Oxford Flog It!


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Flog It! is in the City of Dreaming Spires, Oxford,

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and our venue is the university's splendid Sheldonian Theatre.

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The Sheldonian Theatre was designed by Sir Christopher Wren in the 1660s.

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Inside, the magnificent ceiling paintings show truth

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descending upon the arts to expel ignorance from the university.

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Our task today is to dispel any ignorance that this Oxford crowd

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might be harbouring about

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antiques and collectibles they've had lying around, and they don't want any more.

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It's our job to give them the best valuation possible before we take them off to auction.

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Leading our team of valuers and imparting their knowledge

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are our experts, Charlie Ross and Tracy Martin.

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As well as working in an auction house, Tracy has written about 20th century collectibles.

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I'm really into social history.

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She loves to rummage around for antiques.

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What's in that bag there, young man?

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And Charlie Ross, who, having spent a lifetime in antiques,

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has seen and sold just about everything.

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But it's weird, because I've never seen anything like it.

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No. Can't say I have, actually.

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Well, nearly.

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-Might be worth a fortune, then!

-I don't think so!

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Sometimes, you just never know and coming up, we've got some great lots going off to auction.

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There's a quality Corgi toy that Geoff has had since he was nine.

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I know you've been itching to play with it ever since we sat down at this table,

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in fact, I've been trying to stop you.

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Come on, show me how it works.

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Jean wants to know if her early piece of porcelain was a costly mistake.

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-What did your husband paid for it?

-£400.

-Where did he buy it?

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In a Northampton house auction.

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Right.

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-By mistake.

-By what?

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But there's no mistaking the quality of the gold pocket watch, brought in by Duncan and Gillian.

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Can you see? It says 17 jewels.

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-Most pocket watches will run on seven jewels.

-Oh, right.

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So, the higher the jewel content, the more valuable the watch.

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Stay with us to find out exactly what a jewel is

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and how much this watch is really worth.

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Everybody is now safely seated inside the Sheldonian, and what a wonderful interior.

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We're going to be in for a cracking day.

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Let's join up with our experts and it looks like Charlie Ross is first at the tables.

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Elizabeth, I have seen some domes in my time, but I think

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you have won the prize for the biggest ever dome on Flog It!

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-Oh.

-It's absolutely charming, that's the dome.

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I think the contents are awful.

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They're rubbish!

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It's not often I can meet somebody on Flog It! where

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I can actually speak my mind and they don't hit me.

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No, I agree.

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-Where have hidden it all your life?

-In the attic.

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-What a very sensible place.

-In the dark.

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-But you haven't broken it.

-No, we've been very careful.

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How did you get hold of it?

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We had to clear my husband's aunt's house when she died, and that was there.

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We took it home and put it up in the attic with other bits and bobs.

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Did it have that gubbins inside it?

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Yes.

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-Because I don't think what's inside the dome has anything to do with the dome.

-No.

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The dome is late Victorian, Edwardian,

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1900, that sort of figure.

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I suspect originally, it may well have had a little tree

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growing up it with some branches and some stuffed birds in it.

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The Victorians particularly loved stuffed birds.

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I thought it should have birds in it, rather than that.

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These are silk flowers, which somebody has taken a huge amount of time in making.

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Incidentally, there's a free vase with this dome.

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The vase is not English. I think it's Italian,

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I think it's Murano glass, made in the little island of Murano off Venice.

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Venetian glass, don't get excited by that, it's 20th century, not particularly exciting.

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It's gilt decorated and it's got some enamelling on the front.

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I think we've probably got a value

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of £10 or £20 for the vase inside, which helps.

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I think the dome is worth the best part of £100.

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It's an interesting point as to what somebody would put it.

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Stuffed birds aren't everybody's taste nowadays.

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-You don't want to see it again, do you?

-No, thank you.

-As long as you live. Right.

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We're going to put an estimate of 50 to 100.

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-Don't tell Paul Martin but we're not going to put a reserve on it.

-No.

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-No reserve.

-We'll be very grateful for whatever we get.

-For whatever comes. Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

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No good hiding things from me, Charlie. I always find out eventually.

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Next up, Tracy's playing around with Geoff.

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-We've got a real boy's toy here, haven't we, Geoff?

-Yes, we do.

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Is this something that you had as a child and you've just kept in such fantastic condition?

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Yes, it was a Christmas present for about my ninth birthday, I think.

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It was played with and put back in the box.

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I love the box, I think the box is absolutely fabulous.

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It's survived quite well.

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You've been itching to play with it since we sat down at this table.

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In fact, I've been trying to stop you.

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Come on, show me how it works.

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The cab comes out, like that.

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That tilts, so you can have a look at the engine

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if you feel that way inclined.

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The back flips down.

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That's a 1966 World Rally-winning Mini.

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Various toys do different things.

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The tailgate comes up on that.

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How many cars have we got there?

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Six cars. The headlights have got a fibre-optic headlight.

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Show me how that works.

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There's a little window here and when that's covered, and opened,

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the fibre optics come through.

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In itself, it's silly, but to me,

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when you're a kid, that means everything.

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You're going along and you're flashing your lights.

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Totally, it's all the fun of it.

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The other Minis, they don't exactly do anything.

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You love playing, don't you? You love playing with these!

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Yes, out it comes. It's just a stylised Mini.

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I think it's absolutely fantastic and it's every boy's dream to have something like this,

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especially with all the little gadgets and you can play with it.

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Hours of fun and joy.

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I just think it's absolutely fabulous.

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Because it's so much childhood memories,

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and like I said you've been itching to play with it again,

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are you happy to part with it, to sell it?

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Yes. It's been sitting in the bottom of a wardrobe now for years,

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and it's pointless leaving it there.

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-You want to pass it on to somebody else?

-It's time for it to go.

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I have two children, they played with it and probably done the damage there is to it.

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It's done what it was originally designed to do, and pass it on now.

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As mentioned, there's some damage, obviously.

