by Andrew Cavendish, the 11th Duke of Devonshire, and his wife Deborah.

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This is by Lucian Freud.

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It was done in the early 1950s.

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He became a family friend and stayed at the house on many occasions, doing a series of portraits.

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Deborah sat for this when she was 36 years old,

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and she described Freud as having incredible insight.

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She is quoted as saying, "The older I get, the more like the picture I become."

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And this is so typical of Freud's work, the brushstroke here, rather flat, broad brushes.

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Again, very, very confident.

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Striking. Absolutely striking.

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And this is as close as I'll ever get to a Lucian Freud.

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Look, nearly touching it.

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The family continued the tradition of using artists and the style of the day

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with this incredible portrait of Laura Burlington,

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daughter-in-law of the current Duke. William, the Duke's son,

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commissioned a digital portrait of Laura by artist Michael Craig-Martin

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and this was unveiled at Chatsworth in 2010.

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There are nine areas where the colours keep changing. It's a wonderful likeness,

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but I've been told you could stand here all day

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and probably never see the same colour combination twice

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because there's just millions of different variations.

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As you can see, the background's changing, the lips are changing,

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the skin tone, the colours... It's going to alter again.

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It really is a wonderful likeness but, also, it just reflects the fast-moving times we live in today.

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It's a perfect example of contemporary art.

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'The sale is being held by Hansons Auctioneers and Valuers Ltd.

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'We have two auctioneers selling our lots - David Greatwood and Charles Hanson.

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'Time for a quick reminder of all of our lots.

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'It takes an eagle-eyed expert

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'to spot the Venetian mark on Val's silver jug.

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'So, well done, Michael.

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'The silver top on the walking stick caught my eye

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'because it's so beautifully crafted.

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'Who says size isn't everything?

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'It is probably what will sell the ginger jar.

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'Will picked out the bebe doll.

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'It's a shame someone's taken the scissors to her hair,

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'but at least she has her original clothes.'

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'Before the auction,

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'I caught up with Charles to get his take on the Venetian silver jug.'

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This is a cracking little lot. I love the form.

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It stands proud. "Look at me! I'm very important."

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But the family silver has to go.

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It's Continental, as you know.

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-Michael has put £100 to £150 on it.

-I think it's quite speculative.

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It's an interesting pot. It's got the look of a pot far earlier.

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-It's a style that went on and on.

-Because it was such a good style.

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-Top end or lower end?

-I think £100 to £150 is quite right.

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It could race away. It could stall at the lower part. But I like it.

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-It's a quintessential antique. I agree with the price.

-So do I.

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'It's the first of our lots, so let's see if Charles is right.

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'And we have David Greatwood on the rostrum.'

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-Something that Michael and myself wouldn't dream of selling. Valerie is. You're being a daredevil.

-Yes.

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-Decluttering.

-Yes.

-This is a lovely silver jug.

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I had a chat to the auctioneer about it.

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We both agreed it just looks, "Look at me! I'm SO important."

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-It's just beautiful.

-Bella! Bella! It's Italian, isn't it?

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If the Italians have seen it,

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-it will fly.

-It's going under the hammer. Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:20:440:20:49

Silver pear-shaped cream jug. Commission interest at £75.

0:20:490:20:54

75. 80. Five. 90. And I'm out.

0:20:540:20:57

At £90. Any advance on £90? I'll take five. Surely...?

0:20:570:21:02

Is someone getting a bargain?

0:21:020:21:04

..On the pillar at 90. Any advance at £90? Take five. At £90...

0:21:040:21:10

-It's gone at 90.

-That's fine.

-Happy?

-Yeah, I am. Yes.

0:21:100:21:14

-I'd have hoped for a bit more, for 120.

-I would have done as well. It did look important.

0:21:140:21:21

-It looked really good.

-It's a lovely thing.

0:21:210:21:24

'I don't think the Italians spotted their little jug.

0:21:240:21:28

'It's my choice now, which can be nerve-racking.

0:21:280:21:32

'Charles Hanson is taking the sale.'

0:21:320:21:34

I'm not sure about this one.

0:21:340:21:37

It's that walking cane with a silver top and belongs to Joan, with a value of £60 to £80.

0:21:370:21:43

-Good to see you.

-Thank you.

-Who's this with you?

0:21:430:21:46

-Ted, my grandson.

-Hello, Ted. Pleased to meet you.

0:21:460:21:50

I love your tractor T-shirt. Little boys love tractors, don't they?

0:21:500:21:54

Have you got lots of friends at pre-school? Wave hello to them.

0:21:540:21:59

All your friends can watch you now.

0:21:590:22:02

-I am a bit frightened about this.

-Really?

-Mm.

0:22:020:22:05

If it has to go home, then enjoy it, won't you?

0:22:050:22:09

-Maybe leave it by the front door.

-Yes.

0:22:090:22:13

Put it in a big pot, like you do with walking sticks!

0:22:130:22:17

-I know you got this out the loft.

-Yes. It's been there for ages.

0:22:170:22:22

Mounted walking stick. White metal. Lots of interest here.

0:22:250:22:30

And I am bid, away we go, at £40, £50, £60.

0:22:300:22:34

-Do I see five now...?

-Get it within estimate.

0:22:340:22:39

..75. 85 now.

0:22:390:22:42

90. I'll take five. Let's see you all.

0:22:420:22:45

At £90, we say sell. At 90.

0:22:450:22:48

Fair warning. All out? We say sale.

0:22:480:22:50

Just over the top end of the estimate. Pleased, Ted?

