Cirencester 7 Flog It!


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Cirencester 7

Paul Martin and the team are in the Cotswolds. Michael Baggott brews up excitement about a silver teapot, and Thomas Plant notices jewellery encrusted with diamonds.


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Welcome to Cirencester,

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and to the heart of the British antiques and collectables trade.

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Today we are in the Cotswolds where every small town

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has a scattering of period listed buildings

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and wonderful antique shops.

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So what a perfect place to flog it.

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Cirencester is one of those places

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that is packed with character and charm.

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Everywhere you turn there are pretty houses made from local sandstone.

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And interesting streets lined with quirky shops.

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And the peaceful countryside is never far away.

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All that adds up to a location

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that's brimming with much-loved collectables

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and hopefully ready to give up a few of its treasures.

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We've got a wonderful queue gathering outside the Corn Hall.

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All these people have been waiting patiently,

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and hopefully at the end of the show

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they will be going home with a lot of money

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if these bags and boxes are full of treasures

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that we can sell in auction.

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Yes, this is the programme where we value your unwanted antiques

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and collectables and then help you sell them.

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Our team of experts is led by

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the very capable Thomas Plant and Michael Baggott.

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I'm sure we can do something for you with those.

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Michael started early in the antiques business

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making his first deal when he was at primary school.

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So there is no kidding him.

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He's a silver specialist, but that won't stop him

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from spotting other collectables.

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Ah, now, I'll leave that to my colleague, he's the toy man.

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Thomas Plant claims to be the action man of the team.

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He is a James Bond fan with a love of skiing and fencing.

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There's only one thing he loves more than jewellery, though,

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and that is giving advice.

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If you imagine, when this was made, the brass would be really, really shiny.

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-I wasn't about to clean it.

-Life is too short for things like that.

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Coming up, Thomas is on sparkling form

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and has some good news for Lynn about her ring.

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I've always thought it was just a piece of costume jewellery.

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You've seen the off-screen valuers,

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and they have told you what the stones are here.

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-They have.

-They're not glass, are they?

-No.

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I've got a battle on my hands with Phyllis,

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as she tries to wring every penny out of this pot.

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OK, you win.

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Thanks, Phyllis.

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And Michael is brewing up some excitement

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over a large piece of silverware.

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At the time,

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Americans were buying Bateman silver in droves.

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The price of silver was high,

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it was worth every penny when you bought it.

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So, has it gone up in value since then, or down?

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Stay tuned to find out.

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So many people,

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which means an awful lot of antiques.

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We do have a full house here

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so I think it's about time we went treasure hunting, don't you?

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And Michael is first at the tables.

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He's gone for one of my favourite subjects to kick things off with,

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it's a pretty item of silverware, brought in by Muriel.

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Muriel, thank you for bringing this lovely little silver jug in today.

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Can you tell me, how did you acquire it?

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It was in this cardboard box with a lot of odds and ends

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and the lady said if you are interested

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in whatever is in that box you can have it for £5.

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-There was some china, Japanese kind of plate things...

-Oh, my word!

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..and some other silver things.

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But they were silver-plated.

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Where was this at?

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It was round Bristol, at a car-boot sale round Bristol.

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Cos we used to live in Bristol.

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Good grief! Was that a long time ago?

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Oh, yes, over five years.

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Muriel, don't say five years is a long time ago.

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It was yesterday!

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-Well, it seemed long...

-I'm thinking about 20 years!

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Well, to find that in a car-boot sale,

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even five years ago,

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is a fantastic achievement.

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Have you got any idea when it was made, who made it?

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No idea whatsoever.

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Well, it's a form we call a helmet-shaped cream jug.

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And if I turn it upside down you can see why,

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-because it is shaped like a helmet.

-Yes.

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And it should be marked and it's marked under the lip here,

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and if I just breathe on those I will be able to see them a bit clearer.

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And we've got the maker's mark SH,

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and we've got a set of marks for London 1794.

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-Oh, gracious!

-It's over 200 years old.

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Oh, gracious.

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I mean, what a fantastic buy for in a box for £5.

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Odds and ends, it was.

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These cream jugs were made

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and were bought by quite a lot of middle-class people.

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Because they are fairly light, quite thin silver,

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rather than having any cast decoration

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they simply punch around the rim

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to give this beaded effect.

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And because of that they are quite fragile and prone to damage.

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There has been a little bit of repair at the handle there.

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But nonetheless it is a Georgian silver cream job.

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So we're going to show you a good return on your £5,

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if you put it into auction.

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In pristine condition it will probably be £150 to £200.

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We've got to take into account

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the little bits of damage and the wear on it.

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But nevertheless it is a little jug that at £70-£100,

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and we'd put a fixed reserve of £70 on it,

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I think they'll be hands flying into the air at the auction.

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Lovely. Thank you.

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-So you're happy to put it in?

-Yes, please.

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We'll put it in and hope it pours out a profit on the day.

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I hope so, that will be lovely, won't it?

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-Thank you very much, Muriel.

-Thank you.

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Well, it seems Muriel is absolutely delighted with Michael's valuation,

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what a great way to start the show.

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Next up is Charlie who has an intriguing find to show Thomas.

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Tell me about your medal.

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I saw it in a charity shop

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and it just took my eye and I decided to buy it, really.

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-Really?

-Yeah.

-Are you a buyer and seller of items?

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Not to be honest, I just look around and see what's about

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and what takes my fancy, really.

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So why did it take your eye? I want to know more.

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It's just really the design of it, and to me it's someone's history.

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I thought it was just something military,

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until I looked at the box and it said something to do with Masonic.

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Established Masonic Outfitters here, Toye and Co, in London.

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This here is United Ancient Order of Druids.

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Now, Masonic items,

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there are people who do collect it.

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Personally I've never seen

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a United Ancient Order of Druids medal before.

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We've got this Maltese cross design.

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This is all silver, you haven't given it a clean or anything.

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Quite nicely engraved, et cetera, around here.

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And you've got these two Druids

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standing either side of the field,

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and an armorial on the top.

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This would be probably silver gilt here,

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so it's actually quite an interesting item.

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On the back of the medal it has got a description of who it was given to.

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-If we turn it over and we have got it on here, have we?

-Yeah.

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We've got presented to Brother JC Goodrum

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for introducing members, 1915.

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What did you pay for it?

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-I paid £10 for it.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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And that was how many years ago?

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That was probably about four or five years ago.

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You've done jolly well, really.

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I think we're going to do better than your £10.

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-I think we might get you between £40 and £60.

-That's all right then.

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We'll put it in for that and I think we'll put a reserve on at least 20.

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How does that grab you?

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That's fine, yeah.

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So, what will you do with it, the money?

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Well, going to split it, take some home for myself

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and cos my mum's got arthritis,

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give some money to the Arthritis Trust.

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Yeah, great.

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Well, Thomas likes it

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and it could just prove to be a very profitable find for Charlie.

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And now it's my turn to have a go at a valuation.

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Phyllis, are you a collector?

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-I am a collector.

-You are, are you?

-I am, yes.

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So how many pieces do you have?

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50 to 100.

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Do you know what we're talking about?

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You know what this is, don't you? It's Wemyss, yes.

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We've seen it on the show before.

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So, why are you selling this?

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-We've got too many pieces and we're downsizing.

-Are you?

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Is this the first to go?

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No, the second to go.

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How much did you pay for this vase?

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-385.

-385. How long ago was that?

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In the early '90s.

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You know all about Wemyss, obviously.

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I enjoy Wemyss.

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Yes, there's the mark that tells us it's Wemyss.

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The condition is very good, isn't it? Very, very good.

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Wemyss is the brainchild of Robert Heron

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and it is probably the most sought-after Scottish property,

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from the factory in Fife which was started in 1882,

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but I think he got lucky

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by employing Karel Nekola,

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wonderful artist, and look at the decoration.

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Beautiful.

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Wonderful, wonderful.

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There's a big market for Wemyss.

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I think you paid the right money for it, I've got to say.

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I don't think we're going to be in for a big surprise.

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If we put this into auction,

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I think I'd like to put 400 to 500 on this

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and hopefully, just hopefully, we'll get you your money back.

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Let's put 400 to 500 on it with a reserve at 400,

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with discretion, would you be happy with discretion?

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-Maybe.

-Maybe.

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Is that yes or no?

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-No.

-No, OK.

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You are steering this, you know that,

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I have to go with what you say.

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But the auctioneer might ring you up

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and say can we have a bit of discretion,

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it covers a lot of bases then, doesn't it?

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Well, yes, it does,

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it gets people interested if it is not too high as well.

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You see, you were starting off at a high trade price, £400,

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everybody knows that's its price.

