Herne Bay 29 Flog It!


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Herne Bay 29

Paul Martin and the teams are on the Kent coast at Herne Bay with antiques experts Kate Bateman and Mark Stacey. A tiny glass vase turns out to be a big seller.


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The sea, the sand, plenty of sunshine! But more importantly,

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plenty of people all here laden with antiques

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to have them valued by our experts,

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and today we're in this magnificent building, the Kings Hall

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in Herne Bay on the Kent coastline. And you're watching "Flog It!".

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Look at this! We've got a massive crowd gathering outside our venue,

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this magnificent building, the Kings Hall in Herne Bay

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on the Kent coastline.

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This venue has been used for music recitals, parties,

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and even wrestling. But we don't want any fighting today, do we?

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Because this is "Flog It!",

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the show where we put your unwanted antiques into auction,

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and today somebody's going to go home with an awful lot of money.

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Hello, there! How are you?

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Show and tell! Get them out!

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Today's experts, Kate Bateman and Mark Stacey,

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are already looking for the most exciting items.

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How weird is that?

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They're lovely.

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Kate once stepped out as a ballet dancer.

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These days she's poised as an auction-house owner.

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EPNS stands for electro-plated nickel silver,

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so sadly not solid silver.

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-You're not going to be selling the family silver today.

-No.

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Hello. How are you?

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Mark Stacey grew up in Wales,

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and started collecting silver in his teens.

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He's now an independent valuer with a taste for Art Nouveau.

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It's a lovely piece. We'll tell you more inside.

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I've got a piece that's got a signature on the bottom.

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Well, let's have a quick look, because I like signatures on bottoms.

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THEY LAUGH

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-There you go.

-Thank you very much.

-Bless you. Good luck!

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Coming up - a little bit of the Wild West rides into town.

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He was issued with it by the Pinkerton Detective Agency.

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-Really?

-Yes, for his own protection carrying money.

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And that was in the 1890s.

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We find out that one woman's rubbish is another's treasure.

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-That got the boundary, didn't it?

-Yes! I must go and find some more.

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-Have you got any more?

-Not cricket, but I've got some more rubbish!

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And a charity-shop find knocks us all for six.

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-What are you hoping for?

-I have no idea.

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-I didn't think it was worth anything.

-Really?

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Oh! I knew it had quality, but not that much.

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Find out later just how much quality this little pot has.

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Oh! You caught me unwrapping man's best friend here,

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covered in bubble wrap. As you can see, it's a full house,

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and everybody is now safely seated inside.

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It's about time we got on with the valuations.

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-Everybody wants to know...

-ALL: What's it worth?

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And we're going to find out.

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Kate is the first expert at the blue tablecloth.

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Let's go and join her and see what she's found.

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Isabel, you've brought quite an interesting sporting collection.

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-What do we know about it?

-Well, first of all, it's not mine.

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It's my late husband's, and I found it in the loft.

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-Did you know he had it up there?

-I knew vaguely

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-that there was a lot of what I might have called rubbish.

-Right.

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-I knew not to throw them out.

-He's collected a fantastic collection

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of cricket memorabilia, I suppose you would call it.

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You've got signatures, mainly late 1940s, so post-war.

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He obviously has cut out some of them.

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-Yes.

-Which, for a collector...

-Isn't as good. No.

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In this book, you've got all the different counties,

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and he's got complete sets of quite a few of them.

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Look at this, on a Surrey headed paper.

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-That's beautiful!

-That's really nice. What's this one?

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That's a West Indies touring team, but I'm not sure of the date.

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As you can see, they've come over on a cargo ship,

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and they must have all been sitting on the deck

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-signing pieces of paper.

-Brilliant!

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And again, we've got a West Indies fully signed team photo here.

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New Zealand team, 1949.

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And again, a South African team.

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-I'm not a cricketer myself, obviously...

-No, neither am I!

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So most of these names are not leaping out at me,

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but I'm sure the collectors will still get interested in them.

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They're of a good age, as well, and condition-wise, brilliant.

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-So they were up in the loft.

-They were in the loft.

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How much do you think they might be worth?

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-To me, nothing.

-Right.

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But to a cricketer or a cricket fan,

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-who knows?

-Like your husband.

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Yes! Yes, they were very precious to him.

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As a mixed collection, you've probably got an estimate for auction

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-of somewhere between £100 and £150.

-That sounds brilliant.

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-You'd be happy with that?

-Yes, yes.

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Probably reserve it just below that. £80 reserve.

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-Give the auctioneer a bit of discretion, so if it gets to 75, let it go.

-Yes.

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I'm sure there will be names in here that are very collectible.

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The auction house can find out some of the more collectible names,

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make sure they're listed in the catalogue,

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and they'll contact some collectors, or if it goes up on the internet,

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they'll be flagged up as worth collecting,

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and that will get your buyers in.

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-Hopefully we'll find out the more interesting people and get you a good result.

-Thank you!

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Kate's done her best to put a fair valuation on that collection,

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but you just can never tell with this kind of lot.

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Now, here's something we rarely see on "Flog It!".

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Ted's brought in an antique gun.

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Firearm laws don't apply to old weapons like this,

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as you can't get ammunition for it. It's clearly a collectable.

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-Can you tell us what it is?

-It's a Smith & Wesson.

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It's a .310-calibre Rimfire.

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-It's what is also called a lockup.

-Explain that.

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-Can you show us what that is?

-Yes, certainly. Colts had a patent

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-that they locked down the barrel.

-Oh, right. OK.

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To load it, you'd lock it down and put the bullets in.

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So Smith & Wesson had to think up another idea,

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and they designed what's called the lockup,

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-so it works in the opposite direction.

-Oh, wow!

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-And then you'd load it there.

-What you do is, you cock the gun,

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take out the barrel. You then push out the old cartridges

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with that piece, reload,

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put it back in again, lock it up,

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and it's got a hidden trigger, so it's safe in somebody's pocket.

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-So you don't blow your leg off.

-Exactly, yeah.

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It wasn't a holstered gun. It was carried in the pocket.

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-It's quite a light weight. It's not a heavy gun.

-No.

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It appealed to me for several reasons,

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first of all because it's a really good, collectable firearm.

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There's lots of collectors for them. But also it's in fabulous condition.

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-I used to shoot at the pistol club in Herne Bay.

-Oh, right. OK.

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Looking at it, I'm quite certain it's never been fired.

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By looking down the barrel, you can see how clean it is.

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-If you look up at the light with it, it's never been fired at all.

-No.

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And the wear on it is minimal.

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But also you've got all this wonderful blueing to the metal.

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There's not even a scratch on there, is there?

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And the lovely turned handle.

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-So, how long have you owned it?

-About 18 years now.

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-And where did you get it from?

-I had a very good friend.

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He was ex-Navy, same as I was. And when he left the Navy after the war,

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he became a bookmaker, a London bookmaker.

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And he got friendly with another bookmaker

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who was quite older than him.

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He asked him if he would like this when this bookmaker was retiring,

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and he said that he was issued with it

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-by the Pinkerton Detective Agency.

-Really?

-Yes,

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for his own protection carrying money. And that was in the 1890s.

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-Gosh!

-Yeah.

-There's no reason why it shouldn't have happened,

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but with all these stories, you need a good provenance to show that.

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You've had it for all these years. Why have you decided now to sell it?

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Having reached the great old age of 77...

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They won't throw it in the box after me, will they?

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But the thing is that there are collectors out there,

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younger people who like to collect,

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and it seems such a shame to go to waste.

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I agree with you. They're specialist dealers and collectors

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who want this. I think a sensible estimate is £300 to £500.

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-Is that something you'd be happy with?

-Oh, yes.

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-It's better than being in the safe.

-Of course it is.

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We'll put a reserve of 300, because it's not worth giving these away.

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-It's a good, collectable item.

-It is a mint-condition item.

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I think it's fantastic. I'm really pleased to have met you.

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-Thank you for telling us all about it.

-Thank you, Mark.

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Whoever buys this won't need a firearms licence,

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because it's obviously an antique.

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Just look at this a moment. Do you two know each other?

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-Not at all.

-How random is this?

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This lady has brought in the kettle,

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this young lad's brought in the biscuit barrel.

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Tea and biscuits, anybody? Refreshments are here!

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And I just might have found something to satisfy anyone

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with a real sweet tooth.

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It certainly stands well, Mike. Thank you for bringing this in.

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It's a piece of sterling silver. Anybody know what this is?

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-Sugar shaker?

-Sorry?

-Sugar shaker.

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A sugar shaker?

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-A sugar castor! Yeah.

-Castor.

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Well done. You got it, though, didn't you, really?

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-So, how did you come by this?

-I bought it in Portobello Road.

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Did you? That's my old stomping ground.

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-How long ago was that?

-It was about 30 years ago.

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I would've been there then. I had my own little pitch.

