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Malvern

Paul Martin and experts Kate Bateman and Adam Partridge visit Malvern, where the finds include a toy Chitty Chitty Bang Bang car and four early Newport rugby caps.


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'Today's show from Malvern gets our expert Kate Bateman's pulse racing.'

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-He has got lots then?

-Oh, he's got loads.

-All boxed?

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Yep. Every single one of them.

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That's enough to make an auctioneer's heart start to race.

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How have you come to own these lovely rugby caps?

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'The discovery of some Welsh rugby memorabilia causes excitement all round.'

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-I'm excited about these.

-So was Philip, just before the sale.

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-He knows, they're going to go back to Wales.

-Really?

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Fingers crossed.

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"Flog It!" is visiting the charming town of Malvern -

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famous for its pure water, the beautiful hills it nestles next to

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and the stirring music of one of its most famous sons,

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Sir Edward Elgar.

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And I'm hoping for a show-stopper here at the Malvern Theatres.

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'By the size of the queue,

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'it looks like we'll have a full house.

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'So, who's leading our team of experts today?

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'Well, it's Adam Partridge, who has loved antiques since he was a boy.

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'He made his first purchase at the age of ten.

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'At 17, he bought a van and started going to auctions - and the rest, as they say, is history.

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'And Kate Bateman, who has also got antiques in the blood.

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'Her father was a successful artist

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'who ran an antique shop and art gallery

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'before the family decided to set up their own auction house in Lincolnshire.'

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I don't think you're going to appreciate the ducks,

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-really, are you?

-Not at all.

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Hurray!

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'While people are busy taking their seats, it's a perfect time for me to see what's come in.

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'Meanwhile, some of our experts are already centre stage.

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'Let's catch up with Kate.

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'She's with Jan, who's brought in a little gem in mint condition,

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'belonging to her husband, John.

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'I'm sure this will bring back memories for most of us.'

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He's had it since he was very, very small.

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But he was very careful.

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He never, ever played with it.

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Right.

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I can see it is perfect condition, in terms of the actual car.

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The box has seen better days, but it is boxed, which is brilliant.

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It is Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

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-Was he a fan of the film?

-I think he was, yes.

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We're going to date him horribly, by saying, the date here is 1967.

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-So we shan't mention how old he must be to have been a child when it came out.

-No.

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But it's a great thing. It's so unusual to get them in their boxes.

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Children get it for Christmas, rip open the box, throw it away, play with it.

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So it's so nice to see it in working condition with all its bits.

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Do you know its secret - what it does?

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Yeah, the wings pop out.

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-Do you want to give it a go?

-No, you do it.

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So if I break it, that's fine?!

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This is your item. You've said it live now, we can't go back.

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I'm petrified. Do we pull it forward?

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There we go.

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So it works, and presumably flies off into the distance.

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I think it's a really fun thing. Why are you selling?

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Well, we've got four boys.

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You can't really divide it between the four of them.

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The general consensus is to sell it

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and it will go towards our holiday fund.

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-OK. Flying off in a motorised car somewhere!

-Not quite, I don't think, but...

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In this condition I would have thought estimate for auction is £80-£120.

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-Mm-hmm.

-I think we'd reserve it at slightly lower than that, maybe a £60 reserve.

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But £80-£120 estimate.

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-Would you be happy with that?

-Yeah, fine, lovely.

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I take it you don't have an attic full of other boxed toys?

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-We do.

-You do?

-We do, yeah.

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My husband had two brothers, so whenever one was bought something all three of them were.

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He used to hide his and put them away and play with his brothers'.

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So his were never touched.

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-So are the brothers' completely ruined?

-They're wrecked.

-Excellent.

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He can have the last laugh if this sells for £100.

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That would be brilliant.

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-So we'll take it to the sale and see if it goes.

-OK, lovely. Thank you.

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-Thanks for bringing it in.

-Thanks.

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'It just goes to show, it is well worth looking after things.

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'These rugby caps look in pretty good condition.'

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-Newport, in Wales.

-Wow!

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But there's loads of different things.

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1905-1906.

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'I've no time to stop now.

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'Waiting to see me are Kay and Simon,

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'and my favourite girl of the day, baby Sienna.'

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Can you give me a high five? Yeah! Ah!

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So, whose is this then? Who likes the taxidermy?

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-My father liked it.

-OK.

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It was a bit of a talking point in the family.

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He was the only one that liked it.

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So when my mum moved she didn't want to take it with her, so I took it -

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otherwise it was going to end up in the skip.

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Then this little one's just turned one.

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So we want to invest the money into an antique jewellery box for her.

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-Wow!

-That's the plan.

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That's slightly more girly than a group of arranged dead birds!

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You hit the nail on the head -

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you either loathe this kind of thing or you love it. And I do love it.

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I must admit, I'm a big fan of taxidermy that's done really well. But it has to be good.

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It has to be very, very good. This is a nice gathering.

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I would say it is an Edwardian piece.

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1910, something like that, when everybody

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was hunting, shooting and fishing, and they liked to have these trophies of the things they shot.

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I know it's a bit macabre, but it was very fashionable then.

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And I think this is a good entry piece for somebody who wants to buy some taxidermy.

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Because what you've got going for it is, you have actually got a pictorial image.

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Somebody's taken the time to make some rock formations,

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some fern, some grasses, with this very nice grouping of English birds.

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I know that's a little thrush and there's a mallard duck here.

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Taxidermy goes right back, believe it or not, to the ancient Egyptians,

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-because they used to mummify cats and put them in the tombs as a deity.

