Lissanoure Castle Flog It!


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Lissanoure Castle

The team visit Northern Ireland and Lissanoure Castle in rural County Antrim. A couple of Moorcroft pieces get expert Catherine Southon excited.


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LineFromTo

We've flown across the Irish Sea to Ballymoney,

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in the heart of Northern Ireland.

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And just look at this!

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What a magnificent, beautiful setting we have for today's Flog It!

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Lissanoure Castle dates back to the 14th century.

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It was largely destroyed in 1847, when unused caskets of gunpowder

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were accidentally ignited!

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And this Tudor archway is one of the survivors of that huge explosion.

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But it's out in the barn in the grounds of the castle, today,

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that scores of people have turned up,

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laden with bags and boxes full of antiques and treasures

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to be valued by our team of experts

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and hopefully sold off to the highest bidder at auction.

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Joining us today is expert Will Axon,

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who likes handling the goods,

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especially when it's a handful of gold.

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What have we got?

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They're going to be of interest to someone. They've got the weight.

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Catherine Southon has had an eye for antiques since she was a child.

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And when she finds something, she just can't let it go.

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You can't sell that!

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And, coming up, we take a trip down memory lane.

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'I've got my eye on the ball...'

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Oh, missed it completely!

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'..Will is in touch with his animal side...'

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Tigers attacking elephants!

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'..and Catherine gets flirty.'

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Put my number in your phone, give me a call.

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Well, I'm Bally well done in after that!

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Well, everybody is now safely seated inside

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and somebody here in this massive crowd...

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And honestly, four or five hundred people have already turned up first thing this morning.

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..somebody is going to go home with an awful lot of money.

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It could be you.

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It could be you! It could be this chap, here.

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Who knows, but keep watching and you'll find out.

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And it looks like Catherine Southon is our first expert to the tables.

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Let's take a closer look at what she's spotted.

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It's Heather's vase that's up first.

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Heather, I do love Charlotte Rhead.

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I do actually collect Charlotte Rhead myself.

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-Are you a collector of Charlotte Rhead?

-No,

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not personally. But I think it's rather nice.

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So, where did you get this particular vase from?

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I bought it in Scotland last week, just.

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-Last week?!

-Yes, last week, yes.

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Right, OK. So, did you buy it at a fair or auction?

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-I bought it in an antique centre.

-Right, OK.

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And can I ask how much you paid for it?

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-30.

-£30?!

-Yes.

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OK!

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Well, let's just have a look at it

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-because it screams out Charlotte Rhead.

-Yes.

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It's got all the characteristics that we know and love of Charlotte Rhead.

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The yellow and oranges of the 1930s

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and then obviously the tube lining, here,

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-which looks...I always think it's a bit like an icing bag.

-Yes.

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-Yes, I appreciate that.

-You know, when you're doing your icing.

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-It's as if it's been squeezed out of the bag.

-Yes.

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What I think's quite unusual

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is that it's not a smooth piece, it's very bumpy, isn't it?

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Yes, that's what caught my eye when I saw it, yes.

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That textured look about it.

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-But the rest of it is all very... quite standard Charlotte Rhead.

-Yes.

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Now, let's just turn it over, here.

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And we can see the signature, there, of Rhead.

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-"C Rhead". And obviously she was the designer for the factory...

-Yes.

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..the Crown Ducal factory.

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-Now, you say you paid £30 for it.

-£30, yes.

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I was sort of surprised when he said 30

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and I said, "Yeah, that's fine!"

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So do you actually buy to sell or...?

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Well, I do for charity fairs, mainly.

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And I just love the buzz of buying and selling

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and it keeps the grey matter active!

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Oh, I think that's wonderful.

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-Now, you certainly will make a bit of a profit on this.

-Yes, I'm hoping to!

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I'd like to see this vase, really, make between £60 and £80 at auction.

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-Yes, that's fine.

-It should make, really, £80.

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-But I think let's keep it at £60-80, with a £60 reserve.

-Yes, that's fine.

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-Yes, that's fine by me.

-Does that sound good?

-Yes.

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-So this particular item you bought in Scotland last week?

-Yes, yes.

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It's amazing! This must be one of the quickest items you've had!

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Yes, it definitely is!

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So you've probably had it in your possession about four days!

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I came back on Sunday night

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and this is now Wednesday!

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-So, three days...

-Three days.

-..and then it's off.

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-Well, I hope we do you justice at the auction.

-I hope so.

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-It's a wonderful story.

-Yes.

-And thank you so much

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-for coming along, Heather.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Well, things are moving along nicely, here, today.

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As you can see, it really is in full flow.

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It looks a little bit chaotic but believe me,

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everybody knows what they're doing.

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And this I have to show you,

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because it's the first piece of Irish silver

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that I've come across today.

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It's a wonderful Georgian ladle.

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Instantly you can tell it's Irish or Scottish,

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because the handle is a lot longer than the English ones.

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But there's some nice weight, there.

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It's a good time to sell silver

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because everybody's investing in it right now.

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But if I show you on the back of the handle

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the owner has put some sellotape on the back of the assay marks

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because she's frightened of cleaning them too much

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when she's cleaning the rest of the ladle.

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If this was English,

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a ladle like that, dating from around the early 1800s,

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would realise, in auction, around about £100 to £120, tops.

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But because it's Irish,

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and it's from Dublin,

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this ladle is worth £300.

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I think she'll be pleased with that!

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From a dainty piece of silver to Sharon's mighty bronze.

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Now, I hope you haven't had to lug this here all on your own,

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because there is quite a weight in this.

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Have you got a big strong man helping you with this?

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Yes, I did bring him along.

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-Excellent, he's helping off-camera, is he?

-Yes.

-Keeping under wraps!

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Well, it's an impressive bronze you've brought along today.

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What can you tell me about it?

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My parents had it in their hall since I was a child.

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It always just sat in the hallway, nobody ever talked about it.

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Really?

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And then I inherited it about ten years ago.

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It's beautifully modelled.

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I mean, that's one of the key things with bronzes,

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how crisp and detailed it is.

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The bull's face here and the detail in his skin

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and this Japanese man, because that's what it is, it's Japanese bronze.

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We can tell that by this figure, who's very much similar

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to the kind of figures we see carved in ivory or kimonos

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-and that sort of thing.

-OK.

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This is going to date from around late 19th-century, Meiji period.

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Early Chinese and Japanese bronzes, they were ceremonial pieces.

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Tigers attacking elephants, that sort of, quite, shall we say,

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macho bronzes that a lot of people aren't that keen on.

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Now, this obviously doesn't have any,

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sort of, ritualistic connotations to it.

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The whole, sort of, fashion started to change

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with the rise of Buddhism, shall we say,

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when more naturalistic themes started to come into their thinking.

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Sort of, farmers, rural workers, fishermen.

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The same applies to the ivory carvings that we get

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from Japan as well.

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So, you remember it from your childhood.

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You've got no inclination to hold on to it, really?

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Well, I've tried to grow to like it.

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I've put it in my hall a few times and let it sit there,

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and then put it back in the garage.

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-It's been sitting in the garage for about ten years.

-In the garage?

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That's terrible. We hear that all the time on Flog It!

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If it's not in the bottom of the wardrobe,

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it's under the stairs or in the garage.

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I'm glad it's seen the light of day today.

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I think we can do quite well with this at auction, to be honest.

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Did your parents ever let on

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what they maybe thought it was worth or...?

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-No.

-Have you seen similar items?

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-No, I didn't even know it was bronze, to be honest.

-OK.

-So...

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Well, look, bronze has got a scrap value as well,

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let alone what it's going to be worth for its artistic merit.

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But I wouldn't be surprised

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-if we could put this in the saleroom at around £400-600.

-OK.

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Is that something that you think would sit well with you

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and perhaps your sons,

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who might perhaps stand to get a cut themselves?

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Oh, I'm sure they would be happy enough!

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Yeah, I'm sure they are.

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They'll be watching now saying, "Yes, go on, Mum."

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But I'll be there with you on the day to hopefully see it sold.

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-OK.

-Thanks for coming, Sharon.

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This is the bit I love at valuation days,

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dipping in and out of the queue

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before the experts see all the little treasures.

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So, I'm sitting next to Helen, who's got a little bit of tissue paper.

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What are you going to reveal, there?

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Oh, look at that!

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What's that going to do?

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THEY LAUGH

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And now it's Brian and Ellen,

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who have brought in some of the family silver.

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Thank you very much for coming along to Flog It! today

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and bringing along this lovely piece of Victoriana.

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From first glimpse, we could think

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it might be a little Victorian handbag,

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but if we just open it up, here...

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..we can see that it is a plate...

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Probably a little food warmer of some description.

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So perhaps you used to put your water...

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I don't think you would have put candles underneath,

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cos it's probably a little bit dangerous

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because of this barrel shape here.

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So perhaps put your hot water

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and then you would have put something on the top, here, to heat it up.

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Now, tell me a little bit about it. Where did you get this from?

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Well, my mother left it to me. It was her grandfather's.