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OK, 400 with discretion, OK, you win.

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Thanks, Phyllis.

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It's hard going, isn't it?

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-I like it.

-I know you do.

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But you know what I'm saying,

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everybody wants a bargain in auctions,

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let's face it, that's why people go to auctions,

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otherwise there would be no need for an auction,

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you'd go to an antiques shop

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and there would be a price tag saying £400.

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And then you try and knock the dealer down, still, don't you?

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Come on, you give everyone 10%, why do you give me 20?

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I'll be your new best friend.

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Phyllis might just need a few friends in the sale room

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if this jardiniere is going to make her rather high £400 reserve.

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And from someone who knows just how much she wants,

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to a lady who had no idea about how much her item was worth.

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Lynn has brought in what she originally thought was

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a costume jewellery ring.

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So, Lynn, tell me, why did you come along and bring this ring?

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Well, it's been lying in a box in my drawer

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for at least 20 years now.

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And I've always thought it was just a piece of costume jewellery,

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so I thought that seeing as Flog It! was in town

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I'd come and see whether they could tell me anything more about it.

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So you've come today and you've seen the valuers, the off-screen valuers,

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-and they've told you what these stones are here.

-They have.

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-They're not glass, are they?

-No.

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-They're a carbon, aren't they? They are diamonds.

-They are.

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-What's the stone in the middle?

-It's a sapphire.

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It's a sapphire, isn't it? It's a nice blue sapphire,

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not a dark, dark blue with too much aluminium in,

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it's a nice blue sapphire.

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These are lovely diamonds,

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really nice white coloured stones.

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They are also cut in what we call the old-cut style.

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So that helps you date the ring.

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Early Edwardian, I would say.

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I reckon you have got over one and a half carats of diamonds in there.

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-Really?

-The little sapphire is of minimal value.

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Although the shank,

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this is what we call the shank on a ring, isn't marked,

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it would possibly be 18 carat gold.

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And this white here would probably be platinum.

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Where did you get it from?

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I inherited it from my, dare I say it, my ex-husband's aunt.

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OK.

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And it was just in a box of assorted things that were left.

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What would you have done with it if you hadn't come here?

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-It probably would have sat in the drawer for another 20 years.

-Really?

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Probably.

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-Just sat there.

-Yes. More than likely.

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Until my daughters found it,

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after I'd left this mortal coil.

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Are they into jewellery?

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No, they're not.

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The thing is, about diamonds,

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diamonds are worth money when they're over a carat,

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if you want my honest opinion.

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Once you've got a diamond which is one single stone, over a carat,

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it tends to hold its value extremely well.

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-Lots of little stones would no way add up to the figure of just one single stone.

-Right.

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But for little stones, set within a pretty setting,

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which is also very clean,

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because it hasn't been worn,

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I would value these diamonds per carat at about £300 a carat.

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So the ring would be worth at auction today about £400 to £600.

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-Right.

-Would it be something you would be interested in selling?

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It would be, because as I say, I have no real use for it,

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so I think it would be a shame for it to sit in a drawer

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when somebody else might appreciate it and wear it.

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-It's a fine thing.

-Yes.

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I would certainly say one should have a reserve

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-of £400 with a little bit of discretion.

-Right. Lovely.

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-Are you going to come to the auction?

-Thank you very much. Yes, I'd love to.

-Yes.

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I really would, be all part of the experience that today has been as well.

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How has it been, the experience?

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It's been very, very fascinating, I've really enjoyed it.

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Towards the end of the 19th-century

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the Cotswolds was at the centre of an artistic and social group

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that would change design for ever

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and immortalise some of its key players.

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It became known as the Arts and Craft Movement.

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But whilst designer craftsmen

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such as Philip Webb, Ernest Gimson and Edward Burne-Jones

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were highly celebrated in the movement

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and their work is still renowned today,

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there is one leading light in the world of textiles

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which is virtually unknown.

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And that's the name of May Morris.

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Her contribution to the movement was highly influential and heartfelt.

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But she would for ever remain in the shadow of her father,

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a towering figure in the movement,

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William Morris.

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May was born in 1862,

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the youngest daughter of William and his wife, Jane Burden.

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She spent much of her youth here at Kelmscott Manor,

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the family's summerhouse,

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and would eventually come to live here for good in 1923.

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I've come here today to meet her biographer,

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Jan Marsh, to find out more about May and her work.

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Did May choose embroidery as her art form early on?

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May Morris was kind of born into embroidery,

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because her mother, her aunt,

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and all the whole women in the circle were great needle women.

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It is fair to say that her father

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would have been a big influence on her, surely.

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William Morris is the person who actually began

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the whole Arts and Crafts Movement.

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In embroidery he was one of the first people

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to aim to revive the traditional styles and techniques of embroidery.

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Morris made May and her sister use watercolour and drawing to study things

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that they would later translate into embroidery motifs.

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You've got a couple of examples here, haven't you?

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A piece like this with the beautiful wild rose motif.

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Lovely border.

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That would have been studied from the hedgerow round here, in the stylised form,

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and look at the lovely colour scheme,

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very soft, also very vivid colour scheme.

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That must have taken absolutely hours to do.

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Well, yes, embroidery is one of those crafts that is very time-consuming.

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I guess, for May, this was a real love, wasn't it?

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May Morris is very much someone who found enormous pleasure

0:16:030:16:08

in the slow and patient stitching to make it absolutely perfect.

0:16:080:16:13

It is quite a methodical approach.

0:16:130:16:15

At a very early age for a young woman, at the age of 23,

0:16:150:16:18

she took over the running of the embroidery section

0:16:180:16:22

at the family firm, Morris and Co,

0:16:220:16:24

and that is when they would be producing pieces to commission,

0:16:240:16:28

and it would be either stitched by the girls, really,

0:16:280:16:32

in the workshop,

0:16:320:16:33

or it could be sent out as a kit with the design pounced on the fabric.

0:16:330:16:39

Which is a good idea, it's another way of selling something,

0:16:390:16:42

because I know these things in their day were quite expensive.

0:16:420:16:45

They were, yes. It was a fine craft.

0:16:450:16:48

It's a bit like Laura Ashley,

0:16:480:16:50

it's a kind of high-end design and manufacturing business,

0:16:500:16:55

with a specialised house style.

0:16:550:16:56

Yes,

0:16:560:16:58

it was the style they were trying to sell, wasn't it?

0:16:580:17:01

And once you fell in love with one item, then you wanted the next.

0:17:010:17:05

And that is why the honeysuckle design

0:17:050:17:08

which is a fabric design

0:17:080:17:10

and also a wallpaper design, is one of the ones that May designed.

0:17:100:17:14

It looks really quite like her father's work,

0:17:140:17:17

deliberately so,

0:17:170:17:19

because it had to be in the Morris style,

0:17:190:17:21

that is what the customers were paying for.

0:17:210:17:24

That's what they wanted.

0:17:240:17:25

Many people think that May's talents as a pattern designer

0:17:250:17:30

were equal to her father's,

0:17:300:17:33

and that is one good example.

0:17:330:17:35

But, of course, most of her work would have been solo pieces,

0:17:350:17:39

one-off pieces,

0:17:390:17:40

we are moving towards what we'd call studio practice now.

0:17:400:17:43

Rather than workshop.

0:17:430:17:46

And it's really good that the Arts and Crafts Movement embraced women,

0:17:460:17:50

they wanted to encourage them.

0:17:500:17:52

Yes, and in fact the Arts and Crafts Movement

0:17:520:17:54

was a very positive development in relation to women,

0:17:540:17:56

because, and particularly with this textile arts, embroidery,

0:17:560:17:59

because it was something that you didn't need

0:17:590:18:02

a great deal of equipment for,

0:18:020:18:04

you didn't need specialised premises,

0:18:040:18:06

but you could pursue your own design and become an artist.

0:18:060:18:10

It was labour intense,

0:18:100:18:12

you didn't need a lot of financial capital, either, did you?

0:18:120:18:14

And May Morris was, of course, the leader of this movement,

0:18:140:18:19

and she was not only an embroiderer of immense skill

0:18:190:18:23

and a designer too, but she was also a teacher.

0:18:230:18:25

She taught in what is now Central St Martins,

0:18:250:18:28

she taught at Birmingham School of Art.

0:18:280:18:30

How was embroidery viewed at the time?

0:18:300:18:33

Was it more an accessory to dressing some woodwork, or fine art?

0:18:330:18:38

Actually, embroidery was a very major part of the Arts and Craft,

0:18:380:18:42

of the formal Arts and Crafts exhibitions,

0:18:420:18:45

and it was very highly regarded.