-Yeah.

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The word taxidermy comes from the Greek.

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"Taxi", meaning to move around, and "dermy", skin.

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So you are moving the skin around. That is exactly what the Victorians did.

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They were the consummate artists in taxidermy.

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Back in the late 1800s, early 1900s, English taxidermy really was a big thing.

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Every parlour had something stuffed.

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-Let's get it into auction with a value of £60-£100 and put a reserve of £50, shall we?

-Yeah, great.

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-Happy with that?

-Absolutely.

-And I'm sure somebody that wants

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some entry level taxidermy, this is the thing to buy.

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I know Philip will be annoyed with me, because he said no dead things.

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But unfortunately, Philip, this one's on the bill.

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'The next item might be more to Philip's taste.

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'Remember those rugby caps I spotted earlier?

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'Well, Adam's going to value them.'

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-Jackie, Christine...?

-That's right.

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-I believe you are sisters, are you?

-Yes, we are.

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-Welcome to "Flog It!"

-Thank you.

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Now, how have you come to own these lovely rugby caps?

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Our dad died a couple of months ago so we were searching through all

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his stuff and we came across them in a suitcase up in the loft.

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So you never knew they were there?

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-No.

-Really?

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No. It was quite a find.

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It was, really, wasn't it? Quite surprising.

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Can you explain... I'm presuming that this distinguished-looking

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rugby player here was the owner of these earlier caps.

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That's what we believe. We found the photo with the caps in the suitcase.

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OK. These are Newport Rugby Club, aren't they?

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-Yes, Newport Gwent.

-That's right.

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Famous rugby club, aren't they?

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Do we know who this person is?

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We're not sure, are we?

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We think it might be a cousin of my father's.

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-Right.

-Charlie Priest.

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That's Charlie Priest's cap, cos his name is in the cap. It is signed.

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-Is it?

-Yeah.

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CW Priest.

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We assume that this is either his father or his grandfather.

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Yeah. So you've got four of them there.

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They're in fair condition. Some are a bit worn, aren't they?

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-Yes.

-That one's all right. Is it that one?

-It's this one.

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That one was heavily worn, was it?

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Must have been, mustn't it? Yeah.

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-Must have been very proud of that one.

-Must have been.

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I see you've got this South Wales rugger souvenir over here.

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And there's a team photo of some of the Newport lads from '48 to '49,

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-which also adds in with this bit, which is '50 to '51.

-Yeah.

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I had a scan through this line-up here. I'm sure you have as well.

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-Yes, we have.

-No priests!

-No!

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We're going to a place where... He's a former rugby player himself.

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I know the auction house quite well, Philip Serrell's.

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-In fact, he looks kind of...

-The rugby build!

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Yeah. And I think it's quite a good choice of items to go there.

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I think he's going to like them.

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Value-wise, I mean, at what price would you rather have them back?

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Well, we said we wanted to put a £100 reserve on all of them.

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I think that's sensible. You are pitching about the right level.

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You don't want to overdo it, cos that will kill it off and no-one will bid.

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But £25 each, with a few other bits, £100 reserve sounds sensible.

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'Well, that's a nice collection of rugby memorabilia for £100 or so.

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'Now, a reminder of the first items going up for auction.'

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'Kate's truly scrumptious find - the little toy car,

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'in excellent condition, which should grab the bidders' interest.

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'Next, my choice, the Edwardian taxidermy,

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'which I think is the perfect starter piece

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'for a would-be collector.'

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'And Adam picked up on those rugby caps I spotted earlier,

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'which are bound to appeal to our old friend, Philip Serrell.'

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'Our items haven't got far to travel.

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'They're being sold down the road in Malvern

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'at Serrell's Auctioneers and Valuers.

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'There are plenty of people browsing,

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'so it should be a good sale.'

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'Before the auction starts, I'm going to find out

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'what Philip's research about the rugby caps has unearthed.'

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I know you're the best person in the business

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to bring these to because you are a rugby player.

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I love my rugby, Paul,

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and these caps, this is where the expression "being capped for your country" came from.

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So, England, Scotland, Ireland or Wales,

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-every time you played you got a cap.

-These are Newport, though.

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Yes. The interesting thing about Welsh rugby, now it's all changed and it's regionalised.

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So you've got the Ospreys, you've got the Dragons, Cardiff Blues.

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And sides like Newport, Pontypool, Pontypridd, Maesteg, Neath, they have all evaporated, in a way.

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But these early caps belonged to a splendidly-named Knacker Priest.

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What a man, Knacker Priest, he's obviously got that nickname from something.

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Whether he dealt with dead horses or it was his style of rugby, I don't know.

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But they're just wonderful.

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And I think they've been estimated at what, £100-£150.

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-We have a lot of interest in them and I think we'll do well.

-Good.

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'We're kicking off with Jan who's selling her husband John's toy car.

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'It should do well,

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'because he's kept it boxed and in mint condition.'

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-He's a good boy because he kept the box.

-He always did, yeah.

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I never did. Bad boy!

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It's unnatural. It's unnatural not to keep it.

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You rip the box up and you play with the toys.

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-Christmas Day.

-Or birthdays.

-Normal children do.

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What are you saying about him then?

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It's got all the bits. There's all those bits to lose and break on it.

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-So that's why it should sell.

-And we've got £80-£120, haven't we?

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-Yep.

-It's a real iconic car.

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Every schoolboy knows this car, they loved the film.

