Richmond Flog It!


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Richmond

Paul Martin is joined by experts Adam Partridge and James Lewis to sift through the local treasures in Richmond, North Yorkshire, including some prehistoric axe heads.


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Today we are in the very picturesque market town of Richmond in North Yorkshire and over the years

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this place has certainly seen a lot of history.

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Roman, Norman, medieval, Georgian and judging by today,

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look at all these cars, a very popular tourist destination.

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It's also our destination for Flog It!

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Richmond grew up around the Norman castle which dominates the town.

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And the area that we're filming in today,

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where our massive crowd is gathering, is the market place.

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There would have been stocks housed here to punish the wrongdoers.

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So let's hope this lot behaves themselves.

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They've all come to ask the important question, what's it worth?

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And when you've found out what are you going to do? Flog it! Yeah.

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And what a Flog It! we've got for you today.

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-Paula's got an interesting laugh.

-She's got a very interesting laugh.

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PAULA LAUGHS

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There you go. Beverley and Philip, why do you look familiar?

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-He loves you.

-I love him too.

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He loves you, don't you? Ah, give me a kiss.

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Give me a lick, yeah.

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Ah, good boy.

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We've got a team of experts ready to go and they're headed up

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by two Flog It! favourites here at the market hall.

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Adam Partridge has always been a bit of an entrepreneur. As a young lad,

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he collected rainwater and sold it to the neighbours for gardening.

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You can see he's a little bit more grown-up these days, which is a good job as he runs his own saleroom.

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And you, what have we got, anything exciting?

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As does James Lewis whose speciality is furniture and pictures of all types.

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Specialities are not the name of the game, though, as our experts

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value everything that comes through the doors.

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There was such a massive queue outside, but right now at the very end of this CUE...

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is going to be our expert Adam Partridge.

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It's game on for him and he is going to tell Chris and Craig exactly what this is worth.

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Morning, chaps. How are you doing?

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-Fine, thank you.

-You're, um...?

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-Craig.

-Craig and...?

-Chris.

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-And I am guessing father and son?

-Yes.

-There's a resemblance.

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Now, then, what's the story about this billiard table here?

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Well, it used to be my great-grandfather's. He bought it.

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And then it's been passed down through the family to my grandda, to my dad and now to me.

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-All the way through, so four generations?

-Yeah.

-Gosh.

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The sad thing is that you're selling it, isn't it?

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It's taking up a lot of room and it doesn't get played as often as we'd like and things.

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The firm of Riley's is a major billiard and snooker firm started at the end of the 19th century.

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They really went very well and, by 1910, I believe

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they were making 4,000 of these so-called portable models every year.

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So they're not particularly rare.

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But it just gives you an indication about how large that firm was.

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-This is a properly-made thing.

-Yes.

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-Real mahogany, a slate bed, heavy as anything.

-It is.

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So you've got the original scoreboard here, it looks like a 1930s' period really, I think.

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D'you know when it was bought?

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We think around 70-75, 80 years ago.

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-So 1935 or so?

-Yeah.

-'30s, '35.

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That ties in with the look of it.

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And have you had to have any repair or...?

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-I think we've had the felt on the top been redone, but that's about it really.

-That is about it.

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That was professionally done by Riley's about 10 years ago.

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Are they sadly closed now?

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-Yeah.

-They've gone out of business, haven't they?

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Probably soon after they did this. I'm sure the two aren't connected.

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I think it was about 2002 they went out of business.

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So you got your scorer,

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you've got a variety of cues and the bridge there.

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And you've got your balls somewhere?

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-Not the original ones, but we have some pool balls, yeah.

-OK.

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You brought them. They'll go in the sale as well?

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-Yeah.

-Now, what sort of value expectations do you have?

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-Somewhere between sort of one and two hundred, something like that.

-Very sharp, this young man.

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We should put a reserve on because I don't want you thinking, "It's gone for 60 quid,"

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or something and you're thinking, "We should have kept it."

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-So would you think 100 would be a sensible figure?

-Yeah.

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Anything less than three figures just isn't good enough.

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-Yeah, it just wouldn't be worth it.

-No, I agree with you.

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So let's hope it goes successfully at the auction.

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-Thanks for bringing it along.

-No problem.

-Thank you.

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And now we're going from something extremely heavy to something a little lighter.

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And excitingly it's from Cornwall which is my neck of the woods.

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This is Reggie and he loves Newlyn copper.

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Well, his owner does, Christine, anyway.

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Christine, thank you so much for coming in today.

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-I know Reggie is a special dog, he's a hearing dog, isn't he?

-Yes.

-Because you are deaf.

-Yes.

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So he helps you out, he can hear the telephone, can he?

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He does. And he can hear the oven timer go,

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he wakes me up in the morning by jumping on me

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-when the alarm clock goes off.

-Oh, bless.

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He tells me when the smoke or the fire alarm goes off

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-and that's a life-saver, potentially.

-Yes, it is.

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How long have you had him?

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-I've had him for two years.

-He's so special.

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Well, tell me how long have you had this piece of Newlyn copper then?

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Well, my father passed it over to me about 15 years ago.

