Burghley Flog It!


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Burghley House is an absolute magnet for film crews.

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The virtually unaltered Elizabethan facades and historic interiors

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provide authentic backdrops for many blockbuster movies,

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including Pride And Prejudice and The Da Vinci Code.

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And today, it's the turn of the Flog It! crew.

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Here they come, our faithful following.

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Who knows what wonders they're carrying up to the house?

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Thank goodness the sun is shining, because hundreds of people

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have turned up, which means hundreds of antiques to look at.

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We've got our work cut out so let's get on with it.

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Burghley House has a long history going back to the times of Elizabeth I.

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Today we have Philip Serrell and our very own Elizabeth, Elizabeth Talbot,

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the king and queen of our team of experts.

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Elizabeth has a great interest in history, and knows how to evoke a bygone era.

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Imagine it on the side of a liner ship of the day.

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Very much... Very Jeeves and Wooster.

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Philip is also excellent at dating items.

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1919. If I were guessing, these are early 20th century.

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-This is about 1941, I would have thought.

-It's written on the back.

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Yes. It's also written there!

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Coming up, I find myself in a delicate situation.

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Look, I don't want to be the bearer of bad news...

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I know, I know, I know.

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I know the value... It hasn't held its value. I know that, yes.

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No, things have gone down a little.

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And good results bring excitement to the auction room.

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150 for it. 150. Thank you, 150.

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-Ooh!

-Straight in at the top end.

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We can relax now.

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How do you know it's silver?

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There are some real surprises to be found in people's bags.

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This one is adorable but sorry, madam, we don't do pets.

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Browsing in the queue at the start of the day is always rewarding.

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Neil and Linda have brought in a large collection of showbiz memorabilia,

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including a photo album believed to have belonged to Frank Sinatra.

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He was a big star, a wonderful voice, as well.

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-Terrific.

-That's really nice. That's quite contained, isn't it?

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-It is.

-What else have you got here?

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-Christmas cards signed by the stars.

-Yes!

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Philip is first at the table, with mother and daughter, Jacqueline and Nicole.

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-Tell me about these, where you got them from.

-They were my father's.

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When he died, obviously, they were left to me.

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I've no brothers or sisters.

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I think they're quite nice watches.

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This is a gold case.

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It's clearly had a replacement strap.

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A little bit dated in its appearance, really.

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I don't think a gentleman would wear that today, necessarily, but what I think is...

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-sad about it is this is going to get sold on its gold content.

-Oh...

-Yeah.

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OK? And I think... I think we'll make these two lots at auction.

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-OK.

-We'll put that at £80 to £120.

-Mm-hm.

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And we can reserve that at £60 for you, and it'll fly, all day long.

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-OK.

-And this one we can put at, er...

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-I actually prefer that in style.

-It's lovely. It's classic.

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Yeah, it's earlier.

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It's hallmarked gold again.

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-And whilst I could never see myself wearing that...

-You could do that.

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-Yeah, I just think...

-Me too, it's male or female...

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It's just quite a stylish watch.

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I think this one we can estimate at £60 to £90.

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Put a reserve on it at £50 for you.

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I think that they'll both do very, very well for you, and the estimate's a real "come buy me."

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You know? And I think they'll do very well indeed. How does that sound to you?

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That's fine, thank you.

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If they make £150, what will you do with the money?

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-There's a baby coming.

-Really?

-Yes!

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Past experience tells me it'll cost more than 150 quid.

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-It already has done, actually, but it certainly helps.

-You've all got to pay for your pleasure, you know!

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Yes, Philip, that's true. Babies don't come cheap.

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And they're not easily impressed.

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HE PLAYS TUNE

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Remember the memorabilia I was looking at?

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Let's catch up with Elizabeth, who's having a look at it with owners Neil and Linda.

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To whom do they belong?

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Myself. They were bequeathed to me.

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-OK.

-Yes, I was the editor of a national magazine called Yours,

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a magazine for older people.

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And among our readers was one Alice Dawson, who lived in Manchester.

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Her husband happened to be a showbiz journalist.

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and obviously had the privilege of meeting all sorts of wonderful stars

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and gathering all sorts of material,

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and her wish was to use them to raise money for any charity that I chose.

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-Hence bringing them today...

-Exactly. I saw Flog It! was in town,

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and I thought, "It's time I flogged it."

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So Alice would have approved?

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She would have certainly approved.

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It's very interesting story and a very interesting package.

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Some of the photographs I looked at earlier, they go right back to the 1930s, and some very well-known

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-musicians and actresses and actors and some, as you say, international stars as well.

-Exactly.

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I'm a bit on the spot as to potential value here,

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because we haven't had an opportunity to really go through everything piece by piece.

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But instinctively, I think that it should be reasonable

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to expect somewhere between £150 and £300, I would guess.

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So if you're comfortable in the principle, obviously we'd take it forward as a "in progress,"

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a sort of project in progress.

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-That would be fine.

-On behalf of Alice. Is that OK?

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Excellent, thank you.

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I'm grateful you brought them, because it's a really interesting collection.

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Good story. And it's always nice when people are using their sale

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as a way of giving to charity.

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I'm next with Shirley, who's brought in a lovely collection.

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Have you been to Tunbridge Wells?

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-I have, yes, many times.

-Do you get this from Tunbridge?

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Yes. Yes, I did.

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Obviously, you know that's the centre of Tunbridge Ware.

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I think Tunbridge Wells, because it was a spa town,

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towards the end of the 18th century, beginning of the 19th century,

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-this was sold as tourist wares.

-Was it really?

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-Yes, that's how it started out.

-I hadn't realised.

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Two families specialised in it, the Wise family and the Burrows family,

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but it's wonderful pieces of little wood laid in, sort of micro mosaics.

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-Yes, yes.

-Little geometric patterns.

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Gorgeous. So how long have you had this little set?

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-Since the 1980s.

-Have you?

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Well, yes, my husband collected it, and I used to buy him a small piece every birthday and Christmas.

