Dorchester Flog It!


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Dorchester

Paul Martin and experts Mark Stacey and David Fletcher lead a team of valuers hoping to find some gems amongst the items brought in to the Dorford Centre in Dorchester.


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Transcript


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Welcome to Flog It, the show that values your unwanted antiques and collectables for auction

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where hopefully there will be surprises for you or you.

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Today we're in Dorset's county town of Dorchester.

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It's believed that the origins of Dorchester date back to prehistoric times some 4,000 years ago.

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After the Roman invasion, the town became an important market centre and staging post.

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There's still a weekly market here.

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We're continuing the trading theme here at the Dorford Centre.

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It underwent a £1 million refit not so long ago

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so let's hope we can trade great items for great prices.

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'Coming up on today's show: a surprise for Lillian.'

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That is good news.

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'David ticks off an art critic.'

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-Mr "Owski" would be very cross with you.

-I expect he would be!

-He spent hours painting this.

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'And one owner gets really excited.'

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We'll go with the spirit of the programme and flog it!

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We have a team of valuers helping us today and they're ably led by two of our finest experts.

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Mark Stacey's provenance includes years at a famous auction house, Sotheby's.

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I've got the whole world in my hand!

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David Fletcher has spent his whole life working with and loving antiques.

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Hilda's brought in an unusual collectable that Mark is keen to take a closer look at.

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-It's one of the nicest things I've seen.

-Well, I rather like it.

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-It's so quirky.

-That's right.

-Absolutely.

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The bowl says it all. This is a souvenir of the Boer War, 1899-1900.

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-We've got an exact copy of a gun which is...

-Lee Metford.

-Lee Metford.

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Right down to the bayonet. And all these little details of how the gun worked.

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You'd have gone like that to fire.

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When we turn it over, we've got all the details on the back here - a full set of hallmarks

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and a registration number as well.

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-It's a lovely bit of commemorative silver.

-Anybody who collects spoons or militaria, I thought,

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-would be interested.

-You don't need me at all. You've stolen my line!

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-There are people who collect things to do specifically with the Boer War as well.

-Do they?

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-Tell me the history of it.

-I only know that my mother had it.

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She would have been about 14

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-at the end of the Boer War.

-Yes.

-And that's all I know.

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-It came to me.

-You would have bought this as an act of patriotism.

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-I expect so, yes.

-So your mother or a member of your family would have gone out

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and been proud to have it on display at home, showing you were behind Britain.

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-So for a little object, it's got an awful lot of history.

-Yes.

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-I think I'm going to be cautious and say maybe £60-£80.

-Oh!

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-It's a lot for a spoon.

-It is, but it wouldn't surprise me on the day if it went

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-for over £100.

-Really?

-Absolutely. Why do you want to sell it?

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-My daughter doesn't want it. My son would have loved it, but I lost him a couple of years ago.

-I'm sorry.

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-So what happens to it after?

-And also it's quite nice

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-to know it's going to go to another collector.

-They'd appreciate it very much so, wouldn't they?

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So it's time to pass it on. It's just such a lovely, honest collectable item.

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'Valuation days are the perfect opportunity for all those unwanted antiques to get a proper airing.

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'There's nothing I like better to do than have a good old rummage to see if there are any hidden gems

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'among the bags and boxes in the queue.'

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-What have you brought along?

-A little vase. Quite delicate.

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-A Parian vase.

-Oh, is it?

-Yeah.

-Oh, isn't that lovely?

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-Parian is a Victorian invention.

-Yes.

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It's a cheaper version of white marble. White marble comes from the island of Paros, basically.

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Isn't that lovely? Is that something you're going to sell?

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-Possibly, yes. If the price is right.

-If the price is right!

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Back inside, expert David is taking a closer look at Michael's truncheon.

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-Thank you for bringing this in.

-Pleasure.

-Did you smuggle it in in your trouser leg?

-Yes!

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Well done. I'm not sure if it's an offensive weapon or not.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think I'm right that this is the type of truncheon issued

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to Navy men

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who were responsible for getting together companies to man ships

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-in order to supplement the King's Navy.

-Yes.

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I know that it's initialled WR.

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And above that we have IV for four,

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-which I take to be William IV.

-Yes.

-Or related to William IV.

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And beneath that it's marked or there's a painted inscription, "St Martins".

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-It would be a relatively small force, wouldn't it?

-Yes.

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It would not be hundreds of people. A small group of 10 or 20 peacekeepers.

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I don't know if it was one man for every press man, but if you'd been having a quiet drink

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and woke up in the morning going towards the Bay of Biscay, you'd be unhappy!

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And you'd need people to keep you away from the officers who did it.

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-Yes. So how did it come into your possession, Mike?

-My mother gave it to me. She was a nurse in Canada.

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-Was she?

-And she obviously knew I was in the Navy.