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-We won't sing.

-We won't sing, no, I won't embarrass myself.

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-I can't sing anyway. Can you, have you got a good voice?

-Er, no.

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-I won't put you to the test, then. Good luck.

-Thank you.

-This is it.

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A very collectable Corgi Chitty Chitty Bang Bang model,

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complete with its plastic inserts,

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and nobody should be without theirs.

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I am bid on the book, £40, £45, 50, 60, 70 and five...

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-Don't shake your head.

-Come on.

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It is with me. At 75, one more...

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£80, and five, 85.

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The bid's with me on the book.

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Commission bid. The net's out, the room's out.

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£85 on the book.

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Can I sell then at £85 and done? Thank you.

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-It's gone.

-Well done.

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He'll be pleased.

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-He'll take you out for supper now, do you think?

-Oh, it's mine.

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It's yours. It's your money. Shoes?

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You'll have to dig out the other ones now - see what else you've got!

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-He's got lots, then, you said?

-Oh, he's got loads.

-All boxed?

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Yep. Every single one of them.

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It's enough to make an auctioneer's heart just start to race.

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'I bet Kate wishes her attic was full of boxed,

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'mint condition toy cars.

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'My choice next, and it's time for my heart to start racing.

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'It's Kay and Simon and baby Sienna with the collection of taxidermy.'

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Well, we're talking about the water fowl.

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We've got those stuffed Edwardian birds in the cabinet going under the hammer right now.

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Philip didn't give me a ticking off.

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-He didn't say anything, he avoided the subject.

-Thankfully.

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I just hope they sell after all the effort of bringing them here. Fingers crossed, OK?

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-Fingers crossed?

-Little one and all.

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There we are, the case of taxidermy, two duck and other water fowl.

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Bid me £100 for that lot.

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The case of taxidermy. £100 to start me.

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Well, bid me £50, someone.

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Just down here on the left. I'm bid £20 for that lot.

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20, and five, 30, and five, 35, bid 40,

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40 bid. At 40.

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You're not bidding?

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Any more at all? At 45. 45. 45. One more?

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Come on, one more.

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Are you bidding, sir?

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At 45, any more at all? No, well, I'm sorry, I can't do that.

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-Oh, close.

-Close, but no cigar.

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I'm ever so sorry. Ever so sorry.

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It's been a very worthwhile experience.

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-Have you enjoyed it?

-It's been really enjoyable.

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And we've had a good day out as well.

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-Great.

-I guess we can hang them up on the wall now.

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'Well, that was disappointing, but I'm glad they have enjoyed the day.

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'Christine and Jackie's mum needs picking up from the hospital today,

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'so we've only got one of the sisters at auction.

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'Let's see how the bidders tackle the rugby caps.'

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We have got the four rugby caps going under the hammer.

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-Early 1900s.

-I'm excited about these. I really like these.

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So was Philip, just before the sale. He waxed lyrical.

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-Because you know he loves rugby, don't you?

-Yeah.

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-I said that the other day at the valuation desk, he's going to love these.

-Perfect place to bring them.

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He has contacted a few old mates and he knows they are going back to Wales.

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-There are three or four phone lines booked, so...

-Really?

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Mmm. Fingers crossed.

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Lot number 241 is the Newport rugby caps,

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and the splendidly-named Knacker Priest.

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If you are going to be a rugby player, that's the name for you.

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I'm bid £100 on the book bid. Commission bid at £100.

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-Well, they're already sold anyway.

-120, 130, 140,

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150, 160, 170, 180.

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190, 200, 210...

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They might do 300.

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240, 250, 260, 270, 280.

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They might do more.

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-This is good!

-It is.

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310.

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At £310 only. 320, 330.

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330. 340 on the Net, is it?

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340, 350. 360?

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370. 380 is it on the Net?

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380. 390. 400 on the Net, is it?

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£390 in the room. Any more?

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At £390, and I sell then, thank you.

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You must be so pleased. That's great news for your mum.

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-That will cheer her up no end.

-It certainly will.

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Especially as she's coming out of hospital today.

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Oh, get on the phone and tell her. You will go around to see her.

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I'm going to do the text, yeah.

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-What a result!

-Philip had a really good TRY there and converted us a good result, didn't he?

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'That was a super result.

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'I love it when things sell well over their estimate.

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'It shows this was the right place to sell them.'

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'When we return, Adam sniffs out another interesting item.'

0:16:340:16:37

-It did smell a bit when we...cleaned it out.

-Perhaps it still does.

0:16:370:16:41

I was wondering, we're blaming John here, but it could be the object itself.

0:16:410:16:45

I always get the blame for everything anyway.

0:16:450:16:47

I'm at the Ruskin Mill Glass House College, right in the heart

0:17:010:17:04

of the historic glass quarter of Stourbridge. Now, this whole area

0:17:040:17:07

was the Royal Dalton factory, but now this site provides studio space and workshops for many

0:17:070:17:12

artisans, both in traditional and contemporary glass-making, but also many other crafts.

0:17:120:17:18

'For last 400 years, they have been making glass in Stourbridge.

0:17:180:17:21

'It is one of the great names, world-renowned for its cut crystal.

0:17:210:17:26

'Not only have the factories in the Stourbridge area created some of the finest glass ever made,

0:17:260:17:32

'but the craftsmen from here have influenced the most famous international makers.'

0:17:320:17:37

The golden era was in the Victorian period, when everybody wanted cut-glass crystal.