0:22:500:22:54

That's £90. It's a lot of money.

0:22:540:22:57

I wonder who's going to get the dosh.

0:22:570:23:00

Well, yes. The grandchildren. Of course.

0:23:000:23:03

'I'm delighted we could help Joan give something to the grandchildren.

0:23:030:23:09

'Next, that whopping piece of Carlton Ware.'

0:23:090:23:12

-It belongs to Bill. It was your mum, wasn't it?

-Yes.

0:23:120:23:15

-What do you think of this?

-It's not my type of thing.

0:23:150:23:18

-You don't like Carlton Ware?

-No. But she said to me before she died she'd like to give it to me.

0:23:180:23:24

Hopefully, we can send you home with a bit of money in your pocket.

0:23:240:23:28

We're looking for around £300, maybe 400 on a good day?

0:23:280:23:31

It's a bit out of my comfort zone.

0:23:310:23:34

20th century ceramics are not my first love.

0:23:340:23:37

But it's a bit of a wild stab in the dark,

0:23:370:23:41

which is what I might be getting, if it doesn't sell, off Bill,

0:23:410:23:44

but we will see what happens.

0:23:440:23:46

Very fine Carlton Ware Rouge Royale jar and cover.

0:23:480:23:52

£210. Look at it, it's monumental.

0:23:520:23:55

210.

0:23:550:23:57

I'm bid 210.

0:23:570:23:59

Do I see 220 now? Come on.

0:23:590:24:01

-He's trying his best.

-He is.

0:24:010:24:04

-That's right.

-It's not selling.

-No.

0:24:040:24:08

Once, twice, three times...

0:24:080:24:11

-Not sold.

-No further bids.

0:24:110:24:13

It's a sad reflection

0:24:130:24:15

because that market was at its peak maybe three or four years ago.

0:24:150:24:19

It's just coming down slightly, so maybe the thing to do is pack it up, forget about it for a while.

0:24:190:24:26

-It'll save for another day.

-Yes, thank you.

-Or leave it here.

-Yeah.

0:24:260:24:31

I think Bill is thinking about leaving it here and reducing the estimate.

0:24:310:24:37

-I think Bill is thinking about dropping it.

-I think he is.

-Yes.

0:24:370:24:41

At least Bill's got a sense of humour!

0:24:410:24:45

'Now for the little doll, with auctioneer David Greatwood.'

0:24:450:24:48

-You're putting the proceeds towards DIY?

-Yeah.

-Who's doing that?

-He is.

0:24:480:24:55

We've seen these bisque dolls do quite well.

0:24:550:24:58

£300 to £500. We had one doing a couple of thousand, but they vary so much.

0:24:580:25:04

Well, the first were produced in the 1850s in France.

0:25:040:25:09

They're really sought-after.

0:25:090:25:11

-We suspect this one's German.

-This one's been in a box.

0:25:110:25:15

-Because you didn't like looking at it?

-Yeah.

-I don't blame you.

0:25:150:25:20

Flashing eyes, open mouth, nicely dressed little doll.

0:25:200:25:25

Commission interest here and I must go straight in at £55.

0:25:250:25:29

55. 60. Five. 70. Five.

0:25:290:25:32

80. Five. 90.

0:25:320:25:35

£90 on the right.

0:25:350:25:37

95, new place. 100?

0:25:370:25:39

110. 120. 130.

0:25:390:25:43

Right in the middle and seated at 130. Any advance?

0:25:430:25:46

At 130. Selling at 130.

0:25:460:25:50

-That was a good result.

-Yeah.

0:25:500:25:52

We're all happy. It's gone and for a good price!

0:25:520:25:55

'Good sale! No point holding on to things you don't want.

0:25:550:26:00

'Later, Michael has an extraordinary find.'

0:26:000:26:03

-Made my day. Made my year, even.

-Oh, right. Thank you.

0:26:030:26:07

ANNOUNCER: 'Look at the odds for race number one...'

0:26:120:26:15

'Harness racing, or "trotting", is an exhilarating sport

0:26:180:26:21

'which has been practised in this country for over a century.

0:26:210:26:27

'Every year, more than 1,500 horses take part in the United Kingdom,

0:26:270:26:32

'yet most of us have barely heard of this pocket of sporting history.

0:26:320:26:37

'This is John Towe racing at Pikehall in the Peak District.

0:26:370:26:41

'His family have been involved with the sport for generations.

0:26:410:26:45

'I've arranged to meet him and his wife Nicky at their farm near Matlock to find out more.'

0:26:490:26:55

-Hi, Nicky.

-Hello.

-And who's this?

-This is Merlin.

0:26:550:26:59

You're a fine boy, aren't you?

0:26:590:27:01

Gorgeous, gorgeous horse.

0:27:010:27:03

I'm very excited. I've got my riding hat.

0:27:030:27:07

-Expect the ride of your life!

-PAUL LAUGHS

0:27:070:27:10

What speeds are we going to do?

0:27:100:27:13

-Probably close to 25, 30 miles an hour.

-That's quite fast.

0:27:130:27:18

-Your family has been involved in this sport for a long, long time.

-Oh, yes.

0:27:180:27:24

Probably since the early 1800s.

0:27:240:27:26

My grandfather, great-grandfather, grandfather before him.

0:27:260:27:31

-Are you into this sport as well?

-I'm just starting.

0:27:310:27:35

-It's so scary!

-At least you love horses. A good starting point.

-Yeah.

0:27:350:27:40

-But you're bonkers about this.