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And I think this was a gift from a patient to her. She gave it to me for its naval connections.

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-That was a lovely gesture. You're a Navy man?

-Yes.

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-Hence the beard!

-Yes.

-What's a beard like that called? A full set?

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-It is a full set if you don't shave every day.

-All right, OK.

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And this is something you're no longer interested in?

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I'd like to think somebody with a lot more knowledge about these would add it to his collection.

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He may not want to pay a lot for it,

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-but it would be nice to think it's going to a good home.

-So what I suggest we do is

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put this in the sale at an estimate of £100-£150.

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-Would that be all right?

-Yes, fine.

-Good. You're very philosophical. Reserve of £100?

-Wonderful.

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But I'm sure we'll find someone out there who has a similar collection of similar items

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and, who knows, might even have another St Martins truncheon to make a pair.

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-So I look forward to seeing you at the sale.

-Yes, indeed.

-And safe journey home.

-Thank you.

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Michael wants to see his truncheon go to a better home. There's a mystery about a painting of a house

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brought in by Martin and Elizabeth.

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-They're signed Henry J Sage.

-Yes.

-1907. And have you done any research?

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-Only this.

-He was based in Surrey. In Guildford.

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-Yeah.

-And he painted gentlemen's houses.

-And I think he's a very good watercolour artist.

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Lovely muted colours. The condition is very good. And a double aspect of the same house!

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We need to find the house. We need to find the current occupant.

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This is the side around here.

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-Do you like that?

-Lovely.

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-Do you know whose house that is?

-No, but I know a chap who would.

-Do you?

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Hey!

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-And what's your name?

-Margaret.

-How do you know a chap who would?

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There's a course on architecture in old country houses in Dorset.

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He can show you pictures of every single house. He's studied them.

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-Bob Machin.

-This is spooky, isn't it?

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-Are you serious?

-Yes.

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-OK, we'll take your details, the auctioneer will get in touch with you.

-Yes, OK.

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-And you can refer it to him.

-Yes.

-Can you do that?

-Yes, sure.

-Thank you very much.

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'What a stroke of luck! It just goes to show valuation days are always full of surprises.

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'I hope Martin and Elizabeth are able to track down the location of the house in the paintings.

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'Next, Mark has an object brought in by Michael and Josephine that has some magnetic qualities.'

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Before we open this, I want to ask where did you get it from?

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From an old friend in the Fire Brigade of British Leyland.

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-That's going back.

-Late '70s.

-Early '80s.

-Yeah.

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Why did you get it from him?

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He asked me if I'd like it because I did a lot of sailing, but I never used it.

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It's too nice to use. Giving a clue as to what it is!

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It's a little travelling compass, which explains the nautical flavour.

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The reason I wanted to look at it unopened is because we can tell

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an awful lot by the box. It's a circular wooden box,

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covered with what is almost like skin. It is, in actual fact, skin. It's sharkskin.

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Otherwise known as shagreen. Originally it would be very bright when it was originally made.

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It's a little bit fragile, but it's fundamentally there.

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When we take it out, we've got a little maker's mark on the back as well - J&W Watkins, Charing Cross.

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And this may well be silver. I can't find a hallmark and we shouldn't open the back.

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That might affect the sensitive nature of the instruments inside.

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You've done some research. What have you found out about it?

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We found that J&W stood for Jeremiah and it may have been William

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-or Walter.

-Yes. What age do you think it is?

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The only date that we could find where they mentioned a pocket compass

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was 1803.

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OK. Well, I think it's a bit earlier than that. One of our fellow experts who is not here today,

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Catherine Southon, is a great expert on scientific instruments.

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And she's looked it up in her books

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and actually it dates to the last quarter of the 18th century.

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So we're looking at about 1780, 1790.

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These are great collector's items. This is a really nice, original piece to have.

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I'm not too worried about the case. The people will get it restored

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and it will go to a specialist dealer or a specialist collector.

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Have you ever thought of the value?

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-No, we haven't any idea.

-I think we can put an estimate of £200-£300.

-Fantastic.

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With a reserve of £150, just to protect it on the day.

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If we put that in, it shows it's a privately-entered lot.

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Hopefully we'll get a good collector and a good dealer bidding on it.

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-Are you happy?

-Fantastic. I didn't even know we had it.

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-And we've been married 23 years!

-Boys and their toys.

-Absolutely.

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Hidden away.

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-In a shoebox!

-I'm delighted you brought it. Thank you so much.

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Our first items are in the bag, ready for auction.

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We're selling at Duke's sale room just up the road.

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Two auctioneers are sharing the rostrum - Gary Batt and Matthew Denny. Gary likes one of our lots.

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I absolutely love this. I bet you will as well. It's a travelling compass by Watkins.

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Made in Charing Cross, late 18th century. Valued at £200-£300.

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-I hope that's pointing in the right direction. Plus a bit more!