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-Right, OK, so it's been handed down through the family?

-It has, yeah.

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Now, if we look on the front, here, it does say...

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There's a little inscription here and it says, "Presented to..."

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Just trying to make that out, "..N Luke Esq,

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-"by the pupils of the Metropolitan School of Art in Dublin."

-Yeah.

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-Your grandfather was actually given this as a...

-Retirement present.

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-As a retirement present.

-He taught art in this college.

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Are you an artist yourself?

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-He dabbles!

-Oh, he dabbles! Oh, very nice.

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It says that it's, "A token of their esteem and affection."

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And that's May, 1879, so right at the height of Victoriana, here.

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And that works perfectly, with all this lovely decoration, here.

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I mean, the Victorians liked to go over the top, really, didn't they?

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But, this, I love. It's really beautiful.

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-Now, have you actually ever used this as a warmer?

-No. No.

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I was sort of afraid to do anything with it, in case, you know,

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it wasn't the right thing.

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I thought at first, as you say, putting, like, muffins

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or something to warm them, but then I was afraid of that.

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I mean, I really think that's probably what you used to do.

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Little muffins or something like that on the top.

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I have to say, it's been beautifully made.

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It's not silver.

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I mean, had it been solid silver,

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we'd be talking about something very special.

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If you turn it over here...

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You can see, there, the registration mark, which is actually 1876.

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Have you ever had it valued before?

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Yes, about 1960 something

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-I got an insurance appraisal of

-£10. £10?

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I'll give you £10 for it now! I'll give you 15!

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-Well, I would like to say, probably £100-150.

-Lovely.

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-Let's hope it makes more than that.

-Thank you very much.

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Thank you so much for coming along and I'll see you at the auction.

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-OK.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Next up, it's aspiring collector Danielle.

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You are somewhat below the demographic age

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that we usually see on this programme, which I am pleased about.

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I'm glad to see a younger generation coming through.

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And you've brought, what I would call,

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a piece of almost folk art, I suppose.

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That sort of, well,

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let's call it what it is, chessboard, draughts board, isn't it?

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-Yeah.

-What can you tell me about this? Are you a chess grandmaster?

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Is this what you practise on?

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Me and my brother was actually just in a phase

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of playing chess and draughts at the time

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and me and my dad would be a regular goer to car-boot sales.

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And I spotted this and said it was nice,

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and asked how much it was and the lady told me it was £2.

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But I had £1 in my pocket so I said, "Would you take £1?"

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And she said, "Yeah, take it with you."

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So I was quite happy and me and my brother played on it for a while.

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-So you actually used it?

-Yeah, for a while.

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And you've got her down to £1 from £2, I mean, good work.

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Good haggling, I like your style.

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I don't think it's going to be hugely valuable,

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before we get too excited!

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But I just like its honesty and its simplicity, shall we say?

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I say simplicity, it's actually quite sophisticated marbling on here.

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We've got this border round the outside,

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with these wonderful shamrocks, sort of ribbon tied shamrocks,

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very apt being here in Northern Ireland.

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And in the corners, we've just got these compass-type stars,

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-aren't they?

-Yeah.

-It's that sort of feel.

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And all hand-painted, remember. This is all hand-painted.

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You've got these, sort of, double lines.

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This red line bordered in yellow

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and then you've got this marbled effect in the squares,

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to denote the black and white squares.

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How old do you think it is? Have you any idea?

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-Maybe ten, 20 years.

-Ten or 20 years?

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So what are we talking, '80s or '90s?

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I think it's a bit older than that, to be honest!

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I'm going to say it's definitely 19th century,

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-so we are talking, yeah, 1800s.

-Yeah.

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So you liked it, you've used it, you didn't pay a lot for it,

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so why are you selling it?

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Daddy said just to take it today, to see what it was worth.

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-Did he? Daddy said?

-Yeah.

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So I've already, sort of, told you more or less that it's not

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-going to be worth a fortune.

-That's fine.

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But I think, you know, as someone who likes it

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and would probably have a go at it if I saw it in a sale room,

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I would be prepared to pay, what, between 30, 40, maybe £50 for it

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so how does that sound as a return on your £1 purchase?

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That sounds fantastic.

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Next up, I couldn't resist stopping to have a chat with Margaret

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and her granddaughter Alana.

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What have you brought in today? Apart from Alana!

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-And these wonderful sandals.

-You're sitting on it.

-Oh, am I?

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Oh, can I have a look? Oh, that's nice, isn't it?

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Do you know, we always ask people to bring in furniture

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on Flog It! and not many people do.

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Where has this come from?

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Well, when my husband and I got married,

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a year later we had some wedding money.

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We were married in 1947

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and we bought our antiques in Oxford.

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Oh, how lovely. So you got this chair in Oxford?

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Yes, and I have another,

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a walnut one that was sold as two Queen Anne chairs.

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Oh, now you are talking! How much did you pay for two chairs, then?

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-Can I just...? I'm just going to do this.

-That was 60 years ago.

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A dropping seat.

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-Yes, the seat actually belongs to the walnut chair.

-Does it?

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Did you model them up, then, on the way up this morning?

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No, my daughter did!

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This is a lovely period piece, it really is.

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These date from the Queen Anne period.

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This is, sort of, early 1700s.

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If I just tip this upside down a minute,

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I just want to have a look underneath,

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because it's always good to turn a piece of furniture upside down.

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You've got to, really, to examine its toes.

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And look at those very generous, great big, pad feet.

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And just look at the quality of the wood.

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I mean, that's Cuban mahogany, wonderful, tight, straight grain.

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A very good colour.

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So much mahogany was coming into the country after around 1721,

0:15:350:15:39

when William Walpole, the first Prime Minister,

0:15:390:15:41

reduced the taxes and the levies on imported woods from the tropics.

0:15:410:15:45

So all this wood was coming back from the Caribbean.

0:15:450:15:47

Look at the width of that wood.

0:15:470:15:49

Now, that's been cut from one section of Cuban mahogany.

0:15:490:15:52

That width and that thick.

0:15:530:15:56

My apologies to the monkeys that were done out of their residence.

0:15:560:16:01

I'm really, really sorry, but they would have been dead by now anyway!

0:16:010:16:05

Oh, dear.

0:16:070:16:08

Isn't that lovely?

0:16:080:16:10

And if your walnut one is the same,

0:16:100:16:12

then the walnut one is worth a little bit more money than this one,

0:16:120:16:15

because walnut is a much more sought after and expensive wood.

0:16:150:16:18

Why are you selling them?

0:16:180:16:20

-Because we are downsizing.

-Oh, are you?

0:16:200:16:22

Hey, this is your inheritance, Alana!

0:16:220:16:24

-I know, but there's many more in her house.

-Oh, is there?

-Yeah.

0:16:240:16:28

Would you like to sell them as a pair?

0:16:280:16:29

Shall we put them into auction as a pair, one walnut and one mahogany?

0:16:290:16:33

Well, yes, I would.

0:16:330:16:35

The condition on this one does let it down because of the splits,

0:16:350:16:37

unfortunately. I think it's still worth in the region of £100-150,

0:16:370:16:41

and hopefully if your walnut is the same, we can double that.

0:16:410:16:44

I'd like to get £150 a chair, top end.

0:16:440:16:46

-So £200-300.

-That's OK!

0:16:460:16:51

-They have to go.

-And let's hope we get the top end!

0:16:510:16:55

-That's all I can say. Lots of money in Ballymoney!

-Well, that's it!

0:16:550:17:00

It is believed that Irish monks were the first people to produce whiskey,

0:17:070:17:11

possibly as far back as the 12th century,

0:17:110:17:13

making it one of the earliest distilled beverages in Europe.

0:17:130:17:17

A licence to distil whiskey in the Bushmills area was granted in April, 1608, by James I.

0:17:200:17:26

And some 400 years later, this area is still thriving, producing and

0:17:260:17:30

bottling all of its own whiskey, to sell to people all over the world.

0:17:300:17:34

I'm here to meet Colum Egan, the master distiller, to find out more.

0:17:360:17:41

So, Colum, as master distiller, what does your job involve? What's the role?

0:17:410:17:46

I have to ensure the whiskey that we're making today has the same taste

0:17:460:17:50

and the same characteristics that they have been distilling 50, 100, 150 years ago.

0:17:500:17:54

It's a great sense of tradition in this area, for making whiskey.

0:17:540:17:58

Start me through the whole process, from the beginning, from Bush River.

0:17:580:18:01

Well, we take that water, and we take barley, and then we allow it to ferment.

0:18:010:18:06

-How long does that take?

-It takes about 60 hours.

0:18:060:18:09

At the end of that 60 hours, you get about 8% strong beer.

0:18:090:18:12

At that point we're ready for distillation.

0:18:120:18:15

When you see our wonderful stillhouse and the wonderful aromas and smells...

0:18:150:18:19

I can smell them now, I can smell the yeast coming through in the breeze. You can smell that.

0:18:190:18:24

It drags you into the distillery every morning.

