Cirencester Flog It!


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Cirencester

The crowds flock to a valuation day in Cirencester, where Paul Martin and our team of experts are on the lookout for antiques and collectables to send to auction.


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Today, we're in Cirencester, the capital of the Cotswolds,

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an area that brought us one of the most important movements in international design.

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The bells are ringing out and Flog It is in town.

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The Cotswolds became an important centre for Arts and Crafts around the turn of the 20th century.

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Leading practitioners were drawn here by its rich craft tradition

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and its accessibility to London and Oxford.

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Many also followed William Morris who lived nearby at Kelmscott.

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'I'll be visiting his Gloucestershire home later in the show.'

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We've got a crowd of people outside the Corn Hall in Cirencester,

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eager to find out if they have any treasures in these bags and boxes.

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-If you have, what will you do?

-Flog it!

-Flog it!

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'Helping them discover if they are carrying around a small fortune are our experts

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'headed up by Thomas Plant and Michael Baggott.

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'Thomas owns his auction business, but one of his passions is fencing.

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'Will he be able to score a hit in today's crowd?

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'Michael's interest in antiques began at a very early age.

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'He's ashamed to admit that at primary school,

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'he persuaded a friend to give him his grandfather's First World War medal for three felt-tip pens.

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'I hope our crowd get rather more if they take their items to auction.'

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It is now 9.30. It's time to get the doors open and get this massive queue inside.

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'Here's just a couple of treats coming up on today's programme.

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'Auctioneer Philip Allwood is really impressed with one of our finds.'

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Medal collectors are not going for the bit of metal. They're going for owning a bit of that soldier.

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-This has got oodles of that.

-'And the auction brings some surprising results.'

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-What's going through your mind right now?

-I can't believe it!

-Money!

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'Time to get started and Michael's excavation of Audrey's box

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'has revealed an interesting mix of artefacts.'

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Audrey, thank you. I feel like I'm on an edition of Time Team

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with these wonderful archaeological specimens.

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There must be a wonderful story about how you got these.

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My husband and I used to own the Talbot Hotel in Tetbury.

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-Right.

-And in the cellar where he kept the spirits,

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there was a sort of flagstone.

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And he was intrigued and wondered what was underneath.

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And they found, eventually, that it was a well that had been capped.

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Good grief!

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And so they started to take all the gunge and mud out,

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and apparently in the olden days, the landlord would just sweep everything

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-off the floor down...

-Down the well.

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That was one of the first things that came out, this bottle.

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-That must have been a joy to come out complete.

-I rinsed it under the tap and then all this appeared.

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And then gradually, bits and pieces came out.

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I said to Peter who was doing a lot of it... He used to take buckets home...

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-Go through the gunge.

-I said, "I wish you could find a coin."

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He rang one night and said, "I've found something valuable," and it was this, like a cuff link.

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-Then about ten days later, he phoned and he had found the other one.

-No?

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-Found the matching one ten days later?

-Yeah.

-That's fantastic.

-I had them checked and they are silver.

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-My automatic silver detector in my finger is going off.

-Really?

-There's no doubt about that.

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-What about the little mug?

-Peter Wain, who used to have a business in Tetbury in ceramics,

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he got all the bits and pieces and he was able to reassemble that.

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-Oh, that's wonderful.

-Yes.

-And the tap?

-That was down there as well.

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The tap is interesting because whenever you get this faceted spout,

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that tends to be quite an early date.

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And this would be bronze.

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-Hmm.

-And I would date it at between about 1550 and about 1620.

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-Really?

-So that's a good, early...

-Good heavens!

-..late Tudor, early Stuart tap.

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-This little fellow, I mean, this would be wonderful if that would have come out whole.

-Yes.

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But that's too much to ask.

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It's lead-glazed pottery of a type that was domestic ware in England

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throughout the end of the late 17th century.

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These little fellows... You would call them cuff links today,

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but at the time, they were called sleeve links.

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Funnily enough, they're fairly common. They were made of fairly light gauge silver.

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A lot of them were made in Holland along with buttons and imported into this country,

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so whilst they are silver and they certainly date to about 1680,

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in excavated condition, they're not dramatically valuable.

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-No, no.

-In fact, at auction, I would consider the jug,

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the tap, the sleeve links, the broken pieces,

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along with some of the clay pipes and items that you haven't shown us on the table today,

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would probably go into auction and be possibly £200 or £300.

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The prize, however, was on the top, as it often is,

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which is this fantastic, early wine bottle,

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around 1680, 1690.

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This would have been bright green glass when it was new,

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but it's just a wonderful thing

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and the fact that it's been buried for nigh on 300, 350 years

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has completely changed the nature of it,

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so we have this marvellous iridescence, thick calcification all over it,

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which makes it almost a work of art.

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-There are many, many collectors of early wine bottles.

-Hmm.

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They're incredibly popular and very much sought after.

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You've got the provenance with it. We've even got a picture of the hotel.

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I think we should be conservative and put between £300 and £500 on it

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-and put a fixed reserve of £300.

-That would be wonderful.

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I wouldn't be surprised if it went possibly very much more than that.

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-Really?