-It could be.

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It's a really lovely period piece. It's small, comes to hand nicely.

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-It's in its original shagreen case.

-It's got the feel about it. Everything is so right.

-It's plain,

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understated, restrained. Everything English antiques should be.

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-A proper gentleman's piece.

-A silver case, nicely inscribed.

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It's nice that one of the S's is an F, as you would expect. I think that's a very good thing.

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-Sensible money as well.

-I think it's a reasonable estimate.

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It's always going to be slightly limited because what do you do with it? How do you display it?

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It's a small collectors' field.

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It was possibly an academic's piece and I think it still will be.

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Whoever buys this will display it properly and it won't come to any harm,

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which is really nice.

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Also going under the hammer, Hilda's souvenir Boer War spoon

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and Michael's military truncheon.

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First up, it's Hilda's spoon. Matthew Denny is on the rostrum.

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I know at the valuation day, Mark said everybody would be salivating over your silver spoon.

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It's about to go under the hammer. £60-£80, somewhere around there, but it's absolutely divine.

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My mother gave it to me when she gave up her home

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-because I had been a gunner in the war. My husband was an infantryman.

-Why sell it?

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-I don't want it any more.

-We're only custodians for a little while of certain things.

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274. Silver teaspoon, souvenir of the Anglo-Boer War.

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Interesting thing in the form of a rifle. Lovely thing.

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I've got 30 to start. Shall I take 5? 35.

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40. 45.

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-Somebody wants it.

-A few people.

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55.

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-Come on.

-It's got fresh legs there.

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60.

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65? At £60 on my left. I'll take 5. 70.

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75. 80. 85.

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-90. 95.

-This is very good.

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110. 120?

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£110, lady's bid. 120 anywhere? All done?

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Thank you very much.

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-That was very nice.

-Amazing.

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-£110.

-I know!

-Isn't that a lovely surprise?

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-I wanted it to do £100, Paul.

-Bless you.

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Mark's cautious estimate meant Hilda got a super surprise.

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Next up, it's Michael's military truncheon.

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We're looking for £100-£150 for that wonderful military truncheon belonging to Michael. Great story.

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-This came over from Canada.

-Yes.

-It dates around the 1830s.

-Yes.

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-So why are you selling this?

-Well, I've had it a long time, since the early '70s.

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I think it should go to somebody who knows perhaps a bit about it and maybe has others.

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Normally people who like truncheons tend to have a collection. They only look good in collections.

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It's such a functional thing. What could be more functional?

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Yet they took the trouble to decorate them and they have become decorative items.

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-And very collectable. So let's hope we get the top end.

-I hope so.

-Good luck. Here we go.

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310. William IV truncheon. St Martins on it.

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Nice little thing there. Nice condition, nice painting.

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Still nice and visible. 310. I've got bids to start at £50.

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60. 70. 80? At £70. I'll take 80.

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And 90. 100.

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-Phone bidder.

-Oh, good.

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110? On the telephone at 100. I'll take 110.

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At £100, are we all done?

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You're out there. At £100 on the telephone.

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Yes! The hammer's gone down. £100. Just in there. Happy?

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-Yes. Hope it's got a good home.

-Squeezed out, but we got there.

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What a good result.

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Next up is Michael and Josephine's lovely shagreen travelling compass.

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If I could own any item today it'd be this. The travelling compass.

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It's Georgian. Made by Watkins of London. And it belongs to Jo and Michael. What a lovely item.

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-Scientific instruments, such quality.

-And a London maker.

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London makers add a little premium to anything, don't they?

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-How did you come by it?

-One of the guys I worked with on the Fire Brigade,

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he used to go around antique shops and because I was interested in sailing, walking and climbing,

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he thought that he might be able to sell it to me and I'd use it.

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-Did you ever take it out in the field?

-I never actually used it!

-Thank goodness!

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Imagine losing it! Gosh! Well, good luck, everybody. Here we go.

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The next one is 238. Lovely little travelling compass.

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Nice little case on this one. Charing Cross.

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Good thing. 238. I've got £60 and will take 70.

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£60. 70. 80. 90.

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-100.

-It's climbing. Going in the right direction!

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120. 130. 140?

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At 130 at the back. I'll take 140.

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150. 160. 170.

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180. 190?

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At 180 here. I'll take 190.

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190. 200. 220?

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No, it's £200 on my left. I'll take 220. At £200 here.

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All done? Lovely thing. At £200.

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-200 and it's gone.

-Yeah.

-Happy?

-Yes, that's good.

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Nice find. Well done for looking after it.

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-Get searching all his cupboards.

-I haven't got any more!

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Just a few miles from Dorchester

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is a place that held great significance for one of the most famous names of the 20th century -

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Lawrence of Arabia.

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Thomas Edward Lawrence was known throughout the world as a war hero,

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successful for his campaigns in the Middle East during WWI.

