Warwick Flog It!


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Warwick

A collection of unusual tribal items catches Thomas Plant's eye at Warwick Castle, while Anita gets nostalgic with an extensive postcard collection.


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A 14th century dungeon, several portcullises,

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not to mention a magnificent building

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with a dramatic grand hall, a pretty splendid location, you'd have to agree.

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Well, today the gorgeous, the splendid Warwick Castle is playing host to Flog It!

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It's not just this historic venue

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this massive crowd have turned up to see on this lovely summer's day,

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it's our experts - the gorgeous Anita Manning, Thomas Plant

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and myself, who will be doing all the valuing.

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We'll be dipping into these boxes, looking for the best items to take off to auction.

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Somebody here today is going home with a lot of money. Stay tuned and you'll find out,

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but right now, let's get on with the show, let's Flog It!

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And leading today's team of valuers in finding the treasures packed away in all the bags and boxes

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are today's experts, Anita Manning and Thomas Plant,

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who are already meeting the Flog It! fans.

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These are collectible now, AND you've kept them in good condition.

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-Did you pay a lot for it, 40 years ago?

-I can't remember, dear.

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'Coming up...'

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All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players.

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And the main players on the Flog It! stage are going absolutely animal-crackers.

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A menagerie of beasts.

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Thomas!

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'And they're getting hot under the collar.'

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Love's thermometer - and it's hot!

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And I take a sneaky peek behind the scenes of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

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I bet one or two antiques have slipped through the net.

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It's time to get on with the show, get everybody inside the courtyard

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so they can ask that all-important question...

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ALL: What's it worth?

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Well, I think we are going to be in for a marvellous day here at Warwick Castle.

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The sun is shining, there are smiles on everybody's faces, everybody's now safely seated in the courtyard

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and it looks like Anita Manning is our first expert to the tables.

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Let's take a wee peek at what Anita is looking at.

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Penny's brought in a funky jug to show Anita.

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Penny, this is a delightful stoneware jug. Where did you get it?

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Well, I believe it belonged to my great-grandmother, my gran's mum.

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And that's about as much as I know about it.

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And does it belong to you?

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Well, my mum very kindly has given it to me so that I can raise money for the Cats Protection League,

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because I've just started fostering cats.

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So all funds will go to a good cause.

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-Yeah.

-OK, do you know anything about it?

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I know nothing about it.

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Well, it's a lovely piece of Royal Doulton.

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And we often associate Doulton with a porcelain body.

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This is a stoneware body,

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and they made this type of wares between about 1880 and 1910, 1915.

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And I like this slightly modern style of decoration.

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If we look at the back stamp,

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we can see the initials and the monogram for Frank A Butler.

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Now, he was one of Doulton's most prestigious decorators.

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He worked for them for over 40 years, over a long period of time,

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and this is certainly one of the decorators that the Doulton collectors will like.

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The shape is very pleasing, it's very sympathetic.

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The decoration is simple, it appeals to modern tastes.

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I would put an estimate

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on this jug of between £50 and £80.

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Penny, would you be happy to sell it at that price?

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Yes, I think that's fine. That buys a lot of cat litter.

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Well, I'm delighted at that, hopefully it'll do very well.

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-Brilliant.

-Feed a lot of kittens.

-Absolutely.

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Toy man Thomas has been overwhelmed by Terry's menagerie of animals.

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So, Terry,

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are these your toys?

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They are. I used to play with them quite a lot when I was small,

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way back in the '40s, as you can probably see by looking at them.

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I used to love setting them up and moving them around.

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I can remember wishing that they could move, actually.

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-Really?

-Yes. I did quite enjoy them.

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-We've got a sort of mixture of animals. A menagerie of beasts.

-Indeed.

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So, you've got two sets, you've got the domestic, farmyard,

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and then we've got the zoo, or the exotic, but by different makers,

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which is interesting. Most of these figures are marked on the base.

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Here we've got "Made in England" and we've got "Britains" -

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paint's a bit smudged, but "Britains Ltd" is on there.

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You can start the B there.

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But these ones here are marked John Hill and Co.

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He used to work for Britains, and obviously thought,

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"I can do this myself."

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His work is quite good, because this is premier-division,

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this is sort of what we'd call Manchester United

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of making figures. And then this is sort of probably a bit less,

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but going for the cup as well.

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Very nice collection, quite clean and good condition.

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Well done, you, for looking after them. I like the geese.

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When you go into a field of geese and they attack you like that,

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they put their little necks out and they hiss at you.

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I like these, actually, the little cygnets

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that go with the swan. Something different again.

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I mean, they're so tiny,

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-I'm amazed they're still there, actually.

-Absolutely.

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You know, if they are of any value to anyone, I would like them to go.

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Absolutely, we are not talking mega money.

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-No.

-As a collection, I think that

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we're looking at between £60 and £80.

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I would put the reserve at £50.

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That's fine - I'm very happy with that.

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-I look forward to seeing you at the auction.

-I look forward to it.

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Next up, Debra has brought along a stunning set of silver.

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Deborah, welcome to Flog It!

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And thank you so much

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for bringing this lovely little boxed set of salts along

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for us to look at.

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-Tell me, where did you get them?

-They were my aunt's.

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She very sadly died last year

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and it wasn't quite the right time to sell them straightaway.

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I don't have any use for them, because my table isn't that long!

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But they are beautiful and I shall be sad to see them go.

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These would have been used in grander times with grander tables

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and lots and lots of guests.

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You'd have had the long Victorian table

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and these little salt pots would have been distributed

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along the length of the table.

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What I like about this is the condition.

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The condition is absolutely wonderful.

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And the set is complete.

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If we pick up one and we look at it, we have embossed work,

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which is fresh,

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we have our hallmark

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and they are dated for 1883.

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It's a London hallmark, so it's quality.

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We have a quality piece of kit.

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If we look at the inside,

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we see that the interior has been gilded

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and, again, that's very fresh.

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-I doubt, Deborah, if these have ever been used.

-Mm.

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I doubt if they've ever been used.

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They're over 100 years old.

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And the other exciting thing

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is that we have all the little salt spoons matching,

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and they are all there.

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None missing at all.

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They are in this delightful box, the original box,

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this has kept them in good condition and fresh.

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-This is your wee girl here, isn't it?

-Yes, I'm Beth.

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Tell me what you think about these.

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I think they're gorgeous, it's a shame we can't have them

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in our house. We'd love to keep them, they're beautiful.

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They'll definitely be good

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for someone that wants to have a better use for them

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and can use them in their house.

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Uh-huh. OK - we can put them into auction.

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The estimate I would put on them would be £200-£300.

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I think they deserve surely 200,

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and they may go beyond that.

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Are you happy, Deborah, with that estimate

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-and would you be happy to sell them at that price?

-Yes.

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And, as usual, I'm scouring the queue

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to find something to catch my eye.

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Because art is so subjective,

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it's so arbitrary...

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what I like, you may not like.

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-You're wrong.

-I'm wrong.

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I thought it was Lalique.

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They self-lubricate all the time.

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Oh, well, moving on.

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-Can you play?

-No.

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-Hi, what's your name?

-Jo.

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Hi, Jo, you're very young to be into antiques.

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-Yes.

-Do you like antiques?

-No, I'm here for my mum.

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Do you know, I kind of guessed that!

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-So, what's your mum sent you out for?

-They're teapots, two teapots.

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Are they? And she wants to sell them?

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-Yes.

-Can I have a peep?

-Yes.

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Can I have a look?

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Oh, I know what they are, they're barge ware, aren't they?

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Have they got a teapot on the lid?

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I don't think so. That one hasn't.

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Let's have a look.

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Yes, they do, look at that.

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See? You didn't even know what you'd brought in, did you?