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-How much did you pay for it?

-£48.

-OK.

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Well, there's the assay marks. There's the leopard's head there.

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-Does anybody know that assay mark?

-London.

-Do you know where that is?

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Yeah, London. And the letter U, which is quite clear there.

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-1895.

-That's 1895.

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And there's the maker's initials, look - WRC.

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Now, I can't find any WRCs in my book, unfortunately.

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There's a WRS, late Victorian, but he was a spoon maker.

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I would say you paid...

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..the right money for that, and it's what the trade wants right now.

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It's good, it's clean, there's no dents in it.

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The finial is slightly bent to one side, but that can be sorted out.

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And it stands well. It looks good. It's got a good height.

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It's not flatware, which is quite boring.

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-It looks good in my cabinet.

-Why is it here today,

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-and not in your cabinet?

-I've had it quite a few years now,

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and I've, er, really liked looking at it.

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It's given me a lot of pleasure, and it's time to pass it on to somebody else who'll appreciate it too.

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I would say, if an auctioneer wanted to catalogue this,

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he'd put this into the saleroom at a valuation of £75 to £100.

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-How do you feel about that?

-That's OK. Happy with that. Yeah.

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-Well, let's flog it.

-Yeah. Flog it.

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Next up, Mark has seen something he fancies, but Frances is not so sure.

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What a lovely piece of Victoriana you've brought in.

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-Now, you love it, don't you?

-Oh, yes(!) No!

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THEY LAUGH

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-Do you, though?

-No, no.

-Why not?

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It's just not my sort of thing.

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-You think it's quite ugly, don't you?

-Yes.

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You see, I love it because we've got here a wonderful,

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what we call a relief-moulded mould.

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Basically, it's been made in two halves in a mould

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and then put together

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but it's to commemorate the death of Prince Albert in 1861

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and this was a very traumatic part of British history.

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Remember, Victoria went into mourning for the rest of her life.

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-Yes.

-She was absolutely devastated by the loss of her husband,

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and I just love the imagery.

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We've got a wonderful portrait of Albert there,

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and then the whole jug is covered

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with royal pomp and ceremony.

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You've got crowns, symbols,

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you've got the royal crest on the back here,

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you've got all the medallions. Just fantastic.

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It's not got a maker's mark, as far as I can see.

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It could be several makers but it is really a lovely lot,

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and you haven't washed it or anything, have you?

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-No.

-That's exactly what we need for auction.

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We want to keep it untouched.

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-It's just come from a house.

-Yes.

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I love it. Now, does that make any difference to you?

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-Do you like it any more?

-No.

-No, you still don't like it?

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You're determined to flog it?

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-Yes.

-Wonderful, because we wouldn't have a show otherwise.

-No!

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But I adore it. Where did you get it from?

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Well, my husband was given it by his mother

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and it came from his father's mother.

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-So it's been in the family for quite a long time.

-Yes.

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And does hubby know you brought it along today?

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Only last night, I said, "Shall I take this?"

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-And he was quite happy?

-He said yes.

-If you go home without it,

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-it's not going to cause a family dispute.

-No.

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-Oh, good, because we don't want that.

-No.

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But I adore it.

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I have to tell you the sad thing that ten years ago,

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this probably would have been worth a bit more money.

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I think in today's market

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we are probably looking at an estimate of...

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£60 to £80.

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I hope it would make a bit more than that, if we put a reserve of 50.

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Would that be all right with you?

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-Yes.

-But I just noticed looking at the handle,

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the top of the crown there has got a little bit missing.

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-I didn't notice.

-No, I didn't notice

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until I suddenly look at it at this eye level.

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I don't think it will affect the value

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but maybe if we just put the reserve at discretion,

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-so within 10% rather than fixed, is that all right?

-Yes.

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-That's all right.

-Wonderful.

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Well, I think it's charming

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and I very much look forward to seeing it at the auction,

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and I really hope other people appreciate it as much as I do.

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-Oh, good.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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This is Manston Airfield in Kent.

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As you can see, there are planes behind me here.

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They take off daily carrying passengers and cargo across Europe

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and onwards to Africa, but during the years of the Second World War,

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there was only one destination and that was a short ten-minute hop

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across the English Channel to France

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because this airstrip played a vital role in Britain's air defences.

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In 1940 the threat of German invasion hung over the country

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and airfields across the south-east were put into service

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as urgently needed RAF bases.

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The Battle of Britain had begun

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and much of it was fought in the skies above Kent.

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Manston was home to hundreds of Spitfires.

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The young pilots were on constant alert to intercept bombers

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and the people of Kent even raised enough money

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to sponsor their own squadron.

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Unfortunately, none of those Kent planes survived,

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but you can still see a real Spitfire here at Manston Airfield

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in the Spitfire and Hurricane Memorial Museum.

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This one saw active service at home

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and across Northern Holland and Germany.

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Although it will never fly again, it's been faithfully restored.

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Imagine sitting in there as a young pilot

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chasing the Messerschmitt 109s through the clouds,

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and when I say young, the pilots were young.

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20 years was about the average age.

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Skilful, brave men, and if you've ever wondered

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what a Rolls-Royce V12 Merlin engine sounds like,

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I've got a real treat for you.

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I've come to meet the pilot of one of the few Spitfires still flying,

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which is named in honour of the men and their aircraft

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who once flew out of Manston.

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Some guys go fishing for a hobby or they have classic cars

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but Peter here flies Spitfires.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Pleased to meet you.

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And what a beauty, what a design icon.

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I envy you! What's it like to fly?

0:15:570:15:59

-It's an absolute delight to fly. It really is.

-Is it?

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Yeah, and it's an absolute privilege

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to be able to have access to a Spitfire to fly.

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-Even as a schoolboy, you made Airfix models, I guess. I did.

-Oh, yes.

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-I loved them, I loved making them. I've still got some!

-That's right.

0:16:100:16:14

This is the real thing. How did you come across this?

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Well, I did a little bit of research and found that there were a few

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-that had been recovered from South Africa in a scrapyard.

-Really?

0:16:200:16:24

In a very dilapidated state, to say the least,

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but it was a starting point.

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How did they end up there? Do you know? Did you find out?

0:16:280:16:31

Yes, at the end of the war

0:16:310:16:32

a number of Spitfires were sold to the South African Air Force

0:16:320:16:36

in around about 1946, 1947.

0:16:360:16:39

I believe that they operated them right up until the late '50s

0:16:390:16:42

and then they were scrapped from there.

0:16:420:16:44

-Was this a complete rustbucket, then?

-Um...

0:16:440:16:47

I suppose that's one way of describing it, to be honest.

0:16:470:16:50

PAUL LAUGHS

0:16:500:16:51

-How many years did it take to restore?

-Eight years.

-Did it?

0:16:510:16:55

Eight years of scouring the world looking for spare parts.

0:16:550:16:59

What was the hardest thing you had to find for this?

0:16:590:17:01

-To be honest, airframe parts, the bits you can actually see.

-Fuselage?

0:17:010:17:06

Yeah, fuselage and wing components.

0:17:060:17:08

Engines are still not too much of a problem

0:17:080:17:11

and propeller blades, ironically, are made

0:17:110:17:14

and they are made in Germany.

0:17:140:17:15

-Are they? Really?

-They are.

0:17:150:17:17

Spitfires were not just fighters.

0:17:190:17:21

Many were equalled with bombs

0:17:210:17:23

and used as ground attack aircraft against road and rail targets.

0:17:230:17:27

Some were based on board aircraft carriers

0:17:270:17:30

and others were used for photo reconnaissance.

0:17:300:17:33

In all, 22,500 were built

0:17:330:17:35

and they became the iconic image of Britain's victory in the war.

0:17:350:17:39

But by the late 1940s, with the war over,

0:17:400:17:43

most were quickly taken out of service and scrapped.

0:17:430:17:46

In the early 1950s, the RAF retired its last Spitfire.

0:17:460:17:49

Within a few short years, only a handful were still flying.

0:17:500:17:54

But thanks to enthusiasts around the world,

0:17:540:17:57

70 years after their greatest hour,

0:17:570:17:59

there are believed to be around 50 flying today.

0:17:590:18:02

20 of them are here in the UK.

0:18:020:18:05

You've done a terrific job.

0:18:050:18:07

-Wonderful job.

-It just looks right, doesn't it, as an aeroplane?

-Yeah.

0:18:070:18:12

There's just something about it.

0:18:120:18:13

They always say, if it looks right, then it flies right,

0:18:130:18:16

and I think that's definitely the case with the Spitfire.

0:18:160:18:18

-And it's capable of speeds of up to what? 350 mph?

-Yes, yes.

0:18:180:18:22

-It's not particularly comfortable at high speeds.

-No, I bet it's not.