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-Oh, that's nice.

-Anniversaries, things like that.

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-So you're getting a collection over the years?

-Yes.

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I've got quite a few more pieces at home, but I just brought those today.

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Very nice. Why are you letting these pieces go?

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Well, when my husband died five years ago,

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I downsized to a much smaller house.

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-I haven't really anywhere to display them anymore.

-OK.

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-And I don't have any family to pass them on to, so I thought, well, you know...

-Use the money?

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-Yes.

-I don't blame you. I love the little pen, the little nibbed pen.

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-Look at that.

-Yes, it's beautiful.

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-I think that's my favourite piece.

-Is it?

-Yes.

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-Look at the repetitive patterns.

-Yes, they're quite rare.

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Made of exotic hardwood and local woods, as well.

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Yes, it is amazing.

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The craftsmanship was superb.

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This is interesting, because I think, turning that upside down,

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that's a little match vesta.

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-Oh, really?

-And that's a striker.

-Oh, of course.

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We always thought it was a needle case.

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Yes, so did I, to start with.

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-Did you?

-But it wouldn't be turned underneath.

-No, it wouldn't.

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No, no. Oh, how interesting.

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And that would dress any little bureau, or writing table.

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My husband had them on his desk. Yes.

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Gentlemen's toys, aren't they, really?

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-Yes.

-Condition is superb.

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Condition is very, very good.

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-I think we'll put them into auction as a set. They belong as a set.

-Yes.

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And I'm kind of thinking in the region of around £100 to £200.

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-I'd like it to get the top end.

-Yes.

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-What do you feel about that?

-Um...

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Yes, I know that probably I paid over £100 for each of those, originally.

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-What, £100 each, each, each?

-Yes.

-Did you?

-Yes, in Tunbridge Wells.

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Wow. How long ago was that?

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Well, probably in the '90s.

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Look, I don't want to be the bearer of bad news.

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I know, I know, I know. I know the value...

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It hasn't held its value.

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No, things have gone down a little.

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-Yes.

-Obviously, you bought these from a shop.

-Yes.

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-If a dealer buys these, he'll want to be selling them for 350.

-Yes.

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He's got to pay, you know, his tax, his VAT, his time, his labour.

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-Of course.

-Plus the commission...

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-Yes.

-..in the auction room. Shall I reappraise my valuation, then?

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-Please.

-I tell you what, why don't we say...

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Let's put them into auction.

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-Yes.

-OK? With a guideline of £150 to £250?

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-Yes.

-And we'll put a fixed reserve on.

-Yes.

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-At £140.

-OK.

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Because I don't want you to lose money on this.

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-No.

-No. It's sad but that happens, doesn't it? It does.

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-Tricky business, isn't it?

-It is. It is, yes.

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It's hard but I think we found middle ground there.

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-Yes. I think we have.

-Are you happy?

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-Are you sure?

-Yes.

-OK, well I'll see you in the auction room.

-All right.

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Top condition but Shirley will be lucky to recoup all of her money.

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Next we have Philip with Nick, who's here showing his support for Flog It!.

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Why have you come here today?

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Well, I'm a great fan of Flog It!, and it occurred to me,

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well, unless people actually make the effort and come along,

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how can you possibly continue with the programmes?

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Oh, good man! That's the spirit! So you've brought us this.

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Yes. It says Lalique on the bottom, but whether or not it is or not, I don't know.

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The ability to read in this business is all encompassing, isn't it?

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Lalique, France. That's Rene Lalique.

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-I think he was born in about 1860 and died in 1945.

-Right.

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And early Rene Lalique wares, they can be worth a huge amount of money.

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-Right.

-You could be looking at thousands if not tens of thousands of pounds.

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It really is hugely sought-after. But before I build your hopes up,

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this is not one of those.

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-Oh, right, OK.

-Really.

-Oh, dear.

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I'm guessing that this is probably...

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Post Rene Lalique's death, so certainly after 1945.

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And I'm guessing it might be 1960s or '70s. Guessing.

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I would estimate that, I think, at probably 30 to £50

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and I'd put a fixed reserve on it of 20, £25.

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-OK.

-And I think it's a bit of a "come buy me".

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-OK.

-It's a bit like the old 19/11d.

-Yeah.

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I think if you pitch it low, you have a chance.

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It might make £60 or £70 and I'd be delighted if it did.

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-OK.

-I think it's got little chance of creeping over

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the £100 mark but you never know. So, are you happy with that?

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I am, yes, yeah. If we could make the reserve 25?

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Absolutely. Yes, wizard.

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OK. Thank you very much for making the effort to come, Nick.

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OK, it's a pleasure.

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Come on, everyone, we need more enthusiasts like Nick.

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We've been working flat out and we've found our first items to take off to auction.

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Now, you've heard what our experts have had to say about them.

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You've probably got your own opinion, but let's find out the opinion of the bidders.

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Let's test the market, let's up the tempo and get over to the sale room.

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The sale is being held by Golding Young in Grantham,

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and auctioneer Colin Young is wielding the gavel for us.

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Just being here today has brought back brilliant memories.

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Some of you might remember my recent trip to the Moorcroft factory.

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They let me have a go at decorating one of their vases.

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-It's not going. It's not running.

-He's doing quite well.

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Well, it was sold in this very auction room for Children In Need.

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I've got a surprise for you. Here it is.

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I haven't seen it finished. Look at that. Isn't that marvellous?

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And its owners are right here standing next to me!

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Chris and Eric, thank you so much for pledging so much money towards Children In Need for this.

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It's a wonderful piece of Moorcroft. And here's the evidence,

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signed by me down there.

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-How many pieces of Moorcroft do you have now?

-17.

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And when's the collection going to end?

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When does it ever end?

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It doesn't, does it? Once you're a collector, you're bitten by the bug.

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-You can always trade upwards, buy and sell.

-Yes.

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Thank you so much for reuniting me with that.