0:17:390:17:44

It was hugely fashionable, but sadly, tastes do change

0:17:440:17:47

and many of the big manufacturers went out of business.

0:17:470:17:51

But Stourbridge today is well and truly alive and kicking in glass.

0:17:510:17:54

Many of the traditional methods are still going on around me right now.

0:17:540:17:57

But there is also a new wave of creative artisans providing

0:17:570:18:01

the most wonderful, exciting and contemporary studio glass.

0:18:010:18:05

'This is also the site of the International Festival of Glass,

0:18:050:18:09

'which attracts as many as 15,000 visitors every two years.

0:18:090:18:13

'It hosts a huge programme of events -

0:18:130:18:15

'demonstrations, talks, activities and exhibitions.'

0:18:150:18:19

Including the prestigious British Glass Biennale, which is part of the dynamic celebration of

0:18:200:18:25

the British modern glass-makers, and I'm here to meet Martin Andrews, who is part of this revival.

0:18:250:18:30

Martin, you have got some fabulous pieces here.

0:18:340:18:37

How did you get started in glass-making?

0:18:370:18:39

I did a degree at West Surrey College of Art and Design in Farnham,

0:18:390:18:43

in 1991, and then after that I went to Sweden and I was very fortunate

0:18:430:18:49

to work with Asa Brandt, who was one of first studio glass artists.

0:18:490:18:54

She set up in 1968.

0:18:540:18:56

Do you use traditional methods, but sort of put your own slant on?

0:18:560:19:00

Yes, the traditional glass blowing has not really changed for 400 years.

0:19:000:19:04

Same sort of tools, same benches.

0:19:040:19:07

How do you make something like that? How do you get all the colours?

0:19:070:19:10

The plates, in the furnace I have clear glass.

0:19:100:19:12

All the colour is added while it is still a solid blob.

0:19:120:19:16

Once the design is on, then you start to actually blow the shape.

0:19:160:19:19

The skill of the glass-maker is working as fast as possible.

0:19:190:19:22

You are literally chasing it - the working temperature of glass

0:19:220:19:26

is between 600 and 1,000 degrees, and it will go through that temperature barrier in about 40 seconds.

0:19:260:19:32

So every time you reheat it you've got about 40 seconds to do something with it, and then you reheat it.

0:19:320:19:38

-Got you.

-So you're up and down the bench a lot.

0:19:380:19:41

I really do love that, I love the colours in that, I love the golden hues.

0:19:410:19:46

Could you show me how to make something?

0:19:460:19:48

For a novice like me to attempt something like that?

0:19:480:19:50

I'd like to have a go at that, because that looks like a big challenge.

0:19:500:19:54

-OK, let's go and have a go.

-How long will that take?

0:19:540:19:56

It would take about an hour - with my help.

0:19:560:19:59

-Come on, then.

-OK!

0:19:590:20:02

This is actually for real. We're going to take an hour to do this.

0:20:050:20:08

I don't know what to do, so just talk me through it.

0:20:080:20:11

If you start by heating that up, get that hot. Just keep it there.

0:20:110:20:15

We want to heat the tip up, so it is hot enough for the glass to stick to it when we gather.

0:20:150:20:19

I'm actually feeling quite nervous, to tell you the truth.

0:20:190:20:22

Because I want this to work well.

0:20:220:20:24

We can take that out. That's fine.

0:20:240:20:27

Right. Now you are going to gather from the furnace.

0:20:270:20:30

-Right.

-You do the first gather.

0:20:300:20:32

-Gosh, that's hot.

-And you need to be in and out in about seven seconds.

0:20:320:20:37

OK, keep turning. Keep turning.

0:20:370:20:39

And go to the bench. Don't touch.

0:20:390:20:41

Roll it forward, use all of your arm.

0:20:410:20:44

OK, we are just going to reheat that, so, put the paper down.

0:20:460:20:50

Reheat it in the glory hole.

0:20:500:20:52

-Keep turning?

-Keep turning it.

0:20:560:20:57

-It's not easy, is it?

-No.

0:20:570:21:00

I'm actually quite frightened.

0:21:000:21:02

This is all by feel, you just know, don't you, by instinct?

0:21:020:21:05

Yes, it's all by touch.

0:21:050:21:07

I will put some of the other colour out as well.

0:21:070:21:09

-This is cooling all the time now.

-It is cooling, but the coloured glass is sticking to the clear glass.

0:21:090:21:16

-From here, OK...

-Pulling back all the time.

0:21:170:21:19

Yes. That's good, take it off.

0:21:190:21:22

Now, the hard bit is the technique called thumbing.

0:21:220:21:27

What you need to do is blow down.

0:21:270:21:30

Blow, this in your mouth.

0:21:300:21:32

Put your thumb over it and trap the air, so the air expands in the pipe.

0:21:320:21:37

-Like that, ready? One big blow?

-Yes.

0:21:370:21:39

That's good.

0:21:420:21:44

You now need to reheat it and repeat that process.

0:21:440:21:47

-Keep my thumb on the end?

-No.

0:21:470:21:50

I see, you could do this for several times, you could just

0:21:520:21:55

-keep going until you are happy with the size of air bubble?

-Yes.

0:21:550:21:58

Roll. Turn.

0:21:580:22:01

-Oh, wow.

-And then back the other way.

0:22:010:22:03

-That's good.

-That is better.

-Now blow.

0:22:090:22:11

It is looking more like a light bulb at the moment.

0:22:110:22:14

It is getting bigger and bigger. It's getting harder to come out of that glory hole.