0:18:240:18:27

Shall we get inside and have a look?

0:18:270:18:29

The whole journey from grain to glass involves eight stages.

0:18:330:18:38

Irish whiskey is made in its own unique way.

0:18:380:18:40

The key characteristic being that it's triple distilled,

0:18:400:18:44

whereas Scotch whisky is distilled twice.

0:18:440:18:47

How come that's clear? That looks like water.

0:18:500:18:53

Where do you add the colour?

0:18:530:18:54

When you distil something to that purity, you get absolute crystal-clear colour.

0:18:540:18:59

Whiskey is brown.

0:18:590:19:01

That brown colour, that golden hue to it,

0:19:010:19:03

that all comes from the type of wood it's matured in.

0:19:030:19:06

-Right.

-So, by law, it has to be in that oak barrel for at least three years.

0:19:060:19:10

During that time, the whiskey expands into the oak and draws out a lot of the flavours and the colour.

0:19:100:19:16

And of course the older it gets, the more expensive!

0:19:160:19:20

Absolutely!

0:19:200:19:22

See if you can sell some of that!

0:19:220:19:23

There is a big difference, isn't there,

0:19:230:19:25

between a mature single malt to a three-year-old one.

0:19:250:19:28

Yes, the longer whiskey has in the barrel,

0:19:280:19:30

the more chance it has to pick up little nuances

0:19:300:19:32

and pick up different character from the wood itself.

0:19:320:19:35

And that's where your expertise really comes in?

0:19:350:19:37

Every day, I have to nose, I have to taste, and I have to make sure of the consistency of character.

0:19:370:19:43

What goes in the bottle itself has to be the same today as it's going to be in ten years' time.

0:19:430:19:48

Can we see the barrels, see where the colour comes in?

0:19:480:19:51

The barrels used in the maturation process are shipped in from Spain, Portugal and even as far as the USA.

0:19:510:19:59

They'd have previously been used in making sherry, Madeira

0:19:590:20:02

and bourbon, and add a certain flavour to the whiskey process.

0:20:020:20:06

Look at this! I just love the smell of mature oak.

0:20:080:20:11

How many barrels are in here?

0:20:110:20:13

These are actually all empty barrels.

0:20:130:20:16

We will store about 2,000 barrels at any one time in this area, getting ready to be filled.

0:20:160:20:20

I guess it's essential to use oak, for the taste, for the flavour?

0:20:200:20:24

Oak is fantastic, because of the characteristics and taste it gives to the whiskey.

0:20:240:20:29

There's also a very important factor in it, that oak is impervious.

0:20:290:20:32

-Of course.

-Because the whiskey spends so long in there, from three, to 30 or 40 years,

0:20:320:20:37

we have to make sure that none of the whiskey gets out of there.

0:20:370:20:40

Well, the grain's always tightening, as well, with oak.

0:20:400:20:43

It really does go dense, doesn't it?

0:20:430:20:44

You said... This has been full of bourbon in its day,

0:20:440:20:48

will that not affect the taste?

0:20:480:20:50

To put triple-distilled Bushmills spirit into a brand-new oak barrel,

0:20:500:20:54

you'd be overpowered with woodiness and oakiness.

0:20:540:20:56

So, why I go to Kentucky is, bourbon actually strips out...

0:20:560:21:00

They like that, heavy, oaky, woody notes.

0:21:000:21:02

So, they strip out into their bourbon.

0:21:020:21:04

What's left behind is some nice toasted wood, caramel.

0:21:040:21:07

-And a bit bourbony?

-A touch.

0:21:070:21:10

It's got to be, surely, hasn't it?

0:21:100:21:13

Actually, it leaches out of the wood itself.

0:21:130:21:15

They like every drop of their own bourbon in their own stuff!

0:21:150:21:19

The next stage might look a bit alarming,

0:21:190:21:22

but it's time for that whiskey, which has been maturing in barrels

0:21:220:21:26

for anything up to 30 years, to enter a blending process.

0:21:260:21:29

How many bottles do you think are in each barrel, here?

0:21:290:21:32

There is probably about 1,000 bottles of whiskey in each of those.

0:21:320:21:35

So what's that worth?

0:21:350:21:37

-£20 a bottle.

-£20 a bottle... about 20 grand.

-Oh,

0:21:370:21:40

that's a lot of money, isn't it?

0:21:400:21:42

That's a lot of money per barrel! £20,000 per barrel!

0:21:420:21:45

What I want to know is why you're letting it all out into this gully?

0:21:450:21:49

What we do, we drain it out, put it into these troughs, and we bring it across and we put it into large vats.

0:21:490:21:55

From those vats, we mix it in certain proportions, and that's what gives us our final brand of whiskey.

0:21:550:22:01

Oh, so this is another of the secrets of the Bushmills?

0:22:010:22:04

What's all the black stuff, charred-looking stuff?

0:22:040:22:06

The inside of American barrels are charred to sterilise them.

0:22:060:22:11

The great thing it does for whiskey, it caramelises a layer of sugars in the wood,

0:22:110:22:16

so you get these nice caramel and vanilla notes coming from them.

0:22:160:22:18

I can smell them now!

0:22:180:22:20

I think we should go to the tasting session.

0:22:200:22:23

-I think that would be ideal.

-OK, come on, then.

0:22:230:22:26

What are you smelling there?

0:22:360:22:38

That's a nice vanilla, mixed in with a little bit of woody and oakiness.

0:22:380:22:42

These lovely fruits beginning to come through, floral notes.

0:22:420:22:45

I can't smell them yet.

0:22:470:22:49

My nose isn't as trained as yours.

0:22:490:22:51

A couple of weeks here, and you're there.

0:22:510:22:53

I've got the vanilla.

0:22:530:22:55

So, what would be the classic toast?

0:22:550:22:57

Well you'll have to raise your glass,

0:22:570:22:59

and it simply goes,

0:22:590:23:00

there are tall ships, there are longships,

0:23:000:23:03

there are ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships,

0:23:030:23:07

and may they always be.

0:23:070:23:08

-Slainte!

-Cheers!

0:23:080:23:10

Today, we're at McAfee's Auctioneers.

0:23:230:23:26

Good luck later on.

0:23:260:23:28

Hopefully, you're going to be bidding on some of our items.

0:23:280:23:30

Well, I hope so. It's a jam-packed saleroom here in Ballycastle.

0:23:300:23:34

Someone today is going home with a lot of money. But do you know what?

0:23:340:23:37

Auctions are so unpredictable.

0:23:370:23:39

It can be a roller-coaster ride for everybody.

0:23:390:23:41

Someone may be going home very disappointed. Right now,

0:23:410:23:44

I'm going to catch up with our owners,

0:23:440:23:46

and we're going to leave you with a quick rundown

0:23:460:23:48

of all the items going under the hammer.

0:23:480:23:50

We have Heather's textured Charlotte Rhead vase.

0:23:500:23:54

Eagle-eyed Danielle's bargain chessboard.

0:23:540:23:57

Brian and Ellen's silver-plated food warmer.

0:23:570:24:01

Margaret's early 18th-century chairs,

0:24:010:24:04

and Sharon's Japanese bronze bull.

0:24:040:24:06

Sell it...

0:24:060:24:08

Gerry McAfee is on the rostrum.

0:24:080:24:09

Let's hope it's checkmate in one. You know what I'm talking about.

0:24:090:24:13

I've just been joined by Danielle,

0:24:130:24:14

and we're talking about that lovely chessboard.

0:24:140:24:17

We've got £30-£50 on this, and you got this for just £1.

0:24:170:24:21

-Yeah, at the car-boot sale.

-At the car-boot sale.

0:24:210:24:23

-Have you been back since?

-Yeah.

-Any other bargains?

0:24:230:24:27

Yeah, I've got a few teapots and a few books and stuff.

0:24:270:24:30

And the good thing is, you've been playing chess as well.

0:24:300:24:33

-Yeah, and draughts.

-And beating her brother. Do you play chess?

0:24:330:24:36

Yeah, I used to play a lot with my father, and my grandfather was good.

0:24:360:24:39

It's nice to see someone who is keeping the tradition going,

0:24:390:24:42

because I can imagine it's a game that's dying out somewhat.

0:24:420:24:44

Well, I tell you what. This is a lovely, unique piece.

0:24:440:24:47

You could say it's a bit of folk art,

0:24:470:24:48

and as we are here in Ireland, it's a bit of Irish folk art.

0:24:480:24:51

It's beautifully painted.

0:24:510:24:52

You could put any sort of chess figure on this.

0:24:520:24:54

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-Why do you want to sell it? Are you trading upwards,

0:24:540:24:58

going to put the money towards something else?

0:24:580:25:00

Yeah, I'm just looking, because, like, it's worth so much compared to

0:25:000:25:03

-what I bought it for, so I just think it's worth more money to sell it.

-OK.

0:25:030:25:06

-And buy other things?

-Yeah, buy other things.

-That's the spirit!

0:25:060:25:09

Always trade on and trade upwards. Right now, we're trading this one,

0:25:090:25:12

and it's going right under the hammer. Good luck.