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-Our pleasure.

-Oh, it's my pleasure making that as well.

-A beautiful piece of Moorcroft.

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Before we start, let's remind ourselves of our lots.

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Phil's first with his "come and buy me,"

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the two gold watches belonging to Jacqueline and Nicole.

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I like that.

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Elizabeth was as intrigued as I was by the extensive collection of showbiz memorabilia.

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Shirley's charming collection of Tunbridge Ware caught my eye, but will it make what she paid for it?

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We'll have to wait and see.

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And finally, the late Lalique bowl, which Nick brought in

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because he wanted to come along to enjoy Flog It!.

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And why not?

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It's the Lalique bowl first, and Nick's brought another Flog It! fan with him.

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He's brought his mum, Joan, along, because you are a big Flog It fan, aren't you?

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You've been following the programme for years. Now, you're a big fan of Anita's, aren't you?

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-Yes.

-And you've been up to her saleroom in Glasgow?

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Yes. She came leaping across and gave me a big hug and said,

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"Would you like a wee cup of tea now?"

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Oh, bless!

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We don't get that treatment up there, do we?

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-No, not at all. Oh, but she is wonderful, Anita, isn't she?

-Yes.

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-She's great. She is.

-She really is.

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-She is.

-A tonic. A real tonic.

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-Yes.

-I thought you said "atomic"!

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THEY LAUGH

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-Oh, sorry, Anita!

-Yeah, don't get on the wrong side of her, though!

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No, I didn't mean that. I really didn't!

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There we go. Very nice piece of modern Lalique there. Acid etched.

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Who's going to start me at £30 for it. 30? 20 to go then, surely?

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£20. Who's going to be straight in? 20 bid. 22, 25. Five bid.

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28. 28 bid. 30, at 30 bid. 32, 32.

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35, 38. 38 bid now.

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Have another one. 38 bid. 40. 40 now. 40 bid. 42? No. £40.

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We're over here at 40. Mid estimate.

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Yes. Fresh legs now.

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Five now, do I see? I've got 42 here. At 42 bid.

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Anybody else joining in? At 42. Are we all done and finished then?

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-Selling in the middle of the room at £42.

-That's good.

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-Good.

-I'm delighted with that.

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-That's great.

-That's great, yes.

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-That's a good fish and chip supper, isn't it?

-I think so, yes.

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Well, Colin did a really good job there.

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Next, the fascinating collection of showbiz memorabilia.

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-It's good to see you both.

-Thank you.

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-There's a lot here.

-There is.

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And I know, I know you were looking through this meticulously, thinking,

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-"How do I separate this," weren't you, Liz?

-Well, it was almost...

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-It was a difficult call.

-It seemed a shame to actually separate it

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cos there's so much interaction between the different elements of it.

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-Exactly.

-So I passed it to the auctioneer.

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-Yes, and we've left them in the wallets that they came in.

-Right.

-You did kind of do some kind of...

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Classification, yes. We tried to.

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-Good luck.

-Thank you.

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The money's going to Alzheimer's Research so the higher the better.

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-And Colin is going to wave all commission.

-Oh, that's brilliant.

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-Fantastic.

-A great gesture.

-Because the money's going to charity.

-That's fantastic.

-Every little helps.

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Right, let's find out what the bidders think, shall we? Here we go.

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A collection of showbiz ephemera and autographs, including Tony Bennett,

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Bob Hope, Nat King Cole, Liberace, Eartha Kitt,

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to name but quite a few.

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Who's going to start me at £100 for it? 100? £100, anyone? 100?

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50 to go, then, surely. 50. Where are you going to start me?

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50. 50 on the internet. 50. 60 now, do I see it? 50.

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Who's going to join in the room? 60 now, 60. At 60. And 70 now. 70.

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At 80 now. At £70. Nobody interested?

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We're up to 75. 80. At 80, bid five. 85. 90.

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-That's great, isn't it?

-Yes, yeah. 100, 110.

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-Lots of competition on the internet.

-140, 150, 160. 160 there.

0:16:540:17:00

170, 180, 190, 200 now. £200 bid.

0:17:000:17:03

Oh, this is marvellous, isn't it?

0:17:030:17:06

This is much better.

0:17:060:17:08

260, 280, 300, 320, 340, 340 in the room, then.

0:17:080:17:13

At 340 bid. Any more now? At 340. Gentleman's bit down here then.

0:17:130:17:17

Last call. Selling at £340.

0:17:170:17:18

Yes! The big stars helped us out.

0:17:180:17:21

-Oh, that's fantastic!

-That's great.

0:17:210:17:24

£340. And no commission to pay,

0:17:240:17:26

-so all the money is going to Alzheimer's charity.

-Brilliant.

0:17:260:17:28

-Terrific. Thanks very much.

-That's wonderful.

0:17:280:17:31

-Thank you so much.

-Very generous of you.

0:17:310:17:32

I'm so pleased.

0:17:320:17:34

What an excellent result.

0:17:340:17:36

My choice now, Shirley's Tunbridge Ware.

0:17:380:17:40

It's a nice little group of three. It's a good nucleus for a collection.

0:17:420:17:46

Good.

0:17:460:17:48

On the other hand, they could struggle.

0:17:480:17:50

Oh, dear. Here we go.

0:17:510:17:53

We're going to find out now.

0:17:530:17:54

Quite a sweet little desk set.

0:17:570:17:59

Sounds good. Looks good. Is good.

0:17:590:18:01

Shall we start bottom estimate, 150 to start me? 150. 100 to go, surely.

0:18:010:18:06

£100, anyone? 100?

0:18:060:18:07

That's the roller coaster ride. They say, "Oh, it'll find its own level."

0:18:070:18:11

It starts at 150. 100.

0:18:110:18:13

90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140,

0:18:130:18:17

150, 160, 170, 180, 190, 190 bid.

0:18:170:18:23

At 190. Any more now? At 190.

0:18:230:18:25

Commission bidder has it, then.