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Some paint chips and things like that.

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Corgi cars are very popular with collectors at the moment.

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Lots of men like yourself, reliving their childhoods and wanting to buy back their childhood toys.

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The toy market is quite buoyant at auction.

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Have you got any expectations of the money you'd like?

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Not really. It's never been about money,

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it's always been about the toy.

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OK, that helps me, to be honest.

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I'd like to put a reserve of £80 on it.

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I think it's going to get a little bit more, but we'll stick at 80,

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that's what we call a come-and-buy-me estimate.

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A pre-sale estimate of 80 to 150.

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Hopefully we'll get the top end.

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-Are you quite happy with that?

-Yeah, that's fine.

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Hopefully there'll be loads of men desperate to relive

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their childhood memories and will bid for this.

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What a great toy, and I can see the collectors getting carried away over this one.

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I've been pinned down by a lady with a very personal interest in British motoring history.

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Hillary, fascinating little enamel badges.

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Most of them are dated 1932-33. What are they for?

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I think they were for visitors that went to Brooklands, the racing circuit, years ago.

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They belonged to my uncle, Mr H Hubert Noel Charles,

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who was the chief designer of the MG motor car.

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Really, he designed the MG?

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Yes, 1930-1935.

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Gosh. Do you have an MG?

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I don't, unfortunately, no. I should have done, years ago.

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You missed out, you could have got one at half price!

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I should have done, definitely.

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And you've got lots of photographs and lots of memorabilia.

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-Lots of photographs and books.

-Wonderful, how lovely.

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-Do you have sons?

-I have two sons.

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That's brilliant. They've got that to look forward to.

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Definitely. One son lives and said, "Whatever you do, don't sell them."

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"Don't sell them, Mum!"

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You might be looking at around £40 to £50 per badge, so there's a lot of money's worth.

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Yes, I think so. They have been in the MG museum in Abingdon.

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They do belong there, you know that.

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You must loan it to them again.

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They do go there quite frequently.

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-Good for you.

-I do have a carburettor at home as well.

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Not so interesting to look at, is it?

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No. A bit of old metal, that's how I look at it.

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Thank you. I just wish you had an MG parked outside, you could take me for a ride.

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I would do, definitely.

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It's always a delight to meet so many charming and interesting people at our valuation days,

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and it seems that everyone has a good story to tell.

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Right now, it's Jean's turn to confess to Charlie about her painted piece of porcelain.

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Jean, what have you got here?

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Well, I think it's a very early inkwell.

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-Yep. Do you know who made it?

-Haven't a clue.

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Right. Do you know what it's worth?

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I know what I paid for it, or I know what my husband paid for it.

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-What did your husband pay for it?

-£400.

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-Where did he buy it?

-In an Northampton house auction.

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-Right.

-By mistake.

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-By what?

-By mistake.

-Tell me more.

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Well, we went to the house auction

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and he wanted to buy a particular picture,

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so he put £400 down on this picture.

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-But we couldn't stay because I had to go back home.

-Yeah.

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So in the morning I phoned up and I said, "Did we get lot number 123?",

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whatever it was, and they said, "Yes."

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I said, "How much?" "£400."

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So we drove up to Northampton to get it.

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When I got it, they presented me with this.

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And I said, "No, no, we bought a picture."

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So they looked up on their paper

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and they discovered that instead of saying lot number 480, it was 488.

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And so we bought this instead of the picture.

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That cost us £400.

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Fancy buying a picture and it turning out to be this.

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-There you go.

-It's marvellous.

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Now, this is Worcester.

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It's got no markings on it.

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I've had a look at the bottom of it.

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And it's early 19th century.

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So it's jolly nearly 200 years old.

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And it's really in pretty good condition.

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You can see these panels are hand-painted, as befits the best Worcester.

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Of peacocks. Beautifully coloured.

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Lift up the lid and we've got the inkwell inside.

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-Badly crazed, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-But I don't think that is terminal, really, because that's not the bit you see, is it?

-No.

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If the crazing had been throughout the piece I'd have been more worried.

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There is of course some crazing in some of these panels.

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But by and large, not too bad.

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-So this cost £400?

-Yes.

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Even though you thought it was a picture.

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I'm afraid I don't think it's worth £400.

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I think it's worth about £250-£300.

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-So, it's not too bad.

-No.

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You never know, with two people on a good day with the wind behind them you may get your money back.

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-Or someone making a mistake.

-Like you did. Yes.

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-I'd like to put a reserve on it of £200, and estimate it £250-£300.

-Very good.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

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Looks like Jean and her husband might have made a costly mistake.

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We are now halfway through, time to put those valuations to the test.

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You've seen the items, probably made your own mind up what you think they're worth.

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Let's find out what the auctioneer thinks, shall we?

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Or more importantly, the bidders.

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And for our auction, we are heading out to town to a sale room

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in Watlington, Oxfordshire.

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It's about half an hour before the sale starts but look, it's absolutely jam-packed.

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And that's a good thing for us because hopefully

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it means there'll be competition amongst the bidders for our lots.

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Going under the hammer we've got the glass dome of flowers that neither Charlie nor Elizabeth liked.

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Geoff is hoping his Corgi cars will drive the bidders wild.

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And finally Jean's selling her inkwell her husband thought was a painting.

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And auctioneer Simon Jones thinks it might have been mistakenly identified by our expert too.

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Great story here. This belongs to Jean.

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-Her husband bought it by mistake in auction.

-Good place to buy things.

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Charlie put £250-£300 on this.

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But he dithered a bit because he put a reserve of £200 on it.

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So his valuation really is £200-£300. What do you think?

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I think...

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A - that it's not early Worcester or early 19th century Worcester,

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but it's super quality.

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Yes, they'll get it away, but it will be a bit touch and go.

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-OK. Away at the lower end?

-Lower end, yes.

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Gosh. If it sells at £200, they've lost 50%.