0:25:120:25:15

We have a wooden chessboard. Very nice early wooden chessboard,

0:25:160:25:19

being held up for the back of the room.

0:25:190:25:21

What will we get for the wooden chessboard? £40? 30?

0:25:210:25:25

Ten bid. Wooden chessboard at £10.

0:25:250:25:27

That's cheap. We are in profit.

0:25:270:25:29

16. 18. £20.

0:25:290:25:31

I think they like it, Danielle.

0:25:310:25:33

25. 25 for you. £25.

0:25:330:25:36

Good value at £25. This chessboard now £25.

0:25:360:25:39

I'm selling it. We're all finished now at £25.

0:25:390:25:41

The bid's here at 25. Last call. I'm selling it at £25, all right?

0:25:410:25:45

-Hammer's gone down. £25. That's a good result.

-Yeah, very happy.

0:25:450:25:49

-You paid £1 for that.

-Yeah.

0:25:490:25:51

Don't forget, there is commission to pay.

0:25:510:25:53

But anyway, that's good for you,

0:25:530:25:55

-because you can now go off spending it and trade upwards.

-Yeah.

0:25:550:25:58

-What's on your shopping list?

-Anything... Anything to make money.

0:25:580:26:03

THEY LAUGH

0:26:030:26:04

We've got the makings here of a real dealer, haven't we? Brilliant.

0:26:040:26:08

She's great. It's good to see.

0:26:080:26:09

Maybe Danielle will even be one of our future experts.

0:26:090:26:14

Next up, Margaret is going to find out the fate of her chairs.

0:26:140:26:16

Remember that lovely Queen Anne chair I saw?

0:26:160:26:19

Well, there's now two, because Margaret and Alana

0:26:190:26:22

brought the other one in, and I've just got to say,

0:26:220:26:24

it's wonderful to see you both again.

0:26:240:26:26

You're looking fabulous, and so are you.

0:26:260:26:29

And hopefully, we've got some bidders here

0:26:290:26:31

-to buy these two chairs.

-Yeah, fingers crossed.

0:26:310:26:33

Otherwise, they're going home, and this is your inheritance,

0:26:330:26:35

-and you have got to look after them.

-I know!

0:26:350:26:38

-Because they're Gran's.

-They take up a bit of space!

0:26:380:26:40

THEY LAUGH

0:26:400:26:42

Use them, girl! Use them!

0:26:420:26:44

-Enjoy the moment, won't you?

-Yeah, oh, yes, I will.

0:26:440:26:47

-And I won't be sorry if they don't go!

-OK.

0:26:470:26:49

They're going home if they don't go.

0:26:490:26:51

We have a pair of framed parlour chairs.

0:26:530:26:56

Very, very nice chairs, from a very early period of chairs.

0:26:570:27:01

100 only bid for the pair now. £100.

0:27:030:27:05

-We're in at 100.

-And 110. 120.

0:27:050:27:09

130. 140.

0:27:090:27:12

150.

0:27:120:27:14

This pair now at 150.

0:27:140:27:15

-On the phone, 160.

-Phone bid!

-170.

0:27:150:27:18

New blood, 180. For the pair now, 180.

0:27:200:27:23

190. On the phone at 190.

0:27:230:27:25

On the phone at £190 for this pair now. 190.

0:27:250:27:28

We'd like a little more now at £190.

0:27:300:27:32

If we are all out here at £190...

0:27:330:27:36

I'm going to sell to the phone at £190.

0:27:360:27:38

-Two to three, we said, didn't we?

-Two to three, yeah.

0:27:380:27:42

Are you OK with that?

0:27:420:27:44

-Yeah. I think that's pretty good.

-Oh, yes.

0:27:440:27:46

I mean, we said 200 and got 190, so that was quite good.

0:27:460:27:50

Well...

0:27:500:27:51

All those memories of Oxford. It was Oxford, wasn't it?

0:27:530:27:55

Oh, it was.

0:27:550:27:57

It was early in our marriage too!

0:27:570:28:00

SHE LAUGHS

0:28:000:28:02

Thank you so much for coming in.

0:28:020:28:04

Well, thank you for giving me the opportunity to be myself.

0:28:040:28:09

So, Gerry the auctioneer used his discretion there,

0:28:100:28:13

and someone's got a great deal.

0:28:130:28:15

They were lovely quality.

0:28:150:28:16

Brian and Ellen, it's great to see you. Love the American accent.

0:28:200:28:24

-Come on, give us a bit.

-Hi, y'all.

0:28:240:28:26

-How long have you been in Ireland, then?

-I've been here for 21 years.

0:28:260:28:30

Wow, and you were working here.

0:28:300:28:32

-You were obviously working across the road, that's how you met.

-Yes.

0:28:320:28:36

-That was a good day, wasn't it?

-Yes, it was.

-That was a good day.

0:28:360:28:40

-How many years ago was that?

-That was 17 years ago.

-17.

0:28:400:28:43

-My car had broken down, and he helped me out.

-And he fixed it?

0:28:430:28:47

-Aw, that's love, isn't it?

-Love at first sight.

0:28:470:28:49

Good luck, good luck.

0:28:490:28:51

I agree with the value, anyway.

0:28:510:28:52

Yeah, well it's a piece of Victoriana, isn't it?

0:28:520:28:55

-A high Victoriana.

-Very dressy.

-It is. Really dressy.

0:28:550:28:59

And I think it's quite good quality. It should do top end.

0:28:590:29:03

It's got the look! It's got the look.

0:29:030:29:05

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:29:050:29:07

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:29:070:29:09

A fine silver food warmer or biscuit box, circa 1870,

0:29:110:29:14

a lovely piece of early silver plate,

0:29:140:29:17

and I can start it off with an internet bid of £70.

0:29:170:29:20

£70 bid, £70.

0:29:200:29:22

With me at 80. 85.

0:29:220:29:24

£90.

0:29:240:29:26

-95, £100.

-(Keep going!)

0:29:260:29:29

£100 bid now, at £100.

0:29:290:29:31

Bid left with me at £100.

0:29:310:29:33

£100 for the food warmer now. £100. 105.

0:29:330:29:37

110. 110 there. 110.

0:29:370:29:41

115. And I'm out at 115.

0:29:410:29:44

The bid's in the room now at £115.

0:29:440:29:47

And I'm selling at £115.

0:29:470:29:50

-It's gone.

-Great.

-£115. Happy?

0:29:500:29:52

-Yes.

-Good.

-Thank you very much.

0:29:520:29:54

Well, maybe you can treat yourself for a nice meal out,

0:29:540:29:56

-the two of you together.

-Thank you.

0:29:560:29:58

-A romantic supper.

-Yes.

-Yeah? OK.

0:29:580:30:01

Another meal, care of Flog It! It's good to be of service.

0:30:020:30:06

Next up, there's some more meat on the menu.

0:30:070:30:10

We've got some real quality going under the hammer right now.

0:30:100:30:13

It's the Japanese bull bronze. We have that.

0:30:130:30:15

Unfortunately, Sharon, the owner, can't be with us tonight,

0:30:150:30:18

but we do have Will, our expert. £4-£600, a lot of money.

0:30:180:30:22

-Well, it's got to be worth it, hasn't it?

-I think so, yes.

0:30:220:30:25

We've got a packed saleroom.

0:30:250:30:26

Let's find out right now what the bidders think.

0:30:260:30:29

Here we go. This is it.

0:30:290:30:31

A large Japanese bronze of a bull and herdsman, nicely carved,

0:30:320:30:36

very fine bronze here.

0:30:360:30:38

On a lovely carved base. Very, very nice base.

0:30:380:30:41

Start at £300.

0:30:410:30:43

£300, bid at £300.

0:30:430:30:46

320.

0:30:460:30:47

-Surely.

-340. 360.

0:30:470:30:49

380. Big bronze now at 380. £400.

0:30:490:30:54

The bronze now at £400. This big bronze now. 420 on the phone.

0:30:540:30:58

We need someone in the room with that bull.

0:30:580:31:00

£420. The bid's on the phone now at 420. 440.

0:31:000:31:04

He's like a Jack Russell wrestling with an old sock. Won't let go.

0:31:040:31:07

I was thinking that.

0:31:070:31:08

And in the room at 440 and selling. At £440...

0:31:080:31:12

It's gone down. 440. That's good.

0:31:120:31:15

-I think we need to get on the phone and tell Sharon.

-Yes.

0:31:150:31:18

-She's going to be really happy.

-I hope so.

0:31:180:31:21

If you've got anything like that, we would love to see it.

0:31:210:31:24

Bring it along to one of our valuation days.

0:31:240:31:26

You can log onto bbc.co.uk/flogit

0:31:260:31:30

go to the links, and hopefully we'll be coming to a town

0:31:300:31:33

very near you soon.

0:31:330:31:35

Aspiring collector Heather followed this advice,

0:31:370:31:40

and now her vase is going under the hammer.