-If you're happy with that...

-I'm more than delighted with that.

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-We'll put a discretionary reserve of 180 on these.

-Yes.

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But a fixed reserve of £300 on this, which may be woefully inadequate.

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-I hope so. And wait for them to take off on the auction day.

-Wonderful.

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What a fantastic collection! It's amazing what you can find if you dig around.

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Not only have we got a room full of antiques, it's awash with bright colours.

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-I love the colour of that dress. What's your name?

-Emily.

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-What have you brought along?

-This picture. We'd like to find out more about it.

-Hopefully, you will later.

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-Hello.

-Hello, Paul.

-I love the glasses.

-Thank you.

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Thomas has found a spectacular book brought in by Gemma and her partner Nick.

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You've brought along this very fine book. Where did you get it from?

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-My nan.

-Yes?

-My nan passed away just before Christmas.

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-I am sorry.

-And my dad found it in the house.

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The first thing we open is on to this marbled paper page. Do you know what that's called there?

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-Is it a crest?

-These are called bookplates.

-Ah!

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This is from a library of Henry Drummond. That's his family crest, so you got the crest thing right.

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-Yeah.

-If you have a bookplate, you normally have quite an extensive library.

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The book has had a bit of butchery done to it. It is the History Of Italian Design. That's on the spine.

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"Of original drawings by the most eminent painters and sculptors of Italy. 1823."

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Tell me about this here. What's happened here?

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Oh, well, my nan was very arty and made cards and I think she decided to cut it out.

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-Right. Do you know how she got this?

-I really, really don't know.

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-You'd never seen it when you'd gone round?

-No.

-It was very cluttered. She did have a lot of stuff.

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-We've all heard of Michelangelo, haven't we?

-Yeah.

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This is a fantastic picture by Michelangelo. It's a sketch, a drawing of a youth.

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Here - this is obviously a design for the fresco of the vault of the Sistine Chapel.

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This might be a man checking out your sins, making sure you behaved yourself.

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This is really interesting. This is St Bartholomew in the celebrated fresco of the Last Judgment.

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You've got this print as well, but I don't know why this is in here.

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It's not an etching. Is it just a print of the actual item itself?

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Why is this loose? I'm slightly confused about this.

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We've got similar examples as we go through the book.

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This book, dating from 1823,

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-it's going to be between £500 and £700 at auction.

-Yeah.

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-Would you be interested in selling it at that level?

-Yeah.

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-What do you think about that figure?

-Because I didn't know much about it, I didn't really have a figure.

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I don't think it's about the money.

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-Obviously, it needs to go to a better home to people that would...

-Cos it is such an amazing book.

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-Maybe you should sell the book and, with the money, go to Italy and have a look at it.

-Very good idea.

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If we wanted to put a reserve on it, I think we'll probably put that round about sort of £300.

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-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-So it doesn't sell below that.

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-Yeah.

-We'll put it in and we'll see what happens. You'll come along to the auction?

-Definitely.

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This is Foxy, the Jack Russell. You're having a good day, Foxy.

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We'll get you a glass of water or a bowl of water. Hello, Emily.

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-Hello.

-Hello, Mum. What's going on? What have you found out about the picture?

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-It's by David Bates.

-I'm attributing it to David Bates. It's not signed.

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What we have here is an oil that's been ruined by over-restoration.

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It's been cleaned, over-cleaned and then re-painted,

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which brings that value right down in today's market to probably £100, £150.

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-Is it going back on the wall?

-Yes.

-Good. Enjoy it.

-Thank you.

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I'd better take this little thing back to its owner.

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Sadly, not everyone gets to hear the great news they had hoped for.

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We see quite a few medals at our valuation days,

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but Michael has discovered some that pay tribute to a truly dedicated soldier.

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Patrick, thank you for bringing this wonderful collection of medals in.

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The fact that you've got First and Second World War medals, you must know something about them.

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-Tell me how you got these.

-They were handed down to me from my grandfather when I was a young boy.

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He said to me, "If you can find them, you can keep them."

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I went into the outdoor shed, rummaged around and they were lying in an old tin pot.

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-As a young boy, I can't think of anything much more exciting to find than your grandfather's medals.

-Yes.

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-I was 10 or 12.

-Fantastic.

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We've got the standard First World War medals here,

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ones that are euphemistically called Pip, Squeak and Wilfred. They're all named.

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If we turn this one over,

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-we've got there "G Cockell".

-That's right.

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-Then we've got these Second World War medals, so he served in both wars.

-Oh, yes.

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-And survived.

-Amazing.

-We've got his military buttons and cap insignia.

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-What's very interesting is we've got his Soldier's Service and Pay Book.

-That's right.

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-And at the back here, his discharge papers.

-That's correct.

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There we have... "31st March, 1931,

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"discharge certificate for No.11239,

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"Corporal George Cockell, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry."

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-That's magic.

-That's brilliant.

-"Enlisted 12th August, 1914."

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-My word, he was eager!

-Yeah, he did his bit for Queen and country.

-He did indeed.

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"Discharged 5th November, 1919. Medals..." Here.