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If they'd bought a motor car they'd have lost 100%.

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But I'm not sure that would be much of a consolation to Jean.

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Anyway, first up it's Elizabeth's unloved dome.

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Elizabeth and Doug, your glass dome is about to go under the hammer.

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-Not literally.

-No, of course not!

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We're looking for around £50-£60, hopefully £70.

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Not keen on the flowers. They didn't start out life together, did they?

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No, they're completely different, aren't they?

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-It would look lovely with a skeleton clock in it.

-Ideal.

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If it doesn't sell, we can take it home

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and use the glass as a cloche in the garden.

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It's got to sell! It has no reserve.

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-I know.

-It's a good idea, isn't it, as a little cloche?

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As a little bell cloche?

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Let's get down to business, this is it.

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There we go, nice flower arrangement.

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Under the dome shape.

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£50, £60 for it?

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£40 to start me?

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£40 I'm bid. 45 anywhere?

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£40? You all happy at £40? For the flower arrangement, all done at £40.

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-Yes, the hammer's gone down.

-Good.

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£40.

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-It's better than nothing, isn't it?

-Much better.

-That's good, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-Happy?

-Yes, thank you.

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Pleasure.

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At least it's profit

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and the glass dome is saved from being moved to Elizabeth's garden.

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Jean's up next with her inkwell mistake.

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This is a great lesson in being alert,

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staying focused in a packed sale room.

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Write the lot numbers down correctly!

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Because things do go wrong. I've bought the wrong thing as well.

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I've done that.

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I was sent to buy a rosewood table once and bought a piano.

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Anyway, OK.

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The inkwell, it wasn't the picture you wanted.

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-You paid £400 for it.

-Yes.

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Charlie, you put a valuation of £250 to £300.

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-Yes.

-Now, I had a chat to Simon just before sale started.

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He thinks it might struggle.

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So, you had a word with him, didn't you?

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You've now lowered the reserve to £100.

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I'm sure it's going to go for a couple of hundred. It's got to.

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Let's think positively, OK?

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-We need to.

-We do. Here we go.

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Lot 46 is the porcelain inkwell there. Nice bone china one.

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What shall we say,

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a couple of hundred pounds for it?

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£180 I'm bid, £190.

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Straight in at 180.

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-At £180 for the inkwell, all finished.

-The hammer's gone down,

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-Straight in, straight out.

-I wasn't that far out.

-You weren't.

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-No. You've got to be happy.

-I'm pleased with that.

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-You've lost little bit of money.

-That was years ago.

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-You haven't left a bid on anything today, have you?

-No.

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I think Jean's now learnt her lesson,

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to check the right lot numbers.

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Geoff's up next with his toy cars.

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Will he change his mind and keep them though?

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£80-£150, somewhere around there we'd be happy with.

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Who have you brought along, Geoff?

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-This is my good lady, Carol.

-Hi.

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Hi, Carol. Why is he flogging off his toys?

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They should be carefully boxed up in the attic for the next generation.

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That's what they've been for the last generation.

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-You're having a clear out?

-Yeah.

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We have two sons, so who would you leave it to?

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-It goes.

-It goes.

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I guess with two boys you'll be putting their stuff in the attic now.

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You can't get in there.

0:17:060:17:08

I'm actually a bit concerned though because when we did the valuation,

0:17:080:17:12

Geoff, he wouldn't stop playing with his cars.

0:17:120:17:15

I don't blame him. That's what they meant for.

0:17:150:17:17

-I'm worried he doesn't want to let them go.

-Say goodbye, they're going under the hammer.

0:17:170:17:22

Lot 227, the Corgi car transporter.

0:17:220:17:26

With the six cars in its original box.

0:17:260:17:30

Here we go.

0:17:300:17:32

What can we say for that? £90 I'm bid, £95.

0:17:320:17:35

£90 then, you're all happy at £90?

0:17:350:17:38

£95. £100. £110. £120.

0:17:380:17:41

£130. £140.

0:17:410:17:43

£150. £160. £170.

0:17:430:17:44

This is good!

0:17:440:17:46

£190. £200. £190 then,

0:17:460:17:49

standing by the door at £190. All done at £190.

0:17:490:17:52

Brilliant result.

0:17:520:17:53

Well done, Tracy.

0:17:530:17:56

And well done you because obviously you've looked after it.

0:17:560:18:00

The box is so important.

0:18:000:18:01

I threw all my boxes away when I got my toy cars for Christmas.

0:18:010:18:05

You've got to take Carol out for lunch now, don't forget.

0:18:050:18:08

-Oh, is that the deal?

-That's the deal.

0:18:080:18:10

Well, it shouldn't be any old trucker's cafe for wife Carol.

0:18:100:18:14

The Corgi car transporter exceeded all our expectations

0:18:140:18:17

and was obviously a must-have for the toy collectors.

0:18:170:18:20

While in Oxford, I've come to find out about a book which we all take for granted,

0:18:310:18:35

yet which in its original form took 70 years to complete and ran to 10 volumes.

0:18:350:18:40

Today, we know it as the Oxford English Dictionary.

0:18:400:18:45

The Oxford English Dictionary was a great feat of Victorian ingenuity

0:18:470:18:50

and determination as great as any engineering achievement of that age.

0:18:500:18:55

And it still remains the ultimate authority on the English language.

0:18:550:18:59

When it was first published in 1928 by the Oxford University Press,

0:19:000:19:05

it listed over 400,000 words

0:19:050:19:07

and included not only their meaning but their historical route too.

0:19:070:19:12

To hear the story of this monumental undertaking icon to meet

0:19:120:19:16

the Oxford University Press's head of archive, Martin Moore.

0:19:160:19:21

So had the idea of the dictionary come about then, Martin?

0:19:210:19:24

Well, the dictionary was the idea of a group of academics in London in the 1850s.

0:19:240:19:29

They were called the Philological Society.