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But it came from my grandmother who lived in Newlyn and kept a lodging house.

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-Did she?

-She was taking in artists.

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Some of my other relatives have got paintings from the Newlyn School,

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but I inherited the inkwell.

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It's beautiful, isn't it? It is beautiful.

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I want to handle it.

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I'm so excited, can I put Reggie down?

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-Absolutely. Yes.

-Do you want to hold him?

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-I'll hold him.

-OK. Because he's got to see what's going on.

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Oh, come to Mama.

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There. I've got his lead.

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Well, this whole thing started with John Drew MacKenzie,

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he was an artist basically.

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An easy way of determining the age of Newlyn copper

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is if you turn it upside down it's stamped - Newlyn.

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You know, items were mainly only stamped after John Drew MacKenzie's death

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in the early 1900s.

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Prior to that things were just hand-signed.

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This was done around 1910, 1915.

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It's so stylistic of the period.

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Look at the rolled edges, the way that's been rolled over.

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It's not just a tourist piece, this is meant to be used and last

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for a long time.

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And if you lift the lid,

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you can see it's the most wonderful desk inkwell.

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Unfortunately, it's missing its glass liner.

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Yes, I'm afraid so. I don't know what happened to that.

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But that doesn't matter, you can find replacements.

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They are pretty much a standard size.

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But what I like about it - most Newlyn copper has fish

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and bubbles and seaweed - on the side here we've got a squid!

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HE LAUGHS

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Full of ink.

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Isn't that lovely?

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I think that's absolutely charming. Is it something you want to sell?

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It's been in the family a long time.

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I want to sell it. I want to raise money for Hearing Dogs.

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Reggie's made such a difference to me,

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I'd like to give other people the chance.

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Oh, wonderful. Let's put it into the saleroom

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with a valuation of £150-£200,

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but a fixed reserve at £130.

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-Happy?

-Happy.

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Because it's a very nice piece.

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Well, let's hope the auctioneer can do a proper job for Reggie and Christine here.

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I have a feeling that will go back down to Cornwall.

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James is up next and he's feeling a sense of deja vu

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-after meeting Beverley and Philip.

-Why do you look familiar?

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We've been on before with you.

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That's quite embarrassing. What did you sell last time?

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A Minton jardiniere.

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Now, Phil, Beverley, this is a classic piece.

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Do you love it?

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-No.

-Not really.

-Oh.

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-Did I get it right?

-Right.

-You got it right.

-OK, the pressure's on.

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See if we can get two out of two.

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Because these, for me, are everything that is interesting about history.

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They're the oldest things I've seen for probably five or six years

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on Flog It!

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You can see we have got labels on here, and this one says, "Found in...something Park."

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Found at Tranmere Park in Guiseley.

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In Guiseley, Yorkshire. Harry Ramsden territory.

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That's correct.

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How did you come to have them?

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My grandfather found them when he was building some houses at Guiseley.

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I believe he dug them up in 1936.

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Fantastic.

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You know, he was probably the first person to handle

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-this example for 5,000 years.

-Oh, gosh!

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This is Neolithic,

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an axe head, made 2,500-3,500 BC.

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So the most incredible thing. What a shame it's had a chunk out of it.

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It's a fantastic bit of history.

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This one is later.

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It's far more fashioned, it's far more detailed, with this little bit of decoration here.

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I'm not an expert on this sort of thing, but this, I think, is Bronze Age.

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This is 2,000 BC, to 1,500 BC. This one's not damaged at all.

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A most wonderful bit of Yorkshire history and

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I would hope that local museums

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might be interested, because they're not things that you find every day.

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So why do you want to sell those?

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If they were mine, I wouldn't.

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They've been in a brown paper bag in the garage, in a bottom drawer.

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What are they doing in a garage?!

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Well, where would you put them?!

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If they were mine, they would be pride of place in the living room.

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-I love them.

-I think my grandson would use them as a weapon!

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THEY LAUGH

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The value... The thing is, as much as you've got age, you've got to find somebody who would want them.

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There aren't many mad people in the world like me that would love them.

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So I think they're worth £80-£120.

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It's the old auctioneers' favourite,

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but I think that's what they're worth. If that is rare,

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they might make an AWFUL lot more.

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With a few phone calls

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-in the right direction, we might do a good job for you.

-Good.

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We've now found our first items to take to the saleroom.

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There's some real gems.

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As well as the two long-buried axe heads, we've got the Newlyn inkwell,

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a make I am particularly familiar with, and fond of.

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And finally, the games table might not be as portable

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as the model name suggests, but I think it is a lovely lot.

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5,000.

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And this is where we're putting our experts' valuations to the test.

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Thomas Watson Auctioneers in the heart of Darlington.

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On the rostrum is auctioneer Peter Robinson,

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I am going to meet our owners, their lots are just about to go under the hammer.

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But before we see how they all fare, remember, when you buy

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and sell at auction, there is commission to pay,

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which varies from saleroom to saleroom.

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,ere at Thomas Watson's

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it is 15% plus VAT. The first of our lots

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to face the bidders is the games table.