0:31:400:31:43

Heather, I love the buzz as well, the thrill of buying and selling.

0:31:430:31:46

It's good, isn't it? The hunt, the search.

0:31:460:31:48

I've just been joined by Heather.

0:31:480:31:50

We're putting the Charlotte Rhead vase under the hammer,

0:31:500:31:52

-which came all the way from Scotland, didn't it?

-Yes, it did.

0:31:520:31:55

-Are we going to make a big profit?

-We should do.

-We should do.

0:31:550:32:00

It screams Charlotte Rhead, though, doesn't it?

0:32:000:32:02

It's got the colours, the patterns, that lining. It's a nice thing.

0:32:020:32:06

-It's the only piece like that here today.

-Yes. A good sought-after name.

0:32:060:32:10

-Yeah.

-Great name. That's going to get it away, isn't it?

0:32:100:32:13

-I hope so.

-So do I!

-THEY LAUGH

0:32:130:32:15

We're going to find out what the bidders think right now,

0:32:150:32:18

because this is your lot.

0:32:180:32:20

The Charlotte Rhead Crown Ducal vase.

0:32:210:32:24

Again, lovely quality, lovely colours.

0:32:240:32:26

Will somebody give me £100?

0:32:260:32:27

£100 for the Charlotte Rhead Crowned Ducal vase. £100?

0:32:270:32:32

-Go on, Gerry.

-Started at £50.

0:32:320:32:34

£50 bid for the Crown Ducal vase.

0:32:340:32:36

-Fingers crossed.

-55 bid. 55. £60.

0:32:360:32:39

Crown Ducal vase now at £60.

0:32:390:32:41

Take another five. Anyone there at £60?

0:32:410:32:44

(Go on! A little bit more.)

0:32:440:32:45

We finish at £60.

0:32:450:32:47

And I'm going to sell it, then, the Crown Ducal vase, at £60.

0:32:470:32:51

-Just on its reserve.

-No estimate.

-It's gone.

-That's OK.

-Happy?

0:32:510:32:55

Only cost me 30.

0:32:550:32:56

It only cost you 30. That's a good result.

0:32:560:32:59

Doubled your money, haven't you?

0:32:590:33:01

That's what it's all about. Profit, profit, profit.

0:33:020:33:06

Well, so far, so good.

0:33:060:33:07

That concludes our first visit to the saleroom today.

0:33:070:33:10

We are coming back here later in the programme, so fingers crossed

0:33:100:33:13

there's going to be one or two big surprises.

0:33:130:33:15

The Irish are very passionate about keeping their traditions alive.

0:33:260:33:30

THEY SING

0:33:300:33:34

And this can be found in music and dance,

0:33:390:33:42

and one very unique sporting event.

0:33:420:33:46

'The All Ireland finals are national occasions,

0:33:460:33:49

'arousing such passions, becoming an obsession,

0:33:490:33:51

'overwhelming every other aspect of life for weeks before.'

0:33:510:33:55

The team sport of hurling is one of the fastest

0:34:020:34:05

field games in the world.

0:34:050:34:07

It's frenetic, it's energetic, but most importantly,

0:34:070:34:10

it's born of Irish tradition.

0:34:100:34:12

'The men of the county hurling team

0:34:140:34:16

'prepare for the All Ireland senior hurling final.'

0:34:160:34:19

Hurling is an ancient sport. It came to Ireland with the Celts.

0:34:220:34:27

For the past two millennia,

0:34:270:34:29

the Irish have celebrated its legendary status.

0:34:290:34:32

It's in their blood.

0:34:320:34:34

So, what's involved in the game?

0:34:410:34:43

Well, two teams of up to 15 players try to get a ball

0:34:430:34:47

between two sets of extended goalposts.

0:34:470:34:49

They get one point for doing that, and three points for getting it

0:34:490:34:52

into the back of the net, past a goalkeeper.

0:34:520:34:54

More recently, during the Troubles,

0:34:560:34:58

hurling has become even more important. By uniting communities,

0:34:580:35:02

it's helped to heal the divide in Northern Ireland.

0:35:020:35:06

But on the pitch, things have been known to get a little out of hand.

0:35:060:35:10

It is tremendously exciting,

0:35:150:35:16

but what's caught my eye is the attention to detail

0:35:160:35:19

in making this very simple piece of equipment.

0:35:190:35:23

Michael Scullion runs a hurl-making business from his back yard.

0:35:260:35:30

That's how it starts. You can almost see it taking shape now, can't you?

0:35:320:35:35

-I can show you in the workshop now.

-Sure, OK.

0:35:350:35:39

How many do you make a year?

0:35:440:35:45

We would make probably between eight and 10,000 of all sizes.

0:35:450:35:49

-That's a lot, isn't it?

-Yes, a lot of hurls.

-That is a lot.

0:35:490:35:52

Ashwood is used for its flexibility and strength.

0:35:540:35:57

Michael customises the hurdles for each player's needs.

0:35:570:36:00

You made this so quickly. All of a sudden,

0:36:070:36:09

you've turned it almost into a piece of sculpture.

0:36:090:36:12

It feels so perfect. It really does.

0:36:120:36:14

There's great balance there, isn't there, as well?

0:36:140:36:17

That's what you're looking for, that balance.

0:36:170:36:20

Do you know, I'm very impressed with that. I really am.

0:36:200:36:23

If you've got a quality tool, surely you're halfway there.

0:36:250:36:29

Oh! Missed it completely. Maybe not.

0:36:290:36:32

I think I might need an expert to show me how.

0:36:320:36:34

You can dribble with it.

0:36:400:36:42

And then as soon as you've got it up, you can...

0:36:430:36:46

When you've got it up, you're allowed to take four steps

0:36:460:36:48

with the ball in your hand, and so I'll try and get away from you.

0:36:480:36:51

I can set it on there, and you're allowed,

0:36:530:36:55

when that ball's free like that, you can try and tap it away.

0:36:550:36:58

I see!

0:36:580:37:00

The ball is coming in, and we're trying to win it.

0:37:030:37:05

-HE LAUGHS

-Do people get hurt in this?

-Yeah!

0:37:050:37:09

Hurling is fast, furious, and above all, fun.

0:37:100:37:14

For the Irish, it's more than a sport, and it's vital

0:37:160:37:19

that this tradition is kept alive

0:37:190:37:21

and handed down to future generations.

0:37:210:37:23

'At all the pubs on the roads, there were celebrations.

0:37:230:37:27

'And at every one, they sang the same song, The Banks Of Lee.'

0:37:270:37:30

Back at Lissanoure Castle, there's a buzz in the air.

0:37:370:37:40

And all of these people have come here today to ask

0:37:400:37:43

that all-important question, which is...

0:37:430:37:45

-ALL:

-What's it worth?

-That's more like it.

0:37:450:37:48

-And what are you going to do when you find out?

-ALL:

-Flog it!

0:37:480:37:51

And that's just what Joan is hoping to do with her pottery.

0:37:510:37:55

Can you remember how much you paid for these?

0:37:550:37:57

Well, I know it wasn't any more than £2 each.

0:37:570:38:00

-£2 each?

-Yes.

0:38:000:38:02

I tell you what, Joan, can I come with you next time?

0:38:020:38:05

You certainly can, because it'd be great to have the expert!

0:38:050:38:08

Well, I tell you, for £2 each, I think

0:38:080:38:10

you did pretty well there.

0:38:100:38:11

Now, do you know anything about these at all?

0:38:110:38:14

No, only what I've found out from you, watching your programmes.

0:38:140:38:18

-Right.

-At the time when I bought them, I didn't know at all.

0:38:180:38:20

-So you didn't even know they were Moorcroft?

-No.

0:38:200:38:23

They are actually quite late in date. I would say they're probably 1930s.

0:38:230:38:28

This one, the brown, and this sort of coral or orangey flower here,

0:38:290:38:36

the pattern here is actually known as Hibiscus.

0:38:360:38:39

This is probably like a little bonbon dish, something like that.

0:38:390:38:43

I don't like this one so much.

0:38:440:38:46

I mean, the colour, it's not so commercial,

0:38:460:38:49

and I think also the shape, whereas this one,

0:38:490:38:52

you could nicely display this in your home, and I think also

0:38:520:38:55

the colour is more commercial. It's going to be more collectable.

0:38:550:38:58

Now, the pattern on this one is actually called clematis,

0:38:580:39:02

this dark, very dark blue.

0:39:020:39:05

-Actually, it's quite dusty here, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:39:050:39:08

We could do with a bit of a clean.

0:39:080:39:09

Value-wise, this one, we'd probably be looking at about £40-£60.

0:39:090:39:16

This one, we'd be looking at about £80-£100.

0:39:160:39:20

How does that sound?

0:39:200:39:21

-That's lovely.

-From £2, I think that's pretty good going!

0:39:210:39:24

-Yes, a good return.

-Not bad at all.

0:39:240:39:26

Now, why do you want to sell them?

0:39:260:39:28

Well, I have grandchildren, and I'm scared sometimes,

0:39:280:39:33

maybe they could topple it over and they'll be worth nothing.