0:19:290:19:32

And to mark Queen Victoria's reign, they decided to make a dictionary that was bigger and better

0:19:320:19:37

than any made before, such as the great dictionary by Samuel Johnson in the 18th century.

0:19:370:19:44

The problem with Samuel Johnson's dictionary was that it only listed 43,000 words

0:19:440:19:49

and it was tainted by definitions that reflected his own prejudice.

0:19:490:19:54

Most famously, he defined oats as a grain given to horses in England

0:19:540:19:59

but which in Scotland supports the people.

0:19:590:20:02

It is perhaps ironic then that the great genius of the Oxford English Dictionary

0:20:020:20:06

was a Scot, James Murray, who took over as editor in 1879.

0:20:060:20:12

So how did the project change under the leadership of James Murray?

0:20:120:20:16

James Murray was a remarkable man, a schoolteacher from Scotland.

0:20:160:20:19

He never had the money to go to university and get a formal degree,

0:20:190:20:24

but it's quite clear he had a mind that would put most Oxford professors to shame.

0:20:240:20:28

Among many other accomplishments,

0:20:280:20:31

James Murray taught himself about 40 different languages.

0:20:310:20:36

-Really?

-He could speak, read and write them all.

0:20:360:20:39

And he sees that the dictionary requires far more organisation

0:20:390:20:42

and resources than the society had first thought.

0:20:420:20:46

It's Murray who puts out an appeal to readers in the English language

0:20:460:20:52

to come forward and to read texts for the dictionary.

0:20:520:20:55

We begin to talk about hundreds and hundreds of readers

0:20:550:20:59

sending in information to Murray and his colleagues.

0:20:590:21:03

The readers worked as word detectives, scouring every possible type of printed text

0:21:030:21:08

from medieval literature to scientific journals,

0:21:080:21:11

from song sheets to recipe books, even wills,

0:21:110:21:15

collecting words and their meanings.

0:21:150:21:17

They then sent quotations to Murray and his team

0:21:170:21:20

on half sheets of notepaper and within a short while,

0:21:200:21:23

over a thousand quotation slips a day

0:21:230:21:25

were arriving in an outbuilding in Murray's back garden.

0:21:250:21:29

And you had to obviously check every single form that came back?

0:21:310:21:35

Indeed. They have to take every piece of paper,

0:21:350:21:39

they have to go round libraries in Oxford or beyond...

0:21:390:21:42

Double-checking?

0:21:420:21:43

Double-checking. And then check that everything written out by hand

0:21:430:21:47

matches the printed version down to the very last full stop.

0:21:470:21:53

You can see at the top left of this slip, the word "emperorship" has been written out.

0:21:530:21:58

This is what dictionary makers call "the head word."

0:21:580:22:01

You'll see a sentence written out, showing how the head word, "emperorship",

0:22:010:22:06

has been used in a certain text and then you can see

0:22:060:22:09

a piece of information telling you where that sentence occurs.

0:22:090:22:13

It's mind-boggling, isn't it? It really is.

0:22:130:22:15

So, all the people that actually wrote in with these little forms were obviously academics themselves.

0:22:150:22:21

I guess at that time, half the population of the country couldn't read or write anyway.

0:22:210:22:25

Literacy wasn't as widespread as it is now, certainly.

0:22:250:22:28

But not everybody who contributed these slips

0:22:280:22:30

of paper to the dictionary was a professional academic.

0:22:300:22:34

One of the largest contributors to the first edition was a man called William Minor.

0:22:340:22:40

Minor was an American surgeon.

0:22:400:22:43

He served during the US Civil War and became very disturbed

0:22:430:22:48

as a result of the experiences he went through there.

0:22:480:22:51

He came to England to try and recover, but in fact he got worse and murdered somebody.

0:22:510:22:57

And as a result of that, he was incarcerated for life in Broadmoor Hospital.

0:22:570:23:02

Of course, Dr Minor had nothing else to do with his life but to read.

0:23:020:23:05

-Put pen to paper?

-Indeed he did.

0:23:050:23:08

Is one of these slips his?

0:23:080:23:09

And as we can see here,

0:23:090:23:11

this is one of the slips that he would send to Murray.

0:23:110:23:15

Gosh, look at the tiny writing.

0:23:150:23:18

He's one of the great invisible architects of the dictionary, as it were.

0:23:180:23:21

One of the main people behind the scenes,

0:23:210:23:23

contributing information to this amazing text.

0:23:230:23:26

Minor wasn't the only unusual contributor to the dictionary.

0:23:260:23:30

Murray had 11 children and they earned pocket money sorting the 3.5

0:23:300:23:34

million quotation slips that Murray and his team had to deal with.

0:23:340:23:38

Even so, it was obvious that the enormous task of cataloguing every word used in the English language

0:23:380:23:43

would take longer than anyone had thought.

0:23:430:23:47

-How long did it take him?

-Well, it even surprised Murray, for all his genius.

0:23:500:23:55

The first little part of the dictionary to five years to appear in print.

0:23:550:24:00

And that went from the letter A to the word "ant".

0:24:000:24:05

-You're joking!

-This is just a tiny part of the language.

0:24:050:24:09

Other bits of the language prove to be easier.

0:24:090:24:12

The dictionary picks up speed as it goes along.

0:24:120:24:15

But even so, sadly, James Murray did not live to see the end of the first edition of the dictionary.

0:24:150:24:21

James Murray died in 1915.

0:24:210:24:25

And by that time, the dictionary had got to the letter T.

0:24:250:24:29

So, he could see the winning post, he just did not live long enough to get to it.

0:24:290:24:34

It was left to other editors to carry on the work and so the

0:24:340:24:37

first edition of this amazing piece of scholarship is finished in 1928.

0:24:370:24:44

It does not take 10 years, it takes over 40 years to assemble this single text.

0:24:440:24:50

Wow.

0:24:500:24:51

Today, the complete Oxford English Dictionary contains over 500,000

0:24:530:24:58

entries and 100 new words are submitted for inclusion every month.