0:18:450:18:47

But it's a sort of orphan craft, in a way,

0:18:470:18:51

it kind of gets forgotten and overlooked,

0:18:510:18:53

and one reason for that is that it is very fragile,

0:18:530:18:56

and the other problem I think is that sadly

0:18:560:19:00

very few of the works were ever signed.

0:19:000:19:03

And without an attribution...

0:19:030:19:04

Without the provenance, that's the key thing, isn't it?

0:19:040:19:07

That's where the value is.

0:19:070:19:08

Exactly. They become devalued.

0:19:080:19:10

And so I kind of urge people in the crafts and textile arts now,

0:19:100:19:15

please, sign and date your work,

0:19:150:19:18

because otherwise later generations

0:19:180:19:21

won't know who to attribute it to.

0:19:210:19:23

We've got our first four items, now we're taking them off to the sale.

0:19:390:19:44

This 200-year-old jug belongs to Muriel,

0:19:450:19:47

Michael has valued it at £70 to £100.

0:19:470:19:51

The Masonic medal that caught Charlie's eye in a charity shop

0:19:510:19:54

that he paid just £10 for.

0:19:540:19:57

The floral jardiniere is an unwanted part of Phyllis' Wemyss collection.

0:19:580:20:03

She's pushing her top dollar bids here, but I'm not so sure.

0:20:030:20:07

And Lynne had a present surprise when we told her this ring

0:20:070:20:10

was certainly not the costume jewellery she'd imagined.

0:20:100:20:14

It's covered in real diamonds and a sapphire.

0:20:140:20:17

So come on, bidders, get your cash ready.

0:20:170:20:19

Our auction is that the salerooms of Moore Allen & Innocent,

0:20:210:20:24

just outside Cirencester.

0:20:240:20:26

And they've been in business since the 1840s

0:20:260:20:28

and today's sale contains a mix of antiques and general items.

0:20:280:20:32

It looks like somebody's selling a complete collection

0:20:340:20:36

of Staffordshire greyhounds all in pairs.

0:20:360:20:40

It must be a dog lover. Obviously someone did own a greyhound.

0:20:410:20:46

Our auctioneer, Philip Allwood, has a very busy day ahead of him,

0:20:480:20:51

with 800 lots in the catalogue, including ours.

0:20:510:20:55

And a reminder here -

0:20:550:20:56

the sellers pay a commission of 15% plus VAT.

0:20:560:21:00

Our first lot is this silver jug, brought in by Muriel.

0:21:020:21:05

We are hoping the slight damage to the handle

0:21:050:21:07

won't put the bidders off.

0:21:070:21:08

You can't get greener than antiques. It's classic recycling.

0:21:100:21:13

They keep going around and around and around,

0:21:130:21:16

and hopefully they go up in price. That's exactly what we want today.

0:21:160:21:20

Because I know you got this little silver cream jug for £5,

0:21:200:21:24

-didn't you?

-That's right, yes.

-Whereabouts was that?

0:21:240:21:27

In a car-boot sale.

0:21:270:21:29

Muriel, I think you've got great eyes for looking out for bargains.

0:21:290:21:31

Do you know that?

0:21:310:21:33

Because we are looking at, hopefully, around about £100,

0:21:330:21:36

-at the top end of the estimate.

-Yes, 70-100.

-It's a period piece.

0:21:360:21:39

-OK, it's done the rounds, hasn't it?

-It has! It's ended up at a car-boot.

0:21:390:21:43

But it's small, it's collectable.

0:21:430:21:45

You can make a collection of cream jugs. They are very affordable.

0:21:450:21:49

I think it's delightful.

0:21:490:21:51

Well, let's hope we get the top end of Michael's estimate.

0:21:510:21:54

Let's do some recycling! Here we go.

0:21:540:21:56

Lot number 265

0:21:560:21:59

is the George III helmet-shaped cream jug, by Solomon Houghham.

0:21:590:22:04

1794. Who will start me? £100 to start me?

0:22:040:22:09

Good-looking little piece there. 100. 80?

0:22:120:22:16

£50?

0:22:170:22:19

£50 I'm bid there. 55. 60. 65. 70.

0:22:190:22:24

75. At 75. 80 there. At 80 here.

0:22:240:22:28

At 85.

0:22:280:22:29

90? At £85.

0:22:310:22:34

He is calling for 90. We've got 85.

0:22:350:22:38

90. New blood.

0:22:390:22:41

95, if you like, sir. 95. 100, where we wanted to start.

0:22:410:22:45

110 if you like, sir. 110.

0:22:450:22:47

120. At 120 on my left now.

0:22:470:22:52

At £120. 120...

0:22:540:22:56

Excellent! £120.

0:22:580:23:01

-That is brilliant recycling, isn't it?

-Yes. Marvellous, isn't it?

0:23:010:23:05

It's going to go around and around again.

0:23:050:23:07

Somebody will have that for three or four years and move it on again.

0:23:070:23:10

Someone will lose some money along the way

0:23:100:23:12

and someone will make a bit more.

0:23:120:23:14

That's how it works!

0:23:140:23:15

And we'll see it in ten years' time on Flog It!

0:23:150:23:17

-Yeah. Well done, you.

-Thank you very much.

0:23:170:23:20

And quite right, too.

0:23:200:23:22

It was a beautiful piece when it was made 200 years ago

0:23:220:23:25

and it's still beautiful now.

0:23:250:23:27

Next, it's the Masonic medal

0:23:270:23:29

that Charlie bought for £10 in a charity shop.

0:23:290:23:32

They must have put it in the window for you that morning for you

0:23:320:23:35

to spot it, that's all I can say.

0:23:350:23:36

-Probably.

-Do you do the tour every day?

0:23:360:23:38

No, I don't. It was an impulse buy at the time.

0:23:380:23:42

-How much, £10?

-£10, yes.

0:23:420:23:45

And hopefully we are going to get 40 right here, right now.

0:23:450:23:48

-That's great, isn't it?

-Has that happened to you, Paul?

-No! Never.

0:23:480:23:53

Well done!

0:23:540:23:55

Good luck. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:23:550:23:58

And lot number 185 is the George V Masonic jewel.

0:23:590:24:05

Cracking-looking piece.

0:24:050:24:06

You've got to be an important Mason for this one, I'm sure.

0:24:060:24:09

Who will start me at 50?

0:24:090:24:10

£30?

0:24:110:24:13

Well, 20, then. There must be 20. 20 I'm bid. 25.

0:24:140:24:18

30.

0:24:180:24:19

35.

0:24:190:24:20

-This is good.

-Yes.

-40.

0:24:200:24:22

45.

0:24:230:24:24

At 45 now.

0:24:240:24:26

At 45 on my right here. At 45. 50 anywhere?

0:24:260:24:30

At £45...

0:24:310:24:33

That's a very good result. Excellent result. Great spotting.

0:24:340:24:38

-Congratulations!

-Well done. You must be happy.

-Cheers, thanks.

0:24:380:24:42

Obviously there is commission to pay.

0:24:420:24:45

Despite the commission, Charlie has more than trebled his money.

0:24:450:24:49

Next, we are selling Phyllis's jardiniere.

0:24:510:24:54

She paid £385 for it five years ago.

0:24:540:24:57

But I'm doubtful that she's going to see much more today.

0:24:570:25:00

Unfortunately, we don't have Phyllis,

0:25:010:25:03

but this is Paul, Phyllis's son.

0:25:030:25:06

-I know this is your first auction, isn't it?

-Yeah, so quite exciting.

0:25:060:25:10

-Come on, come on, are you going to buy anything?

-We shall see!

0:25:100:25:14

There's a few items I've looked at, but maybe I'll come back.

0:25:140:25:18

It's packed.

0:25:180:25:19

I hope they all want to buy a bit of Wemyss,

0:25:190:25:21

because right now it's going under the hammer

0:25:210:25:23

and hopefully Paul can get on the phone and tell Phyllis,

0:25:230:25:26

who is somewhere in the Panama Canal, we've sold it.

0:25:260:25:29

It's going under the hammer right now.

0:25:290:25:31

Piece of Wemyss. And that is the large, trumpet-shaped vase there.

0:25:340:25:39

Who will start me? It should be 500, really. 300?

0:25:400:25:43

I can start you here at 280 on the book. It looks cheap at 280.

0:25:450:25:50

At 280. I'll take 290 if it helps. 280...

0:25:510:25:55

300. 310.

0:25:550:25:57

320. At 320... 330 now.

0:25:570:26:00

At 320. 330 anywhere?

0:26:020:26:05

At £320.

0:26:070:26:08

At 320...

0:26:100:26:11

-Struggling.