0:18:250:18:27

Any more bids at 190? And 200. 200 with you.

0:18:270:18:30

At 200. 210, now. 210 with me.

0:18:300:18:33

At 210. 220 anywhere else now?

0:18:330:18:35

At 210, you're out in the room.

0:18:350:18:37

The commission bidder has it and we sell then at £210.

0:18:370:18:41

Fine.

0:18:410:18:42

-That wasn't a bad result.

-No.

0:18:420:18:44

-I think the market has changed.

-It has changed.

0:18:440:18:47

And don't forget, you bought that retail.

0:18:470:18:49

-Yes.

-So it's found its right level.

0:18:490:18:51

Thank you for bringing it in, it's lovely just talking about Tunbridge Ware. It's a wonderful thing.

0:18:510:18:56

-It is.

-A lovely piece of social history from that part of the world.

0:18:560:18:58

-Absolutely.

-That's what it's all about, we can all learn from that.

0:18:580:19:01

I'm sure somebody will get the same enjoyment out of the collection as Shirley's husband.

0:19:010:19:07

Now for the two gold watches being sold as two lots.

0:19:070:19:11

Jacqueline and Nicole, it's great to see you again, and the baby's nearly due.

0:19:130:19:17

Another few weeks and you wouldn't be here, would you?

0:19:170:19:19

-No.

-We've got two gold watches. This is the first of the lots so we're looking at £80 - £120.

0:19:190:19:24

Time is now up for that watch. Is it your first grandchild?

0:19:240:19:28

-No, my fourth.

-Your fourth grandchild, but your first child.

0:19:280:19:31

-Yes.

-Congratulations.

-Thank you very much.

0:19:310:19:33

OK, let's see how the first watch does, going under the hammer right now.

0:19:330:19:37

The gentleman's wristwatch, '60s/'70s, good looking watch this one, stand 585.

0:19:400:19:46

It is a good looking watch.

0:19:460:19:48

-It is, yes.

-At £80.

0:19:480:19:50

Five anywhere else? 85 bid. 90. 195. 100. 110. 120.

0:19:500:19:54

130. 140. 150. 160, now. 170.

0:19:540:19:59

180. 190 now? 180 bid.

0:19:590:20:02

-This is for the baby fund.

-Jumping around happily at this news.

0:20:020:20:06

-Selling at £180.

-Yes, £180.

0:20:060:20:09

That's amazing, thank you.

0:20:090:20:11

One down, one to go.

0:20:110:20:14

Mid-sized wristwatch with one jewelled Swiss movement.

0:20:160:20:19

Who's going to start me and £50 for it? 50? 30 to go then.

0:20:190:20:23

30, I'm bid. 35. 40.

0:20:230:20:25

45. £50 bid.

0:20:250:20:27

And five now.

0:20:270:20:28

50. 55. 60. 65. 70 now.

0:20:280:20:32

70? At £70. Lady's bid at £70.

0:20:320:20:35

And 72 as a last call, two anywhere else now?

0:20:350:20:38

Going then, all done... 72, fresh blood. 75? 78 bid. 80 now.

0:20:380:20:43

82? No, £80 bid, back with the lady then, all done and finished and selling at £80.

0:20:430:20:48

That's £260, isn't it?

0:20:480:20:52

Yippee!

0:20:520:20:53

-Look at the look of excitement and joy.

-Let's go!

0:20:530:20:57

Well, that's a rattling start for the baby fund.

0:20:570:21:02

Coming up: Phil, armed and looking dangerous.

0:21:020:21:06

It's a cavalry officer's sword.

0:21:060:21:08

Don't worry, you're all right!

0:21:080:21:10

Getting a bit anxious here!

0:21:100:21:12

Time now for a gear change.

0:21:170:21:20

Donington Park race circuit has been a key part of the British motorsport history since the 1930s.

0:21:280:21:35

Its museum is also home to the world's largest collection of Grand Prix cars.

0:21:350:21:40

There are well over 130 exhibits here in five huge, great big halls, including

0:21:480:21:54

virtually a complete collection of British Vanwalls from the 1950s,

0:21:540:21:58

an almost perfect collection of Formula One McLaren racing cars

0:21:580:22:02

from the team's inception onwards, and many other fabulous racing cars

0:22:020:22:07

driven by iconic stars, such as Jackie Stewart, Stirling Moss and Ayrton Senna.

0:22:070:22:12

This is a highly personal collection which came together

0:22:160:22:20

because of the determination of one man, the late owner of the circuit, Tom Wheatcroft.

0:22:200:22:25

Tom's success as a builder enabled him to buy the circuit and fulfil his dream by setting up the museum.

0:22:260:22:33

I'm here to speak to his son, Kevin, who spent a lot of his early years

0:22:350:22:39

travelling with his father, tracking down these cars all over the world.

0:22:390:22:43

My father discovered motorsport as a hobby as a young child.

0:22:450:22:48

Once he'd got through World War II and created his business, the first

0:22:480:22:54

thing he indulged in was to buy cars to form,

0:22:540:22:57

not necessarily a collection, it was just a small gathering

0:22:570:23:01

of cars at home, which eventually grew into what we see today.

0:23:010:23:05

Unbelievable.

0:23:050:23:06

You must have lots of wonderful early memories of him, and I know

0:23:060:23:09

he took you on the road buying, didn't he, all over the world?

0:23:090:23:12

Right from an early age I spent every minute of the day with him.

0:23:120:23:16

-I sacrificed school, and I just got on with him.

-Worth doing, though?

0:23:160:23:20

Yes, we're a similar nature in that we're both collectors.

0:23:200:23:24

He bought his first Grand Prix car in 1964.

0:23:300:23:33

Well, I never thought I'd see this, a Ferrari in green. Didn't think it was possible.

0:23:350:23:39

Well, it was two firsts, really.