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You'd not even bothered looking, had you? Have you not seen this before?

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-I have in my grandad's house, that's where they're from.

-Oh, are they?

-Yes.

-And now they're your mother's?

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-Poppa passed away so we are trying to sell all the stuff in the house.

-Oh, I'm sorry to hear that.

-That's OK.

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-So, this really is your inheritance, really, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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-But Mum doesn't like them?

-No, they're not the prettiest of things, we don't think.

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But they are highly sought-after,

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especially the ones with a teapot on them, like that, look at that.

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Unfortunately there's a little bit of damage to the lid on this one,

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it has been extensively repaired just here and here.

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That will hold the collectors back.

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It's also had some restoration around the rim of the larger teapot.

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It is such a shame. Let's have a closer look anyway.

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It's known, really, as barge ware,

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because people that lived on narrowboats

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love to collect this kind of thing,

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it just goes with the whole image, it goes with the look.

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Let's have a look at the other one before I go on any further.

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-Are you a student?

-Yes, I'm at Exeter University.

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Are you, do you like it down in Exeter, the West Country?

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-I do, love it.

-Oh, this is nice.

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It doesn't have another teapot on the lid,

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but I'll tell you what it does have.

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That's what I was looking for - a date.

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It mentions here, "Florence Skirrow, God bless our home, 1910."

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Well, I think these are terrific

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and this one's even got its little saucer to sit on. Look at that.

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Isn't that great, its own coaster.

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I think they're lovely.

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I'd be inclined to put them in as two separate lots.

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-This one, we can definitely put £250 to £350 on as a valuation.

-OK.

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This one, the larger one, which is the more sought-after one,

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because it's got the teapot on a teapot,

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if I show you it and display it like this.

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I think it's absolutely divine,

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but unfortunately it's had some extensive renovation.

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I'd be inclined to put this into auction with a valuation of £180

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-to £250.

-OK.

-OK, with a reserve of £180.

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Will you make it to the auction room?

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-Definitely.

-Have you been to an auction before?

-No.

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Oh, boy, have you got some excitement to experience.

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Oh, I can't wait for it. See you there.

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Next up, Thomas is at the tables with Joanne and her coins.

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Tell me about them - how have you got hold of them?

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-I just got them off a well-known Internet auction site.

-Did you?

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-Yes, I did.

-Why did you buy them?

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I do like collecting coins, I collect lots of things

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and I've got lots of things all around the house,

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so they were just something that I collected.

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I mean, they're definitely commemorative medallions

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for the three Kings,

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which happened quite quickly in the 1930s.

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You've got George V and Queen Mary and the Silver Jubilee for 1935

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and then, obviously, in 1937,

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-Edward VIII became King.

-That's right.

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The reason we've got the description on the reverse is

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because he abdicated soon after.

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He wasn't quite interested in becoming King,

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-he'd rather marry his fiancee - girlfriend at the time.

-Yeah.

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We all know that story.

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Of course, we have George VI and Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother,

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who then came to the throne in 1937 -

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what a time to come to the throne - in two years, we were at war.

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What an interesting, amazing, if not extremely stressful time.

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So these are a nice group, a well-presented group.

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Because they are silver

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we can see that with the hallmarks.

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Did you pay a lot for them on this well-known Internet auction site?

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-I paid about £30.

-Did you? I think you've done rather well.

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-That's good!

-You might see a small profit of £10.

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-I think we can put them in at 40 to 60.

-Yeah.

-How does that grab you?

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-That's fine.

-I really think you could get a result there.

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I'm intrigued about you on the internet -

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are you always on the Internet buying things?

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-I am - my husband goes mad at me.

-Really?

-Yes, he does.

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-So have you ever been to a real, live auction?

-No.

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-So you're an auction virgin.

-Yes! It's much more exciting. Is it?

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Oh, yes! Much more exciting.

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-I'm really look forward to you having a great experience.

-Lovely, thank you.

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What can be more beautiful than a garden on a summer's day?

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And this one is right in the heart of England.

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Hidcote Manor in Gloucestershire is a charming, delightful house,

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it's so quintessentially English,

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but its real merits lie beyond these gates. Because, without doubt,

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it has one of the most outstanding gardens in England.

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It was created in the early part of the 20th century

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and it's the first-ever garden to be taken on

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for its horticultural merits by the National Trust back in 1948.

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The garden, which is Arts and Crafts in style,

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was the lifelong work of Lawrence Johnston.

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His mother, the formidable Gertrude Winthrop,

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a wealthy, twice-widowed American, bought Hidcote in 1907.

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It came with a hamlet of cottages, but no garden to speak of -

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just a collection of rose beds and a huge cedar of Lebanon.

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So, what is an Arts and Crafts style garden? Good question!

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It's the Edwardians turning their backs

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on what they considered to be Victorian conformity.

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Let's say rows and rows

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of regimented, gaudy bedding plants, which was all the rage at the time.

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Lawrence Johnston described Hidcote

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as "a wild garden within a formal setting".

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It was a romantic vision, an artistic vision,

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and he certainly got that right,

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with the use of old-fashioned flowers

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and traditional garden crafts such as topiary.

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That, with a combination of natural materials,

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like the stone I'm walking on,

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and wood, left in the round for all the arbours,

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created a cottage-like atmosphere,

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one that harked back to the preindustrial world.

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Lawrence was a man of 36 when they arrived here.

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He'd already been off to fight in the Boer War

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and had become a naturalised British citizen,

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in love with his adopted English Heritage.

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In the seven years he and his mother lived here

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before the start of the First World War,

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most of the garden was close to the house.

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It took many years for it to grow to its current size,

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spreading slowly out into the surrounding countryside.

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This is his starting point.

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The garden is divided up into rooms which extend out from the house.

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This is key to the Arts and Crafts idea.

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Many gardens are divided up with walls,

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but here, they're divided with beautiful box and yew wood hedges.

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This area is now known as The White Garden,

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and when you look around and take it all in, it's absolutely stunning.

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It's subtle, it's clever,

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and I wasn't surprised to find out that Lawrence was a keen painter.

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It shows the eye of a true artist - just look at it!

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And another great thing

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about having different themed rooms within the garden

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is there's many inviting doorways for you to walk through.

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There are 28 garden rooms here at Hidcote.

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The closer they are to the house, the more formal they are,

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and then gradually, the further away they get,

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they start giving way to nature and wilderness.

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It's a highly creative, personal statement.

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The great thing is, it's all on a wonderfully human scale.

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Walking around the garden, Lawrence constantly surprises.

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Some rooms are bursting full of plants,

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others are left quite sparse,

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and it's these contrasts that make it so incredibly exciting.

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Gardens like this just don't happen overnight.

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Lawrence worked on the design for well over 23 years

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and he created this room, the one I'm in now,

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upon his return from fighting in the First World War.

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Nobody knows for sure why there are 22 English yew pillars here.

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Maybe it's no coincidence that there were 22 fellow officers

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in his regiment.

0:19:180:19:20

And in total contrast, you've got the Rose Walk.

0:19:350:19:38

This is absolutely stunning.

0:19:380:19:40

In fact, it's breathtaking,

0:19:400:19:41

especially on a gorgeous day like this.

0:19:410:19:43

Looking at these wonderful, deep beds,

0:19:430:19:45

you can see splashes of colour everywhere.

0:19:450:19:48

That's the eye of an artist.

0:19:480:19:49

It's like his palette board,

0:19:490:19:51

but it's also the eye of a very keen plantsman.

0:19:510:19:54

Many of the examples you see here

0:19:540:19:56

Lawrence gathered on his plant-hunting trips

0:19:560:19:59

to far-flung places such as South Africa, China and Turkey.