0:18:220:18:25

There's very few comforts in the cockpit, so you need to fly it

0:18:250:18:28

really for pleasure and the preservation of the aircraft.

0:18:280:18:31

So what's the future of this?

0:18:320:18:34

Well, we want to make sure that its future is secure.

0:18:340:18:37

At the moment we do various events with the aircraft,

0:18:370:18:40

not necessarily airshows,

0:18:400:18:42

off-airfield events, weddings,

0:18:420:18:44

private parties, and they all make contributions

0:18:440:18:48

and it does help to cover some of the running costs

0:18:480:18:51

because they are really...

0:18:510:18:53

-Horrendous, I bet.

-They are, yeah.

0:18:530:18:55

We've got a website running for the aircraft

0:18:550:18:58

-and so that's our advertising.

-OK.

-Really that's our future.

0:18:580:19:02

-We just type in "Spitfire", do we, and we find it?

-Absolutely. Sure.

0:19:020:19:06

-Oh, thank you so much for letting me look around this.

-My pleasure.

0:19:060:19:09

I'm going to watch you take off and enjoy the moment.

0:19:090:19:12

Just look at that. The Spirit of Kent, that's nostalgia in the sky.

0:19:310:19:36

It's such a shame that it's just

0:19:360:19:38

a short-range single-seater fighter plane because if it had two seats

0:19:380:19:41

I'd be hitching a lift and it would be fly away Peter, fly away Paul.

0:19:410:19:45

And now for my favourite part of the show.

0:19:550:19:57

Let's head straight to the auction and see what the bidders think.

0:19:570:20:00

And here's a reminder of what we're taking.

0:20:000:20:03

We have Isabel's cricket memorabilia.

0:20:030:20:05

It's been in the loft for ages, but she's sure it's worth a few bob.

0:20:050:20:08

Michael's silver sugar castor is over 100 years old,

0:20:080:20:11

and that's the same age as our third item,

0:20:110:20:14

Ted's Smith & Wesson revolver. It's an unusual piece,

0:20:140:20:17

with a great story.

0:20:170:20:19

And that china jug,

0:20:190:20:20

which was made to commemorate the death of Prince Albert in 1861.

0:20:200:20:24

For our auction today, we've moved a few miles inland to Canterbury.

0:20:270:20:31

A quick tip, just before the sale starts.

0:20:310:20:34

Buy a catalogue, read all the information in it,

0:20:340:20:37

and check the small print, because there is a buyer's and seller's premium to pay.

0:20:370:20:41

So factor that in! When the hammer goes down, make sure you can afford a little extra.

0:20:410:20:46

Our auctioneer today is Cliona Kilroy.

0:20:460:20:49

And first under the hammer is Isabel's cricket collection.

0:20:510:20:55

-This is one for the boys, isn't it?

-It is!

0:20:550:20:57

Let's bring Kate in, because it's a girlie thing as well, cricket,

0:20:570:21:01

-let's face it, if you like...

-Um, no.

0:21:010:21:03

I don't know much about it, just enough to know it should sell at this price.

0:21:030:21:07

-£100 to £200 we've got on this.

-Yeah.

0:21:070:21:10

-Cricket memorabilia is big business. It really is.

-Yeah.

0:21:100:21:13

-This is going to go for six,

-straightaway. Promise?

0:21:130:21:16

-Yes, definitely!

-Might be a duck. You never know.

0:21:160:21:19

No, it won't. It won't be a no-bowl. This is it here.

0:21:190:21:22

Three cricket photographs autographed by the various teams

0:21:240:21:28

as in the catalogue, and a selection of other autographed photographs.

0:21:280:21:32

-Commission interest. We start at...

-90.

-£90.

0:21:320:21:34

-Oh!

-90 I'm bid. I'm looking for £100.

0:21:340:21:37

100 I'm bid. 110. 120. 130.

0:21:370:21:39

140. 150.

0:21:390:21:41

-160?

-Oh, that's great!

0:21:410:21:44

160. 170. 180. 190.

0:21:440:21:47

200? Anybody at 200?

0:21:470:21:50

-This is good.

-On my right, still at £190 now.

0:21:500:21:52

Any further offer? Any further bid? Anything online?

0:21:520:21:55

If not, I'm selling at £190. The bid is on my right at 190.

0:21:550:21:58

You're back in at 200. 210.

0:21:580:22:01

220. 220 anywhere?

0:22:010:22:03

Still on my right at £210. And selling at 210...

0:22:030:22:07

-Yes! £210!

-Thank you!

-Hammer's gone down at 210.

0:22:070:22:11

-Thank you very much!

-That got the boundary, didn't it?

0:22:110:22:14

-Yes! I must go and find some more!

-Have you got any more?

0:22:140:22:19

Not cricket, but I've got some more rubbish!

0:22:190:22:21

Oh, you have some rubbish. If you've got any rubbish like that,

0:22:210:22:24

-we want to see it.

-That's the kind of rubbish we love. Bring it in.

0:22:240:22:27

I'll bring it!

0:22:270:22:29

I love it when one person's hobby

0:22:290:22:31

proves popular with other collectors.

0:22:310:22:33

Our next item is Michael's silver sugar castor,

0:22:360:22:38

which he bought 30 years ago at my old stomping ground,

0:22:380:22:42

the Portobello Road.

0:22:420:22:44

Unfortunately its owner Michael cannot be with us today,

0:22:440:22:47

so it's just me holding the fort. Here we go.

0:22:470:22:49

Let's find out what this lot think. Let's hope the bidders are here.

0:22:490:22:53

Lot number 437 is the late-Victorian silver sugar castor.

0:22:540:22:58

Lot 437. Who'll start me at, er, £50?

0:22:580:23:00

50? Any interest at £50, lot 437, the sugar castor?

0:23:000:23:03

50 I'm bid. Who's in at 60 now?

0:23:030:23:06

60 for someone? 60 I have.

0:23:060:23:08

-Yes. Chap down the front.

-Anybody at 80?

0:23:080:23:10

Bid is at the front of the room here at £70 now. Anybody else bidding?

0:23:100:23:14

Right at the front at £70, then. If we're all done I will sell.

0:23:140:23:19

Well, that's it. It's gone. It just sold for £70.

0:23:190:23:22

Straight in, straight out. Blink and you'll miss it.

0:23:220:23:24

I think Michael will be pleased with that. He bought it for,

0:23:240:23:27

if my memory serves me well, £40 in the Portobello Road quite a few years ago. That's a winner.

0:23:270:23:32

A lovely item, on its way to a new home.

0:23:320:23:35

Next up, it's the commemorative jug brought in by Frances.

0:23:350:23:39

-I know this was your husband's jug, wasn't it?

-Yes.

-Is he here today?

0:23:390:23:42

-Is he going to wave it goodbye? Where is he?

-He's over there.

0:23:420:23:45

-There he is, waving at you. Good luck.

-It was his grandmother's

0:23:450:23:49

and she took in lodgers,

0:23:490:23:51

-so I think they used it as a payment.

-Oh, did they?

0:23:510:23:54

-A part payment, that's a way to pay the bills.

-It's not bad, is it?

0:23:540:23:58

-I like bartering like that.

-Yes, it's not bad.

0:23:580:24:00

I love these sort of things, these moulded jugs. They're wonderful.

0:24:000:24:04

This is so indicative of the royal family and all those coats of arms.

0:24:040:24:07

-Wonderful quality.

-I guess the greatest monument to Prince Albert

0:24:070:24:10

would be the Albert Hall, wouldn't it? What a wonderful building

0:24:100:24:13

with a lovely monument around it.

0:24:130:24:15

-A bit too big to...

-Too big to bring in to film!

0:24:150:24:18

Yes, if you've got anything like that, we want to see you!

0:24:180:24:21

Bring it to one of our evaluation days. Look, good luck.

0:24:210:24:24

And good luck. Here we go, it's going under the hammer.

0:24:240:24:26

Lot number 101 is the 19th-century Parian ware jug

0:24:280:24:31

to commemorate the death of Prince Albert. Lot 101.

0:24:310:24:34

Who'll start me at £50?

0:24:340:24:36

Thank you, 50 I'm bid.

0:24:360:24:38

Who's in at 60 now?

0:24:380:24:39

60 for someone? Thank you. 60? 70.

0:24:390:24:42

80.

0:24:420:24:43

90. 100.

0:24:430:24:45

It's doing well!

0:24:450:24:46

110. 120.

0:24:460:24:47

130? 140.

0:24:500:24:52

No? Any interest at 140 in the room?

0:24:540:24:56

140. 150. 160.

0:24:560:25:00

Somebody on the phone.

0:25:000:25:02

Anyone at 160? Right at the front here at £150,

0:25:020:25:05

I'm looking for 160.

0:25:050:25:07

If not, I'll sell at £150, then...

0:25:070:25:09

Yes, the hammer's gone down. We'll take that, won't we?