0:22:140:22:18

-OK, Martin.

-OK, out you come, yep.

0:22:180:22:21

Ah!

0:22:210:22:23

-Nearly. That's it.

-Hang on.

0:22:230:22:27

-Ah!

-Ah.

0:22:280:22:31

That's it. I just ruined it.

0:22:310:22:33

Nearly had it. That was about 55 minutes' work, wasn't it?

0:22:330:22:36

-Sorry.

-That's all right. Never mind.

0:22:360:22:40

-It's so difficult, isn't it?

-It is very, very difficult. It is.

0:22:400:22:43

Thank you so much, you have been brilliant.

0:22:430:22:45

You know, we were so close,

0:22:450:22:46

ten minutes away from seeing that dish open up.

0:22:460:22:50

But I said we would only do this once.

0:22:500:22:52

I said we would have an hour on this.

0:22:520:22:54

And I knew it. I just knew it would go wrong.

0:22:550:22:58

Do you know that? Oh...

0:22:580:23:00

Oh, so close, yet so far.

0:23:060:23:08

I was five minutes away from creating a wonderful glass charger and it all went wrong.

0:23:080:23:13

That is the most stressful thing I have ever, ever done on "Flog It!" in nine years.

0:23:130:23:17

Not only is Martin Andrews

0:23:170:23:19

a wonderful glass designer and blower, he's also a great teacher -

0:23:190:23:23

teaching traditional skills and methods,

0:23:230:23:25

and that was really difficult, please believe me.

0:23:250:23:27

And if you don't, have a go yourself - you'll see.

0:23:270:23:30

'At the Malvern Theatres, there is still plenty to be discovered.'

0:23:360:23:40

'The crowds on our valuation day are keeping our team of experts very busy.'

0:23:420:23:46

'Kate's been bedazzled by something rather glamorous, that Erica inherited.'

0:23:500:23:55

Erica, you brought in something sparkly which has caught my eye.

0:23:550:23:59

What can you tell me about it?

0:23:590:24:01

Well, originally, it came from Germany,

0:24:010:24:04

it belonged to my mum's great aunty,

0:24:040:24:07

and it was passed to my mother when she died

0:24:070:24:10

and then when my mother died it was passed on to me.

0:24:100:24:13

-So, family history.

-Yes, but my mother didn't like it.

0:24:130:24:15

As soon as she picked it up, it went in her jewellery box and she didn't like it. She didn't wear it.

0:24:150:24:21

And I like it, but I'm not... I don't wear it very often.

0:24:210:24:25

-Not that attached to it.

-Probably a couple of times a year, I wear it.

0:24:250:24:28

-It is what you call a dress ring.

-It is a dress ring, yeah.

0:24:280:24:31

It is very dressy. I'm going to give it a go.

0:24:310:24:34

I might have a bit of a Cinderella fantasy and give it a go.

0:24:340:24:37

See, I can see that on my finger... if my husband's watching!

0:24:370:24:41

But it's very attractive.

0:24:410:24:43

I think date-wise, you're talking between...

0:24:430:24:46

Probably between the wars, maybe.

0:24:460:24:48

So 1930s - does that fit in with the sort of family background?

0:24:480:24:51

Or maybe a bit earlier, '20s?

0:24:510:24:53

I would think a bit earlier, '20s, probably.

0:24:530:24:55

Yes. But it is a classic dress evening ring.

0:24:550:24:58

You've got diamonds and sapphire in the middle, an oval cut sapphire.

0:24:580:25:01

And it is on continental, so 14 carat gold, which again,

0:25:010:25:04

-is not something we usually get in England.

-No.

0:25:040:25:07

But it's quite a pretty thing.

0:25:070:25:09

Very sparkly, you can see this is an old cut brilliant on the diamond,

0:25:090:25:12

so it makes it this lovely, sparkly colour.

0:25:120:25:15

The diamonds aren't very big, but they are nice and clean.

0:25:150:25:19

And they have a good colour to them.

0:25:190:25:20

I suppose at auction

0:25:200:25:22

you would be talking between £300 and £500 for it.

0:25:220:25:25

Is that the kind of figure you would be happy to get?

0:25:250:25:28

I think so, yes.

0:25:280:25:30

-I would like to think I would get more than £400 for it.

-Right.

0:25:300:25:34

It depends on the day.

0:25:350:25:37

If you don't wear it, you've got to think of who the buyer will be,

0:25:370:25:40

and who would wear it.

0:25:400:25:41

I suppose if a dealer's buying it, they would make a mark-up

0:25:410:25:44

if they were selling it in a shop.

0:25:440:25:47

So I think probably,

0:25:470:25:49

you can maybe reserve it at 350 and put 400-500 guide price.

0:25:490:25:53

Then if it doesn't reach 350, it hasn't sold, so at least you are not disappointed if it only gets to 300.

0:25:530:25:58

-Would you be OK with that?

-Yes, I would be fine with that.

0:25:580:26:01

-Brilliant.

-Hopefully we'll get the higher end.

0:26:010:26:04

'Let's hope Erica has not set her sights too high.

0:26:040:26:07

'From crossed fingers to the work of tiny fingers - I love these samplers.'

0:26:070:26:12

'Next, Jill and John get an unusual reaction from Adam.'

0:26:140:26:17

A very distinctive object here, isn't it?

0:26:170:26:20

-It is, yes.

-And quite a distinctive aroma of silage, is it?