0:19:590:20:03

It was for this, and his contribution to horticulture,

0:20:100:20:14

that in 1947 he was given the highest accolade

0:20:140:20:16

of the Royal Horticultural Society -

0:20:160:20:19

a gold Veitch Memorial Medal.

0:20:190:20:20

Not only had he introduced many new plants,

0:20:230:20:26

but he'd created one of the most influential gardens of his time.

0:20:260:20:30

Well, here we have it - this rock bank is a reconstruction

0:20:330:20:35

of what Lawrence would have come across

0:20:350:20:37

on one of his plant-hunting expeditions

0:20:370:20:39

and I absolutely love this part of the garden.

0:20:390:20:41

Because, here, it blends in effortlessly

0:20:410:20:44

with the Gloucestershire countryside.

0:20:440:20:46

A classic end to an Arts and Crafts garden.

0:20:460:20:48

Well, we are now halfway through our day,

0:20:560:20:58

so it's time to up the tempo.

0:20:580:21:00

This is my favourite part of the programme.

0:21:000:21:02

Anything can happen in a sale room.

0:21:020:21:04

You've heard what our experts have had to say,

0:21:040:21:06

you've probably got your own opinions,

0:21:060:21:08

and so have this big crowd here.

0:21:080:21:10

We are halfway through the day, you know what that means. Where are we going?

0:21:100:21:13

ALL: Off to auction!

0:21:130:21:15

Let's do it.

0:21:150:21:16

So, we're selling Penny's Royal Doulton jug with the added bonus of a renowned decorator's back stamp.

0:21:180:21:24

It's animal magic with Terry's lot of toys from the farm and from the jungle.

0:21:260:21:30

Joanne's silver medallions, which she bought off the internet.

0:21:310:21:35

And Deborah's barely used silver salt-pot set.

0:21:350:21:39

And it's teapot time with Jo and the two lovely barge ware examples,

0:21:390:21:43

but will the restoration just put the bidders off?

0:21:430:21:46

Well, you've just seen the items

0:21:490:21:51

our experts have picked out at the valuation day.

0:21:510:21:53

I think there could be one or two surprises there.

0:21:530:21:55

And this is where we're putting those valuations to the test.

0:21:550:21:58

This very building - Bigwood Auctioneers and Valuers

0:21:580:22:00

in Stratford-upon-Avon.

0:22:000:22:02

Let's go inside and catch up with our owners,

0:22:020:22:04

because I know they're feeling really nervous right now.

0:22:040:22:07

The auction room is looking busy, which is always a good sign,

0:22:070:22:10

and we have two auctioneers selling our lots today - Stephen Kay,

0:22:100:22:13

and Christopher Ironmonger is first on the rostrum,

0:22:130:22:16

and he'll be selling Joanne's medallions.

0:22:160:22:19

Daughter Jodie has joined her for their first-ever auction experience.

0:22:190:22:23

It's good to catch up with you both, Joanna and Jodie.

0:22:230:22:27

You look fabulous, by the way. I love all of this!

0:22:270:22:30

-You're testing the market for the first time, aren't you?

-That's right.

0:22:300:22:33

Because you've got these commemoratives coins

0:22:330:22:36

in auction not so long ago,

0:22:360:22:38

and now you're going to sell them and see if you can make a profit.

0:22:380:22:41

-Yes, it's a tall order.

-It is, isn't it?

0:22:410:22:44

-We'll have to wait and see what happens.

-Hopefully!

0:22:440:22:48

-Were you happy with the valuation Thomas gave you?

-Yes, I was.

0:22:480:22:50

-What did you pay for them, with commission?

-It was about £30.

0:22:500:22:54

So you need to make above that to make this work.

0:22:540:22:58

The George VI silver medallions

0:23:000:23:02

-and I can start the bidding at 40 on my book, at 45.

-Straight in.

0:23:020:23:06

At £40, I'm going to sell them here, 40, if you want, five.

0:23:060:23:09

At £40, I thought we'd do better than this. £40, are we done?

0:23:090:23:13

Do you want five? 45. I've got 50. Five, madam?

0:23:130:23:16

-55. I've got 60, now. Five? 60 with me at 60, all done at 60.

-£60.

0:23:160:23:20

The hammer's gone down. That's good.

0:23:200:23:22

-Yes, that's lovely.

-You just need to do that about 20 times!

0:23:220:23:26

-Then you're in the money, definitely!

-That's brilliant.

0:23:260:23:29

Auctioneer Stephen Kay is on the podium to sell the teapots,

0:23:290:23:33

and mum Anna has joined Jo to see how they do.

0:23:330:23:36

Joanna is standing right next to me with mum Anna.

0:23:380:23:41

You didn't know, did you, that Joanna got picked to be on TV?

0:23:410:23:45

-No.

-So, you went home and obviously said to Mum, "The teapots have gone." What was your reaction?

0:23:450:23:51

It was just nice to think they were of some interest to somebody,

0:23:510:23:54

they've sat on the windowsill for a long time.

0:23:540:23:56

The auctioneer has had a chat with you and reduced the estimate, not the estimate,

0:23:560:24:00

he hasn't reduced it, it's still printed in the catalogue,

0:24:000:24:03

but he's reduced the reserve, he's taken the reserve right down.

0:24:030:24:06

-So, you're happy with that.

-Yeah.

0:24:060:24:07

-Yeah.

-Well, fingers crossed, anyway.

0:24:070:24:10

Hopefully Mum will treat you, buy you a pair of shoes or something.

0:24:100:24:14

I don't think we'll get the money!

0:24:140:24:16

Oh, please, maybe I have over-quoted.

0:24:160:24:18

I don't know, but I particularly love them, I love barge ware and I love that treacle glaze.

0:24:180:24:22

I think they're great. A good bit of social history.

0:24:220:24:25

That first lot I really like, Florence Skirrow, that should do well. I'll be shocked if it doesn't.

0:24:250:24:30

And it's going under the hammer right now.

0:24:300:24:32

The barge-ware teapot with the matching stand.

0:24:330:24:37

I've not got any bids, would somebody like to start me at £30...

0:24:390:24:44

30 I've got... I'll take two from anybody else. 32. 35.

0:24:440:24:47

37. At 35, I've got here.

0:24:470:24:50

37, 40...and five.

0:24:500:24:51

50...and five. And 60.

0:24:510:24:55

And five. And 70...and five.

0:24:550:24:58

and 80 and five...

0:24:580:24:59

No? Nobody interested? 80 I've got here, I'll take five...

0:24:590:25:04

Come on - a bit more.

0:25:040:25:05

All done at £80.

0:25:050:25:08

Well, it's gone - it's better than £35, isn't it?

0:25:080:25:12

OK, here's the next one.

0:25:120:25:14

Another barge-ware teapot.

0:25:150:25:19

How about £30 for this?

0:25:190:25:21

30, I've got. 32. 35. 37.

0:25:210:25:25

At 35, I've got here. 37. 40.

0:25:260:25:29

and five, and 50, and five...

0:25:290:25:31

and 60, and five.

0:25:310:25:34

And 70. 65 seated, anyone else?

0:25:340:25:38

No?

0:25:380:25:40

All done at 65.

0:25:400:25:42

It's gone £65, are you happy?

0:25:420:25:44

-Yes, yes.

-That is a pair of shoes, isn't it?

0:25:440:25:48

-Not for Joanna.

-Oh, isn't it?

0:25:480:25:50

-Has she got expensive tastes?

-She's got very expensive taste!

0:25:500:25:54

We'll have to find some more beautiful gems to bring in.

0:25:540:25:57

It's a shame the teapots didn't do better,

0:25:570:26:00

but that damage - well, it just must have put some people off.

0:26:000:26:03

Now, let's see how Deborah and Beth's silver fares.

0:26:030:26:06

-Now, the money is going towards a holiday.

-Yes, it is.