0:39:330:39:37

This way, if I sell them now, I can have a holiday to Blackpool.

0:39:370:39:41

I love going to Blackpool!

0:39:410:39:43

Well, I have to say, it's a pretty good return on £2 each.

0:39:430:39:46

-Very much so.

-Very good. Next time, I'm coming with you,

0:39:460:39:49

so make sure you put my number in your phone,

0:39:490:39:53

give me a call, and we'll be there together!

0:39:530:39:56

But you've made everybody so wise now to it!

0:39:560:40:00

Will has spotted something quite unique amongst the crowd.

0:40:040:40:09

William, can I call you William? Are you a Will, or a Bill?

0:40:090:40:11

-Willie, actually.

-Willie.

0:40:110:40:14

I was called Willie by my father, I'm William when I'm in trouble and Will by my friends.

0:40:140:40:18

So, Willie, you've got an interesting item here.

0:40:180:40:21

It really caught my eye when I saw you in the queue.

0:40:210:40:25

Obviously, looking at it, it's a picture made up of tiles

0:40:250:40:29

in this oak frame, which I think is period.

0:40:290:40:31

I don't think they've ever been out of this frame.

0:40:310:40:34

What really intrigued me was the scene we've got here.

0:40:340:40:37

What can you tell me about this? How have you come by it?

0:40:370:40:40

-It was given to me by my sister, who in turn got it from a friend who was doing a house clearance.

-Right.

0:40:400:40:47

-No idea of its history other than that.

-She obviously didn't like it?

0:40:470:40:51

-Didn't like it.

-So she palmed it off to you.

0:40:510:40:53

-Who doesn't like it!

-So, it doesn't hang in your home?

-No.

-Where does it live?

0:40:530:40:58

It lives in the study, under a large box.

0:40:580:41:03

Under a large box! You really are trying to hide it away!

0:41:030:41:07

Surely you can appreciate how well painted it is, and the unusualness of the scene.

0:41:070:41:12

My family have quite a few connections with South America,

0:41:120:41:15

and so my father used to go out there a lot.

0:41:150:41:18

That kind of caught my eye, because I was trying to work out whereabouts it was.

0:41:180:41:22

We're obviously near some rather large mountains.

0:41:220:41:24

We've got this figure here. It does look a bit like a crow,

0:41:240:41:28

but I suspect it's trying to be more of a condor, or something like that.

0:41:280:41:31

And then we've got these rather fine-looking, shall we call them rancheros?

0:41:310:41:36

Nice strong colours in the blues and greens,

0:41:360:41:39

and then just this hint of the rockwork in these mountains.

0:41:390:41:44

I've had a closer look down here at the bottom, and we've got

0:41:440:41:48

a name here which we can just read.

0:41:480:41:50

-"Joost Thouet and..."

-"La Boucher."

0:41:500:41:55

La Boucher. Well done.

0:41:550:41:57

"Delft, Holland."

0:41:570:41:58

That's helpful to us. It tells us who made it, it tells us where they made it.

0:41:580:42:02

What's unusual, though, is with Delftware,

0:42:020:42:05

obviously people associate it more with perhaps blue and white clogs and windmills.

0:42:050:42:10

I think always intended to be displayed here as a tiled picture.

0:42:100:42:14

And like I said, I think the frame is contemporary,

0:42:140:42:17

so I think we're looking at around circa 1900 as a date.

0:42:170:42:22

-I quite like it, because it's different.

-Yes, but it certainly...

0:42:220:42:26

no, it's not something I would hang on the wall.

0:42:260:42:28

Doesn't fit in with your scheme, shall we say?

0:42:280:42:30

-What about value?

-I have no idea.

0:42:300:42:32

Let's have a stab in the dark, shall we?

0:42:320:42:34

I mean, I haven't seen one similar, so I couldn't tell you what the last one I saw made.

0:42:340:42:39

Let's be mean and say £10 a tile, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80.

0:42:390:42:44

We're going to reach that magic estimate that we like, 80 to 120, aren't we?

0:42:440:42:49

I think it's worth a go at that. I just think it's a bit different and like I say,

0:42:490:42:52

that's what the market wants -

0:42:520:42:54

quirky things that aren't run-of-the-mill.

0:42:540:42:56

-Have you got to phone your sister, is she going to be upset?

-No, no, not at all.

0:42:560:43:01

She'll be relieved. I'm hoping that someone who likes it will buy it.

0:43:010:43:04

Now we come to the point of reserve.

0:43:040:43:07

I don't think you'll be too worried if this just makes what it makes.

0:43:070:43:10

-What it makes on the day, that's... Yeah.

-You're a man after my own heart as well as my own name.

0:43:100:43:14

We'll go 80 to 120, without reserve, then, yes?

0:43:140:43:16

And on the day, fingers crossed it's going to fly

0:43:160:43:19

-away with the condors even, perhaps.

-It makes what it makes.

-Well done.

0:43:190:43:22

So, Willie is taking a punt on no reserve.

0:43:220:43:25

I hope he doesn't end up regretting it!

0:43:250:43:28

Time for some fresh air.

0:43:280:43:29

Cherry and Hector have brought along a family heirloom.

0:43:290:43:33

I've decided to do this one outside, and I know it's drizzling a bit,

0:43:350:43:38

but this castle dates back to the 14th century, and I'm sure it's seen

0:43:380:43:42

a lot worse, don't you? We don't mind a bit of drizzle, do we?

0:43:420:43:44

-We call it mizzle.

-Mizzle! Why do you call it mizzle?

-I don't know!

0:43:440:43:48

THEY LAUGH

0:43:480:43:49

-Do you really? Mizzle?

-Yes, it's mizzling.

-It's mizzling!

0:43:490:43:52

Well, hopefully it'll clear up a bit, anyway.

0:43:520:43:55

But we don't mind that. It's not dampening our spirits, is it?

0:43:550:43:58

We know what this is, don't we, Cherry and Hector?

0:43:580:44:01

Do you know what this is?

0:44:010:44:03

-Not really.

-No, no.

0:44:030:44:04

If I span that round...

0:44:040:44:06

Have another think.

0:44:080:44:10

It's an ornament of some sort, isn't it? It goes on a desk.

0:44:100:44:13

-Inkwell?

-Yes! Look.

0:44:130:44:16

That's where the glass liner should be.

0:44:160:44:18

Which sadly is missing.

0:44:180:44:20

But that doesn't matter, does it, really,

0:44:200:44:22

because hundreds of those have survived.

0:44:220:44:24

Not many of these have, and I'm sure we can find a replacement for that.

0:44:240:44:27

So, tell me, how did you come by this?

0:44:270:44:30

Well, I think it came back from India

0:44:310:44:33

with one or other of two great uncles of mine

0:44:330:44:36

who worked there in the late 19th and early 20th century.

0:44:360:44:40

Now, were they in the forces at all?

0:44:400:44:42

They both worked for the railways in India, although one of them,

0:44:420:44:47

I think, was a volunteer in the Armed Forces with the railway.

0:44:470:44:52

Right, OK. It probably did come back from India, but do you know what?

0:44:520:44:56

It found its way out to India.

0:44:560:44:59

Because this was made in England.

0:44:590:45:01

It is, unfortunately, the downside, it's only silver plate.

0:45:010:45:05

It's electroplated on a Britannia metal.

0:45:050:45:09

Queen Victoria was made Princess of India and there was this whole,

0:45:090:45:13

sort of, zest for anything that had the Raj influence.

0:45:130:45:16

I think an officer and a gentleman, who was serving in the Army,

0:45:160:45:20

took this out on campaign

0:45:200:45:21

with all of his wonderful mahogany camping furniture.

0:45:210:45:24

He would have stuck that inkwell on it...

0:45:240:45:27

and that would have put a smile on his face and reminded him

0:45:270:45:30

of home, and also of where he was.

0:45:300:45:31

And it's obviously an Indian elephant

0:45:310:45:33

because it's got small ears.

0:45:330:45:35

It's got some wonderful ceremonial headdress on it as well.

0:45:350:45:38

It is a very, very good casting. I like all this matte groundwork

0:45:380:45:41

because that gives the texture of the elephant's skin,

0:45:410:45:44

which is so thick and undulating and hairy.

0:45:440:45:47

I think, if you put this into auction,

0:45:470:45:49

we'll give it a valuation of £120 to £150,

0:45:490:45:52

but it should do around that - 150, 180.

0:45:520:45:56

-Well done.

-Well, I like it a lot.

0:45:560:45:59

-That's delightful, isn't it? Something you'd like to own?

-Yes.

0:45:590:46:02

Well, come along to the auction a bit later.

0:46:020:46:05

-You never know, you could be the owner.

-That's right.

-See you there.

0:46:050:46:08

There's just time for one more, and it's Frank's carriage clock.

0:46:110:46:16

Frank, welcome to Flog It! today.

0:46:160:46:18

And you've brought what we would call a four-glass mantle clock.