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He was nicknamed Lawrence of Arabia and mythologized in the 1962 movie by David Lean,

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but there was another quieter side to Lawrence, a side that rejected fame and fortune.

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He sought solitude and anonymity and it was here in Dorset that he came closest to finding it.

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Lawrence pursued a lifelong passion for the Middle East.

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During WWI, working for the government, he gave up everything to fight alongside the local Arabs.

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They were fighting the Turkish army in a campaign that led to Arab independence.

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Lawrence became a high-profile figure after the war. He was lionised by the British public

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and relentlessly pursued by the press. But the stresses of the war and his unexpected celebrity status

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started to get too much for him.

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He was desperate for a new life.

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In an attempt to avoid any more attention, Lawrence joined the RAF in 1922,

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even changing his name to John Hume Ross,

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but he was exposed by the press and forced to leave.

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So Lawrence came here to Bovington Camp in Dorset in 1923

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where he rejoined the Army as a private soldier in the Tank Corps.

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But he was desperately unhappy, wanting solitude and privacy

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and somewhere to nurture his writing talents. Really Lawrence wanted somewhere to hide.

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About a mile from here in Wareham, he finally found it.

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Clouds Hill was a derelict gamekeeper's cottage.

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It was built in 1808, but it was in a dilapidated state when Lawrence first saw it.

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However, he found here the peace and the solitude he so craved.

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He immediately went to work making it habitable.

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By 1934, most of the work had been completed and since then,

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the appearance of the cottage has hardly changed. It's now looked after by the National Trust.

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Lawrence came here to retreat from Bovington Camp, to live quite minimally.

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He spent most of his time reading and writing and listening to music, resting and daydreaming by the fire.

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Although he lived alone, he loved to entertain

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and some of his most illustrious visitors were George Bernard Shaw, Thomas Hardy and EM Forster.

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Gosh, it's quaint. It's very small and dark.

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Actually, as soon as you get over the threshold, the whole place seems to embrace you.

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Oh, I like this.

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Lovely exposed beams.

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Instantly, walking in here, you can get a taste on Lawrence's inspiration for interior design.

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It's sort of medievalism. That's what strikes me first.

0:23:190:23:23

Meets a little bit of Arts and Crafts, some William Morris.

0:23:230:23:27

There's no plaster on the walls. It's more organic.

0:23:270:23:30

This is nice. That's Henry Scott Tuke.

0:23:300:23:34

He was based in Falmouth in the late 1800s, early 1900s, a very important artist.

0:23:340:23:39

This is reputedly Lawrence sitting on the beach at St Mawes which is just opposite Falmouth.

0:23:390:23:46

This is quite low, this shelf over the fireplace.

0:23:460:23:49

That's because Lawrence would love to rest here, perch, with a tin of beans or a tin of soup.

0:23:490:23:55

Just have a spoon and a tin because there's no kitchen here.

0:23:550:23:59

He felt there was no need for one because the camp is only literally a mile up the road.

0:23:590:24:04

Here is his music system. Look at that. Wow! I'd love to hear that.

0:24:080:24:13

This was state of the art at the time. He was a man of good taste.

0:24:130:24:17

Let's get it up to speed.

0:24:170:24:20

He probably sat here with a book, a cigarette.

0:24:290:24:33

CLASSICAL MUSIC PLAYS

0:24:330:24:36

Look at this.

0:24:560:24:58

This is where the final draft was typed by Lawrence for The Seven Pillars Of Wisdom,

0:24:580:25:03

based on his times out in the Middle East.

0:25:030:25:07

It's a very special place, actually. It does embrace you.

0:25:090:25:13

There's an energy here.

0:25:130:25:15

This is Lawrence's drawing room with a large day bed here,

0:25:270:25:31

so he could relax during the day, maybe fall asleep in the afternoon,

0:25:310:25:35

but he did spend his nights back at the camp because of the curfew.

0:25:350:25:40

The bookshelves would have been lined with books. There would be well over 2,000 books.

0:25:400:25:45

And I'm pretty sure Lawrence would have read most of them.

0:25:450:25:49

Lawrence designed this chair specifically for one purpose -

0:25:490:25:53

to be tucked in by the fire,

0:25:530:25:56

so he could sit there, his feet would be keeping warm by the fire,

0:25:560:26:00

but he could have his drinks and his food which he cooked warmed up on the fire,

0:26:000:26:05

resting on these nice, big, flat, wide arms.

0:26:050:26:09

Then he made a little bridge across the two,

0:26:090:26:12

screwed this piece of metal down to make a book rest, so he could sit there and read by candlelight.

0:26:120:26:18

Isn't that marvellous?

0:26:180:26:21

Despite Lawrence's attempts at anonymity, he was still hounded by the press.