0:24:580:25:03

So it looks like the job Murray dedicated his life to will never truly be done.

0:25:030:25:08

Back at the valuation day in Oxford's Sheldonian Theatre,

0:25:170:25:20

we're busy collecting entries for the auction.

0:25:200:25:23

Look at that. Isn't that scary?

0:25:230:25:25

And Diana has come all the way from Sussex to get her dolls valued.

0:25:270:25:31

Di, little and large. And you've brought these along to Oxford and you don't live here, do you?

0:25:330:25:38

-No, I don't.

-On a little trip.

0:25:380:25:40

Yes, yes. I don't think they've ever been to Oxford so I thought they'd like a day out.

0:25:400:25:44

Have you ever been to Oxford?

0:25:460:25:48

-No, I haven't.

-That makes three of you. Fantastic.

0:25:480:25:50

So you're hoping to pay for your trip to Oxford.

0:25:500:25:53

-Indeed, yeah. Hope so.

-Where have these come from?

0:25:530:25:56

They were given to me by my mother, obviously when I was much younger.

0:25:560:26:00

But the thing is that because of their fragile nature...

0:26:000:26:04

They're porcelain-headed dolls, yes.

0:26:040:26:07

I wasn't allowed to play with them much.

0:26:070:26:09

Obviously they would break.

0:26:090:26:11

I know she had them for her childhood as well.

0:26:110:26:14

So they obviously go back a fair bit.

0:26:140:26:18

-And is she still alive?

-No, she's not.

-If she were, how old would she be?

0:26:180:26:22

She'd be 98.

0:26:220:26:24

That's interesting. I think she had them probably new as a child.

0:26:240:26:29

Do you know who made them?

0:26:290:26:31

-No.

-Do you know where they were made?

0:26:310:26:33

No. I know nothing else than that, no.

0:26:330:26:36

If you look at the back of the necks of the doll, it will usually tell you all you want to know.

0:26:360:26:40

-Oh, right.

-I have looked at the back here, and there are the initials AM,

0:26:400:26:47

which stands for Armand Marseille,

0:26:470:26:50

who was a very famous doll manufacturer.

0:26:500:26:53

Russian-born, emigrated to Germany and started a factory in Koppelsdorf,

0:26:530:27:00

and was making dolls up until 1930.

0:27:000:27:04

I'd think these are 1920 or thereabouts.

0:27:040:27:07

-So they're German-made?

-They're German-made dolls.

0:27:070:27:10

It's in reasonable condition.

0:27:100:27:11

When you lie her down, the eyes close.

0:27:110:27:13

But I'm afraid the eyelashes have gone.

0:27:130:27:16

There has been some damage to the hands.

0:27:180:27:20

It's a composition body, obviously, not a porcelain body.

0:27:200:27:23

Just the head is porcelain.

0:27:230:27:24

The damage goes against her quite a bit.

0:27:240:27:28

And fashion goes against her.

0:27:280:27:31

-10, 15 years ago, considerably more saleable than she'd be now.

-Really?

0:27:310:27:36

Yeah. But this is quite exciting, isn't it, this one.

0:27:360:27:40

If we lift her up, lift up her skirt, pardon her blushes,

0:27:400:27:44

mechanical - which you knew, presumably.

0:27:440:27:46

-Have you the key?

-I don't, unfortunately.

0:27:460:27:49

-No, but presumably, wind her up and she walks along.

-I think so, yes.

0:27:490:27:54

I'm surprised that she'd maintain balance, to be honest.

0:27:540:27:59

Her feet are quite small and they aren't really flat at the bottom.

0:27:590:28:03

You'd think she'd probably topple over.

0:28:030:28:06

But never the less, the fact that she's mechanical must add something to the value.

0:28:060:28:11

If we turn her over, look at the back of her neck,

0:28:110:28:14

we'll find something.

0:28:140:28:16

No maker's name, sadly, but the word Germany.

0:28:160:28:19

So there we are, another German doll.

0:28:190:28:22

And a number underneath - four and a half.

0:28:220:28:25

That's the size head.

0:28:250:28:27

Like a pair of shoes, the size of doll, going up to 13, 14 for a bigger-headed doll.

0:28:270:28:33

For a big head.

0:28:330:28:35

Exactly. So how much are we going to get you for them? How much do you want for them?

0:28:350:28:39

-That's a different matter.

-Well, as much as you can get, actually.

0:28:390:28:42

Of course we'll be doing that. Well, the auctioneer will.

0:28:420:28:45

I don't know. I thought perhaps 80 to 100 for each of them.

0:28:450:28:49

Right, I don't think you're far out, actually.

0:28:490:28:52

This is a doll, five to 10 years ago, that probably would have made £300. I know, I know.

0:28:520:28:58

But sadly not any more.

0:28:580:29:00

I think

0:29:000:29:02

80 to 100 isn't a bad estimate. That's about right.

0:29:020:29:06

I think this one has the potential to be worth more because it's mechanical.

0:29:060:29:11

But the condition is no better.

0:29:110:29:13

I'd like to estimate these dolls at 150 to 200 for the two, which is a

0:29:130:29:21

-bit below what you thought, and a reserve at £120.

-OK.

0:29:210:29:24

Are you happy - well, you're not happy but you're reasonably satisfied with that?

0:29:240:29:30

-I accept, yeah.

-I think it's the right money, to be honest.

0:29:300:29:33

They're not going to make three or four hundred pounds.

0:29:330:29:36

If they do, we'll have a very, very lucky day.

0:29:360:29:38

-We'll have a drink on it!

-We will!

0:29:380:29:40

Well, I think Diana's eyes were really opened to the true value of her dolls.

0:29:400:29:44

She was a little bit disappointed.

0:29:440:29:46

However I'm sure I'm not going to disappoint

0:29:460:29:49

Duncan and Gillian, who have bought in a stunning gold pocket watch.