0:26:060:26:09

Do we know where the holiday is? Have you talked about it yet?

0:26:090:26:12

Yes, we booked it very last-minute this week,

0:26:120:26:14

-we're going to Menorca on Sunday.

-Just the two of you?

0:26:140:26:18

No, my mother and sister Lucinda, as well.

0:26:180:26:21

And this is all in memory of Auntie...?

0:26:210:26:23

-Auntie Jean, yes. My father's twin sister who sadly died last year.

-OK.

0:26:230:26:28

Well, fingers crossed.

0:26:280:26:30

You look like you don't need a lot of sunshine,

0:26:300:26:32

your complexions are beautiful!

0:26:320:26:34

-Thank you!

-Here we go, it's going under the hammer now.

0:26:340:26:36

That lovely boxed cruet, 1883.

0:26:380:26:41

Showing here.

0:26:410:26:42

I haven't got any bids to start me, but somebody start me at £100.

0:26:420:26:46

100 I've got. 110. 120? 130.

0:26:460:26:49

140. 150. 160.

0:26:490:26:51

170. 180.

0:26:510:26:54

190. 200.

0:26:540:26:56

190 I've got, anybody else?

0:26:560:26:59

Are we all done at £190?

0:26:590:27:01

210. 200 I have in the aisle.

0:27:010:27:04

Anybody give me 210?

0:27:040:27:06

At £200, are we all done?

0:27:060:27:08

It's gone. Gosh, the hammer went down really quickly -

0:27:080:27:11

"all done", boom!

0:27:110:27:13

-Excellent, excellent.

-Happy, everybody?

-Yes, thank you.

0:27:130:27:17

-Enjoy the holiday, won't you?

-Thank you very much.

0:27:170:27:20

Onwards and upwards, let's turn our attention to Terry's herd of animals.

0:27:210:27:26

And going under the hammer right now we've got a wonderful collection of animals belonging to Terry,

0:27:260:27:31

with a valuation of £60 to £80.

0:27:310:27:33

-Happy with that, weren't you?

-I am very happy with it.

0:27:330:27:36

Well played-with, lots of memories.

0:27:360:27:37

-Indeed they are.

-I've got to say, I admire you, because you've hung on to them for such a long time.

0:27:370:27:42

Well, I have to say it was my mother who hung on to them,

0:27:420:27:45

they were up in her attic, actually.

0:27:450:27:47

My mum's done that to some of my toys. Whenever I go down and visit her, I see my toys dotted about.

0:27:470:27:52

-I try and go back with them because I want to have those, but she won't let me have them.

-I have none left.

0:27:520:27:57

-Oh, Thomas.

-Is it like a stab?

0:27:570:28:00

No, I do I have one, I have a robot.

0:28:000:28:02

And do you know what, Thomas has his own auction room specialising in toy sales.

0:28:020:28:07

Yeah, but I'm an auctioneer and a toy expert.

0:28:070:28:10

So, you like to sell everything and get rid of everything.

0:28:100:28:13

I take the mantra from my grandmother -

0:28:130:28:17

if you haven't looked at it in a year, move it on.

0:28:170:28:21

You came to the right man for the valuation, because Thomas thinks they will do quite well.

0:28:210:28:26

I hope he's right, because I tell you,

0:28:260:28:28

my wife does not want them back.

0:28:280:28:30

Thomas, we are putting Tommy under pressure. Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:28:300:28:34

It's going under the hammer now.

0:28:340:28:36

The assortment of Britains and other farm animals, figures,

0:28:370:28:41

die-cast, all unboxed but, nevertheless,

0:28:410:28:43

very collectable indeed, these figures there, very interesting.

0:28:430:28:47

Who's got 50 for these, the Britains, lead animals, etc?

0:28:470:28:50

Come on, they ought to be 50... 30 I'm bid, all right. 35...

0:28:520:28:56

40. 45. 50. 55. 60. 65.

0:28:560:29:00

60 standing here, and I'm going to sell it.

0:29:000:29:03

£60, the bid's here at 60. Do I hear 5...?

0:29:030:29:06

All sure, at £60.

0:29:060:29:09

Sold, £60.

0:29:100:29:12

Done.

0:29:120:29:13

Job done.

0:29:130:29:15

Really pleased with that.

0:29:150:29:17

-The wife will be pleased.

-Yes, she will, actually.

0:29:170:29:19

You can treat her with a meal, can't you?

0:29:190:29:22

-Yes, I suppose so.

-Just, with the money after commission.

0:29:220:29:25

Celebrate.

0:29:250:29:27

I hope those toys end up getting played with in their new home.

0:29:270:29:31

The Royal Doulton jug is under the hammer now and Penny's waiting in the wings to find out the result.

0:29:310:29:36

If you like salt glaze, you will love this next lot.

0:29:390:29:41

It's an early bit of Royal Doulton, late Victorian. It belongs to Penny,

0:29:410:29:45

who's just joined me. I love what you're wearing.

0:29:450:29:47

-Thank you, I made it.

-Did you make it, really?

-I did.

0:29:470:29:50

-What do you do for a living, then? You obviously make clothes.

-No, I don't, no, I'm a librarian.

0:29:500:29:55

Really? Could be the new Stella McCartney. Here we go.

0:29:550:29:59

The Frank Butler stoneware carafe.

0:30:010:30:04

Interesting piece, very pretty.

0:30:040:30:06

I have a number of bids here on the book and I can start at £100...

0:30:090:30:12

Oh, yes.

0:30:120:30:14

-Yes, straight in.

-I have 100. 110

0:30:140:30:17

and I'm out. Anybody give me 120?

0:30:170:30:19

I have 110 with the gentleman standing, anyone else?

0:30:190:30:23

No?

0:30:230:30:25

All done at £110.

0:30:250:30:27

It's gone down, in and out, straightaway.

0:30:270:30:30

-Blink and you'll miss that one.

-Good result.

0:30:300:30:32

That was, because it was as you said, it was "a wee bit cheap".

0:30:320:30:37

It was a very good result.

0:30:370:30:39

-Are you happy?

-Yes!

0:30:390:30:42

Well, our first items have sold,

0:30:430:30:45

but come with me to discover some more magic

0:30:450:30:48

happening elsewhere in Stratford.

0:30:480:30:50

All the world's a stage and all the men and women merely players.

0:31:220:31:26

Well, when it comes to the Royal Shakespeare Company,

0:31:260:31:29

they take their stage preparations very seriously indeed.

0:31:290:31:32

They create whole new worlds for their audiences to enjoy,

0:31:320:31:35

in all of their sensational theatres,

0:31:350:31:37

just like this one here at Stratford-upon-Avon.

0:31:370:31:40

But if it's anything like television,

0:31:400:31:42

it's not all glamour -

0:31:420:31:43

there's a lot of hard work that goes on behind the scenes.

0:31:430:31:47

Just outside the bustling town of Stratford-upon-Avon

0:31:470:31:52

lies one of the entertainment industry's best-kept secrets,

0:31:520:31:55

the RSC's warehouse.

0:31:550:31:58

Preparation for a new play at one of the company's theatres

0:31:580:32:02

can start up to one year in advance,

0:32:020:32:04

often while other performances are still going on.

0:32:040:32:06

And it all starts here, in this room,

0:32:060:32:09

with a meeting between the designer and the director.

0:32:090:32:13

Discussions lead to a scaled-down architectural model,

0:32:130:32:17

just like this one here,

0:32:170:32:18

which was made for a production of Anthony and Cleopatra.

0:32:180:32:22

This is the first link in the design chain.

0:32:220:32:25

From here it goes on to the scenic workshop.

0:32:250:32:28

There's a new challenge happening right now,

0:32:310:32:33

because the plays at Stratford have a thrust stage.