-Yes. It's very addictive.

0:27:400:27:45

What are the origins of the sport?

0:27:450:27:48

It started with your butchers, bakers, doctors.

0:27:480:27:51

They all had their own horse and cart.

0:27:510:27:54

When they went to market, they'd get together

0:27:540:27:58

and decide, "We'll race home, see who gets home quickest."

0:27:580:28:03

COMMENTATOR OVER P.A. SYSTEM

0:28:030:28:07

The carts have changed over the years.

0:28:090:28:13

Oh, yes. The basic design stays the same.

0:28:130:28:16

-With modern engineering and materials...

-Quite lightweight now.

0:28:160:28:20

This one we're using today is what we call a training sulky,

0:28:200:28:25

specially modified to carry two.

0:28:250:28:27

The myth is they were called sulkies because they only sit one person,

0:28:270:28:32

so you could go out on your own and people said you were sulking.

0:28:320:28:39

How much would an average cart cost, a training, heavy work-out cart?

0:28:390:28:43

-There's not a lot to it, is there?

-LAUGHING:

-No!

0:28:430:28:47

That's the cheaper part, with how much horses cost.

0:28:470:28:51

That would probably cost you...£1,000.

0:28:510:28:54

-The lightweight ones are a bit more expensive?

-Yeah, they can go up to £3,000, something like that.

0:28:540:29:02

Harness racing is known as trotting in a lot of circles.

0:29:020:29:07

Why is that? That's misleading.

0:29:070:29:10

I suppose because the original horses they used were trotters.

0:29:100:29:15

Since the 1900s, they started to breed what they call "pacers".

0:29:150:29:20

So tell me the difference between trotting and pacing.

0:29:200:29:23

Basically, your trotter is like your normal riding horse.

0:29:230:29:28

They have a diagonal gait like this.

0:29:280:29:31

Your pacer has a lateral gait, both legs are moving on the same side.

0:29:310:29:36

That looks really fun to watch.

0:29:360:29:39

It's very smooth.

0:29:390:29:41

It rolls from side-to-side.

0:29:410:29:44

'These lightweight plastic loops around the legs, called hobbles,

0:29:440:29:48

'encourage the horse to pace rather than trot.'

0:29:480:29:52

Merlin's been very good. He's quite patient. Sure-footed?

0:29:520:29:57

Can't wait to put him through his paces.

0:29:570:29:59

He should give you a nice go today.

0:29:590:30:01

The biggest thing that you'll find is the speed, really.

0:30:010:30:05

From an onlooker, it doesn't look so fast.

0:30:050:30:09

But when you're bumping around a track, it does seem...

0:30:090:30:13

There's going to be a lot of dust

0:30:130:30:16

flying in the eyes, grit in your mouth.

0:30:160:30:19

-Oh, yeah.

-It's all part of the fun.

0:30:190:30:22

Do you train these every day?

0:30:220:30:25

They jog half an hour to 45 minutes most days.

0:30:250:30:28

A couple of days a week they'll do fast work.

0:30:280:30:32

You're asking for a bit more to get the speed into them.

0:30:320:30:36

-A day off before the big event?

-They'll have an easy day before.

0:30:360:30:41

Bet he looks forward to the event.

0:30:450:30:47

-Loves it.

-Gets excited. They know when they're going in the box.

0:30:470:30:53

All they've got to see is the lorry coming into the yard and they know!

0:30:530:30:57

-Let me go!

-That's it.

-Have you won much with him?

0:30:570:31:01

-He won on Saturday!

-Did he?

-Yeah. He raced on Saturday and won.

0:31:010:31:05

-Shall we get up on the track?

-Yeah. That'll be fun.

0:31:050:31:09

I'm getting quite excited. There's going to be a lot of dust and dirt!

0:31:090:31:13

Where was this made, in America?

0:31:200:31:22

Yeah. This is American.

0:31:220:31:25

-This is incredible.

-Beautiful views!

0:31:280:31:31

-Shall I get on first?

-Let me get on first.

0:31:310:31:34

I'm going to come back covered...

0:31:340:31:37

Oh, I saw that.

0:31:370:31:39

-It's like a gentle swivel.

-Yeah.

0:31:390:31:41

-That wasn't too bad.

-OK?

-Yeah. I just hold on?

-Yeah. That's it.

0:31:440:31:48

There's a little handle. That's it.

0:31:480:31:51

-Do you lean back, lean into the bends?

-Lean back a little bit.

0:31:510:31:56

You'll find your balance as you're going.

0:31:560:31:58

-Can I have a go?

-Yeah. Now he's settled, you've got your balance.

0:32:070:32:12

-Has he got a soft mouth?

-He's very responsive to his mouth.

0:32:120:32:18

He'll do exactly what you tell him.

0:32:180:32:20

What's great about this sport is that women compete against men.

0:32:200:32:26

-The playing field is more level. Any age group can do it.

-It is. Yes.

0:32:260:32:31

It's down to driver's skill and the horse you've got.

0:32:310:32:35

The sulkies are made so that weight makes very little difference.

0:32:350:32:40

Good lad. Good boy.

0:32:400:32:44

This is absolutely fabulous.

0:32:440:32:46

-Sheer power!

-Good lad.

0:32:460:32:49

-PAUL LAUGHS

-Good boy, Merlin.

0:32:490:32:52

This is fantastic, just brilliant!

0:32:520:32:55

John, I'm going to hand the reins back to you.

0:32:550:33:00

You can take us round at near on race speed and I'll hang on.