0:29:490:29:53

So how did you come by this? This is a full-hunter.

0:29:530:29:56

Well, we found it in a drawer at my mother's after she died in 1985.

0:29:560:30:00

But I believe before that, it belonged to her brother.

0:30:000:30:04

But the history before that, I don't know a lot about.

0:30:040:30:06

It might have been grandpa's but I don't know the age of it at all.

0:30:060:30:10

-So where's it been, Gillian?

-In a drawer, in my jewellery box!

0:30:100:30:16

Did you ever use it at all?

0:30:160:30:17

Yes, I was in the Royal Air Force

0:30:170:30:21

-and I used to wear it on my mess kit.

-Did you?

-With a waistcoat.

0:30:210:30:24

God, I bet you were the envy of everybody there, weren't you?

0:30:240:30:27

-Yeah.

-This is lovely, a full-hunter which means it's built for hunting,

0:30:270:30:30

shooting, fishing, something like this, you can be practical with it.

0:30:300:30:33

A half-hunter would have just a little window in the front,

0:30:330:30:37

slightly more delicate just so you could see the face.

0:30:370:30:40

It's nice, it's got a subsidiary dial, look, a second hand.

0:30:400:30:44

This is nine-carat gold.

0:30:440:30:45

If you look on the back there, you can see the whole thing was made in

0:30:450:30:49

Birmingham, there's the assay mark for Birmingham, the anchor sign.

0:30:490:30:52

And there's the date letter, that was made in 1924.

0:30:520:30:56

Earlier pocket watches would have needed a key to wind them, which you'd find on your fob chain.

0:30:560:31:01

This is a self-winder. But looking at the back, if you can

0:31:010:31:04

see here, look at that, it's also marked Rolex there but can you see?

0:31:040:31:08

Look, it says 17 jewels.

0:31:080:31:11

Yes.

0:31:110:31:12

-Now, most pocket watches will run on seven jewels.

-Oh, right.

0:31:120:31:15

So the higher the jewel content, the more valuable the watch.

0:31:150:31:19

-But when they talk about jewels, they talk about these little rubies. Can you see them in there?

-Yes.

0:31:190:31:23

That's what the movement is mounted on.

0:31:230:31:26

Because they're so hard-wearing, they never wear down.

0:31:260:31:29

And that's why it keeps such accurate time.

0:31:290:31:31

One of these sold recently in auction in 2002 and it made £400.

0:31:310:31:37

-Right.

-A nine-carat one.

0:31:370:31:39

But you've also got the fob.

0:31:390:31:44

-That's lovely as well, that came with the watch, didn't it?

-Yes.

0:31:440:31:48

If I put that on here, look.

0:31:480:31:50

It's 51.2 grams.

0:31:520:31:55

The current price for gold right now is around £8.70 so if I put in

0:31:550:32:02

8.70 times 51.2 equals

0:32:020:32:08

445.

0:32:080:32:12

-so the chain alone is worth £445.

-Gosh.

0:32:120:32:17

In scrap value.

0:32:170:32:19

So put the two together, we've got around £800.

0:32:210:32:24

Gosh.

0:32:240:32:26

-I'm surprised.

-Yes.

0:32:260:32:28

What do you want to do, do you want to put that into auction or

0:32:280:32:31

do you want to keep it now you know it's worth a lot?

0:32:310:32:34

-I think we still want to sell it.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:32:340:32:36

Well if you're happy, I'd like to put this into the sale with a valuation of £600-800.

0:32:360:32:41

-OK? A bit of discretion on the 600 just to kick things off, get everybody excited. OK, happy?

-Yes.

0:32:410:32:47

-Yes.

-We'll see what this one does later on.

0:32:470:32:49

They often say you've got to have quality or quantity

0:32:490:32:52

and Evelyn's got lots of both with her cigarette card collection.

0:32:520:32:56

It includes some highly desirable cards from the tobacco manufacturer Taddy & Co.

0:32:560:33:03

In my line of business, I quite often see collections of cigarette

0:33:030:33:07

cards, Evelyn, but you've got the most amazing collection here.

0:33:070:33:11

Some of them in their original boxes and everything.

0:33:110:33:14

So how did you come to own such an amazing collection?

0:33:140:33:17

-They were my father's.

-Right.

0:33:170:33:20

He's died and we've been helping my mother sort out all the stuff he's left behind.

0:33:200:33:26

And all these cards were there.

0:33:260:33:27

And he was obviously an avid collector?

0:33:270:33:29

Yes, but I mean a lot of these are from his childhood as well.

0:33:290:33:32

So I presume they were his father's because this is only a sample of his collection.

0:33:320:33:36

Really? Just a sample, so how many have you got in the entire...?

0:33:360:33:40

-There are hundreds.

-Hundreds and hundreds.

0:33:400:33:41

And is there any particular sets that you like?

0:33:410:33:44

-I like this one, this Cries of London.

-Oh, Cries of London.

0:33:440:33:48

-I think this is an interesting one.

-And that's John Players' one.

0:33:480:33:51

Let's just pop one out. They're just wonderful pictures, aren't they?

0:33:510:33:54

-They are.

-And this is the sellers and the people that are

0:33:540:33:57

working the streets of London so just really, really lovely.

0:33:570:34:01

I have a little favourite as well because I've had a little browse through them.

0:34:010:34:05

And I love this Safety First.

0:34:050:34:08

But they're the 1920s and '30s cars and I love fashion, anything fashion-orientated and the great

0:34:080:34:15

thing about these is you can look at them and see what they were wearing.

0:34:150:34:19

You can see the ladies in the little fur-trim coats and just a lovely collection.

0:34:190:34:24

And I know that there are more than this so what sort of price did you have in mind?

0:34:240:34:28

-I really don't know.

-You don't know.

0:34:280:34:30

Well, I can tell you that what we have here are Taddy's and Taddy's, depending again on the imagery on

0:34:300:34:35

the front, whether it's a full set, whether there's a rare card in it, can make pretty good money.