0:25:100:25:13

He's laughing his head off, your husband over there.

0:25:130:25:16

-What a good result.

-A very good result

0:25:160:25:17

because there was a tiny bit of damage.

0:25:170:25:19

There was a little bit of the crown missing that we found at the end.

0:25:190:25:22

-All the collectors were here today.

-Yes.

0:25:220:25:24

Frances might not have liked it, but two of the bidders did,

0:25:240:25:27

and that's all you need to get a good price.

0:25:270:25:29

And now we're ready for Ted's 1890s Smith & Wesson revolver.

0:25:290:25:33

The auctioneers are happy to sell, as it's clearly 100 years old,

0:25:330:25:37

and you can't buy ammunition for it.

0:25:370:25:40

-Remind me, why are you selling this?

-You can't take it with you.

0:25:410:25:44

Well, you can't take anything with you, can you?

0:25:440:25:47

I used to do a lot of shooting at one time, but, you know,

0:25:470:25:50

-I sort of packed it up.

-Is there no-one you wanted to pass it on to?

0:25:500:25:53

-No. Kids aren't interested these days.

-Not really, are they?

0:25:530:25:56

You don't want it lying round the house.

0:25:560:25:58

No. It's really for a collector, because, as you say,

0:25:580:26:02

the condition is fantastic, all the blueing on the barrel...

0:26:020:26:05

-It's just what you want.

-I want to see some phone lines booked here,

0:26:050:26:09

and I want to see some internet bidding,

0:26:090:26:11

-because hopefully this will just fly away.

-Hope so.

0:26:110:26:14

Let's find out, shall we? Ted, this is it.

0:26:140:26:16

The Smith & Wesson lockup-patent five-shot-calibre revolver.

0:26:190:26:23

Good thing, this. Several bids. Starting at £360.

0:26:230:26:26

I'm looking for 380. Bid is on the book at £360

0:26:260:26:29

and I'm looking for 380. Who's in at £380?

0:26:290:26:34

Anybody in at 380?

0:26:340:26:36

380. 400. And 20.

0:26:380:26:40

-440. 460.

-This is good.

0:26:420:26:44

480. 500.

0:26:440:26:47

No? It's at £480 on my right now. Any further offer?

0:26:480:26:52

Any further bid in the room? If not I'll sell at £480.

0:26:520:26:56

The bid is on my right at 480. If we're all done at 480...

0:26:560:27:00

-Top end of the estimate.

-We're happy with that.

-Very.

0:27:000:27:03

-Are you, Ted?

-Yeah, not half!

-Good.

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:030:27:05

-There's commission to pay, don't forget.

-Of course.

0:27:080:27:11

-Enjoy the rest of the day.

-Thank you.

-And the money.

0:27:110:27:14

A cheque will be going off to help the old soldiers.

0:27:140:27:17

-Is that what you're doing?

-Some of it.

-Help The Heroes?

-I shall send them a cheque.

0:27:170:27:22

Ted's revolver was in mint condition and had never been fired,

0:27:220:27:25

so the collectors were prepared to pay top money for it.

0:27:250:27:28

That concludes our first visit to the sale today.

0:27:310:27:34

We are coming back here later, and I guarantee one big surprise,

0:27:340:27:38

so whatever you do, don't go away. But while we were in the area,

0:27:380:27:42

I took the opportunity to explore some of the local history.

0:27:420:27:45

Take a look at this!

0:27:450:27:47

For hundreds of years, sailing barges were a familiar sight

0:27:540:27:57

-along the Kent coastline.

-Up topsail!

0:27:570:28:01

Take it right up.

0:28:010:28:03

Forwards, as well.

0:28:030:28:05

One, the Cambria, was still plying her trade

0:28:060:28:09

well into the '70s, the only remaining commercial cargo vessel

0:28:090:28:12

in the UK purely working under sail.

0:28:120:28:16

A flat-bottomed, leeboarded, spritsailed barge she is.

0:28:160:28:20

Built at the turn of the century,

0:28:200:28:22

the Cambria still knows no other power than the wind.

0:28:220:28:26

But this romantic age was slowly ending.

0:28:290:28:32

As modern ships took over the work,

0:28:320:28:34

the Cambria was retired from working life, and left to rot in mud.

0:28:340:28:39

Well, here on the quayside in Faversham,

0:28:450:28:47

the old girl is being brought back to life.

0:28:470:28:50

Underneath all these temporary canvasses and covers,

0:28:500:28:53

the sailing barge Cambria lives again,

0:28:530:28:56

and the shipwrights are working on her right now,

0:28:560:28:59

so come aboard and take a look.

0:28:590:29:00

In 1996, a group of enthusiasts took over ownership of the Cambria,

0:29:010:29:06

and formed a charitable trust.

0:29:060:29:08

William Collard is the project manager.

0:29:080:29:10

What a wonderful vessel! It's an honour to be on the deck with you,

0:29:110:29:15

and I can't wait to see this finished,

0:29:150:29:18

-because it is a huge vessel, isn't it?

-Yes, it is,

0:29:180:29:20

and everything around us, as you see, is chunky...

0:29:200:29:23

-Big scale.

-Big stuff.

-Where did you come across her?

0:29:230:29:26

Well, I first came across her in the 1970s

0:29:260:29:29

when she was down in Sittingbourne in a very bad state.

0:29:290:29:33

She had been taken out of trade,

0:29:330:29:35

and a group of enthusiasts were getting together

0:29:350:29:38

to try and restore her. Unfortunately there was no funding,

0:29:380:29:42

so she slowly deteriorated. She was moved around

0:29:420:29:45

from place to place, but really just only patched up.

0:29:450:29:50

You've been part of this for a long time.

0:29:500:29:52

I joined the Cambria Trust in 1996,

0:29:520:29:55

when the vessel was sinking on every tide.

0:29:550:29:58

The big breakthrough came in 2007.

0:29:590:30:02

The Trust was given a £1 million lottery grant.

0:30:020:30:06

Now they could begin the enormous task of completely rebuilding her

0:30:060:30:11

from the bottom upwards.

0:30:110:30:12

A great percentage of this vessel had rotten timbers in it,

0:30:120:30:17

didn't it? They've all been replaced now.

0:30:170:30:19

She was really falling apart, especially on the one side.

0:30:190:30:23

You could put your hand through the side.

0:30:230:30:25

We couldn't really recover any of the timber.

0:30:250:30:29

It was beyond re-using. Many places it was rotten,

0:30:290:30:32

and in many places it was split and broken.

0:30:320:30:35

An example of that is that knee here, this oak knee.

0:30:350:30:38

This is slightly perished now, but a good hundred years old.

0:30:380:30:41

Yes, indeed. It would've been lovely if we could've used things like this,

0:30:410:30:45

but it's just beyond practical use, really.

0:30:450:30:48

But the original floor was as good as the day it was put in,

0:30:480:30:52

and has formed a base for us to work from.

0:30:520:30:54

And it'll probably be just as good in another hundred years.

0:30:540:30:58

We would hope so.

0:30:580:30:59

The Cambria was a coasting barge.

0:31:060:31:07

She worked along the south and east coasts of England,

0:31:070:31:10

and across the Channel to France.

0:31:100:31:13

What do you carry in this barge mainly, usually?

0:31:130:31:17

Well, like all barges, we carry anything from manure to maize.

0:31:170:31:21

We're a sort of a tramp ship, really. We pick up anything.

0:31:210:31:25

I was on a barge once that had a freight of chicken coops.

0:31:250:31:27

Five chicken coops high on the deck, we were.

0:31:270:31:31

The Cambria had been built in Kent in 1906,

0:31:310:31:34

so it's incredible that, 60 years later,

0:31:340:31:37

she was still competing with the larger, more modern cargo ships.

0:31:370:31:40

Remember, she had no engine, and relied on the winds

0:31:400:31:43

and the skills of her master to take the cargoes up and down the Thames.

0:31:430:31:48

What's going to be her place in the future?

0:31:500:31:52

What will you do with her?

0:31:520:31:54

The big hold area that you've seen down below

0:31:540:31:57

-we're converting into a classroom.

-OK.

0:31:570:32:00

And the idea is, we've picked a number of ports,

0:32:000:32:03

and we're going to take the vessel to the ports.

0:32:030:32:05

We're starting in Kent, but then we hope to go into Essex and London.

0:32:050:32:10

-Oh, smashing!

-And we're going to get 20 to 30 schoolchildren aboard,

0:32:100:32:14

and teach them about the history of the Thames,

0:32:140:32:17

the kind of cargoes these vessels took,

0:32:170:32:20

and see all about the restoration of a really old wooden vessel.

0:32:200:32:25

And the project is already offering opportunities to young people.

0:32:250:32:29

They've even taken on three apprentices

0:32:290:32:31

to work on the restoration,

0:32:310:32:33

under the supervision of master shipwright Tim Goldsack.