-330 anywhere?

0:26:110:26:14

-Struggling.

-At £320.

0:26:140:26:16

You're all out in the room.

0:26:160:26:18

At 320...

0:26:190:26:20

-It didn't sell. Ever so sorry.

-It's OK. You can't always win.

0:26:220:26:27

-At least it's quite easy to pick up and put back in the car.

-Yeah.

0:26:270:26:31

-It's not like a chest of drawers.

-No.

-Mum will be disappointed.

0:26:310:26:35

She will be, but I'm sure there's

0:26:350:26:36

a space on the shelf it can go back onto.

0:26:360:26:39

Or you might just inherit this collection.

0:26:390:26:42

-Maybe I'll get this piece for being here today.

-Thank you so much.

0:26:420:26:45

Thank you very much.

0:26:450:26:46

Well, at least Paul's looking on the bright side.

0:26:460:26:49

And talking of bright, we have that sparkling diamond

0:26:490:26:51

and sapphire ring up next.

0:26:510:26:54

And the great thing about a Flog it! valuation day is you can bring

0:26:540:26:57

items along just like you did, find out all about them

0:26:570:27:00

and exactly what they're worth.

0:27:000:27:02

Because you thought this ring was costume jewellery, didn't you?

0:27:020:27:05

-I did.

-So what a pleasant surprise when Thomas said £400-£600!

0:27:050:27:11

-I was flabbergasted, I must admit.

-Were you?

-Yes, I really was.

0:27:110:27:14

-It was a very pleasant surprise.

-It's a good job you never gave it away,

0:27:140:27:17

-thinking it was only worth £6.

-Absolutely. Yes.

0:27:170:27:22

Well, it excited Thomas, it sparkled in the room.

0:27:220:27:25

Hopefully it's going to sparkle here today.

0:27:250:27:27

We just need two or three keen bidders.

0:27:270:27:29

-Let's find out how it goes, shall we?

-Yes.

-Good.

0:27:290:27:32

This is the lozenge-shaped diamond and sapphire ring.

0:27:320:27:35

Super quality little ring here. Should be 500, really.

0:27:380:27:41

Start me at 400.

0:27:430:27:45

300? At 300 I'm bid.

0:27:450:27:47

300. 320.

0:27:470:27:50

340. 360.

0:27:500:27:51

380.

0:27:510:27:53

-400.

-We've done it.

0:27:530:27:55

420. 440 now?

0:27:550:27:57

At 420.

0:27:570:27:59

At 420. Good-looking ring at 420.

0:27:590:28:02

420...

0:28:020:28:04

440 now?

0:28:060:28:07

At £420... Are you sure now?

0:28:090:28:12

At 420...

0:28:120:28:14

Hammer's gone down. £420. That's good.

0:28:160:28:18

-Yes, better than sitting in the drawer.

-Exactly.

0:28:180:28:21

-And don't forget, there is commission to pay.

-That's right.

0:28:210:28:24

-No, that's lovely.

-Happy shopping!

-Happy shopping, yes!

0:28:240:28:28

Thank you very much indeed.

0:28:280:28:30

It makes you want to rush off and check our your old sock drawer

0:28:300:28:33

just in case there's something valuable hidden at the back.

0:28:330:28:36

Well, don't do it just yet

0:28:360:28:37

because we have more exciting auction action later on in the show.

0:28:370:28:41

Now, it may not be the biggest or the most ornate, but this

0:28:520:28:55

rare gem of a Jacobean country house has something very special about it.

0:28:550:28:59

This is Chastleton House in Oxfordshire,

0:29:010:29:04

and it was here in the 1990s

0:29:040:29:06

that a brand-new experiment in conservation was launched.

0:29:060:29:09

When the National Trust acquired Chastleton House,

0:29:140:29:17

they adopted a new approach.

0:29:170:29:18

Rather than restore this wonderful Jacobean building

0:29:180:29:22

back to its former glory, they decided to leave it as found.

0:29:220:29:27

Now, I'm in the main kitchen to the house,

0:29:270:29:29

and this was in daily use right up until 1952.

0:29:290:29:32

And the soot-blackened ceiling above me

0:29:320:29:35

hasn't been cleaned for nearly 400 years.

0:29:350:29:39

And when I say soot-blackened, I really mean soot-blackened.

0:29:390:29:42

Look at that! Isn't that incredible?

0:29:420:29:46

Gosh!

0:29:460:29:47

HE LAUGHS

0:29:470:29:49

You could scrape that off, couldn't you, with a chisel?

0:29:490:29:51

And in a way, you look up there and you don't really mind it.

0:29:510:29:56

After a while, I could probably live with that. But my wife would go mad.

0:29:560:30:00

She would.

0:30:000:30:02

In 1991, this hands-off approach went against many years

0:30:020:30:06

of National Trust policy.

0:30:060:30:08

Usually, they dress a house to represent one notable time

0:30:080:30:11

in history - redecorating, changing fittings and bringing

0:30:110:30:15

in furniture, to illustrate how the house might just have looked.

0:30:150:30:20

But here at Chastleton

0:30:200:30:21

they saw an opportunity to experiment with something different.

0:30:210:30:25

The house had been in the same family

0:30:250:30:27

since it was built in 1612, and had somehow escaped the updates

0:30:270:30:32

and makeovers experienced by so many country houses.

0:30:320:30:36

So the Trust realised that by keeping the family's

0:30:360:30:39

mix and match of taste of furniture,

0:30:390:30:41

wall hangings and decor, the house would appear

0:30:410:30:43

frozen in time at the point their conservators first arrived.

0:30:430:30:48

The National Trust have also left more recent redecoration untouched.

0:30:480:30:52

This room was fitted out with bookcases in 1850

0:30:520:30:56

to be used as a library.

0:30:560:30:57

But what's not in keeping with the library is this mad red wallpaper.

0:30:570:31:01

This striking red wallpaper was hung by the family 100 years later

0:31:030:31:06

in the 1960s, and is totally out of keeping with the style of the room.

0:31:060:31:11

But instead of stripping it off

0:31:110:31:12

and restoring the room to how it might have looked in 1850,

0:31:120:31:16

after much debate,

0:31:160:31:17

the National Trust decided to leave the wallpaper in place.

0:31:170:31:21

I like it.

0:31:220:31:23

It's very eccentric, and I'm pleased they kept it,

0:31:230:31:25

because it shows the house has been lived in by a family.

0:31:250:31:29

While it may look like the National Trust haven't done much work here

0:31:330:31:37

they have done the important things, spending six years

0:31:370:31:40

and a huge amount of money repairing the roof, replacing wiring

0:31:400:31:44

and defending against damp.

0:31:440:31:47

Their policy was to protect Chastleton House

0:31:470:31:49

but not disturb the character that reflects its 400 years of life.

0:31:490:31:54

I've come to the oak-panelled hall to meet the house steward,

0:31:540:31:58

Sebastian Conway.

0:31:580:32:00

So what is the philosophy behind the National Trust

0:32:000:32:02

leaving Chastleton House as found?

0:32:020:32:05

Well, it was a giant leap forward, really.

0:32:050:32:08

Instead of taking this house back to a glory day

0:32:080:32:12

in the 18th, 19th century, to really show our visitors

0:32:120:32:16

and public how we found Chastleton, this treasure house,

0:32:160:32:19

if you like, this time capsule of a property,

0:32:190:32:21

which has been unaltered really by any sense of modernity.

0:32:210:32:25

So how do you balance conservation against restoration?

0:32:250:32:28

What do you do?

0:32:280:32:30

Well, the approach at Chastleton is to do a little and often,

0:32:300:32:33

but never going overboard.

0:32:330:32:35

Never really affecting how the house looks too much, and trying to,

0:32:350:32:38

-importantly, keep it as we found it.

-Yeah.

0:32:380:32:40

And what's the evidence in, let's say, this room alone,

0:32:400:32:43

of how you found it?

0:32:430:32:45

Well, if you look around,

0:32:450:32:46

you'll see there's the peeling lining paper all around the room.

0:32:460:32:49

-The cracks which have appeared.

-I can see that now, yeah.

0:32:490:32:52

There are the cobwebs in the house and particularly in this room here.

0:32:520:32:55

There's also a fine layer of dust on the furniture and panelling.

0:32:550:32:59

-Is that a hand print there?

-Yeah, it's pretty evident here.

0:32:590:33:02

If I run my finger across, just how much dust is coming off on my hand.

0:33:020:33:05

So, yes.

0:33:050:33:07

And there is a story, really, about when the first conservators were

0:33:070:33:10

here spraying the cobwebs with hairspray to make them last longer.

0:33:100:33:13

What about dust on the furniture? Did you polish anything?