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"1914-15 Star. British War and Victory Medal."

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So they're named in this and what's wonderful

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-is we've got under "character", which must make you proud...

-Yes.

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"Good, honest, sober, intelligent and industrious," which is just magic.

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And to have all of this extra documentation with a set of medals makes a huge difference.

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The people that collect medals, they're not buying the medal,

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they're buying the story and the history attached with it.

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Can I ask you, cos these must be immensely sentimental to you,

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why have you decided to part with them now?

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They are sentimental, but if I were to sell them, the memory sticks in my brain.

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-Your grandfather's in here and here.

-Always in my brain, in my heart. I'll never forget him.

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I'd rather they could go in a collection, so people could see them, like the British War Museum.

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10 or 15 years ago, that group of three medals was making £20 or £30.

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But since then, people have realised that they're getting rarer

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and scarcer and prices have rocketed,

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so I think we could put these into auction at £200 to £300,

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-put a fixed reserve of £180 on them, keep our fingers crossed and Grandad's medals may fly.

-I hope so.

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-Patrick, thank you so much for bringing these in.

-That's all right.

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Michael is convinced these medals will appeal to collectors,

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but will they be at the auction? It's time to find out.

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Well, here we are. My driver didn't turn up this morning, so I've had to make do.

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This is where our items are going under the hammer - Moore, Allen & Innocent just outside Cirencester.

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I'm running a bit late and the auction is just about to start.

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I'll catch up with our owners, make sure they're OK cos I know they're feeling really nervous.

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We'll leave you with a quick rundown of all the items going under the hammer.

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'The first three items are the objects extracted from the old well in Audrey's cellar.

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'The prize is a 17th century bottle, but there are plenty other things,

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'including what could be a Tudor tap.

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'That spectacular book of Italian art, still mostly intact,

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'despite Gemma's nan's fondness for scissors.

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'And Patrick's grandfather's medals.

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'I wasn't running so short of time at the preview and managed

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'to speak to auctioneer Philip Allwood about the medals.'

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Wonderful collection of medals. Great story.

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They belong to George Cockell. First World War and Second World War.

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-We've got £200 to £300 on these medals.

-Yeah.

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They're being sold by the grandson.

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Are they? Well, he must be a very proud grandson.

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Obviously, Grandfather went through the First, into the Second,

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looking at the discharge papers, was retired from the army early or discharged.

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-Exemplary report on here.

-I've never seen one of those before and that's quite interesting.

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-Individually, these medals, not worth a lot.

-OK.

-Lots of them about.

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A lot of people came back from the First with these fairly standard medals. Same with the Second.

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But put that all together with the history, who won them, what they were doing where and when

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and it suddenly gets the collectors' collecting juices flowing.

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-You've got provenance. That's where the value is.

-Medal collectors are not going for the bit of metal.

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They're going for owning a bit of that soldier and what he did.

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-And this has got oodles of that.

-Will it get the top end?

-I wouldn't be surprised.

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200 to 300? I could have easily gone with that estimate and expected to see getting on for the top estimate.

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-Wonderful thing. Good luck with these.

-They should do fine.

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'We both think these medals will march right out of the auction room,

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'but we'll have to wait and see because first to discover their fate is Audrey.

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'Buyers and sellers at today's auction

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'are subject to a commission of 15% plus VAT.'

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This next lot is totally fascinating, picked by our expert, Michael Baggott.

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It's been dug up out of the ground from the Talbot Hotel in Tetbury.

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'Michael split the lot into two parts. The first is a real mixed bag.'

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There's this wonderful manganese, treacle-glazed jug, some churchwarden pipes and...?

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Little silver shirt links.

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-But do you know what's going to make me laugh?

-And a tap.

-A tap. What's that all about, Michael?

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That is a bronze Tudor tap. It's a rare thing. For 180 quid...

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-It's a funny old lot. It really is.

-I've heard that before!

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Valuing it is like playing "pin the tail on the donkey". You never know where it's going to go.

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-That's sensible.

-Let's see what the bidders think.

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The 18th century, manganese, treacle-glazed pottery jug.

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Should be 200 or 300, really. Start me.

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150 then?

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-Start me, 100? £100 for the lot?

-He's going in the wrong direction.

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£50? At £50. A bid there at 50. At £50.

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5 if you like now? At £50.

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At £50. 5. 60. 5.

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-70. 5...

-The churchwarden pipes are worth that.

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..5. 90. 5.

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100. And 10 if you like? And 10.

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At 110. 120 now?

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At 110. At £110.

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Are you all sure now then? At £110, are you all done?

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They didn't understand.

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Well, they didn't want it today.

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-No.

-Maybe they'll want it in a week's time.

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-I'll put it out for the dustmen, I think.

-No, you won't.

-Don't do that!

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'What a shame! Let's hope we do better with the second lot from the collection, that superb bottle.'

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It's a wonderful period piece,

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but what makes it extra special is we know where the object was found.

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-Yeah.

-We know where it was discarded in the 17th century.

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And that lovely iridescent colour that you only get from burial over the years and it's been dug up.

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It's just got those colours that every collector wants.

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-Do you think so?