0:32:330:32:36

Tim, can I stop you there? Hello, mate.

0:32:360:32:39

-Pleased to meet you.

-Hi.

-Gosh, what a big vessel, isn't it?

0:32:390:32:42

It's only when you're down here you can see the immense size of it.

0:32:420:32:46

How long does each one of those planks take you

0:32:460:32:49

-to cut to shape and put in?

-From start to finish,

0:32:490:32:52

each one takes approximately two days,

0:32:520:32:54

and there's something in the region of 150 planks on the vessel.

0:32:540:32:59

Gosh! So there's a lot of work gone into this hull.

0:32:590:33:02

There certainly is, yeah. Quite a few hours.

0:33:020:33:05

And obviously you're caulking it with bitumen and tar?

0:33:050:33:08

Yeah, that's right. These vessels are constructed

0:33:080:33:11

with two layers of planking, and between the layers

0:33:110:33:15

it has what are called set-work, which is a layer of felt

0:33:150:33:18

-and a layer of tar.

-Do you heat the tar up and mix with horse manure?

0:33:180:33:21

Yes. It's hot tar mixed with horse manure,

0:33:210:33:24

which is a traditional binding agent,

0:33:240:33:26

and that helps to give it its watertight integrity.

0:33:260:33:29

And you're trying to use traditional methods all the time?

0:33:290:33:32

Yeah. All the skills we use are the same that were used

0:33:320:33:35

when they were originally built, the only difference being

0:33:350:33:39

that we have modern materials and modern glues, etc.

0:33:390:33:42

I know these would have been pegged and dowled with trennels,

0:33:420:33:45

-tree nails, wouldn't they?

-Exactly, yeah.

0:33:450:33:48

Traditionally they were built with trennels.

0:33:480:33:50

These days we used galvanised iron spikes to put everything together.

0:33:500:33:54

Good luck with it.

0:33:540:33:56

Good luck with it. I'm sure she's going to be watertight!

0:33:560:33:59

THEY LAUGH

0:33:590:34:01

It certainly is coming together. A few licks of paint,

0:34:040:34:07

but under full sail she'll look fabulous,

0:34:070:34:09

and I can't wait for that day.

0:34:090:34:11

That's all down to the guys here and their hard work,

0:34:110:34:14

because this sailing barge, Cambria, is now recognised

0:34:140:34:17

as one of our most important sailing vessels. This is a piece of maritime history right here,

0:34:170:34:22

and I'm touching it. Instead of being consigned to the mud

0:34:220:34:25

for another 100 years, she's going to be afloat for future generations to appreciate and enjoy.

0:34:250:34:30

And long may it last!

0:34:300:34:32

At our valuation day in the Kings Hall, Herne Bay,

0:34:370:34:40

there are still hundreds of eager people

0:34:400:34:42

waiting to have their items valued.

0:34:420:34:45

The room is packed inside there, and the queue is spilling out still

0:34:460:34:50

along the seafront. This is where it all starts.

0:34:500:34:53

If you want to take part in a show, come along to a valuation day

0:34:530:34:56

with your unwanted antiques and collectables,

0:34:560:34:58

because we would love to see you.

0:34:580:35:01

To find details of upcoming dates and venues, just log on to...

0:35:010:35:04

If you don't have a computer, check your local press,

0:35:050:35:09

because we are coming to an area, fingers crossed, near you soon.

0:35:090:35:12

On with our valuations, and it's over to Mark Stacey.

0:35:120:35:16

He's with Carol, who looks like she's cashing in her savings!

0:35:160:35:19

-You've brought a little bit of bling in to show us.

-I have.

0:35:190:35:22

Now, where did you get all these gold sovereigns?

0:35:220:35:25

I bought them off a dealer

0:35:250:35:28

in London, down a lane called Cheshire Street,

0:35:280:35:33

and my children were very young,

0:35:330:35:36

and I was doing market work,

0:35:360:35:38

and my way of saving was, I used to buy one a week,

0:35:380:35:42

and gradually I built them up,

0:35:420:35:44

and I bought the mounts at £1.25...

0:35:440:35:47

Gosh, this must be going back 40 years or more!

0:35:470:35:50

It is going back 40 years or more! And gradually I had it made into a bracelet.

0:35:500:35:55

The George IV coin I bought round about the same era,

0:35:550:35:59

but to be truthful, I've no idea at all what I paid for it.

0:35:590:36:03

-Probably a tenner or something.

-Something like that.

0:36:030:36:06

-Not much.

-A couple of quid for the mount, cos it's slightly bigger.

0:36:060:36:09

No, I had the mount made much later. It cost me £100.

0:36:090:36:12

Gosh! Really? Wow.

0:36:120:36:15

-And I presume the mounts are nine-carat gold...

-They are.

0:36:150:36:18

-..rather than the 22-carat gold of the coins.

-That's right. Nine.

0:36:180:36:21

If I pick it up, we've got a bun- head for the young Victoria's head

0:36:210:36:26

on those, and then this one, we've got a young Queen Elizabeth head.

0:36:260:36:31

That's right.

0:36:310:36:33

Then we go on again, of course,

0:36:330:36:35

to another young Queen Victoria's head.

0:36:350:36:39

-Then we've got a mid-period head, haven't we?

-Yes.

0:36:390:36:42

And then we go back on to another young Victoria's head.

0:36:420:36:46

Another one, yes.

0:36:460:36:47

And then, of course, as you say, you've got a George IV gold £2 coin.

0:36:470:36:51

The sad thing with these sort of things, Carol,

0:36:510:36:54

there's no sentimentality about them.

0:36:540:36:56

-Unless they're a rare coin...

-That's right.

-..or a rare date,

0:36:560:37:00

the dealers will weigh them and say, "That's the gold price."

0:37:000:37:03

So I've had a quick tot-up,

0:37:030:37:06

and I mean, as a sensible estimate,

0:37:060:37:09

we're looking at £800 to £1,200.

0:37:090:37:11

-Right.

-So we're looking at a reserve of about 800 quid.

0:37:110:37:14

-Yes.

-How do you feel about that?

0:37:140:37:16

There'd have to be a reserve of that, yes.

0:37:160:37:19

What I'm looking at, really, I would like £1,200.

0:37:190:37:23

It would be lovely to get that. I can give you a valuation today,

0:37:230:37:26

but by the time the auction comes up in a few weeks' time,

0:37:260:37:30

-the gold might have dropped a lot.

-Exactly.

-Or it might have risen.

0:37:300:37:33

What we've got to pray for is that the market will be higher

0:37:330:37:37

when we come to the auction. So I think what you've got to do

0:37:370:37:40

in your own mind is say, "Right, I'm happy to get the 800 reserve,

0:37:400:37:44

-and I'll pay a bit of commission on that and that's them." How do you feel about that?

-I feel fine.

0:37:440:37:49

-Are you happy with that?

-I am happy.

0:37:490:37:51

If you do get a reasonable price you're happy with,

0:37:510:37:54

any plans? Are you going to go off to Barbados?

0:37:540:37:57

-I shall have a few holidays.

-Will you?

-I'm going to enjoy it.

0:37:570:38:01

-Fantastic. Enjoy it while you're young enough to.

-I will.

0:38:010:38:04

Well, that lot should add up to a decent holiday!

0:38:040:38:08

Now to Kate Bateman. She's with Hugo and his grandson Stanley,

0:38:080:38:12

and they've brought in two old characters.

0:38:120:38:15

What can you tell me about them?

0:38:150:38:17

Well, I've had them for 50 years.

0:38:170:38:21

I got them off my father when he passed on,

0:38:210:38:24

-and he got them off his father...

-Right.

0:38:240:38:27

..which would be my grandfather,

0:38:270:38:30

and which would take us back to the turn of the century.

0:38:300:38:34

Victorian, late Victorian.

0:38:340:38:36

I presume you've had these in your house, if you inherited them.

0:38:360:38:39

Yes. They've been hanging in my bedroom for 30 years.

0:38:390:38:43

-30 years!

-Yes.

0:38:430:38:44

Are you not tempted to keep them in the family, then,

0:38:440:38:47

and pass them on to your grandson here?

0:38:470:38:50

He doesn't want it. He wants me to enjoy myself.

0:38:500:38:54

-Not at all? Oh!

-No.

-Do you like them?

0:38:540:38:56

-Are you a doggy person?

-Oh, yes. I had five dogs.

0:38:560:39:00

Are these looking like either of your dogs?

0:39:000:39:02

No. I had an English bull terrier and four ordinary bull terriers.

0:39:020:39:07

OK. I don't know quite what breeds we've got here,

0:39:070:39:09

but they're rather nice. They are late Victorian.

0:39:090:39:12

They're both monogrammed. You've got here RC on this one,

0:39:120:39:16

and I think FC, or CF, on this one.