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Good luck, Chris and Craig. We're talking about this little,

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tiny snooker table, it's been in your family four generations.

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-So you've obviously had lots of fun with this.

-Yes.

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He's obviously beaten you so many times at snooker, and pool and billiards.

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We've had great fun in the auction room, and I am sure

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someone will buy this, and find another set of balls that's compatible with it, and hey ho.

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£100-£200, I think that's a bargain.

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Do you? Have you been playing on it?

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I have. But they are tricky things to sell.

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They are. But at least it's not massive.

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-No, no.

-Might be all right.

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Here we go. We're going to put it to the test. Good luck.

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The Riley's mahogany slate bed table,

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with its balls and scoreboard.

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And I have £60 to start on this lot. £60.

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At £60, can we say 70?

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At £60, all done at £60? 70, I'm bid.

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80 bid with me now.

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£90, £100 with me. At £100, selling now.

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At £100. Are we all finished?

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At £100, selling now at £100.

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All done?

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£100. That's a good result.

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Incidentally, I thought the scoreboard was at least £40-£50.

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-That was a nice thing.

-Yeah, it was a nice thing.

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-It's gone, guys.

-Someone's got a bargain.

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Yeah. You've got to think of another game to play with now, to keep it in the family, I guess.

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Just at the bottom end of the estimate, but Chris and Craig are going home happy.

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Hopefully, the Newlyn inkwell will raise a bit more for the Hearing Dogs charity.

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My turn to be the expert. Remember that wonderful Newlyn copper inkwell

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with the little squids and octopuses on it?

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It's just about to go under the hammer.

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It belongs to Christine,

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who's just been joined by Sue, and of course, Reggie.

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This is what it's all about, isn't it?

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Hearing Dogs. All the money is going to Hearing Dogs.

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Yes, well, he's my best friend, and I wouldn't be without him now.

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Because he does everything for me I can't do myself,

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in the sense of answering the door,

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he tells me the telephone's ringing, he wakes me up in the morning

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by jumping on me when the alarm clock goes off.

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He loves you. He loves you.

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-I love him too.

-Don't you? Aww.

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Wish us all the best, because it is going under the hammer, isn't it, Reggie?

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Give me a little kiss. Give me a lick! Good boy!

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Here we go, it's going under the hammer now.

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Newlyn School copper inkwell.

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At £100, will we say?

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110, can I say?

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At £100, 110, 120, 130.

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-Good, it's going.

-140? 130, 140, 150.

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Brilliant.

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160. 170. 180. 190.

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200. 210.

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220, 230.

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This is a good result.

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220, the bid's with me now.

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At £220, 230, the next bid.

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Selling then at £220, the lot now being sold at £220. All done?

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Yes. The hammer's gone down.

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-Reggie, give us a bark!

-Give us a bark, Reg.

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That's brilliant!

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-Oh, that's wonderful.

-Isn't that great news?

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Hearing Dogs will be really, really pleased with that because it does cost

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quite a lot to train a hearing dog, but it's so worthwhile.

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It absolutely changes people's lives.

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It's certainly changed mine anyway.

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It's good to catch up with you both, and I hope you treat yourself

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-to a bit of lunch while you're here in town.

-We will.

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-Good. And take Reggie for walkies, cos there's a nice park here as well.

-Yes.

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Brilliant, what a great result for charity, and I can relax now as my reputation remains intact.

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Up next are the axe heads.

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How they get on is anybody's guess.

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Going under the hammer right now, the oldest things in the saleroom,

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belonging to Beverley and Philip.

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We're looking for £80-£120.

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I love these, I think they're absolutely fantastic.

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And your favourite phrase, they've got the rub.

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They have. Do you know what I find really hard to believe?

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The antiquities, the oldest things, really, that we see on Flog It!, are sometimes the cheapest.

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Yeah. They're starting to come, they're starting to be recognised,

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but they've got a long way to go.

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Good luck, anyway. Let's hope we get the top end.

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Interesting lot this time.

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The Neolithic axe heads there.

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And we have got interest in these lots. We can open at £90.

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That's good, isn't it?

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At £90, there are two in the lot, two together.

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£100, on my right, at £100 bid now.

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I have 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160.

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170, 180, 190. 200. 210. 220.

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240. 250. 260.

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A bit of hot competition going on in the room.

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It is lovely to see.

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At £260 for the lot now. All finished? 270, 280, 290,

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going for 300.

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Go on!

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280. At 280, they're being sold.

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At £280, all finished at 280?

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What a lovely result! Good result.

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-£280. Well done.

-You did it again.

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-Lovely.

-Marvellous.

-Lovely.

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You just never know whether those quirky items will get the attention they deserve.

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We've got a lot more coming up in the next part of the programme, so keep watching.

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Just on the outskirts of Richmond is a field where nowadays people walk their dogs.

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But this is no ordinary field.

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It is actually one of the first ever horse racing courses in the country.

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It closed in 1890 for health and safety reasons.

0:17:410:17:44

The bends were considered too tight.

0:17:440:17:47

But North Yorkshire is still synonymous with horse racing

0:17:490:17:53

and training, and has been for over 200 years.