-Oh, it's got the look and the condition.

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Collectors want history with their objects, ideally. And that's got it all.

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200 to get on? At 200, thank you.

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At 200. At 200.

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210 now if you like? At £200. At 210.

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220. 230.

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At 230. 240. 250.

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At £250. 260 anywhere?

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At £250. 260 anywhere now for it?

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At £250. Are you sure now?

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-Oh, come on!

-At 250...

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I'm absolutely shocked.

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That bottle was worth every penny of £300 to £500, if not more.

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-If I were you, I'd be relieved I hadn't sold it.

-I would as well.

-I'm so sorry, Audrey.

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'Well, it looks like the artefacts are going home with Audrey.

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'Perhaps the Italian art will appeal more to the bidders.'

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Wonderful, wonderful book. We're looking at £300 to £500, fingers crossed. On a good day.

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-On a good day.

-It's all there. Condition is good.

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I just hope it doesn't get Stanley-knifed up and sold separately.

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You say the condition is good, but Gemma's grandma had a bit of a Stanley knife fetish

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-and cut a few letters out, but the pictures are all fine.

-That's where the value is.

-Yeah, absolutely.

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-Fingers crossed. It's been a long wait, hasn't it?

-It has, yeah.

0:20:310:20:35

-Have you been tempted to buy anything?

-Yes, I saw a little kid's trike outside.

0:20:350:20:40

-It looks like it needs restoring.

-I know the one. I rode here on it!

0:20:400:20:45

Oh, right.

0:20:450:20:46

The Italian School of Design, 1823. Some lovely images in this.

0:20:460:20:52

Start me. Should be 500. Start me, 3?

0:20:520:20:55

200 to get on then? At 200, thank you. At £200.

0:20:560:21:00

At 220. 240.

0:21:000:21:02

260. 270 then.

0:21:020:21:04

280. 300.

0:21:040:21:06

320 if you like? At 300 here. 320 now?

0:21:060:21:09

At £300. I thought it might have made a little more. At 300.

0:21:090:21:13

At £300. It's on my right.

0:21:150:21:17

Are you all sure now then at 300...?

0:21:170:21:20

-Brilliant.

-Just.

-Sold.

-Just on estimate.

0:21:210:21:25

There was a pause there. I wasn't sure if he was calling for 300.

0:21:250:21:29

-No, he had 300, but I think with that bit of damage, that took off the edge.

-Of course.

0:21:290:21:34

-But you should be very pleased - £300.

-Happy?

-Yeah.

-What will you put the money towards?

-Going on holiday.

0:21:340:21:41

-Where do you fancy going?

-Probably Italy, just to see where it all came from.

-The School of Design.

0:21:410:21:47

-It makes sense, doesn't it?

-It does.

-Go to Rome.

-Payback for it. Yes, go to Rome.

0:21:470:21:52

Good for them. I do hope they get to see those works of art for real.

0:21:520:21:57

Last up, we've got Patrick's grandfather's medals.

0:21:570:22:02

A classic set of medals from WWI, WWII and discharge papers.

0:22:020:22:06

-Michael, you fell in love with these.

-It's the whole story.

0:22:060:22:11

-Is it hard to sell these?

-They've been stuck in a drawer, not appreciated.

0:22:110:22:17

-I think it's time for them to go.

-OK, let's hope they go to a good collector or end up in a museum.

0:22:170:22:23

I can start you here at 130 on the book. 130.

0:22:230:22:28

At 130. 140. 150. 160.

0:22:280:22:31

170. 180. The book's out at 180. 190 now.

0:22:310:22:35

190. 200. 210.

0:22:350:22:38

220. 230. 240. 250.

0:22:380:22:41

260. At 260 on my left now. At 260. 270 now, then.

0:22:410:22:47

At £260. It's on my left. At 260.

0:22:470:22:51

-Super result. The hammer's gone down.

-I'm very happy.

-I am.

0:22:530:22:57

-That was well contested. That was his last battle.

-It was!

0:22:570:23:02

It suddenly shot up. Very pleased.

0:23:020:23:06

I knew the collectors wouldn't be able to resist that lot. A brilliant result and plenty more to come.

0:23:070:23:13

'Bernice has decided it's time to rescue this beautiful Art Nouveau tray

0:23:130:23:17

'out of the grasp of little hands.'

0:23:170:23:20

-Where does it live?

-Well, it sits on the coffee table in the sitting room and it gets knocked around.

0:23:200:23:27

'Phyllis is trying to wean herself off of her Wemyss addiction, but some things are hard to resist.'

0:23:270:23:34

If that one special Wemyss pig came along, would you buy it still?

0:23:340:23:38

-Oh...maybe.

-Maybe.

0:23:380:23:41

'And we discover a bracelet bearing the name of one of the world's greatest fashion designers.'

0:23:410:23:48

On the 16th of May in 1871, the successful writer, designer and socialist William Morris

0:23:590:24:05

set foot in the Cotswold village of Kelmscott for the first time.

0:24:050:24:09

He came here looking for a house for the summer months,

0:24:090:24:13

but when he came down this lane and looked down that garden path and saw that handsome farmhouse,

0:24:130:24:19

he knew his search was over. No wonder he stopped looking.