0:33:000:33:05

-Yeah. You hang on tight!

-Here we go!

0:33:050:33:09

My whole body is vibrating. I can feel my watch vibrating off.

0:33:090:33:14

Literally.

0:33:140:33:16

John, that's marvellous.

0:33:220:33:25

Whoa.

0:33:250:33:27

-PAUL CHUCKLES

-Whoa.

0:33:270:33:30

I'm absolutely exhausted. That was so exhilarating.

0:33:300:33:35

Merlin, you are a wonderful horse. You were a wizard out there!

0:33:350:33:40

Needs a good drink.

0:33:400:33:42

That was exciting. You can feel the horsepower going through your veins, almost making my ribs tickle.

0:33:420:33:49

-I'll remember that for a long time. John, thank you so much.

-Pleasure.

0:33:490:33:54

I think you deserve a drink of water. Let's go.

0:33:540:33:58

-We'll get him a bath as well.

-Hose him down.

0:33:580:34:01

Welcome back to our valuation day at Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School.

0:34:110:34:16

There are hundreds of people here and lots more antiques to value.

0:34:160:34:21

Hopefully, some of these people will go to the auction.

0:34:210:34:25

If you want to take part, just come along to one of our valuation days.

0:34:250:34:30

Check details in your local press about up and coming dates,

0:34:300:34:35

or log on to our BBC website.

0:34:350:34:38

Hopefully, you'll find a town near you where we'll be coming.

0:34:400:34:46

We'd love to see you.

0:34:460:34:47

If you're coming along to a valuation day,

0:34:520:34:54

please, bring more furniture,

0:34:540:34:55

because all of our experts love talking about it.

0:34:550:34:58

Now, this is classic brown, what the trade do call brown shipping furniture.

0:34:580:35:03

It's 1930s. Unfortunately, most of it's made of plywood

0:35:030:35:07

which has been stained to look like mahogany.

0:35:070:35:10

-It's not worth a lot of money, you know.

-OK.

0:35:100:35:12

But I tell you something. Although it's only worth around 30 quid,

0:35:120:35:15

£20, an auctioneer might say, don't throw it away like most people do.

0:35:150:35:19

Use it, be practical with it, be funky with it.

0:35:190:35:22

You must be into art, OK? Get Dad to break up loads of Mum's old plates.

0:35:220:35:27

If you've got some bright coloured crockery that you don't want any more,

0:35:270:35:30

break it up with a hammer, lay all those broken mosaics on there.

0:35:300:35:33

Even put "Amy", your name, right across it. Just be creative with it.

0:35:330:35:36

Get Dad to grout it with some tile grout, and hey-ho, then you've got a table

0:35:360:35:40

that you can use in the garden or the conservatory to put teas and coffees on.

0:35:400:35:44

And paint the legs a bright, funky colour.

0:35:440:35:47

And I don't mind doing that kind of thing with sort of antiques

0:35:470:35:50

that aren't of any virtue, really.

0:35:500:35:53

Obviously, it's not a serious piece, otherwise you can't do things like that to it.

0:35:530:35:56

But just be creative with it.

0:35:560:35:58

-Yeah? Don't throw it away.

-OK.

0:35:580:36:00

And don't put it back up in the loft!

0:36:000:36:02

In the loft, no!

0:36:020:36:04

It's such a shame when items

0:36:040:36:06

are just hidden away and forgotten about.

0:36:060:36:08

Nigel, thank you for bringing this very promising-looking leather case.

0:36:090:36:14

The first thing you can tell is it's very good quality leather.

0:36:140:36:19

-I'm dying to see what's inside, so if I may...?

-Yeah.

0:36:190:36:23

-It is a bit stiff.

-Wow.

0:36:230:36:26

That's an interior! Let's unpack it.

0:36:260:36:29

We've got...

0:36:290:36:31

kettle...teapot.

0:36:310:36:35

We've got the little water jug. We delve in there...

0:36:350:36:39

Got a little caddy.

0:36:400:36:42

It goes on for ever.

0:36:420:36:44

-It does, actually.

-And we've got a little milk jug.

0:36:440:36:48

And we should, finally,

0:36:480:36:50

have the sugar bowl.

0:36:500:36:52

And this lovely surface to

0:36:520:36:54

mount it all on with a little stand.

0:36:540:36:56

The only thing I think we're lacking...

0:36:560:37:01

The burner, I think.

0:37:010:37:04

I didn't know whether that fitted.

0:37:040:37:07

-That aperture there would have been for the burner.

-Oh, I see.

0:37:070:37:12

Some little devil's played with that and that's gone missing.

0:37:120:37:17

-Have you got any idea when it was made or how old it is?

-It was my mother's. It was given to her.

0:37:170:37:24

She was a housekeeper for a family in Derby called Preston-Jones.

0:37:240:37:29

They used to go on a lot of cruises and used to take it with them.

0:37:290:37:34

Now you say that, we can make sense of the initials on the top.

0:37:340:37:39

EPJ for Preston Jones.

0:37:390:37:42

That's lovely to have history going to the original owner.

0:37:420:37:46

We've got the little retailer's name, Asprey,

0:37:460:37:50

which is a good name.

0:37:500:37:52

I know that the design of this set started many years earlier

0:37:520:37:58

and was produced, initially, by Hukin and Heath

0:37:580:38:04

to a design of Christopher Dresser.

0:38:040:38:06

It's Asprey thinking, "This is popular. We'll make our own version."

0:38:060:38:12

The Christopher Dresser originals are about 1875.