0:23:390:23:42

This is the car that started the collection,

0:23:420:23:46

and, yes, it was the first Ferrari delivered in green,

0:23:460:23:49

it being the chosen colour of Tony Vandervell's new formed team, Thinwall Bearing Company.

0:23:490:23:55

So this was raced by the British team?

0:23:550:23:57

Yes, and it was used as a test bed for the later Vanwalls.

0:23:570:24:01

So this really was the forerunner to the Vanwalls we are surrounded by?

0:24:010:24:05

This is the only complete collection of Vanwalls anywhere in the world.

0:24:050:24:09

-Have you driven this?

-I have indeed, yeah.

0:24:090:24:12

Hard to steer?

0:24:120:24:14

-Not at speed, it actually lightens up.

-Gets warmer and hotter.

0:24:140:24:17

Yeah, it's quite a nimble car, and Ferraris were.

0:24:170:24:22

Very well balanced, it's actually quite a comfortable thing to drive.

0:24:220:24:26

In 1975, Blue Peter's John Noakes got the story of Tom's first car straight from the horse's mouth.

0:24:260:24:32

Is there a history behind it?

0:24:320:24:37

Yes, quite a big history, really.

0:24:370:24:40

I saw this advertised in a British magazine, so I wrote off...

0:24:400:24:44

-Where was it?

-In Australia, actually.

0:24:440:24:47

I wrote off and finished up buying it, and it was advertised

0:24:470:24:50

as the ex Peter Whitehead's 1.5 litre 12 cylinder supercharged car.

0:24:500:24:56

When I bought it, it arrived in a packing case.

0:24:560:24:59

I undone it and, to my horror, there was a Chevrolet engine in it, a five litre one.

0:24:590:25:04

-You'd been conned a bit, I bet.

-I really had.

0:25:040:25:07

The engine actually was in a speedboat in Australia,

0:25:070:25:10

and worse luck happened for me, it kept winning every race.

0:25:100:25:14

It won three years' championships.

0:25:140:25:17

I don't know if it was more successful in the boat or in the car, but we finally got it.

0:25:170:25:23

The Italians have always married style with speed, but in the early days that came with a price.

0:25:280:25:36

Lovely Maserati.

0:25:390:25:41

It is, isn't it? 1934.

0:25:410:25:43

I'd imagine back in the late '30s and '40s there was a lot of fatalities in racing?

0:25:430:25:48

It was terrible. Virtually every race there was someone seriously injured or lost.

0:25:480:25:53

They're like bombs on wheels, you're sitting in the fuel tank.

0:25:530:25:56

They are, you're sitting in a bath of fuel with no protection.

0:25:560:25:59

The helmets and the race overalls of the period offered little

0:25:590:26:03

or no protection, so it was down to your skill and your luck.

0:26:030:26:06

-I think the earlier the cars, the more personality they've got.

-They've got a lot of character.

0:26:080:26:13

What are we looking at here?

0:26:130:26:15

This started life as a 1940 Auto Union, which was one of the German Silver Arrows.

0:26:150:26:21

Its career was interrupted by World War II, and it was later,

0:26:210:26:25

at the end of the war, liberated by the Russians,

0:26:250:26:28

who completed it in 1947 as a Sokol,

0:26:280:26:31

so, in effect, becoming the first and only Russian Formula One car.

0:26:310:26:35

This car was actually driven by Joseph Stalin's son,

0:26:350:26:39

and he was all for trying to get his father to promote a Russian Formula One team,

0:26:390:26:44

and eventually a circuit, but it never materialised.

0:26:440:26:48

How did you get this out of Russia, what was the story?

0:26:480:26:51

Well, we bought it legitimately, but couldn't get an export licence,

0:26:510:26:54

so we literally smuggled it out on a coal barge buried in coal.

0:26:540:26:57

-You didn't, did you?

-That was the only way we could get it out.

0:26:570:27:01

-And then pick it up from the border?

-Yes, literally.

0:27:010:27:04

It was an incredibly advanced machine.

0:27:040:27:06

Could that outrace anything in its day?

0:27:060:27:09

In its day, yes, it would have done.

0:27:090:27:11

-It looks like a rocket on wheels.

-Yes.

0:27:110:27:14

In Monaco in 1963, Stirling Moss shocked the world by winning in a British car.

0:27:190:27:26

Even an extra 30 bhp is no substitute for the skill of Moss,

0:27:280:27:32

as round and round the classic Monaco circuit he drives the race of his life.

0:27:320:27:36

This is a car that stole the crowd for Lotus.

0:27:470:27:50

A little garage built car that could take on the might of the Ferraris and beat them.

0:27:500:27:55

-A tiny little firm.

-Yeah, unbelievable.

0:27:550:27:57

Probably one of the most legendary of all surviving Lotuses.

0:27:570:28:00

Incredible, where did you find this?

0:28:000:28:02

Amazingly, this was found in the mid '60s,

0:28:020:28:05

fairly local to here on a pig farm,

0:28:050:28:07

and somebody had run the car after the heyday of Moss and the car had been altered somewhat.

0:28:070:28:13

-But we collected all the original parts that were scattered around the farm.

-It was in a barn?

-Yes.

0:28:130:28:18

-You'd think Stirling Moss wouldn't let this out of his sight!

-I think it's something he may regret.

0:28:180:28:23

-It looks so light.

-It is incredibly light.

0:28:230:28:26

Nothing there, is there? In fact, look, I'm just rocking this with my knee now and look at that.

0:28:260:28:32

I'm not even touching that. Well, barely. Look how light that is.

0:28:320:28:35

This car goes out once a year and is demonstrated.

0:28:350:28:38

-I bet it's a thrill, isn't it?

-Yeah, it is.

0:28:380:28:40

Doesn't it put a smile on your face?

0:28:400:28:42

Yeah, it actually sends a shiver up your spine

0:28:420:28:45

when you think something so simple

0:28:450:28:47

can have done something so important nearly 50 years ago.

0:28:470:28:50

Kevin has really brought some of these stories to life for me.