0:24:190:24:24

For Morris it was the start of a love affair that would stay with him for life, bringing him inspiration

0:24:280:24:34

and pleasure, but as with all great romances, there were also moments of disappointment and betrayal.

0:24:340:24:42

In fact, despite his immediate and deep affection for the place,

0:24:450:24:49

it would be three years before Morris could bring himself to spend any time here.

0:24:490:24:55

Instead, he stayed away while his wife Jane and their two daughters spent their summers here

0:24:550:25:01

with painter and poet Gabriel Rossetti, Morris's friend and business partner.

0:25:010:25:06

Rossetti and Jane had been having an affair for five years.

0:25:060:25:10

Morris was aware that it was starting to attract attention and could damage his business.

0:25:100:25:16

The lease on Kelmscott was taken out jointly with Rossetti, so they could conduct their affair

0:25:160:25:22

away from prying eyes.

0:25:220:25:25

Over the following years, Rossetti would suffer a mental breakdown.

0:25:250:25:29

He spent prolonged periods of time here at Kelmscott, forcing Morris to stay away.

0:25:290:25:35

It wasn't until Rossetti moved out in 1874 that Morris could actually enjoy his beloved Kelmscott.

0:25:350:25:42

This place became a kind of utopia for him,

0:25:420:25:46

somewhere where he could escape from the modern world, which he despised.

0:25:460:25:51

The Arts and Craft movement was driven by a dislike for Victorian industrialisation

0:25:550:26:00

and the fear that mechanisation and mass production would result in blandness and conformity.

0:26:000:26:07

Kelmscott was the antithesis of that.

0:26:070:26:11

He saw this magnificent house as a true work of craftsmanship built with local materials.

0:26:120:26:18

He just loved its vernacular style and it sits in perfect harmony with the rest of the village.

0:26:180:26:24

You could say this handsome house represents all the ideals of the Arts and Crafts movement.

0:26:330:26:39

It was built in the year 1600 and was added to in 1665.

0:26:390:26:43

Look at the lovely hand-cut roof tiles, all made of stone.

0:26:430:26:47

They graduate down - they start smaller and as they come down they get slightly larger.

0:26:470:26:53

Morris described that as looking at the scales interlocking on a fish or maybe the feathers on a bird.

0:26:530:27:00

It really is so organic.

0:27:000:27:02

On the inside, as on the outside, William Morris just loved the simplicity of this house.

0:27:050:27:12

He chose to change it very little from the way he first acquired it from the family who had it built.

0:27:120:27:19

His dream was to live here as simply as possible

0:27:190:27:23

and he described the house as "the loveliest haunt of ancient peace".

0:27:230:27:29

As you look around, you get a real sense of Morris the man,

0:27:290:27:33

from his passion for collecting traditional hand-made objects

0:27:330:27:37

to wonderful examples of his own company's furniture and furnishings.

0:27:370:27:41

The garden and surrounding countryside

0:27:440:27:48

would also provide endless inspiration for his designs.

0:27:480:27:52

It's said that the idea for Strawberry Thief, one of his most popular designs, came about

0:27:520:27:58

as he noticed thrushes stealing wild berries from his kitchen garden.

0:27:580:28:03

And according to his daughter May, the idea for his foliage pattern Willow Bough, 1887,

0:28:050:28:11

came from the willow trees growing on the banks of the Thames nearby.

0:28:110:28:16

Oh, this is a nice room. Spacious, light, airy.

0:28:180:28:21

In fact, there's a nice, tranquil feel about this.

0:28:210:28:25

It's known as the White Room. Morris is known for his colours. He loves reds and golds and greens

0:28:250:28:32

and repetitive patterns everywhere. Yet the family chose to paint the walls off-white.

0:28:320:28:38

In fact, towards the end of his life he admitted he preferred simpler colour schemes and plainer rooms.

0:28:380:28:46

The whole house, in fact, is so understated.

0:28:460:28:50

The decor is quite simple and it sits beautifully with the outside.

0:28:500:28:54

It's just so calm.

0:28:540:28:56

William Morris remains to this day a major force to be reckoned with in the world of design.

0:29:000:29:05

His legacy of work is endless, really. He was a writer, publisher, social campaigner, designer,

0:29:050:29:12

craftsman, illustrator, painter. It just goes on and on and on.

0:29:120:29:16

No wonder that towards the end of his life a doctor proclaimed

0:29:160:29:20

he suffered from the disease of being William Morris, working 18 hours a day.

0:29:200:29:25

That's why, for me, it's so special to come to a place like Kelmscott,

0:29:250:29:30

so you can understand the peace he must have had here.

0:29:300:29:34

William Morris, for me, will always remain a great source of inspiration.

0:29:340:29:41

Back at our valuation day in Cirencester, we've got a packed house.

0:29:500:29:56

Michael - a serious silver fanatic - couldn't resist this striking tray.

0:29:560:30:01

-You've brought this beautiful tray.

-You like it?

-I love it.

0:30:010:30:05

-Where does it live in your house?