0:26:230:26:28

When he retired in February 1935 at the age of 46,

0:26:280:26:33

he expected to live quietly at Clouds Hill,

0:26:330:26:36

but he returned to find news reporters camped outside the front door.

0:26:360:26:41

Sadly, Lawrence was never able to realise his wish for a tranquil retirement.

0:26:410:26:46

Just three months after he did retire on May the 13th in 1935,

0:26:460:26:50

he was involved in what would prove to be a fatal accident on this very stretch of road.

0:26:500:26:56

He collided with two schoolboys whilst riding his motorcycle home to Clouds Hill.

0:26:560:27:01

He was taken back to Bovington Camp where he was treated in the military hospital,

0:27:010:27:07

but sadly, he never regained consciousness and he died six days later.

0:27:070:27:12

One of Lawrence's lesser known legacies is that the surgeon who tried to save his life at Bovington,

0:27:120:27:18

Sir Hugh Cairns, started a campaign and his research led

0:27:180:27:22

to the compulsory wearing of motorbike helmets.

0:27:220:27:25

As a consequence of treating Lawrence,

0:27:250:27:29

Cairns would ultimately save the lives of many motorcyclists.

0:27:290:27:33

Had motorcycle helmets been compulsory at the time,

0:27:350:27:38

Lawrence's life may well have been saved and hopefully, he would have ended up fulfilling his dream

0:27:380:27:44

by spending the rest of his days living peacefully at Clouds Hill.

0:27:440:27:48

At the Dorford Centre in Dorchester, the crowds are still coming in,

0:27:550:28:00

keeping our team of valuers very busy.

0:28:000:28:04

Expert David Fletcher is casting a critical eye over Ann's painting.

0:28:040:28:08

-You're making a bit of wall space at home, are you?

-Yes, yes.

-OK.

0:28:100:28:14

-You've decided to have a bit of a clear-out?

-Yes.

0:28:140:28:17

It was my father-in-law's and I'm not particularly... It's not my cup of tea, really.

0:28:170:28:23

-And do you know how he came by it?

-I don't really, no.

0:28:230:28:27

So he acquired it and didn't particularly like it himself?

0:28:270:28:32

No. It was always on his wall, but it was just something to hang up, I think.

0:28:320:28:37

-Not in pride of place.

-No.

0:28:370:28:39

-We're looking at an oil painting painted on canvas.

-On canvas.

0:28:390:28:44

-It depicts, as we can see, a Highland scene.

-Yes.

0:28:440:28:48

-And it's very well painted without being a masterpiece.

-Yes.

0:28:480:28:53

If you know what I mean.

0:28:530:28:56

I mean, sometimes one is just a little bit rude about pictures like this.

0:28:560:29:02

We use the term "the work of a good amateur hand",

0:29:020:29:07

which is a bit disparaging, really.

0:29:070:29:10

-When you think about it, I certainly couldn't paint like this.

-No.

0:29:100:29:14

I sometimes feel a bit guilty for saying it's only by an amateur hand,

0:29:140:29:18

but I think it's true to say that.

0:29:180:29:21

It is signed...

0:29:210:29:24

by an artist whose name finishes in "owski".

0:29:240:29:28

And I can't make the signature out.

0:29:280:29:31

-No, I couldn't read it.

-And it's dated 1885.

0:29:310:29:35

-You think that's correct?

-Absolutely. That's when it was painted.

0:29:350:29:40

The Victorians loved this sort of romantic subject.

0:29:400:29:44

Queen Victoria spent her holidays in the Highlands and she would have loved this sort of landscape.

0:29:440:29:50

-Are you going to miss it or not?

-No, no.

0:29:500:29:55

-Do you have it hanging up?

-No, we don't.

-OK.

0:29:550:29:58

-It's tucked away in a back room?

-Tucked away by the side of a wardrobe.

0:29:580:30:03

Mr "Owski" would be very cross with you. He spent hours painting this!

0:30:030:30:07

And you've got it tucked away in the airing cupboard. Never mind.

0:30:070:30:11

It's not going to make - I'd like to say it would - £300 or £400.

0:30:110:30:17

-But I think it could well make £100.

-Right.

0:30:170:30:21

-And I would like to suggest an estimate of 60 to 100.

-OK.

0:30:210:30:25

-If that's OK.

-Yes.

-And as ever, we need to think about a reserve.

0:30:250:30:30

-It would be a shame to under-sell it and I would suggest that we put a reserve of £50 on it.

-Right.

0:30:300:30:36

-And your unloved picture will, I hope...

-I hope somebody will...

0:30:360:30:41

-..go to someone who will love it. I'll see you at the sale.

-Thank you very much.

0:30:410:30:46

Although neither Ann nor David are enamoured by the painting,

0:30:500:30:54

on the other side of the room, Mark is impressed by the craftsmanship of an item brought in by Lilian.