0:38:120:38:16

Basically, you've got a travelling picnic set in electroplate...

0:38:160:38:21

Sadly! Rather than silver.

0:38:210:38:24

..dating to around 1900, 1910.

0:38:240:38:27

It's just so compact and so useful.

0:38:270:38:30

Why have you decided to part with it?

0:38:300:38:33

Just cos I'd like to realise what the value of it is, I think.

0:38:330:38:38

Because the burner's missing,

0:38:380:38:41

let's be cautious.

0:38:410:38:42

-Let's say £120 to £200.

-Oh! Yeah.

-Put a fixed reserve of £100 on it.

0:38:420:38:48

Let's hope there are two

0:38:480:38:50

like-minded people at the auction.

0:38:500:38:53

Thanks very much.

0:38:530:38:55

'A nice bit of quality. It should do well.

0:38:550:38:58

'Sometimes on "Flog It!", things don't always go according to plan.'

0:38:580:39:02

Ready?

0:39:020:39:03

This is an anon... An anon... Oh.

0:39:030:39:06

I've never seen one so big before.

0:39:060:39:09

BOTH LAUGH

0:39:090:39:11

-I looked up, sorry.

-Let's do it again.

0:39:140:39:16

Beryl, thank you so much for talking me... Oh.

0:39:160:39:20

bbc.co.uk...

0:39:200:39:23

Three, two, one. I'm not applauding myself. I'm not delusional yet.

0:39:230:39:27

Stop it!

0:39:270:39:29

At the Royal Queen Elizabeth...

0:39:330:39:35

Ash Grove, whatever it is, football game.

0:39:350:39:37

LAUGHTER

0:39:370:39:39

Oh, dear, it's too near lunchtime.

0:39:390:39:42

Action!

0:39:420:39:43

The town comes out in force for the...

0:39:430:39:46

The town in Ashbourne, Derbyshire.

0:39:460:39:48

Oh, it's getting worse, isn't it?

0:39:480:39:51

I've waited a long time to meet you.

0:39:510:39:52

I have to just watch you on the television.

0:39:520:39:55

-Cut!

-OK, let's do that again.

0:39:550:39:58

'Adrian's brought in something very unusual.

0:40:010:40:04

'We don't see many of these!'

0:40:040:40:08

You haven't been walking round with this under your arm?

0:40:080:40:11

-No.

-You came in the car, not on the bike!

-Yeah.

0:40:110:40:15

Good work. When I first saw it, it didn't really grab me.

0:40:150:40:19

When I had a closer look,

0:40:190:40:22

these panels are all hand-decorated.

0:40:220:40:26

It looks like pen and ink. Have you inherited it?

0:40:260:40:31

-It's what Mum left.

-Your mother?

-Yeah.

0:40:310:40:34

-It's not something you want to put into your home?

-No.

0:40:340:40:38

It's just stored in the loft.

0:40:380:40:41

Well, this is what we would call a decorator's piece.

0:40:410:40:46

It's not the most decorative one in the world,

0:40:460:40:50

ie being highly coloured.

0:40:500:40:52

You see those Victorian ones which are decoupage, brightly coloured.

0:40:520:40:58

This one is more understated

0:40:580:41:00

but the more you look at it, the quirkier it becomes.

0:41:000:41:05

It's going to date from late 19th century.

0:41:050:41:08

It's almost Aesthetic Movement, with this ebonised frame.

0:41:080:41:13

Sometimes, you see it with gilt highlights within the frame.

0:41:130:41:19

-Yeah.

-The upper half reminds me very much of Japanese wood block prints,

0:41:190:41:24

late 19th century, that were looked at by Impressionist artists,

0:41:240:41:29

van Gogh, that sort of artist,

0:41:290:41:31

artists who were being inspired by the Far East and wood block prints.

0:41:310:41:37

But if you look at the bottom half, it couldn't be more different.

0:41:370:41:42

You've got here, a chap,

0:41:420:41:44

who's bludgeoning a fox

0:41:440:41:47

while his hounds pounce.

0:41:470:41:49

Not everyone's cup of tea -

0:41:490:41:51

shooting, fox hunting, fishing - but there is a market for it.

0:41:510:41:55

I have seen them do very well, if they're not so "controversial".

0:41:550:42:02

Let's pitch this sensibly, put this in at the £100 mark, 100 to 150.

0:42:020:42:07

I think you'll have to sweeten the buyers with a low estimate,

0:42:070:42:12

unless we have a couple of hunting aficionados in the crowd.

0:42:120:42:17

-Do you want to take it home if it doesn't get away?

-No. I'd sooner see what it fetches.

-Right. OK.

0:42:170:42:24

-I like your approach. Let it find its level.

-Yeah.

0:42:240:42:27

-100 to 150 estimate, but no reserve.

-Yeah. Take a gamble.

0:42:270:42:31

'That might be wise, with the subject matter.

0:42:310:42:35

'Let's look at the one that got away.'

0:42:350:42:38

Hi, Liz. You showed me this earlier.

0:42:380:42:41

It's an inlaid marble picture, pietra dura.

0:42:410:42:45

-You've had a valuation, I gather.

-Yes.

-Were you happy?

0:42:450:42:49

-I was quite surprised.

-What did you think this would have been worth?

0:42:490:42:53

-Between £800 and £1,000, perhaps.

-Perhaps.

0:42:530:42:57

What have our experts told you?

0:42:570:43:00

-Between 1,500 and 2,500.

-So that's good news.

-Very good news.

0:43:000:43:04

Now, are you going to sell it?