0:46:180:46:23

Is this something that you've bought for yourself

0:46:230:46:25

or is this a family piece?

0:46:250:46:26

When my mother was a young girl, she was a servant.

0:46:260:46:31

She was in service, was she? In the big house,

0:46:310:46:34

-shall we say? On the hill.

-Yeah, that's right.

0:46:340:46:36

-And this was gifted to her, was it?

-It was gifted to her.

0:46:360:46:39

Well...a very nice gift,

0:46:390:46:40

and we do hear that a lot in this business.

0:46:400:46:43

Well, let's have a quick look at the clock itself.

0:46:430:46:45

Four-glass - called for obvious reasons -

0:46:450:46:48

-glass on each side.

-Yeah.

0:46:480:46:50

Nice, sort of, clean dial there, with the winding hole there,

0:46:500:46:54

and then another winding hole there.

0:46:540:46:56

I've had a quick look at the movement - it's stamped France.

0:46:560:46:59

They're fairly standard movements, to be fair.

0:46:590:47:02

They were produced in large numbers

0:47:020:47:04

and they were imported into this country...

0:47:040:47:08

It strikes on a gong rather than a bell.

0:47:080:47:11

They're not the most popular striking mechanism, the gong.

0:47:110:47:15

People tend to like the bells

0:47:150:47:16

because that tends to suggest

0:47:160:47:18

-that they're a bit earlier as clocks.

-Yes.

0:47:180:47:20

But the interesting bit that I like is the old mercury pendulum.

0:47:200:47:23

They were looking for clocks to be accurate. Obviously, you don't

0:47:230:47:25

want a clock that's going to start losing a minute every hour or

0:47:250:47:28

something because, by the time you get to the end of the day,

0:47:280:47:31

you don't know what time it is.

0:47:310:47:32

So you go back to the old sundial situation.

0:47:320:47:35

Heat expansions of the pendulums used to affect

0:47:350:47:37

the distance of the arc, the tick, and that in turn would cause it

0:47:370:47:41

to either lose time or gain time.

0:47:410:47:44

Now, the pendulum that was filled with mercury would

0:47:440:47:47

compensate for that temperature change

0:47:470:47:50

and therefore, in theory, it would keep better time.

0:47:500:47:54

Now, have you any idea what it might be worth?

0:47:540:47:56

I have no idea.

0:47:560:47:57

No idea at all?

0:47:570:47:59

If I said it was worth maybe £100 or so, would that be a

0:47:590:48:03

figure you would be happy with?

0:48:030:48:06

Well, to be quite honest, I thought it might have been worth more.

0:48:060:48:09

Well...

0:48:090:48:10

with clocks, the buyers and the collectors are really after named

0:48:100:48:14

makers - that's what they want.

0:48:140:48:16

This is going to be too of a, shall we say, industrial model for them?

0:48:160:48:21

A sort of mass-produced example of the four-glass mantle clock.

0:48:210:48:25

Now, I know you want it to be worth more.

0:48:250:48:27

I would like it to be worth more.

0:48:270:48:28

The auctioneer would like it to be worth more.

0:48:280:48:30

I'll tell you what, let's fix the reserve at £100.

0:48:300:48:33

Are you going to let me run with this one?

0:48:330:48:35

It doesn't stop it making more, remember, at an auction.

0:48:370:48:40

Put a reserve of 125 on it.

0:48:400:48:43

125? That's going to look a bit...

0:48:430:48:45

I'll tell you what, let's go 120.

0:48:450:48:47

You've seen the name of the programme, it's Flog It!

0:48:470:48:50

-OK, right.

-120?

-120.

0:48:500:48:52

-We'll fix it at 120.

-OK.

0:48:520:48:54

It will go and make £300 or £400 now, won't it?

0:48:540:48:57

It's time to leave Lissanoure Castle.

0:48:570:48:58

We're going to put those valuations to the test.

0:48:580:49:01

We're making our way over to the auction room

0:49:010:49:03

and leaving you the quick recap of all the items

0:49:030:49:05

we're taking with us.

0:49:050:49:07

Catherine was amazed by Joan's £2 Moorcroft finds.

0:49:070:49:12

Willie's framed set of Delft tiles.

0:49:120:49:14

Frank's clock ticks all the boxes.

0:49:140:49:16

And Cherry and Hector are selling their exotic inkwell.

0:49:160:49:20

We're back at McAfee's in Ballycastle.

0:49:290:49:33

Frank and Will disagreed about his clock's value.

0:49:330:49:36

What will auctioneer Gerry think?

0:49:360:49:39

We've got a valuation of £120 to £150 on this.

0:49:390:49:43

It should certainly make 120. It's a nice clock in working order.

0:49:430:49:46

-The case is a wee bit plain.

-It's very. Very.

0:49:460:49:48

Which will appeal to some people and not to others,

0:49:480:49:51

but it should certainly get away at the low estimate of 120.

0:49:510:49:54

Oh, that's good. We just need two people that fall in love with this

0:49:540:49:57

and bid against each other, really.

0:49:570:49:58

That's what auctions are all about, isn't it?

0:49:580:50:00

Getting two or three people going, that's right.

0:50:000:50:03

It's time to see if the bidders are here

0:50:030:50:05

because it's going under the hammer, right now.

0:50:050:50:07

Good luck. Good luck. It's jam-packed, isn't it?

0:50:070:50:10

The tension's building.

0:50:100:50:12

I think it's about time we found exactly what Frank's clock is worth.

0:50:120:50:15

It's been in the family a long time.

0:50:150:50:17

It was brought into my house

0:50:170:50:19

and my grandchildren didn't like it striking.

0:50:190:50:22

No, they didn't. Oh, dear. I love that sound, don't you?

0:50:220:50:24

-Yeah.

-It's a good sound. Good luck. Good luck.

0:50:240:50:29

Let's find out what the bidders think. This is it.

0:50:290:50:31

A very nice French brass carriage clock, folks.

0:50:330:50:35

You all viewed it during the viewing.

0:50:350:50:37

It's in very, very good working order.

0:50:370:50:39

Nice, clean brass case here.

0:50:390:50:41

The French glass carriage clock.

0:50:410:50:42

Someone give me a couple of hundred for it.

0:50:420:50:44

Couple of hundred for the brass carriage clock. Couple of hundred.

0:50:440:50:47

180.

0:50:470:50:49

£100. Starting at £100.

0:50:490:50:50

The brass carriage clock. 110.

0:50:500:50:52

110 beside me.

0:50:520:50:54

110. 120.

0:50:540:50:56

130.

0:50:560:50:57

140.

0:50:570:50:59

150.

0:50:590:51:00

160.

0:51:000:51:02

170.

0:51:020:51:03

180.

0:51:030:51:05

This is good. They like it.

0:51:050:51:06

Gent's bid me out. £190.

0:51:070:51:09

Nice carriage clock, 190.

0:51:090:51:12

And I am selling to the gent's bid at £190.

0:51:120:51:15

Yes, hammer's gone down. £190. Good result.

0:51:150:51:19

-Happy?

-Yes.

0:51:190:51:20

What are you going to spend your money on, Frank?

0:51:200:51:23

-Well, now...

-The wife.

0:51:230:51:26

-The wife will have to get some of it...

-OK.

0:51:260:51:29

..and I'll get some of it.

0:51:290:51:31

And a digital clock for the grandchildren -

0:51:310:51:34

-no chiming.

-Oh.

0:51:340:51:36

Sold over the estimate. Frank and family can now divvy up the cash,

0:51:360:51:40

but will Hector and Cherry be as lucky?

0:51:400:51:43

Well, if you've got a good memory, let's say, one like an elephant,

0:51:430:51:46

you will remember this next lot belonging to Hector and Cherry -

0:51:460:51:49

it's that wonderful elephant inkwell.

0:51:490:51:51

Fell in love with this on the day. What a charming little thing.

0:51:510:51:54

It'll grace any gentleman's desk.

0:51:540:51:55

So, what have you been up to since we last saw you, anything?

0:51:550:51:58

-Just sort of taking it easy, I guess.

-Yes.

0:51:580:52:00

-Bit of gardening?

-Enjoying the good weather.

0:52:000:52:02

-It has been beautiful.

-Have you seen the inkwell here?

0:52:020:52:06

-Yes.

-Yes, up at the top there. It looks well.

-It does look well.

0:52:060:52:10

Hopefully we're going to sell it.

0:52:100:52:12

If we don't, it'll go home and you won't mind.

0:52:120:52:15

-We will welcome it home.

-I bet you will.

0:52:150:52:17

Cos it's a lovely thing. Let's find out if it finds a new home.

0:52:170:52:21

It's going under the hammer now.

0:52:210:52:23

A very unusual silver-plated inkwell

0:52:250:52:27

in the form of an elephant.

0:52:270:52:29

A nice bit of early plate.

0:52:290:52:31

Silver-plated inkwell in the form of an elephant.

0:52:310:52:34

A couple of hundred pounds for it? 180? 50 to start? £50.

0:52:340:52:37

Silver inkwell at £50.