0:32:330:32:36

This means part of the stage

0:32:360:32:37

actually projects right out into the audience,

0:32:370:32:39

so they can get a three-dimensional experience from the whole thing.

0:32:390:32:43

It is very exciting, so there's lots of technical challenges.

0:32:430:32:47

Not only do they have to construct the set so it looks absolutely fabulous and realistic,

0:32:470:32:52

but also it has to be made in a way where it can be broken down really quickly

0:32:520:32:56

to take to other theatres around the country.

0:32:560:32:58

With over 5,000 square metres of space,

0:33:030:33:06

the warehouse is where the director's imagination

0:33:060:33:10

and vision of a performance starts to come alive.

0:33:100:33:14

The painters often have an artistic background and work with all manner of techniques and materials.

0:33:140:33:20

I'd love to work here.

0:33:200:33:21

But despite the excitement of this exclusive behind-the-scenes peek,

0:33:230:33:27

the best is yet to come - it's right up those stairs, the props department.

0:33:270:33:31

There are over two floors here,

0:33:340:33:36

absolutely jam-packed full of things from floor to ceiling.

0:33:360:33:41

Stuffed bears, false fruit, chairs, beds and even things like this -

0:33:410:33:45

leather-bound volumes which you think look really heavy,

0:33:450:33:48

but look at that, there's absolutely nothing in them, not even any pages.

0:33:480:33:53

There's well over 4,000 different items here

0:33:530:33:56

all waiting to be recycled for another production.

0:33:560:34:00

They've got absolutely everything. I'm like a kid in a sweet shop.

0:34:070:34:10

False flowers, tea caddies, hundreds of walking canes,

0:34:100:34:14

a little natural-history unit here,

0:34:140:34:17

jewellery, swords, and look at this -

0:34:170:34:19

rows and rows of really cheap bits of pewter,

0:34:190:34:22

silver plate, goblets and tankards which the actors would use on stage.

0:34:220:34:26

Maybe they'd be in a tavern and get a bit merry

0:34:260:34:29

and they'd throw these around.

0:34:290:34:30

So, obviously you can't use a real genuine antique.

0:34:300:34:33

Some of these were even made on site.

0:34:330:34:36

Makes sense to use something like that.

0:34:370:34:40

But I bet one or two antiques have slipped through the net in here.

0:34:400:34:44

Well, you could quite easily get lost in here.

0:34:570:35:00

I seem to be going round in circles.

0:35:000:35:02

Take these chairs, for instance, made by the props department

0:35:020:35:05

back in 2008 for a performance of Hamlet.

0:35:050:35:08

David Tennant and Patrick Stewart sat on these chairs.

0:35:080:35:11

Well, some famous bums did, anyway!

0:35:110:35:13

Now, look at this aisle.

0:35:200:35:22

That reminds me of an auction room,

0:35:220:35:23

different chairs of different periods throughout the ages,

0:35:230:35:27

all shapes and sizes, neatly stacked.

0:35:270:35:29

Just look at this one.

0:35:290:35:31

This, to me, at first sight, looks like a Cromwellian wainscot chair,

0:35:310:35:35

something from the late 17th century, made of heavy oak,

0:35:350:35:38

very understated, typical of the period.

0:35:380:35:41

You go to lift it up and it's feather-light.

0:35:410:35:43

This is in fact made of a soft wood, a pine that's been heavily stained

0:35:430:35:47

to look like that heavy bog oak.

0:35:470:35:50

That's the skill of the craftsmen in the props department.

0:35:500:35:53

They've studied reference books and the real item

0:35:530:35:56

to get an almost exact likeness.

0:35:560:35:58

Well, everything's just vying for my attention at once.

0:35:580:36:01

I don't know where to go. I think I'm going to go that way.

0:36:010:36:04

There are obviously a fair few stories

0:36:110:36:13

behind some of these remarkable items.

0:36:130:36:16

So, to find out more, I had to meet up with

0:36:190:36:21

head of the property shop, John Evans.

0:36:210:36:24

-So, how long have you been here now?

-40 years.

-40 years?!

-40 years.

0:36:270:36:30

-Man and boy, then.

-Man and boy.

0:36:300:36:32

Crikey, wow. You've got some examples there.

0:36:320:36:35

We have indeed. There's various things here.

0:36:350:36:38

That's a marotte from King Lear from a few years back.

0:36:380:36:42

And he sort of did his jokey bit

0:36:420:36:45

by the operation in the handle down there.

0:36:450:36:49

That was David Bradley's King Lear. I forget who the fool was.

0:36:490:36:52

Obviously, our friend Yorick, obviously.

0:36:520:36:55

You are obviously working on something, this is work in progress.

0:36:550:36:59

This is a box, so what's going to happen here?

0:36:590:37:02

Eventually, when the inside is revealed,

0:37:020:37:05

which we haven't got there at the moment, there is a tray of oysters

0:37:050:37:08

which are actually set down there.

0:37:080:37:10

-That's nice, sprung-loaded.

-Yeah.

0:37:100:37:12

-And then that comes up.

-And I guess all this will be plush velvet?

0:37:120:37:16

-This is nice red velvet.

-So, when the lights hit that,

0:37:160:37:19

and you see those oysters coming up

0:37:190:37:21

and a bit of smoke everywhere, it's like magic.

0:37:210:37:23

We hope so, we hope so.

0:37:230:37:26

What's the big volume, that leather-bound...

0:37:260:37:30

If you just want to walk round there and help me carry it...

0:37:300:37:33

HE STRAINS

0:37:330:37:35

THEY LAUGH

0:37:350:37:37

It's very light, by the way.

0:37:370:37:39

-This was made for...

-Did you make this?

0:37:390:37:41

Love's Labour's Lost. This one I did.

0:37:410:37:43

One actor brought it on stage like so, and then out came

0:37:430:37:49

his ukulele to play his song.

0:37:490:37:52

How lovely.

0:37:520:37:54

Nice prop. Nice prop.

0:37:540:37:56

It looks massively heavy.

0:37:580:37:59

That's the best ukulele case I think I've ever come across!

0:37:590:38:03

Have you ever been on stage?

0:38:060:38:08

No, I think I prefer to be here.

0:38:080:38:10

-Chicken!

-As an old friend and colleague said, "We don't do fame."

0:38:100:38:16

So, although it looks like an ordinary warehouse from the front,

0:38:240:38:27

there is in fact a whole theatre industry going on

0:38:270:38:30

behind this huge great big roller door

0:38:300:38:32

with artists, designers and crafts people working tirelessly and enthusiastically

0:38:320:38:37

with a shared vision of getting a production through to performance.

0:38:370:38:40

It's a real team effort going on in there

0:38:400:38:42

and it's about time the artists behind the scenes took a bow.

0:38:420:38:47

Back at the historic Warwick Castle on a glorious sunny summer's day,

0:38:520:38:56

there are still hundreds of people to meet and items to value.

0:38:560:39:00

Somebody here today will get an awful lot of money.

0:39:050:39:08

I don't know who it is, it might be you, it might be you.

0:39:080:39:11

Look, there's a spare seat here, it could be me!

0:39:110:39:14

Sue and Colin are with Thomas with a rather obscure item.

0:39:160:39:20

Can you guess what it is?

0:39:200:39:22

-So, Sue, Colin.

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:39:220:39:25

What have you brought me today?

0:39:250:39:28

Something a little unusual, I think.

0:39:280:39:30

It's something that way back in the early '60s

0:39:300:39:33

was brought into my father's small company

0:39:330:39:36

back in the Birmingham jewellery quarter.

0:39:360:39:39

-Your father was a jeweller?

-No.

0:39:390:39:41

He was a scrap-metal merchant.

0:39:410:39:42

They'd call it recycling these days, I imagine.

0:39:420:39:45

It was such a lovely item and it actually worked.