-It sits on the coffee table and gets knocked around by the grandchildren,

0:30:050:30:12

so I just thought I'd bring it to you and see if you liked it.

0:30:120:30:16

-Do you use it for anything?

-No. I couldn't understand why it was a tray.

0:30:160:30:22

-You couldn't stand anything on it.

-It's all knobbly, isn't it?

-It is.

0:30:220:30:28

-A cup would fall off it.

-Unless you live in a bungalow, you've got it on the wrong floor.

0:30:280:30:34

-Oh, right.

-This belongs in the bedroom.

-Oh! Oh, really?

0:30:340:30:38

This is a dressing table tray.

0:30:380:30:41

And you can't put a glass or a cup on this, but if you think of upturned brushes,

0:30:410:30:47

which would sit quite happily along with combs on that, that's exactly what it was designed for.

0:30:470:30:54

-I didn't know that.

-Any idea about how old it is?

-Erm...

0:30:540:30:58

Judging by the design, I thought Art Nouveau.

0:30:580:31:02

It shrieks Art Nouveau!

0:31:020:31:04

This wonderful whiplash foliate order.

0:31:040:31:07

And then we've got this typically naturalistic scene.

0:31:070:31:11

I'm not sure what these birds are. My ornithological knowledge does not stretch

0:31:110:31:18

-to the lengths of my silver knowledge. Cranes or herons.

-I thought they were herons.

0:31:180:31:24

We'll go with herons. I'll bow to your knowledge. With bulrushes.

0:31:240:31:29

It's a mirror image, very organic and very naturalistic. Exactly what Art Nouveau was about.

0:31:290:31:36

First, we've got the maker's mark there, which is WA. That's for William Aitken.

0:31:360:31:42

He wasn't a very distinguished maker, but he produced on a large scale in Birmingham.

0:31:420:31:48

We've got the date - 1909. The height of Art Nouveau in England.

0:31:480:31:53

And you've got these domestic wares being produced in that style.

0:31:530:31:58

-The sad thing is, it is one part of a very large set.

-Oh, really?

0:31:580:32:03

There would be brushes and combs and hair tidies

0:32:030:32:08

and scent bottles and mirrors, so...any idea where the rest is?

0:32:080:32:14

No, I inherited it with a house.

0:32:140:32:18

-Oh.

-From dear Uncle Joe. He was ill and I decided to nurse him.

0:32:180:32:24

-And, erm, he changed his will in the last three weeks of his life and left it all to me.

-Crikey.

0:32:240:32:31

So it was really lucky. And I got divorced after 40 years, so I had this house to go to.

0:32:310:32:37

-It's just been a godsend. He's up there looking after me.

-Smiling down at you.

-Must have been.

0:32:370:32:44

Well, it's a nice thing to come with a tray! Better than a mirror!

0:32:440:32:48

-So I've got no idea where he had it from.

-It's the sort of thing that's very commercial at the moment.

0:32:480:32:54

-It never really falls out of fashion. Let's put it into auction with £100-£150 on it.

-Really?

0:32:540:33:00

-Gosh.

-Let's put a reserve of £90 on, fixed.

-Oh, amazing.

-And let's see how it goes.

0:33:000:33:06

If there are two people that love Art Nouveau, and there's a good chance, it could do a little more.

0:33:060:33:14

-Gosh, that's amazing.

-It could fly.

0:33:140:33:16

-Oh, thank you.

-Just like the herons.

-Or whatever they are!

-Or the cranes or the ibises!

0:33:160:33:22

Michael may not know his birds, but he knows his silver and I'm sure this will do well.

0:33:220:33:28

But can our crowd identify this next lot?

0:33:280:33:32

This belongs to Phyllis. We've seen a lot of this on the show before.

0:33:320:33:36

-Do you know what this is?

-No. My friend does.

-You know what it is.

0:33:360:33:41

-How about you guys? Pottery enthusiasts?

-No, no.

0:33:410:33:45

-Wemyss.

-That's not bad. Three out of six.

0:33:450:33:48

-It is Wemyss, yes, you're right. You're a bit of a Wemyss collector.

-I am a Wemyss collector.

0:33:480:33:55

-How many pieces have you got?

-Between 50 and 100.

-Really? How long have you been collecting?

0:33:550:34:00

-Since the '70s.

-So why are you selling this particular one?

0:34:000:34:06

I'm downsizing, need space and that one has to go, I'm afraid.

0:34:060:34:10

If that one special Wemyss pig came along, would you buy it still?

0:34:100:34:15

-Oh...maybe.

-Maybe. Maybe sell five other pieces to buy it with.

-Yes.

0:34:150:34:20

That's what everybody wants - Wemyss pigs. They're big ones like that.

0:34:200:34:24

This is a sponge bowl with the strainer. That's nice.

0:34:240:34:28

The strainers did get broken. And also the sponge bowls, the most delicate parts are the handles.

0:34:280:34:35

They used to get chipped and knocked, but they're very good.

0:34:350:34:40

-They are.

-I like the decoration of this. Soft.

-Beautiful soft roses.

0:34:400:34:45

Lovely soft roses. Almost translucent.