0:33:140:33:18

Because I'm looking at things and everything is really, really dry.

0:33:180:33:21

-The panelling is dry, the tables look dry.

-It's dry, yes.

0:33:210:33:25

We don't polish, we don't wax. Basically, we just brush.

0:33:250:33:29

And we brush very occasionally, maybe once a week,

0:33:290:33:31

and that's really a rarity.

0:33:310:33:33

Most things get brushed once a season,

0:33:330:33:35

so it's once a year for us at Chastleton.

0:33:350:33:37

Chastleton House is unlike any other

0:33:370:33:40

National Trust property I've been to.

0:33:400:33:42

You can really feel a sense of history

0:33:420:33:44

and the passing of time, cobwebs and all.

0:33:440:33:46

It gives the house a unique character,

0:33:460:33:48

and the experiment has proved such a success that the Trust

0:33:480:33:52

is adopting it for other, larger stately homes.

0:33:520:33:56

Back at our valuation day at the Corn Hall in Cirencester,

0:34:030:34:06

there is still a good crowd all wanting their antiques valued.

0:34:060:34:09

So let's join up with our expert Michael.

0:34:090:34:12

He's with Annie and Vic,

0:34:120:34:13

who have two vases they are desperate to sell.

0:34:130:34:16

-Can you tell me where you got them from?

-They belonged to my mother.

0:34:180:34:22

She was actually gifted them by an elderly pair of ladies

0:34:230:34:27

who ran a nursing home in Swindon many years ago,

0:34:270:34:32

in gratitude, I think, when she left.

0:34:320:34:35

She was unfortunate enough to be given these two vases...

0:34:350:34:39

-Unfortunate enough?

-Well, she hated them. She absolutely hated them.

0:34:390:34:43

As we do!

0:34:430:34:44

She died a few years ago and I haven't taken them out

0:34:440:34:48

-until today, really.

-We've just left them at the back of a bookcase.

0:34:480:34:52

-So your mother hated them?

-Yes.

0:34:520:34:55

-Vic, you...

-I think they're hideous.

-You hate them.

0:34:550:34:58

-And I really hate them.

-You really hate them.

0:34:580:35:01

Well, I would normally say thank you for bringing them to Flog It! today,

0:35:010:35:04

but you obviously wanted to get rid of them as quickly as possible.

0:35:040:35:07

-Yeah.

-Has anyone ever said these might be this, or they're this old?

0:35:070:35:12

-All I know is that they are in Dutch Delft.

-Dutch Delft.

0:35:120:35:16

-We did have them valued.

-In 1997.

0:35:160:35:19

-Ooh!

-And somebody told my mother they could be worth

0:35:190:35:22

between perhaps £200-£400 on a very good day.

0:35:220:35:25

That would be an extraordinarily good day in 1997.

0:35:250:35:28

I think it would be a very good day, yes.

0:35:280:35:31

So, first of all, it's a bit of a misnomer

0:35:310:35:33

-that we have a pair of vases. We haven't.

-Right.

0:35:330:35:36

We've got two vases that are exactly the same.

0:35:360:35:39

And that's a big difference.

0:35:390:35:41

The scenes on these matter and this is a religious one.

0:35:410:35:46

And I think it's Jesus sowing seeds in a field.

0:35:460:35:50

And we can tell they're not a pair

0:35:500:35:52

because it's the same scene on both vases

0:35:520:35:54

and they do not face each other.

0:35:540:35:56

18th-century and 19th-century pairs of vases

0:35:560:35:59

always worked as a group, so one would oppose the other.

0:35:590:36:01

These were made in such large numbers,

0:36:030:36:05

somebody at some stage has put two together.

0:36:050:36:08

Oh, right.

0:36:080:36:09

And said that's a pair.

0:36:090:36:11

They are Delft, and Delft is basically a pottery body,

0:36:110:36:14

an earthenware body with a white tin glaze over the top

0:36:140:36:18

to imitate, originally, Chinese porcelain.

0:36:180:36:22

We've got the chips.

0:36:220:36:24

Now, they don't necessarily mean they are very early,

0:36:240:36:27

because Delft chips.

0:36:270:36:28

And I think, having looked at these, that these aren't 18th-century,

0:36:280:36:33

but probably date to the beginning or the middle of the 19th century.

0:36:330:36:37

Which would also fit in with the religious scenes, because there

0:36:370:36:41

were much more religious ceramics produced around 1800 to 1850.

0:36:410:36:46

In terms of value, I think

0:36:460:36:49

whoever valued them at 200 to 400 thought they were 18th-century.

0:36:490:36:52

And had they been early 18th-century,

0:36:520:36:55

that's absolutely right.

0:36:550:36:57

I think these are sensibly worth £80-£100 at auction,

0:36:570:37:02

and we should put a fixed reserve, if you want them back, of...

0:37:020:37:08

-of...

-No!

-Maybe we shouldn't.

0:37:080:37:10

-Shall we put a slightly lower reserve on them of £60?

-I think so.

0:37:100:37:14

£60.

0:37:140:37:16

They've had their day in my family. Let somebody else enjoy them, yeah?

0:37:160:37:20

We'll find someone in the auction who isn't like you or Vic.

0:37:200:37:23

-Someone who will love some!

-Yes! I'm sure you will! Possibly.

0:37:230:37:26

Let's join our expert Thomas, who is with Arthur and Maggie.

0:37:290:37:33

And he's finding out that Maggie has some hidden talents.

0:37:330:37:36

I want to know about your badges here. What are they all about?

0:37:380:37:42

-That one was when I did a couple of wing walks.

-Wing walks?

0:37:420:37:47

And the second one I did when I was 75.

0:37:470:37:50

-So you did wing-walking at 75?

-Yes.

0:37:500:37:53

-Wing-walking at 75 - wow!

-And parachute jumping.

0:37:540:37:58

-I've done two parachute jumps as well.

-What, in tandem?

0:37:580:38:00

Oh, yes. I wouldn't go on my own!

0:38:000:38:03

I'd never have got to the bottom!

0:38:030:38:05

SHE LAUGHS

0:38:050:38:06

Well, you're a very, very brave woman.

0:38:060:38:08

So planes have obviously been a part of your life for some time.

0:38:080:38:11

-Probably from my father, yes.

-There he is in the First World War.

0:38:110:38:15

That's right. That was the First World War.

0:38:150:38:17

-He was an engineer, is that right?

-He was an engineer, yes.

0:38:170:38:21

And he worked in the Royal Flying Corps.

0:38:210:38:23

So this here, RFC, is the Royal Flying Corps,

0:38:230:38:26

-which predates the RAF.

-Yes.

-So this was First World War.

-Yes.

0:38:260:38:31

Aeroplanes, etc.

0:38:310:38:32

He was in the First World War and the Second World War, yes.

0:38:320:38:35

-What was his name?

-Theodore Frederick.

0:38:350:38:38

-Theodore Frederick Saunders.

-Theodore Frederick Saunders. Wow!

0:38:380:38:43

So... Air Board Technical Notes.

0:38:430:38:45

It's quite a dry book, really, isn't it?

0:38:450:38:48

-Yes.

-But what's nice is it's stamped Royal Flying Corps.

0:38:480:38:52

So it's a very interesting book, but a bit dry.

0:38:520:38:55

I understand. I don't know what else to do with it.

0:38:550:38:59

This book is actually quite interesting.

0:38:590:39:01

OK, it's technical notes again, but it's got pictures of all the planes.

0:39:010:39:07

That's right.

0:39:070:39:08

And as a schoolboy, I remember doing the First World War

0:39:080:39:11

in my history lessons and we learnt about the Sopwith Camel.

0:39:110:39:15

-Right.

-And the other Sopwith biplanes.

0:39:150:39:18

And while flicking through, I found all these technical drawings

0:39:180:39:22

-and details of the Sopwith biplane.

-Yes.

0:39:220:39:24

-It's quite interesting, isn't it?

-Yes, very. I have looked through it.

0:39:240:39:28

And certainly, from this period, there isn't much about,

0:39:280:39:32

-so it does have a value.

-Right.

0:39:320:39:34

-But also, being quite rare, it also doesn't have a massive market.

-No.

0:39:340:39:39

-So we are not looking at lots of money.

-No.

0:39:390:39:41

It's going to be under £50, I'm afraid.

0:39:410:39:43

-No, that's all right.

-It's going to be 30 to 50.

-Yes. Right.

0:39:430:39:47

-Are you happy with that?

-Put in a lower estimate.

0:39:470:39:49

I put 50 but it can go at a lower estimate.

0:39:490:39:52

We can put it in at £30, can we?