0:39:450:39:48

He knew it was from an old vehicle and he thought, I'll keep that.

0:39:480:39:51

I won't break that up.

0:39:510:39:53

This obviously is a tyre pump, made out of brass.

0:39:530:39:59

It still works, wooden handle.

0:39:590:40:01

-I suggest it's probably... Could be '40s, '50s.

-Maybe earlier.

0:40:010:40:06

Maybe earlier, it may be pre-war, probably.

0:40:060:40:09

The numbering, it's got to be British-made.

0:40:090:40:12

-Yes, I would think so.

-I think if you've got a classic car, this is just the kind of item

0:40:120:40:16

I would have thought that one would want in a restored garage.

0:40:160:40:20

I mean, it's not going to be worth megabucks.

0:40:200:40:23

I think you're looking at £40, £50.

0:40:230:40:25

-That sounds very reasonable.

-I think that's sensible.

0:40:250:40:28

-Buy something nice for my old dad.

-Is he still with us?

0:40:280:40:31

He is actually, but he's in the latter stages of Alzheimer's, so he's in a nursing home now.

0:40:310:40:36

-We'll buy him something nice.

-He won't remember this then.

-No.

0:40:360:40:40

So, you guys, how long have you been married?

0:40:400:40:42

-37 years.

-Wow. This was your closest valuation day.

0:40:420:40:46

-Yes, it was.

-Any other reason why you came here?

0:40:460:40:49

We love Warwick Castle.

0:40:490:40:52

-And I was queen once.

-Queen?!

0:40:520:40:54

I was queen of Warwick Castle for one day.

0:40:540:40:57

What happens there when you're queen?

0:40:570:41:00

Well, what happened was that I was playing Guinevere

0:41:000:41:03

in a National Youth Theatre production of Camelot,

0:41:030:41:07

and the Earl of Warwick invited us along to come to the carnival day.

0:41:070:41:11

I got to be paraded through the streets,

0:41:110:41:15

had a banquet in my honour and I got to give favours out to the jousts.

0:41:150:41:18

-I was the queen who gave out the favours.

-Were you together then?

0:41:180:41:23

-No.

-This was before she knew me.

0:41:230:41:25

About a year before I met him.

0:41:250:41:27

-Pre C, pre Colin.

-I guess I would have been her knight in shining armour.

0:41:270:41:31

-He came along the next year.

-On a white stallion!

0:41:310:41:34

He came along the next year.

0:41:340:41:36

But it was a thrilling day for me, as you can imagine.

0:41:360:41:39

And I can always think I was queen of Warwick for one day.

0:41:390:41:43

It's a wonderful story, thank you for sharing it with us.

0:41:430:41:46

Thank you.

0:41:460:41:47

Isn't that tiny? That's a hand-hammered silver penny.

0:41:550:41:59

That dates back to the reign of Edward III.

0:41:590:42:01

We're looking at about 1329, 1330.

0:42:010:42:05

It's wonderful. It was dug up in somebody's back garden.

0:42:050:42:08

They don't want to sell it, I don't blame them.

0:42:080:42:12

It's worth about £30 to £40.

0:42:120:42:14

I tell you what, this little coin is older

0:42:140:42:18

than that tower.

0:42:180:42:20

That's so rare.

0:42:200:42:22

Sisters Jenny and Jane have got some postcard albums to show Anita.

0:42:340:42:39

Welcome to Flog It!, and thank you so much

0:42:390:42:43

for bringing this wonderful collection of postcards

0:42:430:42:47

for us to look at today. Can you tell me, where did you get them?

0:42:470:42:51

They belonged to my husband.

0:42:510:42:53

I'd been married for two years,

0:42:550:42:57

and he inherited them from his mum and dad.

0:42:570:43:00

They are wonderful to look through.

0:43:000:43:03

You've got half a dozen albums.

0:43:030:43:05

We have different subjects.

0:43:050:43:07

Of course, the heyday of postcards

0:43:070:43:10

was between 1880 and the First World War.

0:43:100:43:14

It was the time when people were travelling,

0:43:140:43:17

the train was there, and we have one which describes that feeling here.

0:43:170:43:22

We have trains and boats and telephone.

0:43:220:43:25

These were areas of modernity,

0:43:250:43:28

and people would go away for their holiday

0:43:280:43:30

and send a photograph and so on.

0:43:300:43:33

Have you enjoyed them, Jenny?

0:43:330:43:35

I've absolutely thoroughly enjoyed looking through them.

0:43:350:43:38

You know, I've only had them for a short time.

0:43:380:43:40

You look, then put them away and get them out

0:43:400:43:43

and you see something different every time.

0:43:430:43:45

What I love is the variety here.

0:43:450:43:48

Now, I love this one here. I've looked on the back here

0:43:480:43:52

and it has been sent by a young girl to her boyfriend.

0:43:520:43:56

And...it's a wee bit suggestive. Love's thermometer - and it's hot!

0:43:560:44:03

THEY LAUGH

0:44:030:44:04

It's a very gentle illustration here.

0:44:040:44:07

But, um... She's hoping that his temperature will be raised

0:44:070:44:12

by receiving this postcard.

0:44:120:44:15

This one here is another interesting one. This is a First World War one,

0:44:150:44:20

which is lovely with the different flags here and embroidery.

0:44:200:44:24

And we have humorous ones, of course.

0:44:240:44:27

These are great fun, and we have these pretty girls.

0:44:270:44:31

So, what you have is a wide selection of postcards,

0:44:310:44:36

and it would be a joy for any collector to buy these.

0:44:360:44:41

Price-wise?

0:44:410:44:44

-About £300, £200 to £300.

-Yep, uh-huh.

0:44:440:44:47

I think you're quite good at this.

0:44:470:44:50

-Perhaps I could join the show.

-You can join the show!

0:44:500:44:54

Let's make the estimate wide.

0:44:540:44:58

We'll put them in at £200 to £400.

0:44:580:45:01

A reserve price of £200 on them,

0:45:010:45:04

-and I'll be there to hold both of your hands.

-Oh, well, I'm glad!

0:45:040:45:07

But roll up, roll up, because the circus has come to town.

0:45:090:45:12

Fran's brought along a silent clown.

0:45:120:45:14

Isn't that just fun? I think

0:45:190:45:21

that deserves a round of applause.

0:45:210:45:24

I don't know what he was playing, but it was very good!

0:45:240:45:26

Fran, wonderful little toy, and it's still working.

0:45:260:45:29

That's the best thing about it.

0:45:290:45:31

-Where did you get it from?

-It belonged to an aunt of my husband's.

0:45:310:45:34

I think originally it was her husband's,

0:45:340:45:37

-because he played the violin.

-Really?

0:45:370:45:39

-So it was more of a comical take on him.

-It was.

0:45:390:45:41

Schuco dates back to 1921, it was made in Germany.

0:45:410:45:44

The factory was bombed during the war,

0:45:440:45:47

but then it was rebuilt and they had a massive market to the States,

0:45:470:45:50

and this was built for the export market.

0:45:500:45:53

This isn't particularly early.

0:45:530:45:55

This isn't the early 1920s one,

0:45:550:45:57

-this is a 1950s one.

-Really?

0:45:570:45:59

Yeah. That's why it's in very, very good condition.

0:45:590:46:02

The colours are very good, the felt's very good.

0:46:020:46:04

-I want to sell it while it's working.

-I don't blame you, in a way.

0:46:040:46:07

We've had the Schuco monkeys on the show before,

0:46:070:46:09

and they've done really well.

0:46:090:46:11

In good condition and boxed,

0:46:110:46:12

this Schuco clown should do around about £120-£180.

0:46:120:46:17

Gosh, even with the state of the box?

0:46:170:46:19

But the box? It's not very good.