0:39:160:39:18

Now, we haven't been able to look up who the artists are,

0:39:180:39:21

and if we can trace them down to a specific artist,

0:39:210:39:24

it may affect the valuation upwards. Of the two,

0:39:240:39:28

I think this one's the slightly better painting,

0:39:280:39:30

and he's got quite a sweet face.

0:39:300:39:32

He's got that kind of hang-dog expression.

0:39:320:39:34

Looks like he hasn't had his dinner and he really wants to go home.

0:39:340:39:38

This one's odder. He looks quite startled.

0:39:380:39:40

I would offer them as a pair, though,

0:39:400:39:43

rather than as individual ones.

0:39:430:39:45

I would have said a fairly low estimate, from my point of view,

0:39:450:39:49

would be £100 to £200 for the pair, so between £50 and £100 each,

0:39:490:39:53

which I know is quite a wide estimate,

0:39:530:39:55

but it will rely on somebody falling in love with the dog

0:39:550:39:58

or specifically wanting dog paintings.

0:39:580:40:00

-Is that the kind of figure you'd be happy with?

-Yeah. Yeah.

0:40:000:40:04

OK. Well, if we put an estimate of £100 to £200,

0:40:040:40:07

would you want a reserve of £100, to stop it going for less than that?

0:40:070:40:11

-Oh, yeah.

-I'd be happy with that.

-To protect it,

0:40:110:40:14

so if the bidding didn't reach £100, it wouldn't be sold.

0:40:140:40:17

I think somebody will fall in love with them, a dog lover,

0:40:170:40:20

-and I think they're great fun, so let's put them in the sale and see how they go.

-Thank you.

0:40:200:40:26

After 30 years on Hugo's wall,

0:40:260:40:28

those two deserve to find a new home, and I'm sure they will.

0:40:280:40:31

It's been such a busy day, and our experts have been working flat-out,

0:40:370:40:41

but there's still time for me to get around the queue and sniff out something special.

0:40:410:40:45

-Can I be nosy? What's your name?

-It's old books. Claire.

0:40:450:40:48

You never know. You never know.

0:40:480:40:51

There could be something really, really valuable in there.

0:40:510:40:54

-There could be, couldn't there?

-And Beatrix Potter books.

0:40:540:40:57

-I think they're first editions.

-You think they're first editions?

0:40:570:41:00

If they are, you're sitting on a small fortune!

0:41:000:41:03

-Do you know that?

-That would be nice, wouldn't it?

0:41:030:41:06

-THEY LAUGH

-Have you shown them to anybody?

-No.

0:41:060:41:09

I've been on the internet doing searches and things.

0:41:090:41:14

-Sadly they're not first edition.

-Oh.

-Which is a shame.

0:41:150:41:19

They're 1960s. But they're in good condition, and very collectable.

0:41:190:41:24

That would've been too good to be true, wouldn't it?

0:41:270:41:30

Here on "Flog It!" we're always turning up little treasures,

0:41:300:41:33

and Mark has found a small piece of glass that might turn out to be something big.

0:41:330:41:38

-Hello, Olive.

-Hello.

0:41:380:41:39

Sometimes they say the best things come in small packages, don't they?

0:41:390:41:43

-Yeah.

-I'm talking about this lovely little vase you brought in.

0:41:430:41:47

-Tell me about it.

-I bought it in a charity shop.

0:41:470:41:50

-No!

-Yes.

0:41:500:41:51

-When?

-I know I bought it after my mother died, and that was '97.

0:41:510:41:55

-How much did you pay for it?

-50 pence, I think it was. Yeah.

0:41:550:41:58

And you were just attracted by the colour, I guess?

0:41:580:42:01

-It was the poppies.

-Yes.

0:42:010:42:03

Because my grandmother loved poppies,

0:42:030:42:05

and she always used to wear the California Poppy perfume,

0:42:050:42:08

so I saw the poppies and I thought, "Ahh!"

0:42:080:42:10

Gosh! I think it's absolutely delicious.

0:42:100:42:14

-Thank you.

-It's an absolutely wonderful little object.

0:42:140:42:17

It's just a little small vase,

0:42:170:42:19

and you've got the little rim here,

0:42:190:42:21

which is decorated in coloured enamels and gilt.

0:42:210:42:24

And as you turn the item around, it's got an iridescent background.

0:42:240:42:29

It has that slight oily-on-water look to it.

0:42:290:42:33

And then you've got these lovely trailing poppies.

0:42:330:42:36

This one is nice and open, and then you've got another little one

0:42:360:42:40

just about to come out, then this one is almost finished.

0:42:400:42:43

It's seeded, really. And it screams quality.

0:42:430:42:46

-Mmm.

-But quality that isn't English.

0:42:460:42:49

-Right.

-It's French.

-Mm-hm.

0:42:490:42:51

What did you think it said underneath here?

0:42:510:42:54

-I thought it said "Dawn Nancy".

-Well, it's actually "Daum",

0:42:540:42:57

and it's got the mark there with a Cross of Lorraine

0:42:570:43:01

and "Nancy". Now, this was made

0:43:010:43:03

probably around about...1900, 1910.

0:43:030:43:08

Really? Oh!

0:43:080:43:10

And it's sort of Art Nouveau-ish,

0:43:100:43:12

and there are three factories in France at that time

0:43:120:43:15

which really strike out for glass - that's Daum,

0:43:150:43:19

Galle, of course, which also produced this type of cameo glass,

0:43:190:43:23

and Lalique, and it just is lovely.

0:43:230:43:26

There's a slight problem or two here.

0:43:260:43:28

There's a couple of little fleabites around the inner rim.

0:43:280:43:32

I mean, they are terribly small, but they're there,

0:43:320:43:35

-and we have to take account of them.

-Right. OK.

0:43:350:43:37

But I think it's a charming little thing. What are you hoping for?

0:43:370:43:41

I have no idea. I didn't think it was worth anything.

0:43:410:43:44

-Really?

-Mm.

0:43:440:43:45

-Well, I think, if we put this in at £50 to £80...

-Ooh!

0:43:450:43:51

..hopefully, even with the little fleabites,

0:43:510:43:54

if two people like it, it could well go over 100.

0:43:540:43:56

-Lovely!

-But I just think it's a charming little object.

0:43:560:44:00

Are you happy to put it in at that? And we'll put a 50 reserve on it,

0:44:000:44:03

-with discretion, if that's OK.

-Thank you. Yes.

0:44:030:44:06

But I do absolutely adore it. I could easily walk home with this.

0:44:060:44:10

I think it's absolutely wonderful.

0:44:100:44:12

-You're not having it.

-I know! The auction's getting it!

0:44:120:44:15

I think Mark's playing it very safe there!

0:44:150:44:18

Daum Nancy glass is very collectable at the moment.

0:44:180:44:21

Up now we have Irene, who's brought in an ornate piece of Victoriana.

0:44:230:44:28

Thanks for coming in. You've brought this rather impressive centrepiece.

0:44:280:44:31

Yes, it's lovely, isn't it?

0:44:310:44:33

What do you know about it?

0:44:330:44:34

Not a lot, really. It used to belong to an elderly neighbour of mine

0:44:340:44:39

-who left it to me in her will.

-Oh.

0:44:390:44:41

I've had it about 30 years.

0:44:410:44:43

-What do you do with it?

-I keep fruit in it on my table.

0:44:430:44:46

OK, but you brought it along today,

0:44:460:44:48

-so you must be thinking about selling it, presumably.

-Yes.

-OK.

0:44:480:44:51

It doesn't really go in the house

0:44:510:44:54

-and my sons wouldn't want it.

-OK.

0:44:540:44:57

So I thought it's just something less for them to have to clear out.

0:44:570:45:01

-Oh, it's quite a girlie piece, I have to say.

-It is.

0:45:010:45:05

I suppose you'd feel quite grand

0:45:050:45:07

taking your peaches and apples out of that. I quite like it

0:45:070:45:10

-but it is a bit over the top, I suppose.

-It is, yes.

0:45:100:45:13

It's basically Victorian and the good thing about the Victorians was,

0:45:130:45:16

they put registered marks on everything,

0:45:160:45:19

so if we have a look at the bottom,

0:45:190:45:21

this will tell us not just the year but actually the day

0:45:210:45:24

and the month it was made as well.

0:45:240:45:26

So on the bottom here there is a registered mark

0:45:260:45:28

and that tells us the class at the top, which is class one,

0:45:280:45:31

-which would be silver plate and glassware.

-Yes.

0:45:310:45:33

-Basically this code means the 3rd of May 1862.

-I didn't know that.

0:45:330:45:38

So we can date it fairly precisely

0:45:380:45:41

and then it's got the name here,

0:45:410:45:42

obviously, Elkington, who are the makers, a fairly good and well known

0:45:420:45:46

-prolific maker of silver plate.