0:26:200:26:23

It's him, not me. He has been doing the cattle this morning.

0:26:230:26:27

-Oh, right, you're farmers?

-Yes.

-Yes, we are. We're beef farmers.

0:26:270:26:30

-Local beef farmers.

-Yes, we are.

-Farmers are working very hard.

0:26:300:26:34

Yes, a lot of hours, not much money, the same as everybody!

0:26:340:26:37

-If only they washed their hands!

-I did. I did!

0:26:370:26:40

-Anyway we are here to talk about this object.

-Yes.

0:26:400:26:43

Why did you bring it, where's it from, tell me about it, please.

0:26:430:26:47

Well, I remember my grandmother growing hyacinths in it.

0:26:470:26:51

And then we moved into the farmhouse, we wanted to redecorate,

0:26:510:26:55

-so we put it in the cellar and we forgot about it.

-Yeah.

0:26:550:26:58

One day I went down into the cellar -

0:26:580:27:01

or tried to get into the cellar -

0:27:010:27:02

and I found that it was over five foot deep in water.

0:27:020:27:06

-Ah.

-So we had a blocked drain.

-We had a blocked drain.

0:27:060:27:10

So everything in the cellar was covered in mud and silt.

0:27:100:27:14

Luckily it was not toilet drains, it was only water drains!

0:27:140:27:17

Lucky it wasn't poo!

0:27:170:27:19

That's right, yes, it did smell a bit when we cleaned it out.

0:27:190:27:23

-Perhaps it still does.

-I was wondering, we are blaming John here,

0:27:230:27:27

-but it could be the object itself.

-I always get the blame for everything anyway.

0:27:270:27:31

Did you have to dig it out of the cellar?

0:27:310:27:34

Well, when we uncovered it, it was all covered in silt and mud and what have you.

0:27:340:27:39

So we cleaned it up and thought, oh, we don't really like that.

0:27:390:27:43

-No.

-So, and it has been sort of, sat, hanging around doing nothing, really.

0:27:430:27:47

Yeah. It is a bit damaged so we are not expecting it to be a big value. But you never know.

0:27:470:27:53

I could tell that you didn't have high expectations.

0:27:530:27:56

-No!

-Well, it looks to me as though it is Italian,

0:27:560:27:59

and a piece of majolica, the tin-glazed earthenware.

0:27:590:28:03

Probably the late 19th century is around the date of it.

0:28:030:28:07

-Oh, yeah.

-There have been quite a few losses, haven't there?

0:28:070:28:11

-There have, yes.

-We have got some damage this end.

0:28:110:28:15

Yes. Even more this end, I'm afraid.

0:28:150:28:17

Top of the wing is missing here.

0:28:170:28:19

And I'm afraid her head fell off.

0:28:190:28:22

It is a very brittle material anyway, it is very prone to damage.

0:28:220:28:25

You rarely see them in good condition.

0:28:250:28:27

If that was in perfect condition, it would be quite a valuable object.

0:28:270:28:31

-But it is far from in good condition.

-Well, yes.

0:28:310:28:34

-Far from it. Erm, is it something you want back?

-No.

0:28:340:28:37

-No.

-I didn't think so. I would share that opinion.

0:28:370:28:40

A lot of people at home will either love this or hate it.

0:28:400:28:42

-There is not going to be any middle ground.

-No, that's right.

-No, yes.

0:28:420:28:46

I would suggest taking a gamble and sticking it in at no reserve.

0:28:460:28:50

-Fair enough.

-It is "Flog It!"

0:28:500:28:52

-I don't think it will do more than £100 to £200.

-Fair enough.

-That's more than I thought.

0:28:520:28:56

I would be tempted to put a bit of a lower estimate on it than that.

0:28:560:29:00

But let's go with 100-200, shall we? Let's go in bullish.

0:29:000:29:03

-Yes, we'll do that.

-But don't blame me if it makes 40 quid.

-All right!

0:29:030:29:07

'No reserve? Well, Adam's taking no risks there.'

0:29:070:29:11

'Let's see if Kate's prepared to stick her neck out on the next find.'

0:29:130:29:17

Now, you've brought in this fantastic snuff box.

0:29:170:29:20

Is it a firm favourite of yours?

0:29:200:29:22

Well, not particularly. We do have it on display, and we like it, yes.

0:29:220:29:26

It wasn't a romantic present from one to the other?

0:29:260:29:28

-No, no, no, no, no, no.

-Oh, OK, fine.

0:29:280:29:30

What's the story behind it?

0:29:300:29:32

Well, I inherited it from my great-grandfather.

0:29:320:29:35

Well, it came down through the family, obviously.

0:29:350:29:39

-And that's about it.

-That's it? Do you know what it is?

0:29:390:29:41

Well, it's a snuff box. I understand it's a snuff box.

0:29:410:29:45

OK. Well, if we take a look at it, it's obviously very pretty from the outside, and we've got this sort of

0:29:450:29:50

machined enamel on the front and a little cartouche in the centre

0:29:500:29:54

with a chap on a chariot, and then a floral border.

0:29:540:29:57

And at first glance, it looks continental, with all this highly decorated stuff going on,

0:29:570:30:04

but if we open it, it's silver gilt, there's gold on the inside, and the hallmark, which is in here,

0:30:040:30:09

tells us that it's actually English and Georgian.

0:30:090:30:13

And the hallmark, if we look at it, is for 1817.

0:30:130:30:17

And we've got a "DH" there for David Hennell, who is the maker.