0:17:530:17:56

There's around 10 top class racecourses which hold well over 170 race meets each year.

0:18:040:18:10

Just down the road from Richmond is the small village of Middleham,

0:18:100:18:14

which is home to flat race trainer Mark Johnston.

0:18:140:18:18

These are some of his horses.

0:18:180:18:20

Mark came to Middleham in 1988 with 13 horses.

0:18:230:18:28

He now has over 200 on three sites.

0:18:280:18:32

And a staff of 135, including riders, stable hands and office workers.

0:18:340:18:39

Hello. Today I'm going to meet a few people who work at the yard,

0:18:460:18:49

and find out a bit more about how these horses are trained.

0:18:490:18:53

Throughout the morning, hundreds of horses are taken up

0:18:530:18:56

to the specially-designed course to be put through their paces.

0:18:560:18:59

I've just made it to the top of the gallops.

0:19:060:19:08

There is a wonderful view from up here. You can see all of Leyburn being lit by the morning sunshine.

0:19:080:19:13

This is the last stream coming round.

0:19:130:19:15

There's four groups go out every morning.

0:19:150:19:17

The first starts at 6.15am, and the last one at about 11.30am.

0:19:170:19:21

The groups have broken up, this is the first string.

0:19:210:19:24

You can hear them. Here they come, look.

0:19:240:19:27

That is a sight to behold.

0:19:270:19:29

These horses are going to be doing around 30-35 miles an hour.

0:19:300:19:35

Isn't that incredible? That's an all-weather track as well,

0:19:460:19:49

that's the same surface that's been put down on the racetrack in Dubai, so it can be used all year round.

0:19:490:19:55

To keep over 200 horses healthy and treated for any injuries, there are two full-time vets

0:19:550:20:01

that work across three sites, in a specially kitted out equine surgery.

0:20:010:20:07

If any of the horses need physiotherapy,

0:20:100:20:13

there's a swimming pool on site where I've met up with senior trainer Jock Bennett.

0:20:130:20:17

I've got to say it's a great pool.

0:20:210:20:23

-Fantastic.

-And look at the view as well.

0:20:230:20:25

I know, yeah.

0:20:250:20:27

The horses on this side get charged more for the view!

0:20:270:20:30

Exactly, room with a view and a swimming pool!

0:20:300:20:34

So obviously this is great for exercising horses

0:20:340:20:37

-where you want to take the weight of their feet, obviously.

-Yes.

0:20:370:20:41

Mainly used for non-weight bearing injuries. Very good for horses

0:20:410:20:44

that have got bruised or poisoned on the foot.

0:20:440:20:47

Also very good for any strains, sore shins, anything like that.

0:20:470:20:51

How many revolutions will this horse do, do you think?

0:20:510:20:54

He will do 20 laps.

0:20:540:20:56

-Will he? That's quite a lot.

-Yes, it's about a 10-minute exercise.

0:20:560:20:59

OK, he's coming out now.

0:21:010:21:03

Yeah.

0:21:030:21:05

That's a lovely sight, that's a really nice sight.

0:21:080:21:11

It's lovely to see the horses happy.

0:21:110:21:13

-Yeah, it is.

-Yeah.

0:21:130:21:15

After a flurry of activity in the morning, the stable's calmed down a bit, although cleaning,

0:21:190:21:23

vet work and feeding still has to be done for the rest of the day.

0:21:230:21:27

The main event is when the horses that are being trained here are taken off to the races.

0:21:270:21:32

And it's all overseen by the man himself, Mark Johnston.

0:21:320:21:36

We're just waiting for a horse to come out now.

0:21:370:21:40

It is called Rule Breaker, and it's going to race at Beverley, so here's its transport ready to pick it up.

0:21:400:21:46

What's happening here? Rule Breaker is being boxed up and loaded?

0:21:480:21:52

Yes, ready to go racing. Daily routine, basically.

0:21:520:21:54

We have them all over the country, all ends of the country today.

0:21:540:21:58

So what do you look for in a horse?

0:21:580:22:00

Well, different people do it different ways, but I'm a great believer in pedigree.

0:22:000:22:04

People think because my background was as a vet, that I'm going to come more from the veterinary

0:22:040:22:10

point of view, from the soundness, the confirmation point of view, but I'm a huge believer in pedigree.

0:22:100:22:15

That's the only real guide we've got to what we're going to have with the finished article.

0:22:150:22:20

-Come on, son.

-Making sure she goes off all right.

0:22:230:22:25

On you go, on you go.

0:22:250:22:27

'And that's all from my fantastic morning here at the stables.

0:22:270:22:31

'Unfortunately, I didn't have time to go to the race, but in case you want to know,

0:22:310:22:35

'Rule Breaker came in third at that race in Beverley.

0:22:350:22:38

'And a few weeks later, he came first in another race, which is absolutely brilliant.'

0:22:380:22:43

I'm hoping there'll be a few winners amongst our owners

0:22:520:22:55

at the valuation day here at the market hall in Richmond.

0:22:550:22:58

-It's Lynne, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Thank you for coming to Flog It! today. Are you a Richmond lady?