0:39:520:39:54

-We'll probably reserve it at around £30.

-Yes.

-But it could make more.

0:39:540:40:00

-Yes.

-Just because the interest in militaria,

0:40:000:40:03

the Royal Flying Corps and WWI is a high peak, at the moment.

0:40:030:40:07

-Where have they been, in your house?

-In the drawer, upstairs.

0:40:070:40:11

So unfortunately, they're...

0:40:110:40:14

My son is up in Scotland,

0:40:140:40:16

-I don't think he's very aircraft-minded.

-Oh, no.

0:40:160:40:20

No, I don't think that, to him,

0:40:200:40:23

they would be of great value,

0:40:230:40:25

if you know what I mean.

0:40:250:40:26

Well, we look forward to seeing you both at the auction -

0:40:260:40:28

no more wing-walking before the auction.

0:40:280:40:30

They won't let me, unfortunately.

0:40:300:40:32

Come on, Maggie! At your age, you should be settling down

0:40:320:40:36

to something more gentle - maybe bungee jumping?

0:40:360:40:39

That is absolutely lovely.

0:40:410:40:43

That is making me buzz - I'm quite excited about that.

0:40:430:40:47

-Is that something you want to sell?

-No.

-It's a gorgeous brooch.

0:40:470:40:50

Is it silver or not?

0:40:500:40:52

It's not silver.

0:40:520:40:53

I think a novelty brooch like that is worth around about £40-£50,

0:40:530:40:58

because it's so individual.

0:40:580:40:59

If that was silver, it'd be £300-£400.

0:40:590:41:03

Napoleon Bonaparte was fascinated by bees.

0:41:040:41:07

The service factory

0:41:070:41:08

actually made all his dinner services for him -

0:41:080:41:10

you know, the fine porcelain -

0:41:100:41:11

they hand-painted little bees on all the saucers.

0:41:110:41:15

And he wore bees on his tunics.

0:41:150:41:17

Oh, that is beautiful.

0:41:170:41:19

There's certainly plenty to keep our workers busy here,

0:41:210:41:23

but looks like Michael's on a tea break.

0:41:230:41:26

He's with Tim, who's brought in some classic silver.

0:41:260:41:28

Tim, thank you for bringing in

0:41:300:41:32

this absolutely breathtaking teapot and stand.

0:41:320:41:35

-Lovely, isn't it?

-It's wonderful.

0:41:350:41:38

What do you know about it?

0:41:380:41:40

I... It's not a family heirloom.

0:41:400:41:43

I bought it to give to my parents

0:41:440:41:46

for their golden wedding anniversary in 1982.

0:41:460:41:49

-Right.

-And, uh...I bought it in London

0:41:490:41:53

and I know that it's by Peter and Ann Bateman.

0:41:530:41:56

Well, Bateman is a great name to conjure with

0:41:560:41:58

and the dynasty really starts off with Hester

0:41:580:42:02

and she managed a whole workshop of silversmiths

0:42:020:42:08

and produced a range of affordable silver.

0:42:080:42:12

And then, of course, we've got the following generation.

0:42:120:42:15

We've got Peter, Ann and William.

0:42:150:42:17

And there are various combinations of their marks in partnership,

0:42:170:42:21

but in this case, we're dealing with...Peter and Ann Bateman.

0:42:210:42:25

Peter and Ann.

0:42:250:42:26

And we've got the date there for 1792.

0:42:260:42:30

The engraving here,

0:42:300:42:31

this wonderful, late 18th century, bright-cut engraving,

0:42:310:42:35

which became all the fashion, simply because they improved

0:42:350:42:39

the quality of the steel

0:42:390:42:41

on the burins that they were using

0:42:410:42:43

to the point where, rather than just scratching a line,

0:42:430:42:46

they could scoop out areas of the surface,

0:42:460:42:50

and as it did that, it brightly polished them.

0:42:500:42:53

So you get this...almost faceting, with the engraving

0:42:530:42:56

and its wonderful borders.

0:42:560:42:58

And we've got the original cartouche here

0:42:580:43:00

and those initials are...

0:43:000:43:02

-Match that.

-Exactly match that.

0:43:020:43:04

And we've got here, really rather attractive,

0:43:040:43:08

-the carved ivory pineapple finial.

-Yeah.

0:43:080:43:11

If you think how rare pineapples were

0:43:110:43:12

at the end of the 18th century, hugely expensive,

0:43:120:43:17

and if you had a valued guest at your house

0:43:170:43:20

and could afford it,

0:43:200:43:22

you would serve a pineapple.

0:43:220:43:24

-So it became the symbol of welcome...

-Yeah?

0:43:240:43:27

..which is why we've got it used there.

0:43:270:43:29

Wow - I mean, they're super pieces and they're in lovely condition.

0:43:290:43:33

Dare I ask? In 1982, were they, um...?

0:43:330:43:37

-London isn't the cheapest place to buy a piece of silver.

-It's not.

0:43:370:43:41

-Um...I think I paid £400.

-£400.

0:43:410:43:45

-At the time, Americans were buying Bateman silver in droves.

-Yes.

0:43:450:43:49

-The price of silver was high.

-Yes.

0:43:490:43:52

It was worth every penny of £400 when you bought it.

0:43:520:43:55

I think it would be prudent to put an estimate of £700-£1,000 on it

0:43:550:44:01

and a fixed reserve of £700.

0:44:010:44:04

-But...

-Good.

0:44:040:44:06

Delightful to see wonderful Georgian silver on Flog It!

0:44:060:44:10

Thank you, Tim, for bringing them in.

0:44:100:44:12

They've made my day.

0:44:120:44:13

Michael certainly loves his silver -

0:44:130:44:15

that's two nice items, ready for auction.

0:44:150:44:18

We've just got enough time for one more evaluation.

0:44:180:44:20

Thomas is with Chris, who's brought in a beautifully decorated cross.

0:44:200:44:24

-Thank you for bringing along your cross, Chris.

-Thank you.

0:44:270:44:30

-And this is your daughter.

-Hannah.

-Hannah.

0:44:300:44:32

-Hannah wanted to bring some jewellery, so...

-Yeah.

0:44:320:44:36

-And did you get it valued?

-Yes.

-Not a positive result, then.

0:44:360:44:39

-Not worth anything.

-Oh, that's a shame.

0:44:390:44:41

So, Chris, this is your item. What do you know about it?

0:44:410:44:46

Well, I think it's Italian and I didn't really know anything else.

0:44:460:44:50

How did it come into your possession?

0:44:500:44:52

Um...my mum gave it me and I've just had it for a long time.

0:44:520:44:55

-And your mother had it from...?

-I've got no idea.

0:44:550:44:57

-And where's your family from? Are they from...?

-Warwickshire.

0:44:570:45:00

-But nowhere else?

-No, no Italians.

-From foreign fields?

-No.

0:45:000:45:05

Maybe your grandmother would've picked it up - did they travel?

0:45:050:45:09

I don't know - I mean, I think Mum just had it a long time

0:45:090:45:12

and I've had it years.

0:45:120:45:14

-She gave me a few things.

-What have you been doing with it?

0:45:140:45:16

-I've just had it in a jewellery box.

-Really?

-I've never worn it.

0:45:160:45:20

So...as to, sort of, origins, we know it's Italian.

0:45:200:45:25

Date, it's probably about 1850s, so mid-Victorian.

0:45:250:45:28

It's the kind of thing...

0:45:280:45:29

The reason I asked if your family travelled,

0:45:290:45:31

-it's the kind of thing you'd pick up on a grand tour.

-Oh.

0:45:310:45:34

If you were a Catholic from Britain, you might be in Rome

0:45:340:45:38

and so you buy it to take back with you as a memento of your trip.

0:45:380:45:42

-These are what we call micro-mosaic.

-Oh.

0:45:420:45:45

So it's lots of little, tiny shards of glass

0:45:450:45:47

inlaid to make a picture.

0:45:470:45:50

And it's set in, sort of, a base metal.

0:45:500:45:52

So I wouldn't imagine it to be gold, it is a base metal.

0:45:520:45:56

But it's widely collected.

0:45:560:45:57

Then you've got the symbolism here to do with Christ -

0:45:570:46:00

the ladder which went to take Christ off the cross,

0:46:000:46:03

the dove of peace, the Holy Spirit

0:46:030:46:06

and the pillar, I have no idea.

0:46:060:46:07

I literally do not know.

0:46:070:46:09

And the flowers, I'm sure they're just decoration on there.

0:46:090:46:12

It's been finely done.

0:46:120:46:14

I love this type of stuff. I really do. I think it's wonderful.

0:46:140:46:17

It's lovely and colourful.