-I did know that.

0:45:460:45:49

So that's pretty good. That makes my job a lot easier

0:45:490:45:52

-by telling me the exact date.

-Yes.

0:45:520:45:53

When it was made. And then you've got the cut glass bit on the top.

0:45:530:45:57

The design of it is really cool and it's got lots of intricate detail.

0:45:570:46:00

You've got these little bits here. These are anthemiums, this design.

0:46:000:46:04

You've got a guioche pattern down the legs,

0:46:040:46:06

you have little flower heads here,

0:46:060:46:09

little lion's-paw feet.

0:46:090:46:10

-There's a lot going on design-wise.

-Yes.

-But it's quite pleasing.

0:46:100:46:13

It's a very nice bowl shape. I quite like it.

0:46:130:46:16

-Yes, these unscrew, these bits.

-Why?

0:46:160:46:19

-And take off.

-Do they? Why on earth would they unscrew?

0:46:190:46:23

-Well, cleaning, I imagine.

-I guess.

0:46:230:46:25

There's no kind of design reason why they would unscrew.

0:46:250:46:28

-You're not missing any parts?

-Oh, no.

-It's silver plated.

0:46:280:46:30

You can see a bit's rubbed off here on the silver plate down to a brass.

0:46:300:46:33

-That takes off.

-Yeah, it would come off to clean.

0:46:330:46:36

I suppose they're quite popular at the moment.

0:46:360:46:38

It's a really nice decorative piece,

0:46:380:46:40

so kind of an interior designer's piece.

0:46:400:46:42

-But silver plate is not as high as it was.

-No.

0:46:420:46:45

-So maybe, estimate-wise, 100 to 150 for auction?

-Yes, that's fine.

0:46:450:46:49

-You'll be OK with that?

-Yes, that would be lovely.

0:46:490:46:51

Reserve would normally be just below, so maybe reserve it at £90.

0:46:510:46:54

-Right.

-£100 to £150 estimate.

-Yes.

0:46:540:46:57

What would you do with it?

0:46:570:46:59

What will you put your fruit in if you sell it?

0:46:590:47:01

Oh, I've got plenty of other things!

0:47:010:47:03

-Something else, and you'd spend the money some other way?

-Oh, yes.

0:47:030:47:06

-Brilliant. OK, well, are you happy to put it into a sale?

-Yes.

0:47:060:47:09

Let's give it a go and see if we can find somebody else

0:47:090:47:11

-that wants to buy it?

-Yeah, that would be lovely.

0:47:110:47:13

-OK, great.

-Thank you.

-Thanks for bringing it in.

-Thank you.

0:47:130:47:16

It's time for us to make our final trip to the auction house,

0:47:180:47:21

and here's a quick reminder of what we're taking with us.

0:47:210:47:24

We've got Carol's gold coins that she's saved over the years,

0:47:260:47:30

Irene's Elkington cut-glass bowl

0:47:300:47:32

with silver plate, valued at £100 to £150.

0:47:320:47:36

We have those two dog paintings brought in by Hugo,

0:47:360:47:39

and the tiny Daum Nancy glass which Olive bought for just 50 pence,

0:47:390:47:43

and Mark's valued it at 100 times that.

0:47:430:47:46

First up, Carol's gold coins,

0:47:490:47:51

and the auctioneer has split them into two lots.

0:47:510:47:53

The George IV £2 coin is now valued at £150 to £200.

0:47:530:47:57

But first it's the bracelet of sovereigns,

0:47:570:48:00

now valued at £800 to £1,200 on its own.

0:48:000:48:04

If you're going to have a gold bracelet, have one like this,

0:48:040:48:07

-because it's worth an awful lot of money, isn't it?

-It is that!

0:48:070:48:10

Wow! I know on the day you valued the bracelet with the £2 gold coin.

0:48:100:48:15

-That's right.

-We've since had them split by the auctioneer,

0:48:150:48:18

so selling the two lots separately,

0:48:180:48:20

though we've still got £800 to £1,200 on the bracelet

0:48:200:48:23

-and hopefully a couple of hundred on the coin.

-That would be nice.

0:48:230:48:26

-This has been a lot of collecting!

-I've done a lot more than that.

0:48:260:48:29

-What, all gold?

-Yes.

-No!

0:48:290:48:32

-And sold a lot.

-Oh, and sold a lot.

0:48:320:48:35

Did you enjoy wearing the bracelet at all?

0:48:350:48:37

That was one I wore all the time. I had another one...

0:48:370:48:41

-Oh!

-..with 36 sovereigns.

0:48:410:48:43

-That's major bling!

-That's major bling.

0:48:430:48:46

That's proper, isn't it? Hey, that's showing off!

0:48:460:48:50

-That got showed off, as you say.

-That was showing off!

-Yeah.

0:48:500:48:54

So, you've decided to have a clear-out of all the gold?

0:48:540:48:57

-I have.

-It's a good time to sell.

-That's why I'm doing it.

0:48:570:49:00

You're not daft, are you? Precious metals are up right now.

0:49:000:49:03

We're in a recession, and people invest in silver and gold.

0:49:030:49:07

Yes. The safe options.

0:49:070:49:08

So, we got two lots. One's following the other.

0:49:080:49:11

Let's start with £300 to £1,200, fingers crossed for the top end. It's the bracelet. Here we go!

0:49:110:49:17

554 is the nine-carat gold bracelet set with six sovereigns,

0:49:180:49:22

as per catalogue, 57.9 grams. Lot 554.

0:49:220:49:25

-Who will start me at £500?

-Wait.

-Sorry.

0:49:250:49:27

-There's commission interest. Start £1,000.

-Starting at £1,000.

0:49:270:49:30

-Straight in at £1,000!

-I'm looking for 1,050.

0:49:300:49:34

Any bid at 1,050, in the room or online?

0:49:340:49:37

It's a commission bid of £1,000. Any further offer? If not, I'm...

0:49:370:49:41

1,050. 1,100.

0:49:410:49:44

1,150.

0:49:440:49:46

No? Bid is on my right at £1,100 now.

0:49:470:49:50

Any further offer?

0:49:500:49:52

1,150. 1,150.

0:49:520:49:53

1,200. Anybody for 1,200? It's now in the room at 1,150.

0:49:530:49:58

And selling...

0:49:580:50:00

-Yes! Top end. So far, so good.

-I'm so excited!

0:50:000:50:02

And there's the £2 coin. Let's see if we can get the top end here.

0:50:020:50:06

Lot number 559 is the George IV £2 coin.

0:50:070:50:10

Lot 559. Who'll start me at £100? 100. 100 I'm bid.

0:50:100:50:13

110. 120. 130. 140.

0:50:130:50:16

150. 160. 170.

0:50:160:50:18

180. 190. 200. And ten. 220.

0:50:180:50:21

230. 240. 250.

0:50:210:50:23

260. 270. 280.

0:50:230:50:25

290. 300. 320?

0:50:250:50:27

Anybody at 320?

0:50:270:50:29

Any interest at 320? On my right at £300 now.

0:50:290:50:32

Are we all done at £300?

0:50:320:50:35

-Yes! £300!

-That's not bad, was it?

0:50:350:50:38

-That's incredible, isn't it?

-Wasn't it?

0:50:380:50:40

-What's that? £1,450?

-Absolutely!

0:50:400:50:42

-Oh, I'm so pleased!

-Oh, I'm ever so pleased!

0:50:420:50:45

-Thank you all very, very much!

-It's a great time to sell gold.

0:50:450:50:48

If you've got anything like that, bring it to a valuation day,

0:50:480:50:52

and it could be you in the auction room next time. Well done, Carol.

0:50:520:50:56

£1,450! A good day for gold, and a great day for Carol.

0:50:560:51:01

Next up, that pair of dog paintings belonging to Hugo and Stanley.

0:51:010:51:05

Well, Hugo and Stanley, we're just about to let the dogs out.

0:51:060:51:10

This is our next lot, £100 to £200. Really nice oils.

0:51:100:51:13

One of them, I'm not sure what breed it is,

0:51:130:51:15

-but the other is a Newfoundland.

-It's a bitzer -

0:51:150:51:18

bits of this and bits of that. It's a bit of a mix.

0:51:180:51:21

They are quite sweet. They are lovely.

0:51:210:51:23

One's better painted than the other, but they're going as a pair.

0:51:230:51:27

But the dog lovers will love them! That's the main thing.

0:51:270:51:31

And hopefully we've got a room full of them.

0:51:310:51:34

-This could be your inheritance he's flogging.

-I'm hoping so.

0:51:340:51:37

-THEY LAUGH

-Let's see how we do.

0:51:370:51:39

It's down to the bidders now. It's going under the hammer.

0:51:390:51:43

Pair of oil paintings, the heads of the dogs there.