0:23:020:23:07

Well, I was here during the war at school.

0:23:070:23:11

-I hated the school.

-Did you?

-But I loved Richmond.

0:23:110:23:15

Then, 30 years ago when I found myself on my own, I came to Richmond

0:23:150:23:19

to live and I've never regretted it, and this is all about the history.

0:23:190:23:24

-Right, this book is the history of Richmond.

-Yes, Clarkson's.

0:23:240:23:28

-By Clarkson, that's a well-known book round here, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:23:280:23:31

And there you've got a pull out map of the area.

0:23:310:23:35

Yes, and there's the inscription on...

0:23:350:23:38

There we are.

0:23:380:23:40

There's a nice inscription there as well, which is "dedicated

0:23:400:23:44

"from the author to his friend George Wales Esq. Recorder of Richmond".

0:23:440:23:49

What a nice thing to find, such a local book.

0:23:490:23:52

-How long ago did you get this?

-About 30 years ago.

0:23:520:23:55

So soon after coming back, you were in a shop and saw the book

0:23:550:23:59

-and thought, I'm going to have that?

-Yes.

0:23:590:24:02

It is the 1821 edition, printed for the author by Thomas Bowman, 1821.

0:24:020:24:08

-The sad thing of course is the condition lets it down.

-I know.

0:24:080:24:11

As you flick through the book you'll see...

0:24:110:24:13

But that's how I bought it.

0:24:130:24:15

We're not trying to blame you, Lynne, for it.

0:24:150:24:17

But there's a lot of information in there about Richmond

0:24:170:24:22

as it was in those days.

0:24:220:24:24

It's a real encyclopaedia of Richmond, isn't it?

0:24:240:24:27

So why have you decided to sell it?

0:24:270:24:30

Well, there are no pockets in shrouds and I can't take it with me,

0:24:300:24:35

so I want it to go to somebody who'll appreciate it.

0:24:350:24:40

I think that's very likely, the fact that you're selling it here,

0:24:400:24:43

that it's going to find that local home.

0:24:430:24:46

They're going to read it, enjoy it, treasure it, etc.

0:24:460:24:50

You bought it about 30 years ago, how much was it for?

0:24:500:24:53

-About £12.

-No mean sum then, really.

0:24:530:24:57

No, it wasn't, I couldn't really afford it,

0:24:570:25:00

but there was a fire in the Clarkson's yard

0:25:000:25:02

and only 100 survived of these.

0:25:020:25:06

It's got to be quite a rare copy. I think if it was in better order

0:25:060:25:09

I'd be saying £100-£150 as an estimate,

0:25:090:25:13

but I think we're going to have to temper that.

0:25:130:25:16

-Yeah, that's fine.

-I think a 50 reserve would be a nice idea,

0:25:160:25:20

because you'd be disappointed if it made any less.

0:25:200:25:22

-Yes.

-An estimate of £50-£80, and fingers crossed two wealthy Richmond people

0:25:220:25:27

get stuck into it and they both really want it.

0:25:270:25:31

-You hope, I hope.

-Everyone hopes, even the viewers hope.

0:25:310:25:35

Fingers crossed, but I've got a good feeling about this one.

0:25:350:25:39

And James has got a great feeling about Barbara's opera glasses.

0:25:420:25:48

Barbara, imagine you're a lady in the 19th century.

0:25:480:25:51

You're going out to the theatre,

0:25:510:25:53

with your friends, your lover or husband, whoever it may be.

0:25:530:25:57

You want to impress them, and when you're sitting watching the theatre or watching the opera,

0:25:570:26:01

you want to take out the finest pair of opera glasses you can afford,

0:26:010:26:06

and these are fantastic.

0:26:060:26:08

Is it something you've used, that you've taken out and enjoyed, or have they been

0:26:080:26:12

-stuffed in a drawer for 20 years?

-I have used them.

-Have you?

-Yes.

0:26:120:26:16

-Where did you take them?

-Dare I tell you?

-Yeah.

0:26:160:26:19

Well, I'm a great fan of Engelbert.

0:26:190:26:21

What? Engelbert Humperdinck?! No, you're not!

0:26:210:26:24

I am, I am, I love him.

0:26:240:26:27

I go to see his shows, all his shows.

0:26:270:26:29

-Really?

-Yes, don't I love him?

0:26:290:26:33

And I take these with me.

0:26:330:26:35

Well, I have to say, I don't know whether old Engelbert could tell

0:26:350:26:38

that something so fashionable and wonderful

0:26:380:26:41

was looking at him from the audience, because these are fantastic.

0:26:410:26:45

Generally you would say opera glasses are very hard to sell.

0:26:450:26:48

I see them all the time

0:26:480:26:50

with the cylinders covered in leather, sometimes veneered in mother-of-pearl,

0:26:500:26:52

sometimes veneered in tortoiseshell, but with this,

0:26:520:26:56

it's enamel, so what we're looking at is a sleeve of metal

0:26:560:26:59

that's been engine-turned on a lathe,

0:26:590:27:03

and then over the top

0:27:030:27:05

you have this rose enamel here and then hand-jewelled and hand-enamelled

0:27:050:27:10

over the top. The most fantastic quality, really.