0:46:190:46:22

So...I suggest we put it into auction

0:46:220:46:24

with a valuation of £60-£120.

0:46:240:46:27

-More than I thought it was worth.

-If that's all right with you.

0:46:270:46:30

It's quite interesting that you say that was bought as a joke

0:46:300:46:33

for your husband's uncle, because he played the violin.

0:46:330:46:35

Somebody went out and thought, I'll buy that because that will put a smile on his face.

0:46:350:46:39

I played the drums, and everywhere my relations went,

0:46:390:46:42

they always went and bought a battery-operated monkey

0:46:420:46:45

playing the drums or something,

0:46:450:46:46

because they thought it would be funny. But it wasn't, really!

0:46:460:46:49

At Thomas's table, there are some really surprising items

0:46:570:47:00

brought in by Vivian and Lorna.

0:47:000:47:02

Vivian, Lorna, thank you very much for coming

0:47:020:47:07

and bringing along these fantastic bits of tribal.

0:47:070:47:11

Now, both of you don't sound like you're from this part of the world.

0:47:110:47:15

-No.

-We're from Wales originally.

0:47:150:47:17

I guessed you were from...

0:47:170:47:19

-And South Wales at that, not North Wales.

-I also guessed that as well!

0:47:190:47:23

I want to know, you've brought along these bits of tribal works of art.

0:47:230:47:28

How did you get them into your possession?

0:47:280:47:31

I was a missionary in Africa, in the Congo.

0:47:310:47:36

-What was it like?

-A bit scary.

0:47:360:47:39

There were attempted coups during the time that I was there.

0:47:390:47:44

And, um... Yes, you know, it could be a bit difficult.

0:47:440:47:49

So, tell me about these items here.

0:47:490:47:51

This is one which is a tribal sword.

0:47:510:47:58

I was given this after I had taken a conference there. That's that one.

0:47:580:48:02

-Fascinating. That's that one.

-And this one here is a ceremonial piece.

0:48:020:48:06

Yes, this a ceremonial machete.

0:48:060:48:11

When a young man is getting married,

0:48:110:48:13

his family have to give a dowry to the bride's family.

0:48:130:48:18

But always, traditionally,

0:48:180:48:21

this ceremonial machete would be part of the bride price.

0:48:210:48:27

Brilliant. This, this next item, I love this, I love the noise.

0:48:270:48:32

The rain stick, used by

0:48:320:48:34

the witch doctor to pray for rain.

0:48:340:48:40

Absolutely. In this country,

0:48:400:48:42

especially in the principality where you're from...

0:48:420:48:45

-We don't need it!

-You don't worry about it!

0:48:450:48:47

And certainly we don't have to wish for rain,

0:48:470:48:50

today we don't want rain, it's fantastic.

0:48:500:48:53

And the next item, which is obviously the most decorative,

0:48:530:48:56

is a staff, is that correct?

0:48:560:48:58

Yes, it's a staff, it's a chief's staff from a tribe just near Zaire.

0:48:580:49:05

This piece here, the staff, and the sword,

0:49:050:49:08

I think these two are the most valuable.

0:49:080:49:10

And then the next in line is the ceremonial wedding gift,

0:49:100:49:14

and then the rainmaker.

0:49:140:49:16

The rainmaker's terribly commercial because of the design,

0:49:160:49:20

the pattern, somebody would like to have it as an objet.

0:49:200:49:23

I have no idea of what they would be worth. None at all.

0:49:230:49:29

I think a wide estimate of £200 to £400. They could do a lot better.

0:49:290:49:34

I'm no tribal specialist, but I've seen this do extremely well.

0:49:340:49:39

Yeah, so have we, watching the programme.

0:49:390:49:41

If we could edge that sort of top estimate,

0:49:410:49:44

what's going to happen with the money?

0:49:440:49:46

This will go towards a holiday, somewhere.

0:49:460:49:49

-A good holiday.

-A good holiday.

0:49:490:49:52

-Brilliant.

-Mind, there's always more jewellery, isn't there?

-Yeah!

0:49:520:49:57

We've found some real gems, so let's find out what the bidders think.

0:50:030:50:06

We're making our way to the auction room.

0:50:060:50:09

Here's a quick rundown, just to jog your memory,

0:50:090:50:11

of all the items that are going under the hammer.

0:50:110:50:14

And this is what we've got. Colin and ex-queen of Warwick Castle, Sue,

0:50:140:50:19

who are taking a chance on an inflatable valuation

0:50:190:50:21

with their old pump.

0:50:210:50:22

Fran's silent clown, complete with slightly tatty box.

0:50:240:50:28

Jenny's set of postcards is extensive and is bound to appeal

0:50:280:50:32

to specialist collectors at the auction room.

0:50:320:50:35

And the tribal items brought in by Vivian and Lorna are going to be an unusual lot at the sale.

0:50:350:50:40

I really hope they do well.

0:50:400:50:41

This is where we're putting our valuations to the test,

0:50:430:50:46

Bigwood Auctioneers and Valuers in Stratford-upon-Avon.

0:50:460:50:49

Don't go away, somebody's going home with a lot of money.

0:50:490:50:52

Stay tuned to find out.

0:50:520:50:54

I think we're ready to see the pump rise to the challenge

0:50:540:50:57

as it's about to go under the hammer.

0:50:570:51:00

Good to see you, Sue and Colin.

0:51:010:51:03

I've got to say, I'm quite excited about this stirrup pump.

0:51:030:51:06

I know it's an old bygone, it really is, and belongs in a rural museum.

0:51:060:51:10

I think the whole country had these at one stage.

0:51:100:51:13

I can remember being a little lad

0:51:130:51:15

playing with one my dad had in the garage.

0:51:150:51:18

He said, "Here you are, polish it up,"

0:51:180:51:20

and I spent hours polishing all the brass up on it.

0:51:200:51:23

We used to play with it as well. Lots of childhood memories for me.

0:51:230:51:26

Did you get any pocket money for polishing it?

0:51:260:51:29

I can't remember, to tell the truth.

0:51:290:51:30

I know my dad was really generous.

0:51:300:51:33

It can't be that long ago, because you're so young!

0:51:330:51:37

-Believe me, it was a good...

-Sounds like the plot to a pantomime!

0:51:370:51:40

..a good 40-odd years ago.

0:51:400:51:43

Anyway, we're going to find out what the bidders think.

0:51:430:51:45

Let's hope we get an inflated price.

0:51:450:51:48

The probably '40s, '50s, British hand-operated car tyre pump,

0:51:500:51:54

T-shaped one there.

0:51:540:51:56

Very handy to carry one of these in your car, and it's a curio as well.

0:51:560:52:02

Got a nice old vintage car, just what you need.

0:52:020:52:04

£30 to get me going.

0:52:040:52:07

20 I'm bid, and five, is it?

0:52:070:52:09

All right, 22...

0:52:090:52:10

£22, only at 22.

0:52:100:52:12

You think you're invincible and won't have a puncture! At £22.

0:52:120:52:16

-24 now. At 24.

-Come on...

0:52:160:52:17

26. 28. Perhaps I'm convincing you.

0:52:170:52:20

£26. 28, is it? Two, surely. At £26. Try 28, 28...?

0:52:200:52:26

All sure, £26 only, at £26, are we done?

0:52:260:52:31

-Didn't sell.

-Ah, never mind.

0:52:310:52:34

-Close, but I think it's worth keeping.

-We will.

0:52:340:52:38

Do you have a classic car?

0:52:380:52:40

-No.

-Vintage car?

0:52:400:52:41

-No.

-Well, I tell you what, that is a good starting point.

0:52:410:52:44

You've got to start somewhere.

0:52:440:52:46

The first piece!

0:52:460:52:48

Well, they might have to borrow the classic car for the time being.