0:51:440:51:47

Various bids. We're starting at £130, and I'm looking for 140.

0:51:470:51:50

There's a dog lover, look. Very keen, waving away.

0:51:500:51:53

200. And ten.

0:51:530:51:56

220.

0:51:560:51:58

230. 240.

0:51:580:51:59

250. 260.

0:52:010:52:02

270. Anybody at 270?

0:52:060:52:09

In the room at £260 now. Any further offer?

0:52:090:52:12

If not, I'm selling at £260. The bid is standing at 260.

0:52:120:52:16

-Brilliant! That was good.

-Fantastic!

0:52:170:52:20

-The dog lovers were here.

-Yeah.

-I thought they were really nice.

0:52:200:52:23

They'd suit anybody's wall. Proper country little scene, that.

0:52:230:52:27

I'm just going off to buy a nice pair of shoes.

0:52:270:52:31

Is that what you're going to do? Oh, well done. Look after him!

0:52:310:52:34

-I will.

-Look after him. The dog lovers were certainly here today.

0:52:340:52:38

What well behaved pooches! They made well over the top estimate.

0:52:380:52:42

Next up, the Elkington bowl.

0:52:430:52:46

And it belongs to Irene. My word, you've changed a lot, Irene.

0:52:460:52:49

-Oh, yes!

-Where is she?

0:52:490:52:51

-She's in Canada at the moment, on holiday.

-What's she doing there?

0:52:510:52:53

-She's having a holiday.

-Oh, is she?

0:52:530:52:55

-In Newfoundland.

-And you're her son.

-Yes.

-What's your name?

-Alan.

0:52:550:52:58

Alan, right. Can you remember this bowl as a nipper in the house,

0:52:580:53:01

-looking at it?

-Yeah, I remember it in the house.

0:53:010:53:03

I can remember the lady that gave it to my mum, who we got it from.

0:53:030:53:08

-I used to mow her lawn.

-Oh, did you?

-When I was a young boy.

0:53:080:53:13

Aw! Well, your mum's obviously looked after this for a long time

0:53:130:53:16

and I guess it's time for it to go.

0:53:160:53:18

-Yeah.

-And let's hope we get that top end of £150

0:53:180:53:20

because I know you like this.

0:53:200:53:22

I would buy this. I think this is really pretty and I think, maybe

0:53:220:53:25

it's a bit of a girlie lot for you,

0:53:250:53:26

but I think as a decorator's piece, it's great.

0:53:260:53:28

Hopefully there's somebody here that will bid in the room for it.

0:53:280:53:31

We'll find out right now. This is it. Good luck.

0:53:310:53:33

Lot number 453 is the Victorian cut glass

0:53:350:53:38

and plated mounted comport by Elkington & Co. Lot 453.

0:53:380:53:41

Who'll start me at £50?

0:53:410:53:43

50 I'm bid. Who's in at 60 now?

0:53:430:53:45

Any interest at 60? Bid is right at the front here at £50 now.

0:53:450:53:48

Who's in at 60? 60 I have. 70.

0:53:480:53:50

-80. 90.

-This is more like it.

0:53:500:53:53

And ten. 120. Who's in at 120?

0:53:530:53:56

-Right at the front at £120 now...

-I was a bit worried.

-Anybody at 120?

0:53:560:54:00

Any further bid? It's in the room at £110 now and selling at 110...

0:54:000:54:04

Yes, hammer's gone down. It was dicey for one moment, wasn't it?

0:54:040:54:08

-I thought we were stuck at 50 there.

-So did I.

0:54:080:54:10

That's auctions for you, isn't it? Lots of tension.

0:54:100:54:12

-Happy with that?

-I'm sure she will be, yeah.

0:54:120:54:14

Will you be able to tell her, ring her up? Has she got a mobile?

0:54:140:54:17

She'll be home in a couple of days anyway. So I'll give her the message.

0:54:170:54:21

A solid mid-estimate sale for a girlie item.

0:54:230:54:26

And now we have my favourite item of the day,

0:54:260:54:28

that delicate French glass vase belonging to Olive.

0:54:280:54:31

And I've a feeling Mark's estimate could be rather mean!

0:54:310:54:35

Now, that lovely little French vase with a poppy on it,

0:54:360:54:40

-which is just incredible, isn't it? That caught your eye...

-Yes.

0:54:400:54:44

-How much did you pay for it?

-50p!

0:54:440:54:46

-SHE LAUGHS

-You see, it is out there, isn't it?

0:54:460:54:49

-And I think we can recycle this 50p into easily £100.

-No!

0:54:490:54:56

That's my gut feeling. It just stands out so well.

0:54:560:55:00

-Absolutely.

-It could do twice your top end.

0:55:000:55:02

£180?

0:55:020:55:04

Well, it could do, Paul. A tiny little thing.

0:55:040:55:07

You could overlook it, but it just screams quality.

0:55:070:55:11

-I saw it from a distance and just -

-Zoomed in.

0:55:110:55:14

I saw you. Wings! You were like that.

0:55:140:55:16

-You gave me quite a fright.

-Did I? I've been told that before.

0:55:160:55:21

When he comes charging towards you. Why are you selling it, though?

0:55:210:55:25

Because it is beautiful! This should be on your dressing table.

0:55:250:55:28

My daughter recently won a make-over and a photo shoot,

0:55:280:55:32

and she took me with her, because you get every photo,

0:55:320:55:36

but then you have to pay for any more that you want,

0:55:360:55:39

so she said, "Come with me so I don't buy any."

0:55:390:55:41

-So I went, and I bought two myself!

-HE LAUGHS

0:55:410:55:45

-Oh, OK.

-If it sells, I will put it...

0:55:450:55:48

-OK.

-Oh, wonderful.

0:55:480:55:50

We can't talk about it any more because it's going under the hammer,

0:55:500:55:53

and it's down to this packed saleroom in Canterbury. Good luck!

0:55:530:55:57

-This is it.

-Thank you.

0:55:570:55:58

181, moving into the glassware.

0:56:010:56:03

It's the Daum Nancy cranberry-tinted glass vase.

0:56:030:56:06

-Several bids. We start at...

-340.

-£340.

0:56:060:56:09

I knew it had quality, but not that much!

0:56:090:56:12

360. 360. 380.

0:56:120:56:15

-400.

-Can you hold me up, please?

-I'll prop you up. Don't worry.

0:56:150:56:20

-460. Anybody at 460?

-460!

0:56:220:56:25

460. 480?

0:56:250:56:27

500.

0:56:300:56:31

520.

0:56:310:56:33

-That was a cunning buy, wasn't it?

-What were the chances?

-540.

0:56:350:56:38

560.

0:56:380:56:40

580.

0:56:420:56:43

600.

0:56:430:56:45

-Oh, my God!

-620.

0:56:490:56:51

640?

0:56:520:56:54

-Hang on in there!

-640. 660.

0:56:580:57:02

680?

0:57:030:57:05

No? The bid is at £660, with Tina.

0:57:060:57:10

680? Do you want to come in?

0:57:100:57:11

Any interest at 680, in the room or anywhere else?

0:57:140:57:17

If not I'll sell at £660. The bidder's on the phone.

0:57:170:57:20

At 660. If we're all done at 660...

0:57:200:57:22

Yes! £660!

0:57:230:57:26

Ooh!

0:57:260:57:27

-Olive!

-It's only this...

-I know, I know!

0:57:270:57:31

But small is beautiful! That poppy was just divine, wasn't it?

0:57:310:57:35

-I have good taste.

-You have very good taste!

0:57:350:57:37

-I had a sneaky suspicion about this.

-You did.

0:57:370:57:40

I had that feeling. You know when you pick things up,

0:57:400:57:43

you think, "Yes, that's a little sleeper"?

0:57:430:57:45

What a wonderful way to end today's show here in Canterbury, with a wonderful moment like that!

0:57:450:57:50

You're going to live that moment for a long time, aren't you?

0:57:500:57:54

-£660!

-My glasses have steamed up!

0:57:540:57:57

THEY LAUGH

0:57:570:57:59

That poppy design clearly had a lot of sentimental value for Olive,

0:58:020:58:06

and it's earned her more than 1,000 times the 50 pence she paid for it.

0:58:060:58:09

Just goes to show, always buy things you love!

0:58:090:58:12

What a fantastic day we've had here!

0:58:140:58:16

Everything's sold, and a lot of it at the top end of the estimate,

0:58:160:58:21

and we were clearly overwhelmed by the sale of Olive's glass vase.

0:58:210:58:25

That's definitely one to remember.

0:58:250:58:28

Paul Martin and the teams are on the Kent coast at Herne Bay with antiques experts Kate Bateman and Mark Stacey. There are smiles - and tears - as a tiny glass vase turns out to be a big seller. Paul finds out how a one-million-pound lottery grant is helping refloat a 100-year-old sailing barge as an educational project.