0:27:100:27:13

These would have been made in Paris.

0:27:130:27:16

I would put £150-£250 on these.

0:27:160:27:20

-You haven't told me if you're happy to sell them yet.

-Yes.

0:27:200:27:23

As long as the price was right.

0:27:230:27:25

150 reserve?

0:27:250:27:27

-Yes.

-Happy?

0:27:270:27:29

-Yes.

-Let's do that.

0:27:290:27:31

While James keeps the ladies happy with his valuations, Adam uses his cheek to keep them laughing.

0:27:330:27:40

It's going to be good this one. I'm going to remember this one.

0:27:400:27:43

-Welcome to Flog It!, Faye.

-Thank you.

0:27:430:27:45

It's very nice to see you, and your friend here?

0:27:450:27:48

Yes, this is Paula.

0:27:480:27:51

-Paula's got an interesting laugh, hasn't she?

-She's got a VERY interesting laugh.

0:27:510:27:53

-Most people can hear her laugh.

-PAULA LAUGHS

0:27:530:27:56

Faye, you've got an interesting story to tell us

0:27:560:27:59

about this painting by Fred Yates, and a lot of people

0:27:590:28:02

will recognise Fred Yates, a distinctive style, a well-known artist,

0:28:020:28:06

born in 1922 and died in 2008 at the age of 85.

0:28:060:28:11

Born in Manchester and you can see the Lowry influence in the figures, can't you?

0:28:110:28:16

Yes, you can, definitely.

0:28:160:28:17

What's the significance of this painting to you?

0:28:170:28:20

I used to race powerboats and this is one

0:28:200:28:23

of the powerboats I used to race in.

0:28:230:28:24

OK. It's a great name for a boat, The Executioner.

0:28:240:28:27

It was good, it was a really good boat.

0:28:270:28:29

So we went down to Fowey for a powerboat race over four days,

0:28:290:28:32

and when we turned up with the boat this gentleman started painting it.

0:28:320:28:37

We said, "What are you going to do with that?" and he said, "You can buy it off me."

0:28:370:28:42

He popped this frame on it, we brought it back

0:28:420:28:45

and we paid him £30 for it.

0:28:450:28:46

Gosh. And you bought it yourself?

0:28:460:28:49

-Yup, bought it myself.

-How long ago was this?

-This was back in 1981.

0:28:490:28:53

You must have been the youngest powerboat racer.

0:28:530:28:56

I was the youngest lady co-driver that Saturday at the age of 16.

0:28:560:29:00

-So do you like it?

-Not particularly, no.

-Have you had it on display?

0:29:000:29:03

-No.

-Where has it been?

0:29:030:29:05

My mum's attic.

0:29:050:29:07

What about you, Paula, do you like it?

0:29:070:29:09

-It's hideous.

-Is it? Straight to the point, Paula.

0:29:090:29:12

Straight to the point.

0:29:120:29:13

Fred Yates, good name,

0:29:130:29:15

interestingly he used to be a painter and decorator.

0:29:150:29:18

After the war I believe he came back and he started as a painter and decorator

0:29:180:29:22

and then went on to art school and it all went from there, and art courses.

0:29:220:29:27

He's now very desirable, he moved to Cornwall I think about 1970, and so he was there hanging around,

0:29:270:29:32

always painting outside, and I think he spent his last years in France,

0:29:320:29:38

but he came back to England and died in England of a heart attack.

0:29:380:29:41

This country's no good for you.

0:29:410:29:43

Stay out in France, you'll live longer!

0:29:430:29:46

Prices vary massively

0:29:460:29:49

from 5,000 or 6,000, down, down, down to about £100.

0:29:490:29:54

Down, down...

0:29:540:29:56

There's a massive range of prices

0:29:560:29:59

and his typically high prices seem to be the ones with lots

0:29:590:30:04

of buildings, lots of people, and you know, beaches, the Cornish scenes.

0:30:040:30:09

We're worried about the great big boat in the middle, I like that

0:30:090:30:13

and obviously it makes it for you,

0:30:130:30:15

but it may not make it for the Fred Yates buyers.

0:30:150:30:19

That's why I think it intrigued us.

0:30:190:30:21

A good investment, £30.

0:30:210:30:23

I think you could stick a nought on that nowadays and put 300-500.

0:30:230:30:28

I don't think it's going to make thousands,

0:30:280:30:30

I'd love if it did,

0:30:300:30:32

because can you imagine at the auction with you two there as well.

0:30:320:30:35

You'll hear us.

0:30:350:30:37

But I think 300-500 is worth a spin,

0:30:370:30:39

-and put a reserve of £300 on it.

-That's fine by me.

0:30:390:30:42

Anyway, fingers crossed.

0:30:420:30:45

I'm looking forward to this one more than most.

0:30:450:30:48

-Oh, good, onwards and upwards.

-Let's hope the bidding powers on it and it makes a fortune.

0:30:480:30:52

-Yeah, with any luck.

-Thanks a lot.

0:30:520:30:53

We're all looking forward to it, and we won't have to wait long to find out

0:30:530:30:58

what the bidders think of our final three items.