0:30:540:31:01

-Where did you get this wonderful little cane from?

-A friend gave it to me 40-odd years ago.

0:31:010:31:07

What for? Any particular reason?

0:31:070:31:10

Because I liked antiques and things, but I hadn't got anything very much,

0:31:100:31:14

and they had it and they said, "Would you like it?"

0:31:140:31:18

-You've had it all those years?

-Yes.

0:31:180:31:21

-Have people admired it in your home?

-A lot of people haven't noticed it because I've had it in a corner.

0:31:210:31:27

-I'm afraid it would get broken.

-You'd need to protect it because it's very delicate.

0:31:270:31:33

We've got here what I think is a piece of fruitwood,

0:31:330:31:37

-so it's come from a walnut tree or an apple tree or something like that.

-Yes.

0:31:370:31:42

Somebody, first of all, has carved down and once he's got it down to a particular shape,

0:31:420:31:48

he's then started to carve all these little details out.

0:31:480:31:52

-I think this is a love token.

-Oh, do you?

0:31:520:31:56

I think somebody in the 19th century, a young man,

0:31:560:31:59

-wanted to create something interesting for a loved one.

-Yes.

0:31:590:32:04

You find these are very regional. I've from South Wales, for example.

0:32:040:32:08

In Wales, you come across what are known as knitting sheaths.

0:32:080:32:12

Those were little things that people would keep or store their knitting needles in.

0:32:120:32:17

These would be beautifully and intricately carved like this.

0:32:170:32:22

This is absolutely charming, this little polygonal design here.

0:32:220:32:26

In each of these, there's a little leaf and a different animal.

0:32:260:32:30

-The one I find particularly charming is the squirrel.

-Lovely.

0:32:300:32:34

Then this is where I think it's a friendship or a love thing.

0:32:340:32:38

We've got these entwined hands,

0:32:380:32:40

then all the way down here, they've done a spiral twist with this lovely decoration of hops.

0:32:400:32:46

-And look, there's a little frog there.

-Hmm.

0:32:460:32:50

And a little lizard carved after him.

0:32:500:32:53

-All this intricate detail keeps going on.

-Yes.

0:32:530:32:56

The reason I think it's got a bit of age is the sheer quality of it,

0:32:560:33:00

-the fact that people have handled it over the years and you've got that lovely patina.

-Yes.

0:33:000:33:06

You've had it 40 years. Why are you thinking of selling it?

0:33:060:33:10

Well, because I haven't got lots of room

0:33:100:33:13

and I'm beginning to think I should sell some of my bits and pieces.

0:33:130:33:18

-De-clutter?

-That's right.

0:33:180:33:20

-What do you think it's worth?

-I don't honestly know. I didn't think about it.

0:33:200:33:25

I just brought it to see what you said.

0:33:250:33:28

-So, if I said I'll give you £20 for it...?

-I don't think I would have accepted that.

0:33:280:33:33

Fantastic. And you shouldn't have.

0:33:330:33:36

I'd certainly want to put it in at £100 to £150.

0:33:360:33:40

-Yes? Oh, lovely.

-And maybe with a reserve of 90 fixed.

0:33:400:33:44

-If that's OK with you.

-Yes.

-I really hope that somebody would appreciate it.

0:33:440:33:49

-I do think there's a lot there.

-It's just fabulous.

0:33:490:33:53

I would love it. If I saw that at auction, I'd certainly be very happy to pay £100 for it.

0:33:530:34:00

-You're happy to flog it?

-Yes.

0:34:000:34:02

Fantastic. I look forward to seeing you at the sale

0:34:020:34:06

-and I really hope people appreciate it as much as you and I do.

-So do I.

-Thank you, Lilian.

0:34:060:34:11

'On Flog It, our experts are highly knowledgeable and they are backed

0:34:150:34:19

'by a team of valuers who know their stuff if we are in doubt about an object.'

0:34:190:34:24

Yeah, I thought that was good.

0:34:240:34:27

What have we found there?

0:34:270:34:29

Well, something comfy to sit on.

0:34:300:34:33

'Well, I'm glad I asked. I hate to create a stink by getting it wrong.

0:34:330:34:39

'However, there's no doubt about what the item brought in by Cathy and Paul is.'

0:34:390:34:44

Now, Cathy, you're far too young for this doll to be yours.

0:34:440:34:48

-And I assume it wasn't yours, Paul.

-I hope not, no.

0:34:480:34:52

Some boys do play with dolls.

0:34:520:34:54

-It wasn't me.

-Who did it belong to?

-My mother-in-law. Paul's mother.

0:34:540:34:59

She always thought it was worth keeping because of its age and how well-preserved she thought it was

0:34:590:35:05

and I think it is, and "Maybe one day," she said, "when I die,

0:35:050:35:10

"you'll inherit it and you can do what you want with it."

0:35:100:35:13

-But we've got four sons and two grandsons, so...