0:34:450:34:49

It's sought-after Scottish pottery.

0:34:490:34:52

-Well sought-after. And I still classify this as country pottery.

-It is.

-I'm struggling with value.

0:34:520:34:59

I think it's worth an awful lot more than £150, but I don't know what you paid for that.

0:34:590:35:05

-80.

-80. How long ago?

0:35:060:35:08

-In '95.

-'95, OK.

0:35:080:35:11

-Let's call it £100 with a reserve at £100 and see what happens.

-Absolutely.

0:35:110:35:16

-And hopefully we'll get that 120, 150.

-Absolutely.

0:35:160:35:20

-On a good day, we will.

-I think it's a unique piece. If we find a collector...

0:35:200:35:26

The artwork on this particular one is very good.

0:35:260:35:29

-This I'd date to around 1900, 1910.

-Beautiful.

-In great condition.

0:35:290:35:34

-Will I see you at the auction?

-No, my youngest son's coming.

-Is he?

0:35:340:35:38

-What does he think about Wemyss?

-Not a lot!

-We'll find out!

0:35:380:35:43

And fingers crossed there will be at least two people in the room who appreciate it more than that.

0:35:430:35:49

Next, Thomas is looking at a particularly glamorous bracelet with Angie.

0:35:490:35:55

-Tell me how it came to your possession.

-My grandmother gave it to me when I was about 10.

0:35:550:36:01

I've had it ever since. I don't know a lot more, but it's Christian Dior.

0:36:010:36:05

-Absolutely. It is. So your grandmother had stopped wearing it?

-I don't think she ever wore it.

0:36:050:36:12

It's not the sort of thing she'd have bought. I think it would be a gift.

0:36:120:36:16

She was a housekeeper for wealthy families and was often given things by guests who stayed regularly.

0:36:160:36:22

I think she was given it as a gift.

0:36:220:36:25

-Did you like it because it was pink?

-Yes! And I used to dress up and wear it, high heels and handbags.

0:36:250:36:32

I used to wear it then. But now I have to say I haven't worn it since.

0:36:320:36:38

I find it a bit garish, actually!

0:36:380:36:40

-Really?

-Yeah.

-It is Christian Dior.

0:36:400:36:42

We can see it from here, the mark there.

0:36:420:36:46

That conjures up all these wonderful fashion items

0:36:460:36:50

and high-end jewellery, but this is Christian Dior the costume jeweller here.

0:36:500:36:56

It was developed in the post-war period when the jewellery at the time, worn by Hollywood stars,

0:36:560:37:03

was all gem-set. These would have been rubies and opals, et cetera.

0:37:030:37:08

With fashion wanting to copy that, they decided to make jewellery like this,

0:37:080:37:14

so it would reflect the Hollywood style. It is costume jewellery, we should explain that.

0:37:140:37:20

You've got the mauve stones and the pink. This is glass and diamante or paste, on a base metal.

0:37:200:37:27

What would this go for in a provincial saleroom like where we're going to go?

0:37:270:37:33

It would probably make over £50, but I should have the estimate at £70-£100.

0:37:330:37:40

-OK.

-I also think we should fix the reserve at that sort of £60.

-OK.

-How about that?

-That's fine.

0:37:400:37:48

-Then with the commission taken off, you'll end up with 50.

-OK.

0:37:480:37:53

-So see you at the auction?

-OK, yes, you will!

0:37:530:37:57

'That completes our final lots.'

0:37:590:38:02

'Michael's hoping for a great result with Bernice's Art Nouveau tray.'

0:38:020:38:06

'There's the Wemyss sponge bowl and strainer, but will it clean up?

0:38:090:38:14

'Finally, we've Angie's grandmother's Christian Dior bracelet.'

0:38:140:38:18

'We're selling them at Moore, Allen & Innocent.

0:38:200:38:23

'It's a busy day and silver is selling well,

0:38:230:38:28

'so what will they make of the tray?'

0:38:280:38:30

-Good luck. The tension's building.

-It's very exciting.

-We're about to sell a silver dressing table tray.

0:38:300:38:36

-Art Nouveau flavour, beautifully decorated.

-It is.

0:38:360:38:40

-Hasn't been on the dressing table.

-No, it's been on the coffee table and the kids have knocked it.

0:38:400:38:47

-Now it's going. I bet the kids are upset.

-I don't think they noticed!

0:38:470:38:52

You don't want your children knocking your silver about!

0:38:520:38:56

-It's good because it's a good display piece.

-Yes.

-Sometimes bowls are difficult to display.

0:38:560:39:02

Put that on an easel and you get the full impact of it.

0:39:020:39:07

-That's a nice way of displaying it. There's a tip. Good luck.

-Thank you.

-It's going under the hammer.

0:39:070:39:13

Who'll start me? Should be 100.

0:39:150:39:17

100? 80?

0:39:170:39:19

At £80. A bid there. At £80. 5 anywhere now?

0:39:190:39:23

At £80. 5. 90. 5.

0:39:230:39:26

-Brilliant!

-Silver's selling well here today.

-I hope Uncle Joe's watching.

-I bet he is!