0:52:490:52:54

Now, let's move onto the postcard albums, and Jenny and Jane are here

0:52:540:52:58

to see their wonderful pieces of history go under the hammer.

0:52:580:53:01

Jenny and Jane, good luck. You've obviously watched Flog It before.

0:53:030:53:07

You've brought your album collection along,

0:53:070:53:09

full of wonderful postcards.

0:53:090:53:11

It is the social history that sells well.

0:53:110:53:13

Beautifully presented, as well.

0:53:130:53:15

-We've got over 500.

-Did you have any favourites?

0:53:150:53:17

-I like the valentines.

-OK.

0:53:170:53:20

But we have a great variety.

0:53:200:53:21

-You're a romantic.

-Of course.

0:53:210:53:23

You were waiting for that.

0:53:230:53:25

I was a bit slow.

0:53:250:53:28

That's not like you!

0:53:280:53:30

No, they're great, they really are, lots of memories there for somebody.

0:53:310:53:35

-Yes, I hope so.

-Yeah, good luck.

0:53:350:53:37

I think they'll go to a collector. Here we go.

0:53:370:53:40

This is a collection of seven modern vinyl albums containing

0:53:420:53:46

a vast number of early and mid 20th century postcards.

0:53:460:53:50

There's about 510 cards in all, so it's a collection and a half.

0:53:500:53:57

-Multiple bids, I can start here at £340 on the book.

-Straight in.

0:53:570:54:03

340. Is it 360? At 340.

0:54:030:54:06

With me on the book, 360, do I hear?

0:54:060:54:09

360? 360.

0:54:090:54:13

380... 400?

0:54:130:54:14

£400. 420... 440?

0:54:160:54:20

440. I'm cleared, it's with that phone.

0:54:200:54:25

Do I hear 460 now? Now at 440 on the telephone.

0:54:250:54:29

440.

0:54:290:54:30

Are we sure we're finished?

0:54:300:54:32

All done at £440.

0:54:320:54:34

-Yes!

-Good result.

0:54:340:54:36

-Brilliant.

-Got to be happy with that.

0:54:360:54:38

Are you going halves on the money?

0:54:380:54:40

-Well, I'm treating her to a holiday.

-Lovely, where are you going?

0:54:400:54:43

Hopefully Malta for Christmas.

0:54:430:54:45

Oh, lovely. I've been there, it's nice.

0:54:450:54:48

Fantastic, over the top end of the estimate for the postcards.

0:54:480:54:51

And now, I can't even get serious! We're sending in the clowns next.

0:54:510:54:57

Right, it is now my turn to be the expert,

0:54:570:54:59

and I hope it's not going to end up like this.

0:54:590:55:02

Tears of sorrow. You know what it is, I've just been joined by Fran,

0:55:020:55:06

and we've got that little tiny clockwork toy, playing the violin.

0:55:060:55:09

Love it to bits.

0:55:090:55:10

OK, the box isn't in brilliant condition, but it is a box of sorts!

0:55:100:55:14

We've got a fixed reserve of £60

0:55:140:55:16

-because you don't want to sell it for any less than that.

-No.

0:55:160:55:19

-Happy with all of that?

-Yes, thank you.

-Excited by all this?

0:55:190:55:23

-Excited, yes!

-Let's hope it flies away, shall we?

0:55:230:55:27

We're going to find out now.

0:55:270:55:29

That brings us on to the collectable toy,

0:55:310:55:33

1950s Schuco soloist clown violin player.

0:55:330:55:37

Little blue felt hat, red pants, etc.

0:55:370:55:41

-Had a lot of fun with this, didn't we?

-Yes, we did.

0:55:410:55:43

So who's going to give me,

0:55:430:55:45

I don't know, a Schuco item, £50 to get me going?

0:55:450:55:48

50? 40 to start me, then. 40 I've got, at 40 and five.

0:55:480:55:53

At £40, five, 50, five, 60...

0:55:530:55:56

Yes, we sold it - it's gone.

0:55:560:55:57

Down here at 60, and make no mistake, it will go.

0:55:570:56:00

At £60, five if you want to carry on. At £60,

0:56:000:56:04

are we all finished at 60?

0:56:040:56:07

-It's gone. That's good, isn't it?

-Very good.

-£60, I'm happy with that.

0:56:070:56:11

-Thank you.

-Just on the reserve.

0:56:110:56:14

-Well, you can treat yourself now, can't you?

-Yes!

0:56:140:56:17

A day out at Warwick Castle! With lunch!

0:56:170:56:20

We're taking our grandchildren away, so that'll buy the ice creams!

0:56:200:56:24

-Where are you taking them?

-We're going to Torquay.

-Oh, are you?

0:56:240:56:27

-Yes, your neck of the woods.

-On the old Riviera.

0:56:270:56:30

Well, the sale of the clown

0:56:300:56:32

certainly put a smile on Fran's face.

0:56:320:56:34

And now for our final lot in the programme.

0:56:340:56:37

It's the tribal items, and I've got my fingers crossed.

0:56:370:56:41

Good luck, Vivian and Lorna, and I love what you are wearing.

0:56:410:56:45

-Oh, thank you!

-We have the tribal items

0:56:450:56:47

which Vivian got in the Congo when you were working as a missionary. This is a minefield to value.

0:56:470:56:52

Thomas, our expert, has put £200 to £400 on this, but as you know,

0:56:520:56:56

-it could do anything.

-Paul, this is a guestimate.

0:56:560:56:59

-It's a guestimate.

-We are going to be shocked.

0:56:590:57:01

Thomas is a brave man.

0:57:010:57:02

I hope we are, Lorna, I hope we're all shocked.

0:57:020:57:06

We're not optimistic at all.

0:57:060:57:08

Got to be positive, haven't we?

0:57:080:57:09

The cup's always half full, not half empty.

0:57:090:57:12

Let's find out what the bidders think. Here it is.

0:57:120:57:15

There's a rain stick, chief's staff,

0:57:160:57:18

sword with a monkey-skin handle

0:57:180:57:20

and ceremonial tribal machete, all sort of things.

0:57:200:57:23

I've got multiple bids on the book.

0:57:230:57:25

I can start the bidding on the book, £200 on the book, at £200.

0:57:250:57:28

-Good, straight in.

-At 200...

0:57:280:57:30

with me, 20? 210 he says, cautiously. 220. 230.

0:57:300:57:37

He's got a commission bid, he keeps looking down.

0:57:370:57:40

On the book at 240...

0:57:400:57:42

All sure? If there's no further advance,

0:57:420:57:46

are you all finished and done?

0:57:460:57:48

That's good.

0:57:480:57:50

-£240.

-I can't believe it.

0:57:500:57:53

Nothing to do with me, that was a guestimate.

0:57:530:57:56

Paul, thank you, because we wouldn't have sold it without Flog It!, you and Thomas.

0:57:560:58:00

That's what we're here to do.

0:58:000:58:02

-Thank you, Thomas.

-And if you've got anything you'd like to sell,

0:58:020:58:06

we would love to see you.

0:58:060:58:07

Now, you can find the details of upcoming dates and venues

0:58:070:58:11

on our BBC website, just log onto bbc.co.uk/flogit

0:58:110:58:14

and all the information will be there.

0:58:140:58:16

Or check the details in your local press, because we are coming somewhere near you soon.

0:58:160:58:20

Bring your antiques along, we want them.

0:58:200:58:23

A collection of unusual tribal items catches Thomas Plant's eye, an 'ex-queen' of Warwick Castle returns for a visit, and Anita gets nostalgic with an extensive postcard collection. Presenter Paul Martin gets a sneak peek behind the scenes at the prop and set design workshops of the Royal Shakespeare Company in nearby Stratford-upon-Avon.