0:30:170:30:21

So, he's a fairly well-known maker of snuff boxes.

0:30:210:30:23

Regency, so you're talking George III, basically. It's a lovely thing.

0:30:230:30:28

I used to polish it every week!

0:30:280:30:30

Oh, my goodness! Because, obviously, it is quite soft, so you can overrub silver.

0:30:300:30:35

Yes, I learnt that from "Flog It!"

0:30:350:30:36

Ah-ha! We've taught you something!

0:30:360:30:39

Public information broadcasting at its best.

0:30:390:30:42

So, in terms of valuation, he's a known maker, it's a very pretty thing.

0:30:420:30:46

You do have a little bit of wear, I've noticed, on the bottom here,

0:30:460:30:49

-which will affect the price a little bit.

-Mm.

0:30:490:30:52

But it's still very pretty,

0:30:520:30:53

and for a snuff box collector I think it's going to be quite fun.

0:30:530:30:57

-Auction estimate would be between maybe £200 and £300, something like that.

-Mm!

0:30:570:31:03

Would that be the sort of price you'd be happy to sell it for?

0:31:030:31:05

-Yeah, round about that, yes, certainly.

-OK.

0:31:050:31:08

Well, we'd normally set a reserve of just below that, so maybe 150 reserve, an estimate of 200 to 300.

0:31:080:31:14

-Yeah.

-That's OK?

0:31:140:31:15

-Yes.

-You'd not be sorry to see it go, then?

0:31:150:31:18

-No.

-No, not really.

0:31:180:31:19

-No, no.

-Not having to polish it any more?

0:31:190:31:21

-Well, I haven't polished it for two years, so...!

-No loss. No loss.

0:31:210:31:26

OK, we'll try it, and I have high hopes for it at the auction, so hopefully it will go.

0:31:260:31:30

-Thank you.

-Fingers crossed. Thanks.

-Thank you.

0:31:300:31:32

'Now, that's more like it! We love a bit of optimism.

0:31:320:31:36

'Let's remind ourselves of the final items going off to auction.

0:31:360:31:39

'If the bidders like Erica's dress ring as much as Kate does, it should do very well.'

0:31:390:31:45

'Jill and John don't like their majolica bowl, so it's time for it to go under the hammer.

0:31:480:31:54

'If the serious snuff collectors are in the room on the day,

0:31:540:31:57

'I think Bill and Jan could be in for a nice surprise.

0:31:570:32:02

'Auctioneer Philip Serrell will be selling the rest of our lots

0:32:020:32:06

'in his saleroom in Malvern.

0:32:060:32:07

'The room's getting busy, which is always a hopeful sign.

0:32:070:32:11

'First, let's find out how Jill and John do with their majolica bowl.

0:32:110:32:15

A lovely bit of earthenware. Love it, love it, love it. Why are you selling this?

0:32:180:32:22

Well, YOU may love it, but we don't, I'm afraid.

0:32:220:32:25

We found it in our cellar, underwater.

0:32:250:32:29

Neither of us like it, so we thought, "Well, we'll sell it."

0:32:290:32:32

We're going to find out what the bidders think and also what the collectors think.

0:32:320:32:35

-It's going under the hammer now. Here we go.

-Fingers crossed.

0:32:350:32:38

Lot number 540 is this really nice Cantagalli-style oval dish,

0:32:400:32:45

a lovely thing. Will you bid me for that?

0:32:450:32:47

Start me at £100, someone.

0:32:470:32:50

Well, start me!

0:32:520:32:54

Bid me £60 for it.

0:32:560:32:59

Bid me £50 for it.

0:32:590:33:02

20 I am bid. At £20 only. At 20.

0:33:030:33:07

At £20 only. At 30. 40.

0:33:070:33:11

50. 50 bid. At 50.

0:33:110:33:13

At £50 only. Lady's bid at 50.

0:33:130:33:17

At £50 only. Your bid, ma'am.

0:33:170:33:19

At 50. At 50. 60. At 60. At £60. Have another go!

0:33:190:33:23

At 60.

0:33:230:33:25

Philip's got to work hard on this.

0:33:250:33:27

Is 70 anywhere now? At £60 it's yours.

0:33:270:33:30

It's not dear, this, at £60.

0:33:300:33:32

Is there any more at all? Any more?

0:33:320:33:35

At £60. And it's done and sold, then, at 60. And done.

0:33:350:33:38

-JILL:

-Oh, well.

-Just a bit too badly damaged.

0:33:380:33:40

Yes. Well, they said they didn't want it back. Didn't you?

0:33:400:33:44

Well, that's right, yes. Yes.

0:33:440:33:46

She could have lost her head altogether, so...!

0:33:460:33:49

'Well, I can't help thinking that somebody got a real bargain there.'

0:33:490:33:53

'Erica's brought her son Kurt to the auction room.

0:33:560:33:58

'Let's hope the bidders give them a good price for the diamond and sapphire ring.'

0:33:580:34:04

Why have you decided now is the best time to sell this?

0:34:040:34:08

Well, I don't wear it.

0:34:080:34:10

My mum didn't like it, either.

0:34:100:34:12

She had it in her jewellery box and never wore it, and I thought,

0:34:120:34:15

-I might as well sell it and use the money to get something I'd like.

-OK.

0:34:150:34:20

Hopefully the money will go to something you like as well, Kurt.

0:34:200:34:24

But I know you really like this, don't you, Kate?

0:34:240:34:26

It's a bit of sparkle. It's a girlie lot.