0:39:260:39:32

140. 150 now?

0:39:320:39:34

- Good heavens. - All out in front?

0:39:340:39:38

At 140.

0:39:380:39:41

-Well done!

-Top end!

-He knows his onions.

-Exactly.

0:39:410:39:45

-That'll pay for my art now.

-What sort of art? Classes?

-Yes.

0:39:450:39:49

I'm just going on some art courses and the next one was £140.

0:39:490:39:54

-It was meant to be!

-Exactly.

0:39:540:39:56

How perfect! Who knows? We could be selling one of her paintings at auction in the future!

0:39:570:40:04

OK, it's my turn to be the expert. I'm feeling nervous. Unfortunately, we don't have Phyllis,

0:40:040:40:12

-but we have her son, Paul. Hi.

-Hi.

-Good to see you.

0:40:120:40:16

-You've grown up with your mum's collection.

-Yes, filling the house.

0:40:160:40:20

Ever since she got a little pig, she's been collecting ever since.

0:40:200:40:24

-Every time I go back there, there's another cupboard of Wemyss!

-This could be your inheritance!

0:40:240:40:30

I'm a bit unsure about selling it! Why is that happening?

0:40:300:40:35

-This is it.

-Start me at 100 to get on. 100.

0:40:350:40:40

-For the Wemyss ware.

-Oh, come on.

-50, then.

0:40:400:40:43

-£50, thank you.

-I'm so nervous!

0:40:430:40:47

At £50. 5. 60. 5. 70.

0:40:470:40:50

5. At 75. 80 now?

0:40:500:40:53

-At 75. 80. 5. 90. 5.

-He's sold it.

-100.

0:40:530:40:57

On my left at 100. 110 now? At £100. Are you sure?

0:40:570:41:01

It's on my left, then, at 100.

0:41:010:41:04

-Yes. Made estimate.

-Oh, good. Well done on the estimate.

0:41:040:41:09

-I think she'll be pleased.

-I had a note saying, "Take it home."

0:41:100:41:15

-Hopefully she's had a wonderful holiday.

-And a good bit of news when she comes home as well.

0:41:150:41:21

-She'll be happy with that.

-Give her my regards.

0:41:210:41:25

Well, the Wemyss went down well, but what will the auction room make of Angie's costume jewellery?

0:41:250:41:31

-It's going under the hammer. £70-£100. This was given to you by your grandmother?

-22 years ago.

0:41:310:41:37

-It's been in a drawer ever since.

-You don't wear it?

-No.

-Fair enough.

0:41:370:41:42

-So I want to buy something to wear.

-Fair enough.

0:41:420:41:46

-Will it sell well?

-I don't know.

0:41:460:41:49

It'll be a tough call today, I think, if it does sell at all.

0:41:490:41:53

It's quite a difficult subject to sell in a traditional sale room,

0:41:530:41:57

-but we're going to give it a go.

-Here we go. Fingers crossed.

0:41:570:42:01

You never know what's going to happen at an auction.

0:42:010:42:05

We have a phone. It's the Christian Dior bracelet.

0:42:050:42:10

Phone!

0:42:100:42:12

Dated 1958. Should be over 100.

0:42:120:42:15

80? At £80, thank you. £80 the bid. At £80. 5. 90.

0:42:150:42:21

5. 100. 110. 120.

0:42:210:42:24

130. 140. 150. 160.

0:42:240:42:28

-At 160.

-Gosh!

-Lady's bid.

0:42:280:42:30

170 now? At 160. At 160. 170 on the phone.

0:42:300:42:35

180. 190 if you like. 190.

0:42:350:42:38

-200.

-They absolutely love it.

-They do know it's paste?

0:42:380:42:43

220. 230. 240.

0:42:430:42:46

250. 260.

0:42:460:42:49

270. 280. 290.

0:42:500:42:54

300. 320?

0:42:540:42:56

320. 340.

0:42:560:42:58

-I am flabbergasted.

-Di you miss something?

-380.

0:42:580:43:03

400. 420.

0:43:030:43:05

-440.

-Do they know something we don't know?

0:43:070:43:11

-Oh, I can't believe it!

-Money!

-Good old Nana.

0:43:110:43:15

All sure now, then? It's on the phone at 440.

0:43:150:43:20

Incredible! £440. Angie, that is wonderful.

0:43:200:43:24

-Thank you so much!

-Good old Nana.

-I can get something really nice.

0:43:240:43:29

-I am flabbergasted.

-That's the beauty of auctions.

0:43:290:43:33

Sadly, it brings us to the end of another wonderful show.

0:43:330:43:37

Join us again soon for many, many more surprises, but for now, from Cirencester, it's cheerio.

0:43:370:43:44

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2010

0:43:550:43:59

Email [email protected]

0:44:000:44:02

The crowds flock to a valuation day in Cirencester, where Paul Martin and our team of experts are on the lookout for antiques and collectables to send to auction. Finds include a 17th-century wine bottle recovered from the bottom of a well and some costume jewellery by one of the world's most famous fashion designers. Paul visits Kelmscott Manor, the country home of William Morris, the father of the Arts and Crafts movement.