0:43:040:43:07

-Sadly, not at the present time.

-I don't blame you. That's quality.

0:43:090:43:14

That dates to about 1850. Has that been on the wall?

0:43:140:43:18

-It has.

-It's obviously going back on the wall.

-Yes.

0:43:180:43:21

-How did you come by it?

-It was part of a collection of my grandfather.

0:43:210:43:26

-It is a family heirloom.

-It is.

0:43:260:43:29

Not everybody sells their family heirlooms!

0:43:290:43:32

-Hang on to it. It's absolutely beautiful.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:320:43:35

'I would have hung onto it too.

0:43:350:43:37

'Michael has come across something he's pretty excited about.'

0:43:380:43:43

Brenda, it's not often I'm speechless

0:43:430:43:47

with a piece of pottery, but this is wonderful.

0:43:470:43:51

Where did you get this fine fellow from?

0:43:510:43:54

In 1989, we were left a farm and that was part of it, in the house.

0:43:540:44:00

-Just left in the farmhouse?

-Yes.

0:44:000:44:02

Were you delighted when you discovered it?

0:44:020:44:06

-Not really. No.

-What have you done with it since?

-Put it in a cupboard.

0:44:060:44:12

-From the abandoned farmhouse to the cupboard.

-Yes.

-That's appalling.

0:44:120:44:17

What we're looking at is a class of pottery

0:44:170:44:21

that developed from creamware.

0:44:210:44:23

Creamware came in about 1770.

0:44:230:44:27

It's a pottery body that's covered in a glaze to imitate porcelain.

0:44:270:44:32

It was widely produced in Staffordshire

0:44:320:44:35

and potteries further north.

0:44:350:44:38

It had a creamy tone to it

0:44:380:44:40

and to whiten things up

0:44:400:44:43

the glaze was "blued", and so we get the version on from that, pearlware.

0:44:430:44:49

If we tip this fellow over,

0:44:490:44:51

we've got that pooling of the blue glaze on the base.

0:44:510:44:55

This is a pearlware figure.

0:44:550:44:58

And it's a whopper!

0:44:580:45:00

I've seen, in my years, very many pearlware horses.

0:45:000:45:05

-They're very sought-after. This is the first cow I've seen.

-Oh!

0:45:050:45:10

Which makes it very unusual. We have got little bits of damage.

0:45:100:45:15

The horns are there. Normally, the horns go and the ears are left.

0:45:150:45:19

You've done it the other way round with this one!

0:45:190:45:23

I wouldn't date it much before 1820.

0:45:230:45:27

And not much after 1830, 1835.

0:45:270:45:31

It's a rare thing, a lovely thing, as well.

0:45:310:45:34

It really has taken my breath away to see it.

0:45:340:45:38

-Any idea of what it's worth?

-No. Not at all.

0:45:380:45:42

Have a guess.

0:45:420:45:45

-A hundred.

-£100.

-At the most.

0:45:450:45:48

I never have my chequebook on me when I should!

0:45:480:45:52

We will put this into auction

0:45:540:45:57

and we'll put £1,000 to £1,500 on it.

0:45:570:46:01

-And we'll put a fixed reserve of £1,000 on it.

-Oh.

0:46:010:46:05

I think that there will be three or four leading English pottery dealers

0:46:050:46:11

who would cut each other's throat to own this.

0:46:110:46:14

I think it's going to do exceptionally well.

0:46:140:46:19

-I might turn out to have been conservative. You're happy?

-Yes.

0:46:190:46:24

-Thank you so much for bringing it in.

-Thank you!

-Made my day. Made my year, Brenda.

-Thank you!

0:46:240:46:31

'I think we might have a little treat in store.

0:46:310:46:36

'I'm next with Keith, who's brought in something really interesting.'

0:46:360:46:40

-Keith, heads or tails?

-I don't know...

-I'll flip it. You catch it.

0:46:400:46:44

-Three pence.

-Three pence. Fancy having those in your pocket!

0:46:440:46:48

How did you come across this?

0:46:480:46:51

It was just passed on to me and the wife from a nursing matron

0:46:510:46:55

who was actually nursing in the First World War.

0:46:550:46:59

The wife nursed her till she died. It was just passed through to us.

0:46:590:47:03

It's been sitting in a tin in my wardrobe since I've had it.

0:47:030:47:08

-At least it's been safe.

-Yes.

-And you couldn't spend it.

-No.

0:47:080:47:12

I wouldn't want to carry it around in my pocket with the weight of it.

0:47:120:47:16

You could only spend these up until 1820.

0:47:160:47:19

They were out of circulation after that.

0:47:190:47:23

That's a workhouse in Birmingham on the site of where the police station is now.

0:47:230:47:28

So it's been pulled down, like many of the workhouses.

0:47:280:47:31

Yes. The Gilbert's Act came in in 1782 and it enabled all the parishes

0:47:310:47:36

to club together to form a Poor Law Union.

0:47:360:47:39

-Yeah.

-Where they could build workhouses. This one was built in Birmingham two years later in 1784.

0:47:390:47:45

-At the time, there was a shortage of coins, so these were made to pay the workers.

-Yes.

0:47:450:47:50

These were redeemable in certain shops around the area.

0:47:500:47:54

You could spend this token on anything except for alcohol.

0:47:540:47:58

-I see.

-So it encouraged the workers to stay sober.

0:47:580:48:01

-That way, they always got it returned to them because it was no good to anyone else.

-Absolutely.

0:48:010:48:08

These were made right up until 1817.