0:30:580:31:00

We're off for our second visit to Thomas Watson Auctioneers in Darlington.

0:31:000:31:06

We've got the fantastic Fred Yates painting we've just seen,

0:31:060:31:10

joined by super fan Barbara's stunning enamel opera glasses,

0:31:100:31:14

which should hopefully raise enough money to get her to another Engelbert Humperdinck concert.

0:31:140:31:19

And lastly, a lovely record of historic Richmond which is going under the hammer right now.

0:31:190:31:25

We're big fans of this lot, it's a lovely bit of local history,

0:31:310:31:34

it belongs to Lynne and I think for not much longer, I really do.

0:31:340:31:37

A wonderful book.

0:31:370:31:39

-It is.

-Why have you decided to sell this?

0:31:390:31:41

I've had it for 30 years now, and I feel that it should go to somebody else to be the custodian.

0:31:410:31:48

-To enjoy it as well.

-Yes, yes, to enjoy it.

0:31:480:31:50

A little bit of foxing, but the print's all there, isn't it?

0:31:500:31:54

Everything's there, the spine is good, everything else is good.

0:31:540:31:57

It's a lovely thing.

0:31:570:31:58

What is particularly pleasing is, when we go all around the country

0:31:580:32:02

and it's so nice to see something particularly local to that area.

0:32:020:32:05

That's what it's all about, local interest.

0:32:050:32:07

Let's see what the locals think. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:32:070:32:10

The volume this time there, showing the map,

0:32:100:32:15

the History of Richmond, Clarkson, 1821,

0:32:150:32:18

and commission bids here, I'm opening at £50.

0:32:180:32:23

At £50,

0:32:230:32:26

60 can I say?

0:32:260:32:28

We're straight in at 50.

0:32:280:32:29

60 bid. £70. £80. £90. £100.

0:32:290:32:32

At £100, are we all finished now at £100 for the lot?

0:32:320:32:35

Now selling at £100. 10, and 20. And 30.

0:32:350:32:39

-He's got a bid on the board clock.

-At £140, being sold now at £140

0:32:390:32:45

for the volume, selling at 140. All done?

0:32:450:32:47

£140. It was straight in at 50, wasn't it? Oh, brilliant.

0:32:490:32:53

That did not take long. That's gone back to Richmond, hasn't it?

0:32:530:32:56

-Yes.

-Thanks for bringing it.

0:32:560:32:59

Yes, lovely, absolutely lovely.

0:32:590:33:00

And I enjoyed your expression as the price went up.

0:33:000:33:03

Well, I didn't expect it.

0:33:030:33:06

Open-mouthed shock.

0:33:060:33:08

What a result. It doesn't surprise me as local items tend to sell well in their home area.

0:33:080:33:13

Let's hope this doesn't affect the Parisian opera glasses.

0:33:130:33:17

We've got some real quality for you right now, glasses like I've never come across before.

0:33:170:33:22

They belong to Barbara, wonderful opera glasses with the most beautiful enamel, exquisite enamel.

0:33:220:33:27

It's lovely, isn't it?

0:33:270:33:29

Why are you selling these, these are a keeper, surely?

0:33:290:33:32

Well, it depends on the day.

0:33:320:33:36

I think they'll fly away.

0:33:360:33:38

-You're a big fan of Engelbert Humperdinck, aren't you?

-I am.

0:33:380:33:41

What if he comes to town and you want to see a concert?

0:33:410:33:44

I'll wait and see him after the show, and I'll see him in the flesh.

0:33:440:33:48

Oh, get a closer look.

0:33:480:33:50

THEY LAUGH

0:33:500:33:53

He's been in the business a long time, hasn't he?

0:33:530:33:56

Yes, over 40 years.

0:33:560:33:58

And what was his original name?

0:33:580:34:00

-Gerry Dorsey.

-That's it.

0:34:000:34:03

Yes, and he's 74 now.

0:34:030:34:05

# Please, release me... #

0:34:050:34:07

That's the one, isn't it?

0:34:070:34:08

# Let me go... #

0:34:080:34:09

I'm off.

0:34:090:34:10

We're just about to release these opera glasses here

0:34:100:34:13

on the bidders in Darlington, and I think they should do well.

0:34:130:34:17

-Great quality.

-I hope so, they are lovely.

0:34:170:34:19

The best quality.

0:34:190:34:21

OK, let's find out what the bidders think, here we go.

0:34:210:34:24

A very nice lot this time,

0:34:240:34:27

the opera glasses with the enamel decoration and mother-of-pearl.

0:34:270:34:31

A lot of interest here, I'm starting at 160.

0:34:310:34:35

At £160 bid, 170, 170, I am bid. 180.

0:34:370:34:42

190. 200. 210. 220.

0:34:420:34:45

At £220 bid, 230. 240. At £240 bid.

0:34:450:34:51

Quality always sells!

0:34:510:34:53

Are we all finished now at £240?

0:34:530:34:55

All done at 240?

0:34:550:34:57

-Brilliant.

-Oh, good.

0:34:570:34:59

-£240.