0:28:550:28:58

Without Tom Wheatcroft, many of these iconic cars would no longer exist.

0:28:580:29:03

Father and son have made a lasting contribution to the sport.

0:29:030:29:07

Back at Burghley, the day is going with a swing.

0:29:190:29:23

Elizabeth is with Stephen and Kate who have a very special reason for wanting to "Flog It!".

0:29:240:29:30

Kate's lost her engagement ring.

0:29:300:29:32

Oh, no!

0:29:320:29:34

So what I'm going to do is sell these so she can have a new engagement ring.

0:29:340:29:40

Aaw, that's lovely.

0:29:400:29:42

Yeah.

0:29:420:29:44

It's a Victorian sovereign which has been put into a loose mount

0:29:440:29:49

which is good which means it can be easily retracted

0:29:490:29:53

and then placed in the gold ring shank.

0:29:530:29:56

In all honesty because of

0:29:560:29:58

the condition of the basket and the shank there,

0:29:580:30:02

the value's really mainly in the sovereign but you cannot ignore the intrinsic value of the gold as well.

0:30:020:30:08

-OK.

-In the case of the other ring which is slightly smaller.

0:30:080:30:11

You have a half sovereign there which is actually an Elizabeth II one

0:30:110:30:14

so it's a much later piece.

0:30:140:30:16

It's not as collectible and interesting as one that's so much earlier.

0:30:160:30:20

Gold at the moment is very strong. People are investing in gold.

0:30:200:30:23

It's a good time to sell gold.

0:30:230:30:25

If we break it down into components,

0:30:250:30:27

the Victorian sovereign on its own is currently worth

0:30:270:30:31

anywhere between I would have thought £65 and £85.

0:30:310:30:35

So if you look at, I suppose, 70 to 100, 80 to 120 on this ring on its own.

0:30:350:30:40

And the other ring anywhere between I suppose...

0:30:400:30:45

-£38 and £55. Very broad band but it just depends on gold on the day.

-OK.

-OK.

0:30:450:30:49

So you need to sell them together I think to make it worth your while.

0:30:490:30:53

Yeah, definitely, yes.

0:30:530:30:54

So if we did that and put a combined estimate of...

0:30:540:30:57

I'd be happier at 100 to 150 if you could cope with that.

0:30:570:31:01

Are you happy with that? A £100 reserve on?

0:31:010:31:04

Anything towards it would be just lovely.

0:31:040:31:07

-We'll see what we can do for you at the auctions.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:31:070:31:10

All I can say is that Stephen seems like a very understanding man.

0:31:100:31:14

Philip's with Tony and Janet who've brought in something for a friend.

0:31:190:31:23

You've been walking through Stamford with this?

0:31:230:31:26

Not quite. Just from the car park.

0:31:260:31:28

Well, what can you tell me about it?

0:31:280:31:32

It's a friend of ours. It doesn't belong to us actually.

0:31:320:31:34

She inherited it from her...

0:31:340:31:38

-Sister in law.

-Sister in law.

0:31:380:31:40

They believe it was used in the Charge of the Light Brigade.

0:31:400:31:45

-1854, wasn't it?

-It is.

-Battle of Balaclava. Crimean War.

0:31:450:31:49

"Onward, onward, half a league onward, into the valley of death, rode the 600." There you are.

0:31:490:31:53

They think it's sort of back end of the 19th century.

0:31:550:31:58

I was wondering if it might be a little later than that.

0:31:580:32:01

Might be the first part of the 20th century. Sort of 1912, 1914.

0:32:010:32:07

But I don't know.

0:32:070:32:08

It's either late 19th or early 20th century.

0:32:080:32:11

What I do know is that it's a cavalry officer's sword...

0:32:110:32:15

Don't worry, you're all right!

0:32:150:32:17

Getting a bit anxious here!

0:32:170:32:20

Thinking about it, whilst I'm holding this, my grandfather's sword which I know is First World War

0:32:200:32:25

has a thumb piece there like that and this doesn't have that so this could well be 19th century.

0:32:250:32:30

What amazes me about those guys is any sort of cavalry officer, you're on horseback,

0:32:300:32:34

you're trying to ride a horse with one hand and with the other hand trying to put that.

0:32:340:32:39

How you didn't do yourself all sorts of untold damage is beyond me.

0:32:390:32:46

This hilt looks continental there.

0:32:460:32:49

I think that's called the pommel.

0:32:490:32:52

This is meant it to look like it's whipped with cord.

0:32:520:32:56

We've got the maker's stamp there on the blade

0:32:560:33:01

which is A & E H.

0:33:010:33:04

I think it'll do quite well actually because I'm renowned for being mean on this programme.

0:33:040:33:09

I would put a £60 to £90 estimate on it. £50 reserve.

0:33:090:33:12

Wouldn't surprise me if it made 150 quid.

0:33:120:33:16

-You happy with that?

-Yes, indeed.

-I'll just try and get it back in.

0:33:160:33:21

Isn't it funny how things come back you that you forgot like from when you were a kid?

0:33:210:33:25

I remember getting my grandfather's sword out and what I used to love was...

0:33:250:33:29

Isn't that brilliant?

0:33:290:33:32

Yes. Very good.

0:33:320:33:34

That's what I call getting straight to the point.

0:33:340:33:37

Elizabeth's attention has been captivated by an exquisite piece of folk art.

0:33:390:33:44

Laura and Alec, you have brought a lovely piece of scrimshaw in here. What is the story behind this?

0:33:440:33:49

I don't know a lot about it.

0:33:490:33:51

It was in the house ever since I was very small.

0:33:510:33:54

How it got there, who brought it, I do not know.

0:33:540:33:58

-Did you handle it and have a look with it?

-Yes, I used to hold it and play at it.

0:33:580:34:03

My mother used to shout, "You'll drop that on your toe!"

0:34:030:34:07

And did you ever?

0:34:070:34:09

No. But it got taken away and put into a drawer but it didn't stop me.