0:48:080:48:10

They were being used up to 1817, 1820, then taken out of circulation.

0:48:100:48:15

-Have you thought what it's worth, have you done any research?

-No, no.

0:48:150:48:21

I think if it wanted to go into someone's hands who could appreciate it more

0:48:210:48:27

than being stuck in my tin in a wardrobe, I'd like them to have it.

0:48:270:48:31

-What else is in this tin?

-Oh, many things.

0:48:310:48:35

Many kinds of coins and things, but I think this is the oldest.

0:48:350:48:39

Well, in 1813, this coin was worth three pence.

0:48:390:48:43

I think today, if we put it into auction, fingers crossed, £40.

0:48:430:48:48

But let's put it in with a valuation of 20 to 40. It's had a bit of damage.

0:48:480:48:53

It's been dropped. Around the edge, you can see that.

0:48:530:48:57

But the image is very clear, so that's good. It's a nice piece of social history.

0:48:570:49:02

It's a good connection to the past.

0:49:020:49:05

'There's just enough time to have a look at what our experts picked out to take to auction.

0:49:060:49:11

'I can see people being taken up by the romance of Nigel's picnic set

0:49:110:49:17

'from the turn of the last century.

0:49:170:49:21

'The late 19th-century screen is hand-decorated.

0:49:210:49:25

'However, the hunting scene might not be to everybody's taste.

0:49:250:49:31

'I love history, so Keith's three pence coin caught my attention.

0:49:310:49:35

'I hope I'm not alone.

0:49:350:49:37

'And all I can say about the pearlware cow

0:49:390:49:41

'is if Michael is THAT excited, it's definitely the one to watch.'

0:49:410:49:45

'It's Nigel's monogrammed picnic set first. Let's see how it does.'

0:49:520:49:56

-Good luck, Nigel.

-Thank you.

0:49:560:49:58

-All we need is somebody in this room with the initials of PJ.

-Be ideal.

0:49:580:50:04

-There's a bit of history, and people use these.

-You want to play with it.

0:50:040:50:09

You want to take it all out, look at it, put it all back in...

0:50:090:50:13

I just thought of somebody who might buy it. The guy from the Dragons' Den, Peter Jones.

0:50:130:50:20

-He could afford it. Anyway, let's see what the bidders think here in Derbyshire.

-Thank you.

0:50:200:50:27

Very, very fine picnic set. Even better because it's Asprey.

0:50:270:50:33

There we are. I will start this at £150...

0:50:330:50:37

-Ooh. Good start.

-..Do I see 160 in the room?

0:50:370:50:42

150. Do I see 160? 180.

0:50:420:50:45

200? 220. 250..?

0:50:450:50:48

That's more like it.

0:50:480:50:50

..320. 350? 380. 400...

0:50:500:50:55

This is keen bidding. This is really keen bidding.

0:50:550:50:59

..£500. It's my under-bid at 500...

0:50:590:51:02

I wonder if it's Asprey's on the phone buying it for stock!

0:51:020:51:07

..At £500. £500. 520.

0:51:070:51:12

550. Out.

0:51:120:51:14

And out. At 550, all done. We say sale at £550.

0:51:140:51:19

We certainly turned up the heat there. £550!

0:51:190:51:22

-Without the burner!

-Brilliant!

0:51:220:51:25

Thank you so much for bringing that in. That was something from the golden years of travel.

0:51:250:51:31

I'll be looking for one with a burner!

0:51:310:51:35

'It sold for over £500, which means the commission drops to 10%.

0:51:350:51:40

'Now for that late Victorian screen.'

0:51:400:51:43

It's hand-painted, wood block, Japanese influence, and it belongs to Adrian.

0:51:430:51:49

Unfortunately, Adrian can't be with us today. I like this a lot.

0:51:490:51:54

-A lot of work's gone into this.

-That's what caught my eye.

0:51:540:51:58

You think there's not much about it,

0:51:580:52:00

but on closer inspection, all the decoration is hand-painted.

0:52:000:52:04

Late Victorian ebonised three-fold dressing screen

0:52:070:52:10

with hunting rural scenes...

0:52:100:52:12

Nice broad panels. Typical of the period.

0:52:120:52:16

..£50, £60. Five. 70.

0:52:160:52:20

Five. 80. I've got 90.

0:52:200:52:22

-Five. And I'm out...

-Near the bottom figure.

0:52:220:52:26

-Be nice to get a round 100.

-You're in, sir.

0:52:260:52:31

£95. Come on. One more, do I see? Fair warning. All done.

0:52:310:52:35

-I'll get on the phone to Adrian.

-Yeah.

0:52:360:52:40

'I think he'll be pleased with that.'

0:52:400:52:42

-I think the story is more important than the value.

-Exactly.

0:52:460:52:50

I relate it to my days in the '30s when I was at school and what you could get for three pence then.

0:52:500:52:57

-I'll just give you one instance.

-Go on, then.

0:52:570:53:00

You could get a fish from the fish shop for tuppence.

0:53:000:53:03

For a pound, that was 120 fish.

0:53:030:53:06

-Now we're going back another 115, 120 years.

-Yes.

0:53:060:53:12

-So what could you get for three pence in those days?

-It's a long way back, isn't it?

0:53:120:53:17

Keith, let's find out what value it's going for today. This is it.

0:53:170:53:22

Copper too, it came from a Birmingham workhouse.

0:53:230:53:27

£18 I'm bid. Do I see £20 for it?

0:53:270:53:31

18. 20, ma'am. 2. 24. I'm out.