0:46:170:46:18

Regarding value, I think it's worth between £150-£200.

0:46:180:46:23

I mean, I wouldn't be surprised if it made about £200,

0:46:230:46:26

but I would suggest a reserve at 150, with discretion.

0:46:260:46:29

-Yeah.

-Which is sort of 10%-20% below that bottom estimate.

0:46:290:46:33

-Are you happy to flog it?

-Yes, yeah.

-Yes?

-Yeah, that's fine.

0:46:330:46:36

-Do you like it?

-It's OK, yeah.

-It's just OK.

-I like the flowers.

0:46:360:46:40

The flowers are pretty, aren't they?

0:46:400:46:41

-So you're going to come to the auction?

-Oh, yes, yeah.

0:46:410:46:44

You won't be able to.

0:46:440:46:45

-It's on a school day.

-It is, unfortunately.

0:46:450:46:47

-But we look forward to seeing you, Chris.

-Thank you very much.

0:46:470:46:51

We'll all be in for a few lessons at the saleroom,

0:46:520:46:54

especially the economics of just how much that cross is worth.

0:46:540:46:58

Our lots are going off

0:46:580:46:59

to Moore Allen and Innocent's Cirencester saleroom

0:46:590:47:03

and this is what we're taking with us...

0:47:030:47:05

Two identical 19th century vases

0:47:050:47:07

which Annie and Vic can't stand the look of.

0:47:070:47:10

Maggie and Arthur's technical air books are a real slice of history

0:47:100:47:14

and her father's special connection makes it quite unique.

0:47:140:47:18

The micro-mosaic cross, brought in by Chris and Hannah,

0:47:180:47:21

took a lot of detailed work to make.

0:47:210:47:24

Let's hope the bidders appreciate it.

0:47:240:47:26

And we have Tim's silver teapot and stand -

0:47:260:47:28

a lovely example dating from the 1790s

0:47:280:47:31

and clearly marked as the work of the Bateman family.

0:47:310:47:35

Michael loves it,

0:47:350:47:36

but auctioneer Philip Allwood thinks it could be overpriced.

0:47:360:47:41

This looks absolutely fabulous -

0:47:410:47:43

I'm not a big teapot person, but this, to me,

0:47:430:47:46

looks more like a centrepiece, doesn't it?

0:47:460:47:50

Well, if you wanted to find an example of a Georgian teapot,

0:47:500:47:53

this has got to be it.

0:47:530:47:55

The shape is exactly what you'd expect...

0:47:550:47:57

By Bateman, late 18th century.

0:47:570:47:58

-It's got everything going for it, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

0:47:580:48:01

-A classy piece.

-Very, very smart. Perfect in every way.

0:48:010:48:06

I just, ideally, would be liking to see it...

0:48:060:48:08

I know what you're saying...

0:48:080:48:10

-..at more, like, £400-£500, than...

-£700-£1,000, yeah.

0:48:100:48:14

-There's a fixed reserve at £700.

-Yeah.

0:48:140:48:17

There's only one thing will stop this selling.

0:48:170:48:19

I think we're just slightly on the high side.

0:48:190:48:24

But a good thing - if you wanted to buy one, this is a good example.

0:48:240:48:28

Yeah. Fingers crossed.

0:48:280:48:29

-And everything else.

-Both of them.

0:48:310:48:33

We'll stay with crosses right now,

0:48:350:48:37

because our first item to go under the hammer

0:48:370:48:39

is the Italian micro-mosaic cross belonging to Chris.

0:48:390:48:42

-Been in the family a fair bit of time?

-Yes, a while, yes.

0:48:430:48:45

-And it's never been worn.

-I've never worn it, no.

0:48:450:48:48

I don't remember my mum ever wearing it.

0:48:480:48:50

It's beautiful. Absolutely beautiful.

0:48:500:48:53

-But I do know you've had a chat with Philip, haven't you?

-Yeah.

0:48:530:48:56

You're slightly worried about the valuation.

0:48:560:48:59

You just want this to sell

0:48:590:49:00

and Philip's advised you to drop the reserve right down.

0:49:000:49:04

-He's going to use his discretion.

-That's right, yeah.

0:49:040:49:06

-So it could go for a lot less.

-That's fine, quite happy with that.

0:49:060:49:10

We're going to find out, Thomas -

0:49:100:49:12

I know you're not really happy about that,

0:49:120:49:14

because I know there is quality in this.

0:49:140:49:16

Yes, just...I don't like things being given away, but, you know...

0:49:160:49:19

We are in the open market and the open market's going to decide.

0:49:190:49:22

And 355 is the Italian gold-coloured crucifix pendant

0:49:240:49:28

with the micro-mosaic decoration.

0:49:280:49:29

Super piece - what'll you give me for this? Who'll start me?

0:49:290:49:32

Should be a couple of hundred, really. Start me at 100. £100.

0:49:340:49:37

80.

0:49:380:49:40

£50, to get on. 50 bid, thank you.

0:49:410:49:44

Come on...it's a low start.

0:49:440:49:46

At £50...five...

0:49:460:49:47

No-one likes giving anything away to start with.

0:49:470:49:50

They wait till it gets as low as possible.

0:49:500:49:52

Got to be cheap at 55. 60, anywhere?

0:49:520:49:54

60. At £60. Five. 70. Five.

0:49:540:49:59

80...80. Five.

0:49:590:50:01

At £85 on the left, here.

0:50:010:50:04

At £85. It's selling at 85...

0:50:040:50:07

At £85 - 90, if you like.

0:50:080:50:10

-90.

-Ooh...

-At £90, still cheap at 90.

0:50:110:50:14

Five if you like, sir.

0:50:140:50:15

At £90, it's on my right.

0:50:150:50:17

At £90 - you all sure?

0:50:180:50:21

Selling here on my right at 90...

0:50:210:50:23

Good - well, it's gone.

0:50:250:50:26

-So...we're pleased.

-Yes.

-I know Thomas is a little disappointed.

0:50:260:50:29

No - I thought it would've made a little bit more. But, you know...

0:50:290:50:32

Then again, it is a religious work of art

0:50:320:50:34

and they do not sell as well as they should.

0:50:340:50:36

-No. It does put a lot of buyers off. Well done.

-Thank you very much.

0:50:360:50:41

Thomas was clearly a little disappointed there,

0:50:410:50:43

but the auctioneer knew his stuff

0:50:430:50:45

and his advice to drop the reserve was spot-on.

0:50:450:50:48

So, will he be right about this next item?

0:50:480:50:51

Michael's valued this silver teapot and stand at £700-£1,000.

0:50:510:50:56

But the auctioneer thinks it just might struggle.

0:50:560:50:59

It belongs to Tim - unfortunately, he can't be with us today,

0:50:590:51:02

but we do have Michael, our expert, that put the £700-£1,000 on this.

0:51:020:51:06

Had a chat with the auctioneer

0:51:060:51:07

and we both thought this was just so tasteful -

0:51:070:51:10

it's exquisite, it really is.

0:51:100:51:12

-It's beautiful design, lovely condition.

-Good makers.

0:51:120:51:16

And Bateman - fantastic name.

0:51:160:51:19

And everything matches, all the armorials,

0:51:190:51:21

the crests are all the same.

0:51:210:51:23

We have seen silver selling extremely well here today.

0:51:230:51:25

I think the trade are here, covering all the silver lots,

0:51:250:51:28

so hopefully ours is no exception.

0:51:280:51:29

Let's hope we get top money because it's a choice piece.

0:51:290:51:32

If you're going to buy a teapot, buy this one.

0:51:320:51:34

It's going under the hammer now.

0:51:340:51:36

George III silver teapot and stand there by Peter and Ann Bateman.

0:51:370:51:41

What's it going to be for this? Super little lot.

0:51:410:51:44

Where are you going to be for that? Who'll start me?

0:51:450:51:47

Start at 800?

0:51:490:51:50

Five?

0:51:510:51:53

Well, I can start you here on the book at 440.

0:51:530:51:57

On the book here at 440.

0:51:570:51:59

At 440, good piece there at 440.

0:52:010:52:03

460. 480. At 480, here. 500, now.

0:52:030:52:08

At 480. At 480. 500. 520. 540.

0:52:100:52:16

560. At 560, 580, now.

0:52:160:52:19

At 560.

0:52:200:52:21

At 560, looks a good piece here at 560.

0:52:230:52:25

580. 600.

0:52:250:52:28

620. 640. 660. 680.

0:52:280:52:33

700. On my left is 700. Book's out now at 700.

0:52:330:52:37

Someone's got a good buy, I think.

0:52:370:52:39

720, if you like, now?