0:52:370:52:40

£50 bid now. At 50.

0:52:400:52:41

60 bid.

0:52:410:52:43

-70 bid.

-It looks fabulous.

0:52:430:52:45

-It looks better...

-£80.

0:52:450:52:47

Surely worth more, folks? £80.

0:52:470:52:49

The inkwell at £80.

0:52:490:52:51

85? 85 bid.

0:52:510:52:54

£90. The inkwell now at 90.

0:52:540:52:56

The inkwell now at £90. We're hoping for more, folks. At £90.

0:52:560:53:00

This wee silver-plated inkwell only making £90.

0:53:000:53:04

We're going to have to leave this, folks, at £90.

0:53:040:53:08

No. I'm pleased it's going home

0:53:080:53:10

because it didn't sell at the price we wanted.

0:53:100:53:14

-We protected it with a reserve.

-Yes.

-A sensible reserve.

0:53:140:53:17

It's a lovely thing. Try and find another one.

0:53:170:53:19

-I'm glad it's going home.

-Oh, good.

0:53:190:53:21

-Maybe appreciate it more.

-I bet it never leaves your sight again.

0:53:210:53:25

Never again!

0:53:250:53:27

Well, at least Hector's happy to be taking it home.

0:53:270:53:30

That's just the way it goes sometimes.

0:53:300:53:32

Next up, it's Willie's turn with the tiles.

0:53:320:53:36

This is Willie's first auction. Come on, sum it up.

0:53:360:53:39

-Yep, first time I've ever been to an auction.

-It's packed, isn't it?

0:53:390:53:42

-I think the whole town has turned out today.

-It's brilliant.

0:53:420:53:45

-There's no reserve.

-That's right.

-There's no need for that.

0:53:450:53:48

Willie doesn't want them back, so let them make what they make.

0:53:480:53:51

That's the great thing. He said, "I've never liked them."

0:53:510:53:54

Exactly. Which is great,

0:53:540:53:56

because someone is going to fall in love with them, hopefully.

0:53:560:53:59

Welcome to the rollercoaster ride. It's going under the hammer.

0:53:590:54:02

Good luck.

0:54:020:54:03

Lot number 65 is the framed set of eight Delft tiles,

0:54:030:54:07

lovely tiles, in a hardwood frame.

0:54:070:54:09

£50 for the set. Start at £30.

0:54:090:54:12

Set now at £30.

0:54:120:54:14

I'm selling at 35 on the phone.

0:54:140:54:16

-It's all right.

-35.

0:54:160:54:18

£40.

0:54:180:54:20

At £40.

0:54:200:54:22

45 on the phone.

0:54:220:54:23

On the phone at 48. In the room at £48.

0:54:230:54:25

-50 on the phone. At 50. Good value here.

-Come on.

0:54:250:54:29

I'm selling. Delft tiles, bid's on the phone at £50.

0:54:290:54:32

£50.

0:54:320:54:34

All out. Selling on the phone...

0:54:340:54:36

At £50...

0:54:360:54:37

-Would have liked a little bit more for you, Willie.

-Yep.

0:54:370:54:41

Your first auction experience.

0:54:410:54:43

-But that's it.

-It was quick, wasn't it?

-It was.

0:54:430:54:46

-Blink and you'll miss it.

-Yeah. Phone bidder,

0:54:460:54:49

they obviously spotted them and I'm sure they'll be pleased with

0:54:490:54:52

-what they bought.

-I hope somebody will enjoy them.

0:54:520:54:54

Thank you so much for coming in.

0:54:540:54:56

Well, Willie took a real chance there with no reserve,

0:54:560:54:58

but he's just glad to have sold them.

0:54:580:55:00

Our last item of the day are Joan's Moorcroft pieces,

0:55:000:55:03

which have been split into two lots.

0:55:030:55:05

Going under the hammer, we've got some real quality.

0:55:050:55:08

I've just been joined by Joan, and it's not you going under the hammer.

0:55:080:55:12

-It's your Moorcroft. Two lovely finds.

-Yes.

0:55:120:55:15

-From a bric-a-brac sale.

-Indeed.

0:55:150:55:17

-How long ago?

-At least ten years.

0:55:170:55:20

Oh, OK. Not recently, then.

0:55:200:55:22

No. No, no.

0:55:220:55:23

So the first is the little vase. Yes, £80 to £100.

0:55:230:55:26

Why are you selling now, then, Joan?

0:55:260:55:29

Well, there's none of the family interested in it.

0:55:290:55:34

-Aren't they?

-No.

0:55:340:55:36

And they're always telling me to downsize.

0:55:360:55:39

I live in a fold, which... You only can have so much.

0:55:390:55:44

-So I really have to downsize.

-You live in a what?

-A fold.

0:55:440:55:47

-What's a fold?

-It's...

-I've never heard of that.

0:55:470:55:50

I can't say I know what a fold is.

0:55:500:55:52

What's a fold?

0:55:520:55:54

It's... You're independent living,

0:55:540:55:57

but you have a supervisor to check on you.

0:55:570:56:00

-Oh, OK.

-To see that you're all right.

0:56:000:56:03

-So you do need to declutter a bit?

-Yes. Really.

-Good luck.

0:56:030:56:06

Let's hope all the collectors are here,

0:56:060:56:09

because this is a name to collect.

0:56:090:56:11

We're now into two very nice pieces of Moorcroft.

0:56:110:56:15

We are starting at lot number 325, the Moorcroft vase.

0:56:150:56:17

Who'll give me £150 for it?

0:56:170:56:19

150? 125?

0:56:190:56:21

-Come on.

-£100, the Moorcroft vase.

0:56:210:56:23

50 bid.

0:56:230:56:25

60 bid. 70 bid. 80 bid.

0:56:250:56:28

-Good.

-85.

-We've sold this one.

0:56:280:56:30

-£90.

-Come on.

0:56:300:56:31

95. £100.

0:56:310:56:34

Standing here, at £100. The Moorcroft vase at £100.

0:56:340:56:37

105 on the phone.

0:56:370:56:39

110. At £110.

0:56:390:56:42

-Excellent. We like.

-On the phone at £115.

0:56:420:56:45

I'm selling to the phone if we're all out. 120.

0:56:450:56:49

Back in at 120. 125 on the phone.

0:56:490:56:51

On the phone at £125, and I'm selling...

0:56:510:56:55

-Yes, hammer's gone down. £125.

-Excellent.

0:56:550:56:58

Here's the second lot, it's the bowl.

0:56:580:57:00

-Hopefully, we'll get £50, £60.

-Unusual colours this time.

0:57:000:57:03

Who'll give me £100 for this one?

0:57:030:57:06

£100 for the Moorcroft comport?

0:57:060:57:08

£100? 90? 80? £50 for this one?

0:57:080:57:11

30 to start with. £30.

0:57:110:57:14

£30 now. At 30. £30 for this Moorcroft. 135.

0:57:140:57:17

-40 here. 45.

-Good.

-£50.

0:57:170:57:21

£50. The lady's bid at £50.

0:57:210:57:23

55 over here.

0:57:230:57:25

£60 here. 65.

0:57:250:57:27

-£70.

-This is great.

-I'm very pleased about this. It's great.

0:57:270:57:31

£75 over here.

0:57:310:57:33

I'm selling at £75 if we're all finished...

0:57:330:57:36

-At £75...

-Marvellous.

0:57:360:57:38

-Very good.

-And we always keep saying on this show,

0:57:380:57:40

quality always sells.

0:57:400:57:43

Joan, that's marvellous, isn't it?

0:57:430:57:46

-That's marvellous.

-Not bad for £2!

-That's going to come in handy.

0:57:460:57:49

-£2 from a bric-a-brac sale.

-Yes.

-Good on you.

0:57:490:57:52

Yes. And it was you who educated me.

0:57:520:57:55

And are you going to spend the money on yourself?

0:57:550:57:59

Well, I love Blackpool.

0:57:590:58:00

I'll probably put it into a holiday to Blackpool.

0:58:000:58:03

Holiday to Blackpool. Aw, lovely.

0:58:030:58:05

That's it. We've come to the end of another day

0:58:100:58:13

in another auction room.

0:58:130:58:14

It's been a marvellous rollercoaster ride of emotions

0:58:140:58:17

here in Northern Ireland - some highs and lows,

0:58:170:58:19

some hits and misses - but that's what auctions are all about.

0:58:190:58:23

You can't predict what's going to happen and I, for one,

0:58:230:58:25

can't wait until the next one, so join me again soon, but for now,

0:58:250:58:28

from Ballycastle in Northern Ireland, it's bye-bye.

0:58:280:58:32

The team visit Northern Ireland and the beautiful Lissanoure Castle in rural County Antrim. Hundreds of locals bring along their treasures to be valued, including various bargains bought by eagle-eyed antiques lovers. A couple of Moorcroft pieces bought for £2 get expert Catherine Southon excited and Will Axon values a chessboard originally bought for only £1. Will their owners find they made good investments when they take their items to auction in Ballycastle?