-Gosh!

-No point.

0:35:130:35:18

No. That's interesting.

0:35:180:35:20

-When was your mum born? Do you know?

-Oh, '22.

0:35:200:35:24

1922.

0:35:240:35:26

This doll was manufactured a bit before then

0:35:260:35:31

in, I suspect, about 1900.

0:35:310:35:33

It was manufactured by a firm called Armand Marseille.

0:35:330:35:37

-Although that sounds...

-French?

-..as if they should be French, they were in fact German manufacturers.

0:35:370:35:43

-Is there a lot of these dolls in England?

-There are a lot.

0:35:430:35:47

They were expensive when they were made.

0:35:470:35:51

They were not the sort of thing you would have bought at the corner shop. They were aspirational toys.

0:35:510:35:57

-So, a middle-class family toy?

-That's a good way of putting it.

0:35:570:36:01

What about the clothes? This doesn't look old.

0:36:010:36:04

The clothes date, I would have said, from the 1920s

0:36:040:36:08

and that makes me think that it might have been dressed when your mum was young.

0:36:080:36:14

-Was this for playing with or was it more a keep...?

-I think they were for playing with.

0:36:140:36:19

-It's not very playable.

-No, they're very fragile.

0:36:190:36:23

-The hands and the legs are papier-mache.

-Really?

-Really?

0:36:230:36:26

The head is a bisque porcelain.

0:36:260:36:30

She's had a bit of a crop at some stage, hasn't she?

0:36:300:36:34

She hasn't had her hair done lately!

0:36:340:36:37

It's time she took a trip to the hairdresser's!

0:36:370:36:40

I think a serious buyer would probably put a new wig on this.

0:36:400:36:44

OK, it's time to think about what it's worth.

0:36:440:36:48

There are no chips or cracks, but she is a bit worn.

0:36:480:36:52

-Just a little bit tired, isn't she?

-Yeah.

0:36:520:36:55

Following on from that, she is not particularly rare.

0:36:550:36:59

And for those reasons, I would suggest a competitive estimate

0:36:590:37:04

-of £60 to £100.

-OK.

0:37:040:37:07

Do you want a reserve put on it?

0:37:070:37:09

-I don't want to give it away.

-£50? How about that?

0:37:090:37:13

-£50, yes. OK.

-OK.

-Yeah, we'll go with £50.

0:37:130:37:18

-Jolly good. We'll go with that.

-OK.

-I look forward to seeing you at the sale.

-Thank you.

0:37:180:37:23

That's the last of our items going to the saleroom,

0:37:230:37:27

so here's a quick recap of what else is going under the hammer.

0:37:270:37:31

Ann's Highland painting, valued by David at £60 to £100,

0:37:320:37:37

and this carved wooden cane, brought in by Lilian, valued by Mark at £100 to £150.

0:37:370:37:44

First up, it's Ann's unloved painting.

0:37:470:37:50

-I hope this next lot sells because it belongs to Ann and she does not like it. Do you?

-No, not at all.

0:37:510:37:58

This Highland scene, oil on canvas, £60 to £100.

0:37:580:38:01

It hasn't been on the wall where it belonged. Where has it been?

0:38:010:38:05

-By the side of a wardrobe.

-Tucked down the side, so you can't see it.

0:38:050:38:09

To buy an original oil on canvas, a work of art, a one-off, that you can't do your comparables with,

0:38:090:38:16

I think is really cheap because everybody can own a print or a photograph and stick it on the wall.

0:38:160:38:22

-You can have an original work of art for £60 or £70 which is lovely. Yeah?

-Yeah.

-So let's big it up.

0:38:220:38:28

Let's put it under the hammer right now.

0:38:280:38:31

394 we come on to, Scottish scene,

0:38:320:38:35

oil on canvas, landscape there.

0:38:350:38:38

Nicely presented, 394.

0:38:380:38:40

I've got overlapping bids to start you at £50. I'll take 60?

0:38:400:38:44

At £50 with me. I'll take 60. 70.

0:38:440:38:47

-80.

-Good.

-85.

0:38:470:38:49

90.

0:38:490:38:51

90 with you at the back and I'll take 5? At £90.

0:38:520:38:55

5 anywhere? All done then at £90 right at the back...? Thank you.

0:38:550:39:00

-£90. That's going home and that's going on someone's wall.

-Lovely.

0:39:000:39:05

-Isn't it?

-Yeah.

-You've got £90, less a bit of commission.

0:39:050:39:09

-It's destined to be seen in its true light, not lurking behind your wardrobe.

-A country house probably.

0:39:090:39:15

-I don't know about that.

-No. Well, you never know.

-You never know.

0:39:150:39:19

'Everyone's a winner on this show.

0:39:190:39:22

'Ann gets to pocket the dosh and the painting will find a fresh lease of life on someone else's wall.