0:34:090:34:13

I used to sneak and have a look.

0:34:130:34:15

-You are fascinated by it?

-Yes, I suppose I was.

0:34:150:34:19

-And do you like it?

-I like it, yes.

0:34:190:34:21

I find it quite intriguing that I believe how it was done -

0:34:210:34:27

sailors must have had a lot of time on their hands is all I can think of.

0:34:270:34:30

I guess they did with long voyages.

0:34:300:34:32

Scrimshaw is often using whale or walrus tusk or whale bone.

0:34:320:34:38

They used whatever natural products they could lay their hands on.

0:34:380:34:41

It's thought to have been primarily sailors who would undertake this form of craft

0:34:410:34:46

using knives or needles to scratch away at the surface

0:34:460:34:50

and to actually make the design up.

0:34:500:34:52

Normally they represent the ship that they were serving on.

0:34:520:34:57

There it is. The nice masted galleon there with the billowing sails.

0:34:570:35:02

Now if that ship were traceable

0:35:020:35:04

or if it were known as to where that sailed,

0:35:040:35:07

who might have sailed on it,

0:35:070:35:09

that would potentially add value to the piece itself.

0:35:090:35:12

Date-wise it's going to be probably mid-nineteenth century.

0:35:120:35:15

It has a little bit of damage but I think that's been like that for a long while.

0:35:150:35:21

-It's always been there.

-That wasn't when you dropped it?

0:35:210:35:23

-No!

-Just about proof of an incident not reported.

0:35:230:35:28

When it comes to value...

0:35:280:35:30

You can't get much scrimshaw for 100, 150.

0:35:300:35:33

So 200 to 300 for that is not out of the way.

0:35:330:35:38

-We could be cheeky and do a wider estimate and say 200 to 400.

-Yes.

0:35:380:35:42

-You are giving people the thought it could make more without frightening them.

-That's right, yes.

0:35:420:35:47

-Shall we say 200 to 400?

-Yes.

0:35:470:35:50

Put a reserve on of £200.

0:35:500:35:53

-Make that firm?

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:35:530:35:55

Thank you for coming in today. We shall see you at the auction.

0:35:550:35:59

Yes, and we've enjoyed it, thank you very much.

0:35:590:36:02

That's a canny estimate from Elizabeth.

0:36:020:36:05

Time to take a look at our last items.

0:36:070:36:11

It is the right time to sell gold so Stephen and Kate should get

0:36:110:36:14

a reasonable contribution to the cost of the new engagement ring.

0:36:140:36:19

Philip really enjoyed looking at the cavalry officer's sword.

0:36:210:36:24

It's extraordinary to think it might have been used at the Charge of the Light Brigade.

0:36:240:36:29

Finally, that lovely piece of scrimshaw,

0:36:290:36:32

just like the sword, it's an object which fuels the imagination.

0:36:320:36:37

Before the sale in Grantham,

0:36:390:36:42

I caught up with our auctioneer Colin Young,

0:36:420:36:44

to see if he's had much interest in the scrimshaw.

0:36:440:36:47

I saw this at the valuation day

0:36:490:36:51

and Elizabeth beat me to it but I was absolutely fascinated by it.

0:36:510:36:55

We've seen a lot of scrimshaw before.

0:36:550:36:57

But I've not seen one with a Highland infantry soldier in full tartan regalia on the back.

0:36:570:37:05

I must admit I haven't come across any either.

0:37:050:37:08

I thought I'd do a little bit of research beforehand

0:37:080:37:11

and I couldn't find any, so we're in new territory.

0:37:110:37:14

So surely that should make it very rare and put the price up.

0:37:140:37:17

We've got £200 to £400 on this.

0:37:170:37:19

Yeah, that's fine, I think we published 200 to 300.

0:37:190:37:22

We know that it's low hundreds.

0:37:220:37:24

And with that sort of estimate we shouldn't scare anybody off.

0:37:240:37:27

-No, it's still got a fixed reserve of £200.

-Absolutely.

0:37:270:37:30

It's going to be anchored and it'll be fine at that level.

0:37:300:37:33

That's going to sell. Has there been any interest in the room at all?

0:37:330:37:38

In the preview we've actually had the quite a few people asking for extra images, for condition reports.

0:37:380:37:44

-So there certainly has been the interest that you would expect for a piece like this.

-OK.

0:37:440:37:48

I've got high hopes for that one, do you know that?

0:37:480:37:50

I personally would like to see that sell for maybe around 500 to 700. Somewhere out there.

0:37:500:37:56

I would love it too as well but we are working on commission!

0:37:560:38:01

You just don't know what's going to happen at auction, do you?

0:38:010:38:04

You don't. But at least we know we're safe. It's protected with the reserve.

0:38:040:38:08

Good luck. I know you're going to do your best on this one.

0:38:080:38:11

I'll get my teeth sunk into it.

0:38:110:38:13

Do you know, I knew you were going to say that!

0:38:130:38:16

Well we're going to have to wait and see how the scrimshaw does

0:38:160:38:18

because it's the sale of the two gold rings first.

0:38:180:38:21

We've got the rings, we've got Elizabeth our valuer.

0:38:210:38:24

She's put £100 to £150 on these rings but unfortunately we don't have the owners Stephen and Kate.

0:38:240:38:30

-No, sadly not here.

-But hopefully these are going to go for the top end of the estimate.

0:38:300:38:34

It's a good time to sell.

0:38:340:38:35

The rings are in quite poor condition actually but the gold content is good.

0:38:350:38:39

-The scrap value's good.

-Absolutely, yeah.

0:38:390:38:41

-That's all that matters right now.

-I'm hoping we'll do well for them.

0:38:410:38:45

Here they are, going under the hammer now.

0:38:450:38:48

A Victorian full sovereign 1893 and a nine-carat ring mount.

0:38:510:38:56

Also a distorted half sovereign as well.

0:38:560:38:59

I'd be in trouble if I lost an engagement ring.