-Well, they're worth it.

0:34:590:35:02

That's a concert ticket to see Engelbert, isn't it, really?

0:35:020:35:06

Yes, it is.

0:35:060:35:08

It's not, it doesn't cost that much!

0:35:080:35:09

No, but you might have to travel somewhere.

0:35:090:35:11

I have to stay in a hotel, and I have to travel there.

0:35:110:35:15

And take a friend, yes.

0:35:150:35:17

Well, yes, there you go...

0:35:170:35:18

Well, perhaps a visit to Paris to see Engelbert is in order.

0:35:210:35:25

And the final, most exciting discovery from Richmond

0:35:250:35:30

is the painting that Adam loved and the girls who seemed to love Adam.

0:35:300:35:35

Next up, we've got that wonderful oil painting by Fred Yates, we're looking at £300-£500.

0:35:350:35:39

It belongs to Faye who's right next to me, hello, both of you there.

0:35:390:35:43

-Hello.

-I've just read in my notes you were the youngest lady in the powerboat race.

0:35:430:35:47

-I was, yes.

-Did you win?

0:35:470:35:48

-Yes, we did, quite a few times.

-Wonderful.

0:35:480:35:51

What I've got to ask is, why?

0:35:510:35:53

This is your boat as well.

0:35:530:35:55

Fred Yates painted this, you met him, why do you want to sell this?

0:35:550:35:59

All your memories are here, you don't have the boat, do you?

0:35:590:36:02

No, I don't. My mum's sat up in the balcony hoping we take it home.

0:36:020:36:05

Is she? You know what, I don't blame her, I really don't blame her.

0:36:050:36:09

-What do you think?

-Yeah, I agree.

0:36:090:36:12

It's got to go home on the wall, surely.

0:36:120:36:14

You've changed your tune, Paula, you were saying, "Get rid of it, it's horrible," the other day.

0:36:140:36:18

Well, it's the subject matter, it's not horrible.

0:36:180:36:22

I don't agree with her, I was just saying...

0:36:220:36:24

I love Fred Yates, but for me I don't own a powerboat, and if I did I wouldn't be selling this.

0:36:240:36:30

But we thought we'd come and see.

0:36:300:36:32

We don't mind if it doesn't sell, we've had a brilliant time.

0:36:320:36:35

-Just here for the day out?

-£300-£500, we're looking at.

0:36:350:36:39

-An experience.

-He's a sought-after artist.

-I know.

0:36:390:36:41

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:36:410:36:44

The Fred Yates, 387, £300.

0:36:440:36:49

At £300 bid. 320.

0:36:490:36:54

-350. 380.

-Well, it's sold.

0:36:540:36:57

400. 420.

0:36:570:36:59

440. 460.

0:37:000:37:03

480. 500. 520. 550.

0:37:030:37:09

580. 600.

0:37:090:37:12

620. 650.

0:37:120:37:14

650, the bid's on the phone.

0:37:140:37:16

680. 700.

0:37:160:37:18

720. 750. 780.

0:37:180:37:22

800. 820. 850.

0:37:220:37:26

880. 900.

0:37:260:37:29

No, 880, then I'm bid.

0:37:290:37:31

-£880.

-Out on the phone.

0:37:310:37:34

-My mum will be crying.

-All done?

0:37:340:37:36

Yes, £880, I'm ever so pleased for you.

0:37:360:37:39

A car service and a bit of credit card, excellent.

0:37:390:37:42

A bit of credit card?!

0:37:420:37:44

Is that what you're going to do?

0:37:440:37:46

-Oh, bless you.

-Why not, why not?

0:37:460:37:47

And get the car serviced.

0:37:470:37:49

-Yeah.

-Mum's going to be pleased, can you see her smiling? Thumbs up?

0:37:490:37:53

Yes.

0:37:530:37:55

I'm ever so pleased for you all.

0:37:550:37:57

We've had a great time, haven't we?

0:37:570:38:00

-We certainly have.

-An incredible result.

-Any sadness to see it go?

0:38:000:38:03

A bit, but we've got the picture in the catalogue.

0:38:030:38:05

Where is the boat now?

0:38:050:38:07

I think it's maybe on a scrapheap.

0:38:070:38:09

-Oh, really.

-Recycled.

0:38:090:38:11

I don't want to say my age, but it's a fair few years ago now.

0:38:110:38:14

-Don't ask, either.

-Thank you so much for coming in.

0:38:140:38:19

-We've enjoyed every minute.

-What a wonderful day we've had.

0:38:190:38:21

I hope you've enjoyed watching the show as well.

0:38:210:38:24

Do join us again for more surprises on Flog It!

0:38:240:38:26

But for now from Darlington, it's goodbye from all of us.

0:38:260:38:29

Bye!

0:38:290:38:30

Flog It! comes from Richmond in North Yorkshire. Paul Martin is joined by experts Adam Partridge and James Lewis, who sift through the local treasures. Among the interesting antiques uncovered are prehistoric axe heads and Parisian opera glasses last used to watch Engelbert Humperdinck.

Paul checks out horse training, which has been synonymous with Yorkshire for over 200 years.