0:34:350:34:42

-Here, we're probably talking sort of about £5 per card.

-Really?

-Yes.

0:34:420:34:46

-So are you quite pleased with that?

-Yes.

0:34:460:34:49

These are fab because they're in their original boxes.

0:34:490:34:52

And I haven't personally seen a huge collection of cards like this in their original boxes before.

0:34:520:34:59

But I want to put a fairly conservative estimate on it

0:34:590:35:01

to encourage people to come along, have a look.

0:35:010:35:03

-So I'm thinking of a region of around £100, £150 for the lot.

-OK.

0:35:030:35:09

In the hope that will encourage people to come along and cigarette card buyers, or collectors, they

0:35:090:35:16

-like to have a really good look and look at each individual card, check on condition, things like that.

-Yes.

0:35:160:35:23

-So I think these could fly, so if you're happy, we'll put them in at £100-150 and see how they do.

-OK.

0:35:230:35:30

We're only going to be selling this small part of Evelyn's collection but it should give her a good idea

0:35:300:35:36

of what the rest of the collection might be worth.

0:35:360:35:38

If you're starting to declutter and want to find out whether your antiques

0:35:380:35:42

and collectibles are worth anything at auction, why not bring them along to one of our valuation days?

0:35:420:35:49

Check the details in your local press or log on to bbc.co.uk/programmes.

0:35:490:35:54

Click F for Flog It, follow the links and hopefully we're in a town very near you soon.

0:35:540:35:59

If you've got any unwanted antiques or collectibles you want to sell, we'd love to see you. Let's Flog It.

0:35:590:36:05

Today we're selling our lots at the auctioneers Jones & Jacob

0:36:060:36:09

in Watlington in Oxfordshire and coming up...

0:36:090:36:12

We've got Diana's dolls which are looking for a new home.

0:36:120:36:15

Evelyn's got an awful lot of cigarette cards to sell and our final lot is the superior quality

0:36:150:36:20

gold watch, and heavy gold chain which our auctioneer Simon Jones has decided to split into two lots.

0:36:200:36:27

This belongs to Duncan and Gillian

0:36:290:36:31

and I understand why you've split them up because obviously it'll push

0:36:310:36:35

-the watch collectors if they've got a lot of Albert chains.

-That's right.

0:36:350:36:38

But deep down, something in my heart is saying to me I hope whoever buys the watch, buys the chain.

0:36:380:36:43

-Which way's it coming round first?

-Watch first, chain second.

0:36:430:36:46

I thought so. I hope they stay together, because they look good together.

0:36:460:36:49

It would be nice to think they would but I'll lay money that they don't.

0:36:490:36:53

No, but nevertheless, there's a combination here of around £600-800.

0:36:530:36:57

That's right, I mean the gold in the chain itself is over £400 worth in

0:36:570:37:01

the chain and there's probably jolly nearly the same in the watch itself.

0:37:010:37:05

I don't think we'll have any trouble, there's a lot

0:37:050:37:08

of really good silver and jewellery, gold in the sale and so they'll come and have a really good crack at it.

0:37:080:37:14

I'm sure Simon's done the right thing and by splitting them up,

0:37:140:37:17

we've a better chance of getting the top end of the estimate.

0:37:170:37:20

Before that, it's the sale of the two German dolls, brought in by Diana.

0:37:200:37:25

Unfortunately, the prospects for one meant this was a pair best kept together.

0:37:250:37:30

Beautiful, beautiful quality on the heads, though.

0:37:300:37:32

They always were, weren't they?

0:37:320:37:34

Lovely, lovely workmanship.

0:37:340:37:35

And one's slightly articulated, how does that work, do you know?

0:37:350:37:39

I don't know, I haven't actually ever seen it working but it's got a mechanical piece inside.

0:37:390:37:44

-The ordinary Armand Marseille bisque-headed dolls have really dropped in value.

-Have they?

0:37:440:37:50

Because they were fetching £200-300.

0:37:500:37:52

They were, but they don't seem to be any more but the mechanical ones are of more interest now.

0:37:520:37:57

OK. So fingers crossed, there's a collector here, that's going to want to add to their collection.

0:37:570:38:02

Or more than one collector.

0:38:020:38:03

Well, that's what we want, isn't it?

0:38:030:38:05

Exactly, you know the game! Let's find out, shall we?

0:38:050:38:08

Lot 240, it's the Armand Marseille bisque-headed doll.

0:38:080:38:14

And another one.

0:38:140:38:16

What can we say for those, 150 for them? 120 to start me, then.

0:38:160:38:19

120, I'm bid, 130 anywhere?

0:38:190:38:23

-Ooh.

-At 120, 130. 140, 150.

0:38:230:38:26

160. 170.

0:38:260:38:28

160, standing by the door at 160. Are you all happy at 160?

0:38:280:38:31

All done at 160?

0:38:310:38:33

Just, well done, Diana. 160.

0:38:330:38:36

-I'm pleased.

-Because you didn't want to take them home, did you?

0:38:360:38:39

-No.

-Where have they been anyway, since your mother passed away, in a drawer?

0:38:390:38:43

-Cupboard under the stairs.

-There you go!

0:38:430:38:45

Poor things! Hopefully they've gone to a collector who'll give them a little bit of TLC.

0:38:460:38:51

Now, we're selling a small part of Evelyn's cigarette card collection.

0:38:510:38:54

-We've got a few hundred here but I know there's how many, 10,000 or something?

-Altogether.

0:38:540:39:00

-Altogether.

-We haven't put 10,000 in.

0:39:000:39:02

No, I know but that's a lot of collecting, isn't it?

0:39:020:39:05

-That's grandfather and father?

-Yes.

0:39:050:39:07

You had so many, it was physically impossible for me to go through every one.

0:39:070:39:11

-And they're so particular, cigarette card collectors.

-Mm.