0:34:260:34:28

-Something you could wear?

-I like to think so, yeah!

0:34:280:34:31

Well, let's hope this lot want a bit of sparkle as well, shall we?

0:34:310:34:34

Here we go. Let's find out.

0:34:340:34:35

The diamond and sapphire cocktail ring, set with a central sapphire.

0:34:350:34:41

Come on...

0:34:410:34:43

I'm bid £250 bid. At 250. 260.

0:34:450:34:47

At 260 bid. 260. At 260.

0:34:470:34:51

This is good.

0:34:510:34:52

270. 270. 280.

0:34:540:34:57

290. At 300 bid.

0:34:570:35:01

At £300 only. At 300.

0:35:010:35:02

At £300. At 300 out on my left.

0:35:020:35:05

At £300 only. Any more?

0:35:050:35:07

At £300. Is there any more at all?

0:35:070:35:10

At £300 only on my left. Any more?

0:35:100:35:13

At 300. There it is.

0:35:130:35:15

At 300. Your bid. At £300. Any more?

0:35:150:35:18

And done, then, or not at 300.

0:35:180:35:20

Well, I'm sorry, I can't do that.

0:35:200:35:23

-Oh, well.

-No!

-It was close, wasn't it?

0:35:230:35:25

We had a fixed reserve of 350.

0:35:250:35:27

Yeah. So it didn't quite make it.

0:35:270:35:30

Oh, I'll take it home and try again another time.

0:35:300:35:33

-You're stuck with it, Kurt!

-That's it!

0:35:330:35:35

Better start liking it!

0:35:350:35:38

'Erica's right, there will be another auction on another day.

0:35:380:35:42

'No point giving good things away.

0:35:420:35:44

'Now, this is a lovely lot, Bill and Jan's silver Regency snuff box.'

0:35:440:35:48

Absolutely beautiful, it really is, isn't it?

0:35:500:35:53

It's a lovely example of what it is, yeah.

0:35:530:35:56

-£200 to £300.

-Yeah. Nice.

0:35:560:35:58

Why are you selling this now?

0:35:580:36:01

I don't know why. It just happened.

0:36:010:36:03

We wanted to bring something to "Flog It!"

0:36:030:36:05

You thought that was a good item?

0:36:050:36:07

We didn't realise it was as old as it is. It's 1817.

0:36:070:36:10

That's the great thing about hallmarks, is you can date it precisely, yeah.

0:36:100:36:13

Good luck, because this is a piece to treasure.

0:36:130:36:16

And there's lots of collectors for

0:36:160:36:18

this kind of decorative item, so it should do well.

0:36:180:36:20

-And here we go. We're going to find out.

-All right.

0:36:200:36:23

Georgian silver snuff box.

0:36:260:36:28

Bid me, chaps. 150 to start?

0:36:280:36:30

Thank you. 150 I'm bid. At 150. 160.

0:36:330:36:37

-170. 180.

-Still cheap!

0:36:370:36:39

-190. 200.

-Oh, it's not finished yet!

0:36:390:36:41

-Go on!

-210. 220. 230. 240.

0:36:410:36:47

Don't shake your head, ma'am. One more?

0:36:470:36:49

240 with me. At 240. 250. 260.

0:36:490:36:54

260. 270. 280.

0:36:540:36:59

290. 300. 310, is it?

0:36:590:37:02

310. 320.

0:37:020:37:05

£320 on the book.

0:37:070:37:10

330. 340. 350. 360. 370. 380.

0:37:100:37:16

390. 400. And 10 with me. At 410.

0:37:160:37:19

Is there any more?

0:37:190:37:21

At £410. Any more in the room, phone or internet?

0:37:210:37:26

At £410. Any more?

0:37:260:37:27

And I sell, then, at £410. And done.

0:37:270:37:31

Yes, the hammer's gone down.

0:37:310:37:33

What a lovely moment. Well, thank you so much for bringing that in.

0:37:330:37:37

-Good result!

-Yes!

0:37:370:37:39

Just goes to show, quality always sells, doesn't it?

0:37:390:37:42

And if you've got anything like that, we want to see it!

0:37:420:37:44

-So, what are you going to spend all that money on?

-There's still a debate on that.

0:37:440:37:48

-You could open a bottle of something and toast Grandad.

-We could do that!

0:37:480:37:51

Thank you for bringing such a wonderful item in, it really made our day.

0:37:510:37:55

And it's a wonderful, fitting end to a great day here in Malvern.

0:37:550:37:58

All credit to Philip Serrell. He's done us really proud.

0:37:580:38:01

If you've got anything like that, we want to see you.

0:38:010:38:03

Bring it along to one of our valuation days.

0:38:030:38:05

But from Malvern, until then, it's cheerio.

0:38:050:38:08

'And you can find details of our next valuation days

0:38:080:38:11

'by logging on to the internet and going to...'

0:38:110:38:14

'Click F for "Flog It!"

0:38:170:38:18

'then follow the links and find the list of towns

0:38:180:38:21

'we're coming to very soon.'

0:38:210:38:23

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:38:430:38:46

Paul Martin and experts Kate Bateman and Adam Partridge visit the beautiful spa town of Malvern, where Kate discovers a toy Chitty Chitty Bang Bang car in truly scrumptious condition and Adam enjoys valuing four early Newport rugby caps brought in by sisters Jackie and Christine.

Taking a break from the antiques, Paul travels north to Stourbridge to meet glassblower Martin Andrews, and tries his hand at glassblowing.