0:52:390:52:40

At £700. On my left is 700. 720 anywhere?

0:52:410:52:44

At £700, sure now? It's selling.

0:52:470:52:50

At 700...

0:52:500:52:52

-Sold.

-Sold.

-Just.

-Just. Skin of its teeth.

0:52:530:52:57

I think there was one really interested buyer...

0:52:570:52:59

And no-one else to push him.

0:52:590:53:00

No-one else to push him up. He did very well.

0:53:000:53:03

Yeah, he did, yeah.

0:53:030:53:04

Just made it - Tim should be happy

0:53:050:53:07

because he's nearly doubled the £400 he paid for it almost 30 years ago.

0:53:070:53:12

Two items that most definitely won't be welcomed back

0:53:140:53:17

are the vases brought by Annie and Vic.

0:53:170:53:19

-Are you feeling nervous or are you excited?

-Um...

0:53:210:53:24

-Or both?

-Sceptical.

0:53:240:53:26

-LAUGHING:

-Oh-ho-ho!

0:53:260:53:27

-I'm feeling quite positive, actually.

-Are you?

0:53:270:53:30

Yeah, we got two Delft vases going under the hammer.

0:53:300:53:32

£80 - got to be worth it, Michael.

0:53:320:53:34

Well, we've aimed a little lower at 60.

0:53:340:53:37

They didn't like them. I must say, they're not my cup of tea,

0:53:370:53:40

-because they're not period...

-Yeah.

0:53:400:53:41

..he said, in a low voice, before anyone could hear him.

0:53:410:53:44

But hopefully they're £60-worth

0:53:440:53:45

to someone who wants to put them on the dresser.

0:53:450:53:47

-Nice shape, as well, like the shape.

-Hm...yeah.

0:53:470:53:50

-Oh, come on, cheer up!

-I think they're revolting, but...

0:53:500:53:53

HE LAUGHS

0:53:530:53:55

Look, there's no accounting for taste.

0:53:550:53:57

Somebody out there - we know who you are - will absolutely love these.

0:53:570:54:01

They're going under the hammer right now.

0:54:010:54:03

Pair of 19 century Dutch Delftware vases.

0:54:030:54:06

Good-looking pieces, there. Where are you going to be for those?

0:54:090:54:12

Are they 100?

0:54:120:54:13

50, to get on.

0:54:160:54:18

£30. £30, a bid there at 30.

0:54:190:54:22

At £30 - five. 40. Five. 50. Five.

0:54:220:54:26

Got some bidding going on over there, look.

0:54:260:54:28

They like them. They want them.

0:54:280:54:30

They're mad.

0:54:300:54:31

Might be a Dutch clergyman, you never know.

0:54:310:54:34

100. And five. 110. 120.

0:54:340:54:38

At 120 on my right, there, 120. 130, now.

0:54:380:54:41

At £120, right in front of me, then.

0:54:420:54:44

At 120...130, new bidder.

0:54:440:54:46

-Late licks!

-130 by the door, now.

0:54:460:54:49

-130, 140, now.

-This is great, Ann.

0:54:490:54:51

£130. It's on my left, then.

0:54:510:54:53

At 130.

0:54:530:54:55

Yes! Brought it down at £130 - you see?

0:54:560:54:58

Half a dozen people in the room absolutely loved them.

0:54:580:55:01

Crazy!

0:55:010:55:03

I'm glad to see the back of them.

0:55:030:55:04

-I said there's no accounting for taste.

-Well pleased.

0:55:040:55:07

-Hm? Happy, now?

-Yes, I am.

-That's what it's all about.

0:55:070:55:11

That's what it's all about, isn't it?

0:55:110:55:12

-What can I say? Praise be!

-Yes.

0:55:120:55:15

Annie had no faith her vases would sell,

0:55:170:55:19

but in the end, they went for £10 more

0:55:190:55:21

than the top end of Michael's estimate.

0:55:210:55:23

Now hoping to fly high

0:55:230:55:24

with her WWI technical aircraft manuals and notes

0:55:240:55:28

is wing-walking pensioner Maggie.

0:55:280:55:30

Are you ready for this, Maggie and Arthur?

0:55:320:55:34

-I most certainly am.

-Maggie's always ready.

0:55:340:55:36

-Maggie is a wing walker, aren't you?

-Yes.

0:55:360:55:38

-What was it like up there?

-Fantastic. Fantastic.

0:55:380:55:42

I'd do it again if they'd let me, but they won't.

0:55:420:55:44

And we're talking about this -

0:55:440:55:46

two technical flying manuals with two photographs of your father.

0:55:460:55:50

My father - one in the First World War and one in the second one.

0:55:500:55:53

-Incredible.

-Yeah.

0:55:530:55:55

-Has anyone else in the family done a wing walk?

-No.

0:55:550:55:57

They're all too chicken, aren't they?

0:55:570:55:59

I've got to say, you're very brave. I wouldn't do it.

0:55:590:56:01

-I wouldn't do it, Thomas.

-I don't think you'd get me up there.

0:56:010:56:04

A little bit agoraphobic with big, high spaces,

0:56:040:56:07

seeing the ground beneath me.

0:56:070:56:08

-She's done parachuting as well.

-And you've done parachuting!

0:56:080:56:12

-Have you done any?

-No way!

0:56:120:56:13

Gosh - so you watch from the ground below

0:56:130:56:16

and you're like, "Oh, gosh! Oh, gosh!"

0:56:160:56:17

-All for charity.

-Aw, all for charity.

0:56:170:56:20

Good luck. Good luck. Let's see what this does.

0:56:200:56:22

-Let's see if this flies away, shall we? Here we go.

-I hope so!

0:56:220:56:25

The WWI Department of Aircraft production technical notes.

0:56:250:56:29

There we go. Couple of little volumes, there.

0:56:310:56:34

Again, good wartime memorabilia, there.

0:56:340:56:36

Who'll start me? Should be 50 to get on, really.

0:56:360:56:39

£30.

0:56:390:56:41

At £30, a bid here at 30. At £30, in front of me. Five, now.

0:56:410:56:45

At £30. Got to be cheap at £30.

0:56:470:56:49

Five. 40. Five. 50.

0:56:490:56:53

Five. 60. At £60, in front of me, now.

0:56:530:56:57

Five. 70. Five. 80. Five.

0:56:570:57:01

-90.

-This is going well.

0:57:010:57:03

Well, this is good!

0:57:030:57:05

Five. 100, sir? 100.

0:57:050:57:08

At 100, here, now.

0:57:100:57:11

Gracious me - I would never have believed that.

0:57:110:57:14

At £100, then. You sure, now?

0:57:140:57:16

In front of me at...110, back here.

0:57:160:57:19

120, if you like, sir?

0:57:190:57:20

At 110.

0:57:200:57:21

Have another, you're here now.

0:57:220:57:24

At 110 - 120, if you like?

0:57:240:57:25

At 110, it's right at the back, then, at 110...

0:57:280:57:31

-Sold - £110.

-Oh, that's unbelievable!

0:57:310:57:36

That could pay for another wing walk,

0:57:360:57:38

if you were allowed to do it!

0:57:380:57:39

We got £110 - now, what are you going to do with that?

0:57:390:57:42

It'll go to charity, some of it,

0:57:420:57:44

but we've got our 60th wedding anniversary coming up next week.

0:57:440:57:48

Oh, congratulations!

0:57:480:57:50

And we'll take the family out for a meal.

0:57:500:57:52

You've got to do that, haven't you? Oh, what a wonderful celebration.

0:57:520:57:56

Thank you.

0:57:560:57:57

Well, let's hope Maggie keeps her feet on the ground at the party.

0:57:570:58:01

What a terrific result to end the programme -

0:58:010:58:03

£110 was more than double Thomas' top estimate.

0:58:030:58:07

If you've got any antiques and collectables you want to sell,

0:58:070:58:10

we'd love to see you,

0:58:100:58:11

but you've got to come to one of our valuation days

0:58:110:58:13

and you can check the details in your local press

0:58:130:58:15

or you can log on to...

0:58:150:58:17

Click F for Flog It, follow the links

0:58:210:58:23

and hopefully, we'll be coming to a town very near you soon.

0:58:230:58:26

So, come on, bring them along.

0:58:260:58:28

Paul Martin and the team are in the Cotswolds - the heart of Britain's antiques and collectables trade. Our experts are lead by Thomas Plant and Michael Baggott. Michael brews up some excitement about a 200-year-old silver teapot, and Thomas is in sparkling form as he notices some costume jewellery is actually encrusted with real diamonds. Meanwhile, Paul discovers a 400-year-old house where even the cobwebs are being preserved for future generations.