0:39:110:39:14

-Yes.

-There's probably one in there that could be worth hundreds.

0:39:140:39:18

A lot of money, the missing one to somebody's set, the incomplete one.

0:39:180:39:22

I think you should easily exceed the estimate.

0:39:220:39:24

Fingers crossed. Good luck.

0:39:240:39:25

The collection of Player's, Wills and other cigarette cards,

0:39:250:39:31

all sorts in there.

0:39:310:39:33

80, £90, start me for these?

0:39:330:39:34

£80 I'm bid. 85. 90 anywhere?

0:39:340:39:38

90, 95, 100. 110, 120.

0:39:380:39:45

120, 130. 140.

0:39:450:39:49

150. 160. 170. 160 then, seated at 160.

0:39:490:39:53

It is yours at 160. All done then, at £160, you all done?

0:39:530:39:59

-Hey, you were spot on.

-Yeah, wasn't bad actually!

0:39:590:40:01

-Excellent.

-Complete guess!

0:40:010:40:03

-£160. Well done, well done. Are you happy with that?

-Yes, very happy.

0:40:030:40:08

Does that give you a gauge on what the others might be worth?

0:40:080:40:11

It does, yes. Although hopefully there's a very rare one in there.

0:40:110:40:15

-Tucked away somewhere, yes.

-That would be nice.

0:40:150:40:17

What will you do with the rest of them? Are you going to carry on keeping them?

0:40:170:40:21

No, I'm not going to keep them permanently, no.

0:40:210:40:23

Maybe put them into auction here at another time?

0:40:230:40:26

-Yes, yes.

-Well, you've tested the market and it works.

-Yes.

0:40:260:40:28

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:40:280:40:30

Based on that sale, the rest of Evelyn's collection could easily make four figures.

0:40:310:40:37

Now it's time to sell the Rolex watch and chain brought in by Duncan and Gillian.

0:40:370:40:41

Simon Jones is having a break so the sale of

0:40:410:40:45

these final lots will be handled by auctioneer Francis Ogley.

0:40:450:40:49

I've been joined by Duncan because Gillian is down the front.

0:40:490:40:52

She's got her eye on something that she wants to buy,

0:40:520:40:54

it's a very close lot to the one where the watch is.

0:40:540:40:58

The auctioneer's decided to split them up, you know that.

0:40:580:41:01

He sent you a copy of the catalogue, the watch can go to a collector,

0:41:010:41:04

the Albert chain may go to the jewellery trade

0:41:040:41:06

but it may stay with the watch.

0:41:060:41:08

-That's right.

-I'm still hoping for that top end plus.

0:41:080:41:10

I'm really hoping for that top end plus, there's been some good sales this morning already.

0:41:100:41:15

-Flying out of the door, aren't they?

-They are.

0:41:150:41:17

-Great.

-And nothing's been unsold.

0:41:170:41:18

-No, nothing's sticking.

-A good day.

0:41:180:41:20

The auctioneer's happy. Right, let's make his day, shall we?

0:41:200:41:23

And yours. Here we go. This is it.

0:41:230:41:25

The Rolex full-hunter pocket watch, white enamel dial to it.

0:41:270:41:31

300 for that?

0:41:310:41:33

250, start me. 250?

0:41:330:41:36

250 I've got. 250, 260 anywhere?

0:41:360:41:40

260. 270. 270, 280. 290.

0:41:400:41:45

300. At £300, selling at 300.

0:41:450:41:48

-All done at 300? 310. 320. 330.

-That's better.

0:41:480:41:53

-Yeah.

-320 then. At £320?

0:41:530:41:56

All done at 320?

0:41:560:41:57

OK, hammer's gone down. 320.

0:41:590:42:02

Slightly less than I was hoping for.

0:42:020:42:04

Yes, a little bit. Let's see if we can make it up on the chain.

0:42:040:42:07

-See what happens with the chain.

-Here we go.

0:42:070:42:09

322, we have the Albert, a nine-carat gold Albert.

0:42:090:42:14

Went with the preceding lot, the watch. 300 for that?

0:42:140:42:18

290. 300. 310.

0:42:180:42:21

320. 330. 340. 350. 360. 370. 380?

0:42:210:42:27

At 370, at 370.

0:42:270:42:29

380. 390? At 380.

0:42:290:42:33

-380. 390? At 380, all done at 380?

-The hammer's gone down.

0:42:330:42:38

-That's better.

-That's better, isn't it?

0:42:380:42:41

£380, both sold in the room.

0:42:410:42:43

Interestingly enough, to separate bidders.

0:42:430:42:45

-Yes.

-So they did get separated.

-They did get separated.

0:42:450:42:48

That gives us a grand total of £700 which is pretty good because we said at the valuation, £600-800.

0:42:480:42:53

-So it's in the middle of the estimate.

-Yeah. Happy?

0:42:530:42:56

-Yeah, happy.

-That's good, isn't it?

0:42:560:42:58

Well, the watch has been sat in the drawer, it's been doing nothing,

0:42:580:43:01

and we've now turned it into something we can make some use of.

0:43:010:43:04

The value of gold has gone through the roof in the last few years, and Duncan and Gillian's watch

0:43:040:43:09

and chain have proved that you can get a great price at auction.

0:43:090:43:13

That's it, it's all over and what a fabulous day we've had here in Oxfordshire.

0:43:130:43:18

I hope you've enjoyed the show because I know our owners have, they've all gone home very happy.

0:43:180:43:23

So until the next time, from us it's cheerio.

0:43:230:43:26

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:460:43:50

Paul Martin is joined by experts Charlie Ross and Tracy Martin at Oxford University's beautiful Sheldonian Theatre. Some interesting pieces come up, including a stylish Rolex watch and an unwanted inkwell. Paul hears the story behind a book that originally took 70 years to complete - the Oxford English Dictionary. All the items in the show are sent to a packed saleroom in Watlington, Oxfordshire.


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