0:38:590:39:02

You would, wouldn't you?

0:39:020:39:04

-You would, definitely.

-Start me at 150 for it. 150 for it, 150.

0:39:040:39:08

Straight in at the top end.

0:39:080:39:10

-I can relax now.

-220, 240, 260, 280?

0:39:100:39:14

At 280, do I see?

0:39:140:39:17

275 I'm bid. 280? 280 bid. At 280.

0:39:170:39:22

290 now, at 280 at the back of the room. Any more bids?

0:39:220:39:25

Selling at £280.

0:39:250:39:28

-Hammer's gone down.

-They will be pleased, won't they?

0:39:280:39:30

I said it was a good time to sell precious metals.

0:39:300:39:34

It's a brilliant time. £280!

0:39:340:39:35

Yes. They weren't in great order, it is just the value of the gold.

0:39:350:39:39

Do you know how much the original ring was?

0:39:390:39:41

No, they didn't impart much knowledge to me about that.

0:39:410:39:44

I don't know what they are aiming for now but I think she's got her eye...

0:39:440:39:48

-Well that's a good start.

-Yes.

0:39:480:39:50

Well, a result like that is certainly going to help.

0:39:500:39:53

Now it's Toby and Janet selling the cavalry officer's sword for a friend.

0:39:550:39:59

We are looking at £60 to £90 and I absolutely like this.

0:39:590:40:04

I think it's a fabulous lot.

0:40:040:40:06

There aren't many other items, I'm looking around feeling a bit worried for Philip

0:40:060:40:11

but there's not a lot of items of militaria here.

0:40:110:40:14

It's standalone. I think I might have undercut this a bit.

0:40:140:40:17

I think it's more like 120, 180.

0:40:170:40:20

Because I think it is 19th century.

0:40:200:40:22

Yeah, you're a little unsure of the valuation, weren't you?

0:40:220:40:26

19th-century cavalry trooper's sword together with its scabbard.

0:40:290:40:34

Who's going to start me at £100 for it? 100. 80 to go then. 80.

0:40:340:40:38

Silence, 50 then.

0:40:380:40:40

-Oh dear.

-At the back 50 bid. And five now.

0:40:400:40:43

£50 bid, £5 now surely.

0:40:430:40:46

55. 60, sir, 60. 65. 70. 70 bid.

0:40:460:40:52

75. 80.

0:40:520:40:56

85 and 90.

0:40:560:40:59

95. 100. 110 on the book.

0:40:590:41:05

120, 130. And 130 do I see?

0:41:050:41:08

120 on my right, 120 is the last call then going at £120.

0:41:080:41:15

-That was good, wasn't it?

-You were spot on there, weren't you?

0:41:150:41:19

-More by luck than judgement!

-That was good.

0:41:190:41:23

-It found its level so...

-Happy?

0:41:230:41:25

Yes, more than happy with that.

0:41:250:41:26

Yes, that's lovely.

0:41:260:41:28

That's good news for them to take back.

0:41:290:41:31

Norma and Alec's engraved whale tooth known as scrimshaw, looks like a promising lot to me.

0:41:340:41:39

Let's see if I'm right.

0:41:390:41:41

I'm sure this will find its way into a big collection.

0:41:410:41:44

I think at £200 to £300 it's here to go. That's for sure.

0:41:440:41:49

-Our little grandsons will be pleased.

-Is the money going to the grandsons?

0:41:490:41:52

Yes it is. Joseph and Oliver.

0:41:520:41:54

They're two. They're very small children but it's going in their savings account if we get anything.

0:41:540:42:00

That's a great start, isn't it?

0:42:000:42:01

-Yes.

-Well you're going to get something, believe me. Hopefully a lot!

0:42:010:42:05

Here we go, it's going under the hammer.

0:42:050:42:07

There we go - very nice piece of scrimshaw.

0:42:100:42:13

A lot of interest in it.

0:42:130:42:16

-Here we go.

-What's it worth?

0:42:160:42:18

-We're going to find out.

-We are going to have to start at 150.

0:42:180:42:21

160 do we have now? 160, 170, 180.

0:42:210:42:24

190. 200 now. 200. 220, 240.

0:42:240:42:27

260. 280. 300.

0:42:270:42:30

£300 bid. 320 anywhere else?

0:42:300:42:32

At 300 at the back of the room. Any more bids? 320 from Australia.

0:42:320:42:37

Oh!

0:42:370:42:38

360 now. 360. 360.

0:42:390:42:43

400 now. £400 bid.

0:42:430:42:45

400, do I see? 400. 420?

0:42:450:42:50

420. 440 now.

0:42:500:42:54

This is good.

0:42:540:42:56

440 in the room. At 460?

0:42:560:42:58

At 440 the net bidder has it.

0:42:580:43:02

We sell then to Australia at 440.

0:43:020:43:05

The grandkids are going to be happy.

0:43:050:43:07

Very much so. Yes.

0:43:070:43:10

Worth every penny. Worth every penny.

0:43:100:43:13

-Yes.

-A lovely thing.

-Really good.

0:43:130:43:14

Well that's it. It doesn't get much better than that because we've sold everything.

0:43:170:43:22

All credit to Colin Young and to our experts.

0:43:220:43:25

Everybody has gone home happy and they've enjoyed themselves

0:43:250:43:29

and I hope you've enjoyed watching.

0:43:290:43:31

So from Grantham, until the next time,

0:43:310:43:33

when there's plenty more surprises on "Flog It!", it's cheerio.

0:43:330:43:36

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:540:43:58

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:580:44:01

Beautiful Burghley House in Lincolnshire plays host to Flog It. Presenter Paul Martin is joined in the magnificent gardens by antique experts Philip Serrell and Elizabeth Talbot. The team values a range of items including gold watches and rings, and an unusual cavalry officer's sword. Paul enjoys a visit to Donington Park to see the Grand Prix Exhibition, the largest collection of Grand Prix racing cars in the world.


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