0:39:220:39:28

'Now it's Cathy and Paul's German doll.'

0:39:280:39:31

Good luck, you two. We're about to find out if there are any doll collectors in the saleroom.

0:39:310:39:37

We've got that German doll going under the hammer. We're looking for £100.

0:39:370:39:42

Dolls are very collectable. This sale's been online. People around the world know about it.

0:39:420:39:48

-Really?

-Yes. Collectors will find them. You've got a lot of sons and grandsons?

0:39:480:39:53

-Four sons, two grandsons.

-Not the sort of thing a son would want to inherit?

-No.

0:39:530:39:58

-But my mum used to enjoy the programme.

-Oh, right.

0:39:580:40:01

-We're going with the spirit of the programme and we're going to flog it.

-Brilliant.

0:40:010:40:07

Armand Marseille doll...

0:40:080:40:10

There we are, nice Armand Marseille doll. What shall we say for it? 358.

0:40:100:40:15

I've got bids to start you at £40. I'll take 5. 50...

0:40:150:40:19

-We're there.

-60.

0:40:190:40:21

-It's going up.

-5.

0:40:210:40:24

-70? £65, commission bid. I'll take 70?

-Come on, 70.

0:40:240:40:28

At £65, commission bid. 70 anywhere...?

0:40:280:40:32

All done at 65...

0:40:320:40:34

-Yes, £65. Well done, David.

-Good.

0:40:360:40:39

-I'm happy with that.

-What are you going to do with the money?

0:40:390:40:43

-Well, we've had a thought...

-We're going to get a cat from the Cat Protection. Two cats.

0:40:430:40:48

-Rescue them, yes.

-We've seen them, two strays. We'll give them a lovely home.

0:40:480:40:53

'It makes a pleasant change from putting the money towards decorating the house.

0:40:530:40:59

'There will be two very happy moggies running around Cathy and Paul's house thanks to Flog It.

0:40:590:41:04

'Last to go under the hammer is Lilian's carved cane and auctioneer Gary Batt will be on the rostrum.'

0:41:040:41:11

They say you can tell a man's profession by his walking cane and this is absolutely gorgeous.

0:41:110:41:17

-It's a labour of love, whoever carved this.

-I just hope this one flies away.

0:41:170:41:22

-We've got £100 to £150 on this and you've had this for 40 years.

-Yes.

0:41:220:41:27

If only it could tell a few stories of where it's been!

0:41:270:41:30

-We know there's a lot of collectors out there for walking canes.

-Is there?

-A very big market.

0:41:300:41:36

They will like this a lot. It will go to a collector.

0:41:360:41:40

We're going to find out now. Good luck, Lilian.

0:41:400:41:43

The wooden cane we're on to now. This is fun.

0:41:450:41:49

Lot 226.

0:41:490:41:51

A very delicate cane with a nice, carved decoration all over it.

0:41:510:41:55

226. Could be a continental piece.

0:41:560:42:00

What for this then?

0:42:000:42:02

I've got overlapping bids. Interest expressed in this at 150 to start me.

0:42:020:42:07

-Straight in.

-150, that is good news!

0:42:070:42:10

I'll take 160 now. 160 is bid.

0:42:120:42:14

170, anyone in the room? 170, anyone in the room?

0:42:140:42:18

170 on the book then. 180. 190.

0:42:180:42:21

200. And 20.

0:42:210:42:23

-There's someone right down at the front there.

-Gosh!

0:42:230:42:27

240. 260. 280?

0:42:270:42:30

At £260. I have 260. 280, anyone?

0:42:300:42:33

280 bid. 300.

0:42:350:42:38

With me at £300, against you in the room.

0:42:380:42:42

-Gosh!

-£300, Lilian!

0:42:420:42:44

At £300, commission bid. Are we all out and clear, I sell...?

0:42:440:42:48

Thank you, £300. Excellent.

0:42:500:42:52

-Yes! I love those moments.

-You were spot-on.

0:42:520:42:56

Absolutely fabulous. What are you going to do with that?

0:42:560:43:00

-There is commission to pay, don't forget.

-Probably help me go on holiday or something.

0:43:000:43:05

-Get a bit of sunshine.

-Yes.

-What a wonderful end to a lovely day here in Dorchester!

0:43:050:43:11

I hope you've enjoyed the show. There's plenty more surprises next time on Flog It!

0:43:110:43:16

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2010

0:43:330:43:37

Email [email protected]

0:43:370:43:41

Paul Martin and experts Mark Stacey and David Fletcher lead a team of valuers hoping to find some gems amongst the items brought in to the Dorford Centre in Dorchester. A carved cane brought in by Lillian is a real hit with Mark, but will the bidders in the saleroom feel the same? Paul takes some time out to discover the lesser-known side of one of Dorset's more well-known residents, Lawrence of Arabia.