0:53:310:53:35

26. 28. 30. 2?

0:53:350:53:38

One more. Are you sure?

0:53:380:53:40

2, thank you. 35.

0:53:400:53:43

-A little better than we were saying, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:53:430:53:47

..£35. Yes, we are. All done.

0:53:470:53:49

-Sold in the room, £35.

-You was pretty good at that

0:53:490:53:53

-because you said between 20 and 40.

-I did.

0:53:530:53:56

-What are you going to treat yourself to now? A quick drink in the hotel here?

-I will tell you one thing.

0:53:560:54:02

-Have a gin and tonic.

-It's my diamond wedding next month.

-Is the wife here?

-Yes.

0:54:020:54:08

I've got my eye on a diamond ring and it's a real sparkler.

0:54:080:54:12

'Well, that was worthwhile then.

0:54:120:54:14

'Our next lot is the pearlware cow,

0:54:140:54:16

'which Brenda found in an inherited farmhouse.

0:54:160:54:20

'Let's look what Charles had to say about it earlier.'

0:54:200:54:26

This has got to be the largest piece of pearlware

0:54:260:54:30

I've seen on the show in nine years.

0:54:300:54:32

-Yeah.

-It's wonderful, isn't it?

-It's glazed very well. It's huge.

0:54:320:54:37

-We've got £1,000 to £1,500.

-Yes.

0:54:370:54:41

-For 1820s pearlware.

-Yeah. I had a phone call from Brenda.

0:54:410:54:45

Brenda said, "Charles, sell it. You get what it's worth."

0:54:450:54:49

I think we'll probably... If we get up towards £600, we'll let it go.

0:54:490:54:54

-She was happy to have no reserve?

-Absolutely.

-That's a dangerous game.

0:54:540:54:58

-You don't want to sell this, as an auctioneer, for £25.

-No.

0:54:580:55:02

-You're not going to earn any money.

-We feel it's worth 1,000 to 1,500.

0:55:020:55:07

-If it only got to £100, it wouldn't go because it makes us look...

-Not so good.

0:55:070:55:13

-Exactly.

-So you're going to say there's a fixed reserve of £600,

0:55:130:55:18

-or it's going back to Brenda and you'll try on another day.

-Indeed.

0:55:180:55:23

-It is worth £1,000 - we hope!

-Absolutely.

0:55:230:55:26

My gut feeling is this was made for a butcher's shop as advertisement.

0:55:260:55:31

-That's a good thought.

-That's not a domestic piece.

0:55:310:55:34

-Who's got a mantelpiece big enough?

-No-one.

-That's a butcher's shop.

0:55:340:55:39

'Auctioneer David Greatwood is taking this sale.'

0:55:460:55:50

Unfortunately, Brenda isn't here. She's on holiday in Blackpool.

0:55:500:55:54

We do have her husband, Gordon. You must have seen this all your life.

0:55:540:55:59

Yes. It's been in the farmhouse as long as I can remember.

0:55:590:56:04

It's the largest model of a cow I've ever seen. You see cow creamers make £300, £400, £500 this big.

0:56:040:56:11

-That's a whopper.

-We could be in for a real surprise.

0:56:110:56:16

-You ready for this, Gordon?

-Yes.

-It's going under the hammer right now.

0:56:160:56:21

Pearlware model of a cow. A very fine specimen. Rare.

0:56:240:56:28

-Commissions. I'm opening at £380...

-Oh, dear. That's really low.

0:56:280:56:33

-..500. And 20...

-'We have hit £500.

0:56:330:56:37

'So it's the lower commission of 10%.'

0:56:370:56:39

-..550...

-Climbing steadily.

0:56:390:56:42

..650. New place. 680.

0:56:420:56:46

700. And 20. 750.

0:56:460:56:49

-780...

-Come on!

0:56:490:56:51

..850. 880.

0:56:510:56:54

-900...

-There are collectors in the room.

0:56:540:56:57

..950. 980.

0:56:570:57:00

1,000. And 50.

0:57:000:57:03

1,200. And 50.

0:57:030:57:05

1,300. And 50.

0:57:050:57:08

1,400. And 50...

0:57:080:57:10

-Isn't this exciting?

-Yes. They like it very well.

0:57:100:57:15

..1,800. 1,900.

0:57:150:57:18

2,000. 2,100. 2,200.

0:57:180:57:22

2,300. 2,400.

0:57:220:57:25

2,500...

0:57:250:57:27

-CHUCKLES

-It deserves to make this.

0:57:270:57:31

In the room, now, at 2,500.

0:57:310:57:34

-£2,500...

-BANGS GAVEL

0:57:340:57:36

The hammer's gone down. Gordon, well done!

0:57:360:57:41

Thank Brenda for bringing that in. Cheer her up in Blackpool!

0:57:410:57:45

-How come you're not with her?

-We're farmers.

-You can't leave.

0:57:450:57:50

-I'll give her a ring.

-She might go on a spending spree in Blackpool!

0:57:500:57:56

What a wonderful way to end the show. I hope Brenda's over the moon.

0:57:560:58:02

Join us for many more surprises, because you never know what's going to happen in an auction room.

0:58:020:58:08

For now, until then, it's goodbye.

0:58:080:58:11

In Ashbourne in Derbyshire, Paul Martin is joined by a team of antiques experts led by Will Axon and Michael Baggott. A pearlware cow and an Asprey and Co's picnic set bring some surprising auction results. Paul visits the Peak District to experience the thrills of harness racing.